WorldWideScience

Sample records for electronically enhanced student

  1. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  2. Enhancing Student Empathetic Engagement, History-Taking, and Communication Skills During Electronic Medical Record Use in Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoSasso, Alisa Alfonsi; Lamberton, Courtney E; Sammon, Mary; Berg, Katherine T; Caruso, John W; Cass, Jonathan; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2017-07-01

    To examine whether an intervention on proper use of electronic medical records (EMRs) in patient care could help improve medical students' empathic engagement, and to test the hypothesis that the training would reduce communication hurdles in clinical encounters. Seventy third-year medical students from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University were randomly divided into intervention and control groups during their six-week pediatric clerkship in 2012-2013. The intervention group received a one-hour training session on EMR-specific communication skills, including discussion of EMR use, the SALTED mnemonic and technique (Set-up, Ask, Listen, Type, Exceptions, Documentation), and role-plays. Both groups completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) at the clerkship's start and end. At clerkship's end, faculty and standardized patients (SPs) rated students' empathic engagement in SP encounters, using the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perceptions of Physician Empathy (JSPPPE), and their history-taking and communication skills. Faculty mean ratings on the JSPPPE, history-taking skills, and communication skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. SP mean ratings on history-taking skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. Both groups' JSE mean scores increased pretest to posttest, but the changes were not significant. The intervention group's posttest JSE mean score was higher than the control group's, but the difference was not significant. The findings suggest that a simple intervention providing specialized training in EMR-specific communication can improve medical students' empathic engagement in patient care, history-taking skills, and communication skills.

  3. E-learning support for student's understanding of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Sendrup, Linda; Sparsø, Jens

    2008-01-01

    To enhance active learning and understanding of analogue and digital electronics the use of e-learning techniques will be investigated. In a redesigned course combining introductory analogue and digital electronics, students will be motivated to prepare for lectures and exercises by providing...

  4. Enhanced transport of relativistic electrons through nanochannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient transport of fast electrons driven by intense laser solid interaction depends crucially on optimal target design. We demonstrate a hybrid target design that incorporates two important features—efficient generation of relativistic electrons and their unimpeded transport in dense media. The target was fabricated on a porous alumina base consisting of an array of sublambda cylindrical holes partially filled with Cu nanorods, such that light field propagates in the hollow channels, located ahead of the metallic fillings. The hollow array acts as an efficient source of hot electrons when driven by relativistically intense, femtosecond laser pulses and shows a 60-fold enhancement in electron flux compared to a solid target. This enhancement is ascribed to an increased penetration of laser through subwavelength pores and enhanced local electric fields. The metal doped part facilitates efficient transport of the generated electrons, due to its large background conductivity. A 4-fold enhancement in target rear side electron flux is observed compared with unfilled porous alumina.

  5. June, 2015 Gender Differences in Students' Utilization of Electronic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined gender differences among students in the utilization of electronic information ... resources, the relationship between gender ..... Library Book to Enhance Academic. Excellence in. Nigeria. Tertiary. Institution; A case study of Hezekiah. Oluwasanni Library Journal of social sciences 10,(2),119-122.

  6. Student decisions about lecture attendance: do electronic course materials matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings-Gagliardi, Susan; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2007-10-01

    This study explored whether first-year medical students make deliberate decisions about attending nonrequired lectures. If so, it sought to identify factors that influence these decisions, specifically addressing the potential impact of electronic materials. Medical students who completed first-year studies between 2004 and 2006 responded to an open-ended survey question about their own lecture-attendance decisions. Responses were coded to capture major themes. Students' ratings of the electronic materials were also examined. Most respondents made deliberate attendance decisions. Decisions were influenced by previous experiences with the lecturer, predictions of what would occur during the session itself, personal learning preferences, and learning needs at that particular time, with the overriding goal of maximizing learning. Access to electronic materials did not influence students' choices. Fears that the increasing availability of technology-enhanced educational materials has a negative impact on lecture attendance seem unfounded.

  7. Enhancing Metacognitive Practices in Science Education Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing Metacognitive Practices in Science Education Students Using the Intelligencies for Nation Building. ... AFRREV STECH: An International Journal of Science and Technology ... Three experts from Measurement and Evaluation (2) and one from Science Education scrutinized the instrument to ensure validity.

  8. Electronics a course book for students

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, G H

    2013-01-01

    Electronics: A Course Book for Students, Second Edition, provides a general introduction to electronics for those who find formal or examination texts to be unsuitable for their needs. This revised text includes more analytical work on circuits. Examples and examination-type exercises are also provided. The book's early chapters focus on the basic components, such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, and transistors. Readers are then introduced to combinations of these components that form the fundamental circuits from which most electronic equipment is built. Semiconductor devices are also di

  9. From student feedback to institutional quality enhancement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From student feedback to institutional quality enhancement initiatives that focus on supporting staff and students. ... reasons for a particular set of circumstances, planning and implementation of changes in a generally fluid situation, collection of evidence for outcomes, and provision of succinct reports to stakeholders.

  10. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors

    OpenAIRE

    Huggins, David

    2016-01-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and...

  11. Undergraduate students' perception and Utilization of electronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An evaluation of undergraduate students' perception and utilization of electronic information resources and services was carried out. The population of the study consisted of all registered library users in the 2014/2015 academic session. The total population of the study was 4, 211 registered users. Accidental sampling ...

  12. Students' accessibility and utilization of electronic information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper aimed at examining the accessibility and utilization of Electronic Information Resources in selected Monotechnics in Oyo State. The descriptive survey design was adopted and one hundred and fifty (150) students from three Monotechnics in Oyo State were made to respond to the questionnaire used to elicit ...

  13. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, David

    2016-04-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching. It shows how coaching has reduced the 'burden' of mentoring by reducing mentors' workloads, and has helped students to take responsibility for identifying learning needs and delivering supervised patient care.

  14. Electronic outlining as a writing strategy: Effects on students' writing products, mental effort and writing process

    OpenAIRE

    De Smet, Milou; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Leijten, Mariëlle; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    This study addresses to what extent and how electronic outlining enhances students' writing performance. To this end, the focus of this study is not only on students' final writing products but also on the organisation of the writing process (i.e., planning, translating, and reviewing) and perceived mental effort during writing. In addition, effects of repeated electronic outlining were examined. A combined within and between subjects design was implemented in which 93 10th-grade students wro...

  15. Instructor Touch Enhanced College Students' Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2013-01-01

    Touch between people is associated with several outcomes, including reduced stress, more positive mood, enhanced feelings of closeness, and positive behavioral change. However, the potential utility of touch rarely has been examined in a college sample, with teachers touching their students. In the present study, we used instrumental touch…

  16. Enhancing Critical Thinking: Accounting Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Carla L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how assessment design was used to enhance students' critical thinking in a subject concerned with business enterprise systems. The study shows positive results and favorable perceptions of the merit of the approach. Design/Methodology/Approach: A case study approach was used to examine how the…

  17. Enhancing Students' Language Skills through Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banditvilai, Choosri

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of using blended learning to enhance students' language skills and learner autonomy in an Asian university environment. Blended learning represents an educational environment for much of the world where computers and the Internet are readily available. It combines self-study with valuable face-to-face interaction…

  18. Enhancing Senior Secondary Students Knowledge of English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Direct explicit and indirect explicit grammar instructional strategies enhanced students' achievement in English grammar and composition in public senior secondary schools in Ibadan metropolis. Teachers should adopt both strategies in teaching English grammar and composition for improved performance. Keywords: ...

  19. Electronic outlining as a writing strategy: Effects on students' writing products, mental effort and writing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smet, Milou; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Leijten, Mariëlle; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    This study addresses to what extent and how electronic outlining enhances students' writing performance. To this end, the focus of this study is not only on students' final writing products but also on the organisation of the writing process (i.e., planning, translating, and reviewing) and perceived

  20. Online discussion: Enhancing students' critical thinking skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathakrishnan, Mohan; Ahmad, Rahayu; Suan, Choo Ling

    2017-10-01

    Online discussion has become one of the important strategies for the teacher to teach the students to think critically when conveying their ideas and become more proactive and creative. In this paper, padlet online discussion communication was conducted to examine its effectiveness in enhancing critical thinking. In this study, there are two types of critical thinking: macro and micro critical thinking. A total of 70 Universiti Utara Malaysia Management Foundation Programme students involved in this experimental research design. The students in treatment class are divided to few groups. Every group uses padlet online discussion to discuss the topic given. All the group members discuss and write their ideas in padlet. Ideas that are posted in padlet will be displayed in front of the class so that the entire group in the treatment class could see the given ideas. Paul's (1993) model was used to analyze student's macro and micro critical thinking in padlet online discussion and communication. The finding shows that students who used padlet online discussion backchannel communication have greater macro and micro critical thinking level than students who do not use online discussion.

  1. A Model for Teaching Electronic Commerce Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard C. Woodard

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of information technology in an ever-changing world at universities presents a challenge. Are courses taught as concepts, while ignoring hands-on courses, leaving the hands-on classes to the technical colleges or trade schools? Does this produce the best employees for industry or give students the knowledge and skills necessary to function in a high-tech world? At GeorgiaCollege & StateUniversity (GC&SU a model was developed that combines both concepts and practical hands-on skill to meet this challenge. Using this model, a program was developed that consists of classroom lecture of concepts as well as practical hands-on exercises for mastering the knowledge and developing the skills necessary to succeed in the high-tech world of electronic commerce. The students become productive day one of a new job assignment. This solves the problem of students having the "book knowledge" but not knowing how to apply what has been learned.

  2. Phonon Enhancement of Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    amphoteric nature of silicon dopants in GaAs materials, the maximum attainable electron density is approximately 5xl 018/cm3. At this carrier concentration...150C for 1 minute with hotplates 18 seconds exposure; Post bake @ 120C for 1 minute with hotplates 12 seconds develop in the developer RD6 (b) Oxide ...etching before the E-Beam evaporation Etch with HCI (37%) : H20 (1:10) for 20 seconds to remove native oxides on InAs & GaSb (c) E-Beam evaporation

  3. Cooperative Learning and Enhanced Communication: Effects on Student Performance, Retention, and Attitudes in General Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, R. C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the effects of cooperative learning and enhanced communication on student performance, retention, and attitudes in general chemistry. Results indicate that cooperative homework, cooperative quizzes, electronic-mail communication, and open office hours were associated with significantly higher student retention and higher performance on…

  4. Engineering Students: Enhancing Employability Skills through PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, Othman; Mat Daud K., A.; U, Ewon; Salleh B, Mohd; Omar N., H.; Baser J, Abd; Ismail M., E.; A, Sulaiman

    2017-05-01

    As a developing country, Malaysia faces challenging tasks to develop her economy just like many other countries. Nowadays, change involves many aspects like the economy from agriculture to manufacturing, technology from modern to more advanced ones; mindset from traditional to advanced and so on. Previous studies show that one of the major issues facing local graduates is the lack of employability skills. This problem concerns not only the government but undergraduates and institutions alike. From the pedagogical aspect, one of the more effective ways to improve this is through instructional delivery and in this case the use of Problem-based Learning (PBL). The need to adopt PBL should involved applied subjects undertaken by engineering students. Studies have shown that the use of PBL has been proven to make learning more attractive and effective. In this research, we studied the effectiveness of PBL towards enhancing employability skills among engineering undergraduates. This study adopted a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data was collected using documents analysis. Student samples comprised manufacturing engineering undergraduates from public institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The results show that student’s employability skills can be enhanced using PBL. In addition, students become more competitive towards making them more relevance with the needs of the industry with regard to employability skills. In conclusion, PBL is a very effective catalyst towards raising the employability skills among engineering undergraduates and should be adopted in all engineering education.

  5. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi

    2012-09-01

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  6. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A' iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); School of Chemicals and Material Engineering, NUST Islamabad (Pakistan); Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-09-26

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  7. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi

    2012-01-01

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  8. The Determinants of Electronic Textbook Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon R.; Nutting, Andrew W.; Baker-Eveleth, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Electronic books are a fast-growing component of the publishing industry. Sales of electronic textbooks (e-textbooks) are growing, but at a slower rate. In this research we use data from an undergraduate student survey to estimate the determinants of e-textbook use. We find that students who are younger, lower-income, and from larger high schools…

  9. Resonant enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes during geomagnetically active periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Roth

    Full Text Available The strong increase in the flux of relativistic electrons during the recovery phase of magnetic storms and during other active periods is investigated with the help of Hamiltonian formalism and simulations of test electrons which interact with whistler waves. The intensity of the whistler waves is enhanced significantly due to injection of 10-100 keV electrons during the substorm. Electrons which drift in the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field generate the rising tones of VLF whistler chorus. The seed population of relativistic electrons which bounce along the inhomogeneous magnetic field, interacts resonantly with the whistler waves. Whistler wave propagating obliquely to the magnetic field can interact with energetic electrons through Landau, cyclotron, and higher harmonic resonant interactions when the Doppler-shifted wave frequency equals any (positive or negative integer multiple of the local relativistic gyrofrequency. Because the gyroradius of a relativistic electron may be the order of or greater than the perpendicular wavelength, numerous cyclotron, harmonics can contribute to the resonant interaction which breaks down the adiabatic invariant. A similar process diffuses the pitch angle leading to electron precipitation. The irreversible changes in the adiabatic invariant depend on the relative phase between the wave and the electron, and successive resonant interactions result in electrons undergoing a random walk in energy and pitch angle. This resonant process may contribute to the 10-100 fold increase of the relativistic electron flux in the outer radiation belt, and constitute an interesting relation between substorm-generated waves and enhancements in fluxes of relativistic electrons during geomagnetic storms and other active periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms

  10. Rubrics and the enhancement of student learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Y Reddy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research on the effectiveness of rubrics has primarily concentrated on its contribution towards improvement in academic performance, as reflected in attainment of higher grades. Its role in assessing the other dimensions of SL such as attitudes, behaviors and perceptions that affect students’ inclination and ability to learn has been largely unexplored. There is also a paucity of literature on how the tool can be used for informing course delivery and course design. The objectives of the study are derived from these gaps in literature. The proposed study seeks to explore the usefulness of rubrics from the perspective of students, drawing motivation from two recent studies – the study by Andrade & Du (2005, which examined the usage of rubrics by students to support their own learning and academic performance and the study by Petkov & Petkova(2006, which explored the possibility of developing curriculum wide rubrics at post-graduate level. This study intends to investigate the contribution of rubrics referenced feedback towards enhancement of motivation, development of self- regulation characteristics and improvement in academic performance. It seeks to achieve this by assessing student-learning outcomes in a multiple courses of general Masters in Business Administration (MBA program in two or more business schools in Hyderabad including, ICFAI Business School, Hyderabad.

  11. Enhanced coherent undulator radiation from bunched electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Crosson, E.R.; Ricci, K.N.; Smith, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    When energetic bunches of electrons traverse an undulator field, they can spontaneously emit radiation both coherently and incoherently. Although it has generally been assumed that undulator radiation is incoherent at wavelengths short compared to the longitudinal size of the electron bunch, several recent observations have proved this assumption false. Furthermore, the appearance of coherent radiation is often accompanied by a significant increase in radiated power. Here we report observations of strongly enhanced coherent spontaneous radiation together with direct measurements, using transition radiation techniques, of the electron distributions responsible for the coherent emission. We also report demonstrated enhancements in the predicted spontaneous radiated power by as much as 6x10 4 using electron bunch compression. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Nonrelativistic electron bunch train for coherently enhanced terahertz radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuelin; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2008-01-01

    We propose to generate a train of prebunched electron beams for producing coherently enhanced Smith-Purcell radiation [S. J. Smith and E. M. Purcell, Phys. Rev. 92, 1069 (1953)] in the terahertz wavelength range. In this scheme, a train of picosecond laser pulses is produced to drive a photoemission gun to generate a train of 50 keV electron pulses. The parameters are chosen so that the space-charge effect does not destroy the pulse time structure. Smith-Purcell radiation from the electron pulse train is enhanced due both to the short length of the individual electron bunch and to the repetitive structure of the beam. Example systems producing coherent terahertz power at about 1 mW are described

  13. Use and Perception of Electronic Cigarettes among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbo, Craig W.; Harper, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study provides insight into how electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) may affect the social normative environment for tobacco use among college students. Participants: Participants were 244 freshman and sophomore students. Methods: Students completed an online self-report survey in April 2011. Results: There is a higher acceptance…

  14. The Relationship between Electronic Portfolio Participation and Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, William E.; Hakel, Milton D.; Gromko, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Electronic portfolios represent an assessment measure with strong potential for providing feedback about student performance to improve curricula and pedagogy, determining individual students' mastery of learning and providing feedback for improvement, and actively involving students in the assessment process. This study examined the relationship…

  15. Investigating Students' Usage and Acceptance of Electronic Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieche, Susan; Krey, Birte; Bastiaens, Theo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate students' usage and acceptance of electronic books. Factors correlating with students' attitude towards e-books were examined using the Technology Acceptance Model (Davis, Bagozzi, & Warshaw 1989). A questionnaire was administered online for students at University of Hagen. Results indicate that…

  16. Student Satisfaction with Electronic Library Resources at Wayne State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Robert P.; Powell, Ronald R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of student satisfaction with electronic library resources other than the online catalog at Wayne State University. Undertaken in Fall Term 2000 as a class project for a marketing course, a student team designed, administered, and analyzed a survey of a random sample of students. Almost 40% of the…

  17. Improving Grade One Students' Reading Motivation with Online Electronic Storybooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Katia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study stemmed from a concern of the perceived decline in students' reading motivation after the early years of schooling. The current research explored eight grade 1 students' experiences with online electronic storybooks (eBooks). Eight students were given ten 25-minute sessions with the software programs over 15 weeks.…

  18. Students' Perceptions of E-Assessment at Saudi Electronic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadoon, Hamadah

    2017-01-01

    This study explored students' perceptions of E-assessment at Saudi Electronic University. The university recently implemented this mode of assessment in the learning management system it uses. Therefore it is important to examine the students' perceptions of this mode at the university level. The results were encouraging. Students had positive…

  19. Student Reading Practices in Print and Electronic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foasberg, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a diary-based qualitative study on college students' reading habits with regard to print and electronic media. Students used a form to record information about their reading practices for twelve days, including length of reading event, location, format used, and the purpose of reading. Students tended to use print for academic…

  20. Brand Building and Enhancement with Electronic Marketing Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Limba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The changing buying habits of customers and the tendency of the growing number of purchasers on the internet force companies to move their business or part of their processes to the electronic environment, and this causes the need to evolve a marketing strategy and its implementation measures. Electronic marketing has recently forced specialists in this field to look for new ways to satisfy the needs and expectations of customers, which often are associated with intangible attributes, such as brand. However, the lack of e-business managers, focusing on brand meaning to the company, is obvious. Quite often it is limited only to advertisement. But this is only one of the possible electronic marketing tools used in brand building and its enhancement process. Still there is a lack of detailed analysis of electronic marketing tools used in brand building and enhancement in the electronic environment. So, the goal of this paper was to present brand building and enhancement with the electronic marketing tools process model. It was done via analysis of brand peculiarities in the electronic environment and the strategic brand building and enhancement process. The suggested model helps to understand the electronic marketing tools position, objectives and functions in brand building and enhancement context. Detailed analysis of brand in the electronic environment showed that its essence and significance remains the same as in the traditional environment, but differs in implementation. Brand idea is developed not only considering consumer perceptions and values, but also organization strategy, culture and values, which matches its employers’ perceptions and values towards brand. Brand essence is implemented via such brand components as 1 brand name, sign of ownership, legal protection; 2 functional capabilities; 3 emotional value; 4 risk reducing; 5 shorthand notation; 6 service components. Brand in the electronic environment is influenced by such factors

  1. Teaching Students to Correspond Effectively Electronically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extejt, Marian M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses current standards for formatting and etiquette of electronic mail in the business setting. Discusses privacy and appropriate content. Notes that class assignments involving electronic mail provide practical opportunities to develop ease with this form. (SR)

  2. Brief report: learning via the electronic interactive whiteboard for two students with autism and a student with moderate intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2013-06-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention (a self-operated video modeling and self-monitoring delivered via an electronic interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a system of least prompts) on skill acquisition and interaction behavior of two students with autism and one student with moderate intellectual disability were examined using a multi-probe across students design. Students were taught to operate and view video modeling clips, perform a chain of novel tasks and self-monitor task performance using a SMART Board IWB. Results support the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention in improving students' skill acquisition. Results also highlight the use of this technology as a self-operated and interactive device rather than a traditional teacher-operated device to enhance students' active participation in learning.

  3. Effects of Enhanced Eathode Electron Emission on Hall Thruster Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Interesting discharge phenomena are observed that have to do with the interaction between the magnetized Hall thruster plasma and the neutralizing cathode. The steadystate parameters of a highly ionized thruster discharge are strongly influenced by the electron supply from the cathode. The enhancement of the cathode electron emission above its self-sustained level affects the discharge current and leads to a dramatic reduction of the plasma divergence and a suppression of large amplitude, low frequency discharge current oscillations usually related to an ionization instability. These effects correlate strongly with the reduction of the voltage drop in the region with the fringing magnetic field between the thruster channel and the cathode. The measured changes of the plasma properties suggest that the electron emission affects the electron cross-field transport in the thruster discharge. These trends are generalized for Hall thrusters of various configurations.

  4. Enhancing the professionalisation of student affairs through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    education through conferences, organisations and publications, student affairs professionals ... assessment, student affairs, best practices, higher education. ..... on college campuses: Shifting the focus from teaching to learning. Boston, MA: Pearson. International Association of Student Affairs and Services (n.d.). History.

  5. Business Students Flock to Courses on Electronic Commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1999-01-01

    Business schools across the country are specializing in electronic commerce, in which teams of students create online businesses available on the Internet only to participating institutions. The courses offer students an opportunity to see how an online retailing business is conducted, including creating and maintaining Web sites, advertising…

  6. Access to electronic information resources by students of federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses access to electronic information resources by students of Federal Colleges of Education in Eha-Amufu and Umunze. Descriptive survey design was used to investigate sample of 526 students. Sampling technique used was a Multi sampling technique. Data for the study were generated using ...

  7. Enhancement mode single electron transistor in pure silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binhui; Yang, C. H.; Jones, G. M.; Yang, M. J.

    2007-03-01

    Solid state implementations of lateral qubits offer the advantage of being scalable and can be easily integrated by existing main stream IC technologies. In addition, the two Zeeman states of an electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) provide a promising candidate for a qubit. Spins in lateral QDs in the GaAs/AlGaAs single electron transistors (SETs) have been intensively investigated. In contrast, Si provides a number of advantages, including long spin coherence time, large g-factor, and small spin-orbit coupling effect. We have demonstrated Si SET in the few electron regime.* In this talk, we will report the isolation of a single electron in a Si QD using a fabrication technique that incorporates the standard Al/SiO2/Si system with an enhancement mode SET structure. Our SET is built in highly resistive Si substrates with bilayer gates. The high purity Si minimizes the potential disorder from impurities. The top gate induces 2D electrons, and several side gates help define the tunneling barriers, fine tune the shape of the QD, and control the number of electrons in it. We will discuss the operating principle, computer simulation, and low temperature transport data. *APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS 89, 073106 (2006)

  8. Enhancing Higher Education Student Attendance through Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Zaid N.

    2016-01-01

    The findings of three consecutive studies about effective classroom management techniques designed to enhance higher education student attendance and the resulting correlation between student attendance and student achievement are reported here. The consecutive studies included a pilot study, culminating study, and replication study. The…

  9. Enhancing quality of student teachers' practices through reflective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the role of journal writing in enhancing student teachers' learning during school practice. It analyses data from 22 student teachers' journals and 23 questionnaires. The study focuses on the areas that student teachers reflected on most, the nature of their reflection and the extent to which previous ...

  10. Grade/Study-Performance Contracts, Enhanced Communication, Cooperative Learning, and Student Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a teaching strategy, designed to increase student retention while maintaining academic performance levels in undergraduate organic chemistry, that uses grade/study-performance contracts, enhanced communication using electronic mail, and cooperative learning. Concludes that a series of interventions can substantially…

  11. Radiation effects on and dose enhancement of electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srour, J.R.; Long, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes radiation effects on and dose enhancement factors for electronic materials. Alteration of the electrical properties of solid-state devices and integrated circuits by impinging radiation is well-known. Such changes may cause an electronic subsystem to fail, thus there is currently great interest in devising methods for avoiding radiation-induced degradation. The development of radiation-hardened devices and circuits is an exciting approach to solving this problem for many applications, since it could minimize the need for shielding or other system hardening techniques. Part 1 describes the basic mechanisms of radiation effects on electronic materials, devices, and integrated circuits. Radiation effects in bulk silicon and in silicon devices are treated. Ionizing radiation effects in silicon dioxide films and silicon MOS devices are discussed. Single event phenomena are considered. Key literature references and a bibliography are provided. Part II provides tabulations of dose enhancement factors for electronic devices in x-ray and gamma-ray environments. The data are applicable to a wide range of semiconductor devices and selected types of capacitors. Radiation environments discussed find application in system design and in radiation test facilities

  12. Electron mobility enhancement in (100) oxygen-inserted silicon channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Nuo; King Liu, Tsu-Jae [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Takeuchi, Hideki; Hytha, Marek; Cody, Nyles W.; Stephenson, Robert J.; Mears, Robert J. [Mears Technologies, Inc., Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 02481 (United States); Kwak, Byungil; Cha, Seon Yong [SK Hynix, Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-21

    High performance improvement (+88% in peak G{sub m} and >30% in linear and saturation region drain currents) was observed for N-MOSFETs with Oxygen-Inserted (OI) Si channel. From TCAD analysis of the C-V measurement data, the improvement was confirmed to be due to electron mobility enhancement of the OI Si channel (+75% at N{sub inv} = 4.0 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} and +25% at N{sub inv} = 8.0 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}). Raman and high-resolution Rutherford backscattering measurements confirmed that negligible strain is induced in the OI Si layer, and hence, it cannot be used to explain the origin of mobility improvement. Poisson-Schrödinger based quantum mechanical simulation was performed, taking into account phonon, surface roughness and Coulomb scatterings. The OI layer was modeled as a “quasi barrier” region with reference to the Si conduction band edge to confine inversion electrons. Simulation explains the measured electron mobility enhancement as the confinement effect of inversion electrons while the formation of an super-steep retrograde well doping profile in the channel (as a result of dopant diffusion blocking effect accompanied by introduction of the OI layer) also contributes 50%–60% of the mobility improvement.

  13. Nutrition Students Enhance School Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the Nutrition Education Students and Teachers (NEST) project was to develop a model of collaboration between University of Delaware dietetics students and elementary teachers to promote nutrition education in the classroom. Design/methodology/approach: Junior and senior level students in a nutrition education course…

  14. Enhancing the professionalisation of student affairs through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thought is that viewing assessment as an integral, rather than 'extra' aspect of student affairs and incorporating these activities within their work, student affairs professionals will not only improve the effectiveness of their work with students but also can help legitimise the field as a profession. Keywords: assessment ...

  15. Subauroral electron temperature enhancement in the nighttime ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Prölss

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In the nightside subauroral region, heat transfer from the ring current causes a significant increase in the electron temperature of the upper ionosphere. Using DE-2 satellite data, we investigate the properties of this remarkable feature. We find that the location of the temperature enhancement is primarily dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity. For geomagnetically quiet conditions (the temperature peak is located slightly poleward of 60° invariant latitude. For each decrease in the Dst index by 10 nT, it moves equatorward by about one degree. To a lesser degree, the location of the heating effect also depends on magnetic local time, with a significant positional asymmetry about midnight. The magnitude of the temperature enhancement varies with altitude. Within the height range 280 to 940 km, the peak temperature increases by 73%, on average. Thereby a conspicuous increase in the temperature gradient is observed above about 700km altitude. The magnitude of the heating effect also depends on the level of geomagnetic activity. For a decrease in the Dst index by 100 nT, the peak temperature increases by 46%, on average. This rate of increase, however, depends on season and is significantly smaller during winter conditions. A superposed epoch type of averaging procedure is used to obtain mean latitudinal profiles of the temperature enhancement. For an altitude of 500 km, the following mean properties are derived: amplitude K; width at half this peak value deg; distance between equatorward boundary and maximum deg. On average, a decrease in the electron density is observed at the location of the temperature enhancement, at least at 500 km altitude. At the same time, a moderate increase in the zonal ion drift speed is recorded at this location. During larger geomagnetic storms, the latitudinal profile of the temperature enhancement assumes a more step-function-like shape, with a broad increase in electron temperature poleward from the

  16. Students' Intentions to Purchase Electronic Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert W.; Baker-Eveleth, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Textbooks have played an important role in education for decades. Given the significant number of technology applications in education, it is not surprising that at least one such application is the electronic textbook (e-textbook). There are a variety of motivations to adopt an e-textbook, including frequent content updates and low costs. The…

  17. Enhancing Student Learning with Academic and Student Affairs Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Robert A.; Strom, Stephen L.; Downey, JoAnna; Schultz, Deanna D.; Holland, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    As the student affairs profession developed, expanded, and specialized over the last century, a disconnect occurred between student affairs professionals and academics. Despite that separation, the literature on student affairs in higher education supports the need for movement towards collaboration and integration of academic affairs and student…

  18. Electronic Repositories of Marked Student Work and their Contributions to Formative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinrich

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The educational literature shows that formative assessment is highly conducive to learning. The tasks given to students in formative assessment generally require open-ended responses that can be given, for example, in essay-type format and that are assessed by a human marker. An essential component is the formative feedback provided by the marker that needs to assist the student in recognising knowledge gaps and in formulating steps to close these gaps. The concepts of ‘electronic repositories of marked student work’ introduced in this article suggests an approach to support learning from formative assessment. At the core of this concept lies the realisation that the artefacts submitted by students and assessed by markers are a valuable resource. This resource should not just be used by the submitting students but should be made accessible to future students studying the same concepts. These students can learn from the artefacts and the formative feedback attached to these artefacts. Self- and peer-assessment, important concepts closely linked to formative assessment, can be integrated with the repositories to develop the students’ subject knowledge, to enhance their critical thinking skills and to familiarise them with assessment procedures. This article develops the concepts of electronic repositories of marked student work. Special emphasis is put on reviewing the educational literature on formative assessment and on binding the concepts introduced into the literature findings.

  19. Control of climatics environments to enhance reliability of electronics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekhon, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    The techniques to control temperature and humidity to reduce failures in semiconductor devices are presented. The maximum operating junction temperature affects the electronic system reliability, and the equation for the junction temperature of the device shows that internal and external thermal resistances affect component life. Junction temperature reductions up to 60 C were achieved by the development of heat pipes for microcircuits, which will enhance electronics life by 32 times. Humidity control by improved sealing and use of heaters to prevent moisture condensation proved difficult and costly, and high pressure dehydrators were heavy and expensive. Therefore, low pressure dehydrator was developed which is smaller, lighter, and less expensive. The development of low pressure dehumidifying system including test data is presented

  20. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  1. Advances in Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer From Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroshi; Wei, Jinjia

    This paper reviews recent advances in enhancing boiling heat transfer from electronic components immersed in dielectric liquids by use of surface microstructures. The microstructures developed include rough surfaces produced by sanding, vapor blasting hard particles, sputtering of SiO2 followed by wet etching of the surface, chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 film etc., laser-drilled cavities, a brush-like structure (dendritic structure), reentrant and micro-reentrant cavities, microfins, and porous structures fabricated by alumina particle spraying and painting of silver flakes, diamond particles, aluminum particles and copper particles. Heat sink studs with drilled holes, microfins, multi-layered micro-channels and pores, and pin fins with and without microporous coating have also been developed. The height of microstructure ranges from 0 to 12mm. The primary issues discussed are the mitigation of temperature overshoot at boiling incipience, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer and increasing the critical heat flux.

  2. Enhancing student engagement using the flipped classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboy, Mary Beth; Heinerichs, Scott; Pazzaglia, Gina

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is an innovative pedagogical approach that focuses on learner-centered instruction. The purposes of this report were to illustrate how to implement the flipped classroom and to describe students' perceptions of this approach within 2 undergraduate nutrition courses. The template provided enables faculty to design before, during, and after class activities and assessments based on objectives using all levels of Bloom's taxonomy. The majority of the 142 students completing the evaluation preferred the flipped method compared with traditional pedagogical strategies. The process described in the report was successful for both faculty and students. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Awareness of Electronic Banking System among Management Students in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan FAREED

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Banking is an essential sector of banking industry. E-banking services are gaining the attention of conventional bank’s customers rapidly. It has brought the revolutionary changes in the Pakistan banking industry in terms of customer and business perspectives. Electronic banking has got popularity in the developed as well as developing countries because it saves people time, reduces costs and people have access to all banking services on the click of a button. More often, the new innovated system allows the customers to touch their accounts at home using a mobile device or electronic terminals. This research paper focuses on growth and awareness of electronic banking among Management Students of the Okara, Pakistan. Questionnaire on 5 point Likert scale was developed to find the views of 200 respondents. Frequency distribution and correlation analysis were employed on data. The results revealed that 74% of the students are well aware about ATM and 82% of management students of our sample populations believe that e-banking is very convenient system of banking. 74% of the Management students feel secure when they have money in credit and debit card while 82% of the students prefer e-banking over traditional banking.

  4. Using Digital Photography to Enhance Student Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to help students develop their digital photography skills and see the world through new eyes. An emphasis is placed on using digital photography to communicate ideas and feelings. (Contains 6 figures and 2 tables.)

  5. Visiting summer students enhance research skills

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Seven undergraduate students from universities across the nation and one from Virginia Tech are working side by side with Virginia Tech professors this summer on research projects related to sustainable management of resources.

  6. Empowering students by enhancing their employability skills

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Fraser J.; Connell, Pauline; Thomson, Linda A.; Willison, Debra

    2017-01-01

    Recognising the importance of graduates being equipped with appropriate employability skills alongside their subject-specific skills, we have had transferable skills training embedded throughout our degree programmes for 30 years. More recently, a specific employability skills module for final-year honours students has been created. This module consists of a programme of\\ud activities supporting employability skills, which was delivered to final-year undergraduate students from 2012 to 2015. ...

  7. Health-enhancing physical activity among university students in nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to investigate health-enhancing physical activity (PA) among university students in ASEAN countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 8,709 (37.7% male and 62.3% female) university students (Mean age 20.6, SD=2.0) from nine ASEAN countries. They were assessed ...

  8. Bibliotherapy: An option for enhancing students'motivation for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bibliotherapy: An option for enhancing students'motivation for academic achievement in Iganmode Grammar School and Grait International College, Ota – Ogun ... with school teachers and counsellors to know the reading needs and challenges of students; this will assist in acquiring relevant reading materials in addition to ...

  9. Enhancing of Self-Efficacy in Teacher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of training module on enhancing self-efficacy in teacher education students was investigated. Sixty-eight (68) teacher education students (M age = 22.74; SD = 0.57) participated in this study, 36 of whom were assigned to an experimental group and the other 32 were assigned to a control group. The training module on…

  10. Enhancing first year chemistry student's participation in practical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, enhancing student's participation in practical analytical chemistry course at Haramaya University with various reasons was conducted. The data were collected from I year chemistry undergraduate students of class size 56 of which 23 were females and 33 were males. The class was arranged in to two groups ...

  11. Constructive feedback as a learning tool to enhance students' self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If feedback is provided in a way that can develop students' self-regulatory skills, it could enhance learning and, consequently, lead to improved performance. To improve teaching and learning in higher education (HE), this study sought to determine whether the feedback to first-year students affords them an opportunity to ...

  12. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B., E-mail: behrouz@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  13. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered

  14. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  15. Factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Pulcini, Joyce; Wang, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Health Information Technology Act (2009) in America had recommended that electronic health records (EHRs) should be fully adopted by 2014. This has urged educational institutions to prepare healthcare professionals to be competent in using electronic health records (EHRs) while they are in schools. To equip nursing students with competency in using EHRs, an electronic health record for nursing education (EHRNE) has been developed and integrated it into nursing curricula. The purposes of the study were to investigate the factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of the EHRs in nursing education using the extended Technology Acceptance Model with self-efficacy as a conceptual framework. The study is a descriptive study design using self-reported questionnaires with 212 student participants. The IBM SPSS and AMOS 22.0 were used to analyze the data. The results showed that attitude toward using the EHRNE was the most influential factor on students' acceptance. The preliminary findings suggested that to enhance the students' acceptance of the EHRNE, cultivation of a positive attitude toward using this EHR as well as increasing the perceived usefulness is very important. Also, the study's framework could be used in guiding learning health informatics and be applied to nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of cognitive enhancers among medical students in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lengvenyte Aiste

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS – The purpose of this study is to analyse the use of cognitive enhancers among medical students in Lithuania, determine the reasons for usage and evaluate the contributing factors such as socio-demographic characteristics, stress levels, sleep quality and knowing somebody who has used a neuro-enhancing drug.

  17. Students' access usage and awareness of electronic information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' access usage and awareness of electronic information resources at the University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. RA Ojo, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract. Lagos Journal of Library and Information Science Vol. 3(1) 2005: 16-24. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD ...

  18. Use of electronic databases by postgraduate students in a university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of electronic databases by postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science and Agriculture at the. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg. The study adopted a quantitative approach and a survey was conducted. The results of the study found that while postgraduate ...

  19. The Use of Pocket Electronic Dictionaries by Thai University Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on a small-scale study of Thai-speaking learners using pocket electronic dictionaries (PEDs) to read an English news article. It investigates how the subjects use their PEDs for reading comprehension. Thirty-nine undergraduate students completed a questionnaire survey. Of these, four were chosen to ...

  20. Gender differences in students' utilization of electronic information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined gender differences among students in the utilization of electronic information resources in Ramat Library, University of Maiduguri. One objective,with corresponding hypotheses guided the study. The survey research method was used. The population for the study comprised 13,995 (thirteen thousand, ...

  1. Personal librarian enhancing the student experience

    CERN Document Server

    Moniz, Richard; Matthews, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    The incredible shift in the provision of library services resulting from innovations such as online resources, mobile technologies, tablet computers, and MOOCs and hybrid courses makes it more challenging than ever for academic librarians to connect students with the information they need. Enter the Personal Librarian, a flexible concept that focuses on customizing information literacy by establishing a one-on-one relationship between librarian and student from enrollment through graduation. In this book the editors, with decades of library instruction and academic library experience between t

  2. Attendance, Employability, Student Performance and Electronic Course Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the possible detrimental effects of low attendance on the achievement of important learning outcomes in terms of "soft" employability-enhancing skills among undergraduate students in business schools, and explores how the use of learning technologies may contribute to high...... or low class attendance levels. The chapter describes the exploratory results of a survey carried out among final year bachelor students attending a strategic management course, the findings of which suggest that a significant number of students view virtual learning environments as a substitute...... for lectures. I find only very limited evidence that such students actually attend classes any less than other students do. Furthermore, I find that reasons for non-attendance are similar to those reported in existing literature....

  3. Algorithms for contrast enhancement of electronic portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez, S.; Sánchez, S.

    2015-01-01

    An implementation of two new automatized image processing algorithms for contrast enhancement of portal images is presented as suitable tools which facilitate the setup verification and visualization of patients during radiotherapy treatments. In the first algorithm, called Automatic Segmentation and Histogram Stretching (ASHS), the portal image is automatically segmented in two sub-images delimited by the conformed treatment beam: one image consisting of the imaged patient obtained directly from the radiation treatment field, and the second one is composed of the imaged patient outside it. By segmenting the original image, a histogram stretching can be independently performed and improved in both regions. The second algorithm involves a two-step process. In the first step, a Normalization to Local Mean (NLM), an inverse restoration filter is applied by dividing pixel by pixel a portal image by its blurred version. In the second step, named Lineally Combined Local Histogram Equalization (LCLHE), the contrast of the original image is strongly improved by a Local Contrast Enhancement (LCE) algorithm, revealing the anatomical structures of patients. The output image is lineally combined with a portal image of the patient. Finally the output images of the previous algorithms (NLM and LCLHE) are lineally combined, once again, in order to obtain a contrast enhanced image. These two algorithms have been tested on several portal images with great results. - Highlights: • Two Algorithms are implemented to improve the contrast of Electronic Portal Images. • The multi-leaf and conformed beam are automatically segmented into Portal Images. • Hidden anatomical and bony structures in portal images are revealed. • The task related to the patient setup verification is facilitated by the contrast enhancement then achieved.

  4. Repeatable Writing Assignments to Enhance Student Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebold, W. J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the use of two short writing assignments and a peer review system in an undergraduate agronomy course to improve writing skills and the learning of agronomic principles. Provided is a course description and procedures used in the course. Student evaluation in the course is reviewed. (CW)

  5. Inclusive Partnership: Enhancing Student Engagement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Cherry, Niamh; Healey, Ruth; Nicholson, Dawn T.; Andrews, Will

    2016-01-01

    Partnership is currently the focus of much work within higher education and advocated as an important process to address a range of higher education goals. In this paper, we propose the term "inclusive partnership" to conceptualise a non-selective staff-student relationship. While recognising the challenges of inclusive partnership…

  6. Enhancing Classroom Conversation for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, William

    2013-01-01

    The author, a 5th-grade teacher, offers strategies intended to assist and encourage ELL students to participate in academic conversations. They include insisting that children take part in conversations despite their apprehension and teaching them the language they need to communicate their ideas. One strategy is Think, Pair, Share--a simple…

  7. Enhancing Student Learning through Scaffolded Client Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the current status of client projects (CPs) in business communication courses, provides a scaffolded model for implementing CP, and assesses student learning in CPs. Using a longitudinal mixed method research design, survey data and qualitative materials from six semesters are presented. The instructor survey indicated need…

  8. Scrum: Enhancing Student Team Organization and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opt, Susan; Sims, Christy-Dale L.

    2015-01-01

    To teach collaboration and overcome students' aversion to teamwork, Pope-Ruark (2012) recommends the Scrum approach, which she has used to manage major client-based course projects in writing and publishing courses. The Scrum approach emerged out of the software development industry in the 1990s as a framework for improving team…

  9. Enhancing students' cultural competence using cross-cultural experiential learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Bertolo, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate community health students' perceptions of their cultural competence. Little is known about students' cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills after their experience working with diverse cultural groups and language barriers. A cross-cultural experiential learning exercise was used as an educational approach. Reflective writing was used to elicit students' attitudes of the other culture and their coping skills. Three themes emerged as cultural awareness and knowledge, observation and learning, and cross-cultural communication. Results underscore the need for student academic preparation using cross-cultural educational approaches to enhance cultural competence.

  10. Enhancing the Psychology STEM Student Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kimberley M.

    2017-01-01

    Psychology is a valuable Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) discipline, but one which could do far more at communicating its value to the wider public. This paper discusses how popular initiatives, such as "The University of Northampton's STEM Champions" programme, enhance psychology's STEM membership, while…

  11. Enhancing Critical Thinking Skills among Authoritarian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson Hurley, Martha; Hurley, David

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on assignments designed to enhance critical thinking skills for authoritarian personality types. This paper seeks to add to the literature by exploring instructional methods to overcome authoritarian traits that could inhibit the development of critical thinking skills. The article presents a strategy which can be employed…

  12. Using Technology-Nested Instructional Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lumpkin, PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Students today expect the use of technology in their classes, rather than have to listen to less-than-engaging lectures. College students are connected electronically and incessant technology consumers. As a result, they may prefer the infusion of technologies to help them learn and enjoy the process of learning, rather than having to listen exclusively to lectures. To investigate this, the authors solicited student perceptions to assess the importance of learning through technology-nested instructional strategies. Student perceptions give direction to and affirm the benefits of instructional strategies that increase student motivation to engage more actively in their learning. Based on quantitative and qualitative responses through action research in multiple courses, students perceive their learning as more engaging and enjoyable when technology-nested instructional strategies are infused into their classes.

  13. SPECT electronic collimation resolution enhancement using chi-square minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durkee, J.W. Jr.; Antich, P.P.; Tsyganov, E.N.; Constantinescu, A.; Fernando, J.L.; Kulkarni, P.V.; Smith, B.J.; Arbique, G.M.; Lewis, M.A.; Nguyen, T.; Raheja, A.; Thambi, G.; Parkey, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    An electronic collimation technique is developed which utilizes the chi-square goodness-of-fit measure to filter scattered gammas incident upon a medical imaging detector. In this data mining technique, Compton kinematic expressions are used as the chi-square fitting templates for measured energy-deposition data involving multiple-interaction scatter sequences. Fit optimization is conducted using the Davidon variable metric minimization algorithm to simultaneously determine the best-fit gamma scatter angles and their associated uncertainties, with the uncertainty associated with the first scatter angle corresponding to the angular resolution precision for the source. The methodology requires no knowledge of materials and geometry. This pattern recognition application enhances the ability to select those gammas that will provide the best resolution for input to reconstruction software. Illustrative computational results are presented for a conceptual truncated-ellipsoid polystyrene position-sensitive fibre head-detector Monte Carlo model using a triple Compton scatter gamma sequence assessment for a 99m Tc point source. A filtration rate of 94.3% is obtained, resulting in an estimated sensitivity approximately three orders of magnitude greater than a high-resolution mechanically collimated device. The technique improves the nominal single-scatter angular resolution by up to approximately 24 per cent as compared with the conventional analytic electronic collimation measure. (author)

  14. REINFORCEMENT ENHANCING EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE VIA ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Michael, Valerie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. Methods We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10 ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled “36 mg/ml”) or placebo (“0”) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one’s own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Results Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Conclusions Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. PMID:26070455

  15. Enhanced Mixed Electronic-Ionic Conductors through Cation Ordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Allan J. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Grey, Clare [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The performance of many energy conversion and storage devices depend on the properties of mixed ionic-electronic conducting (miec) materials. Mixed or ambipolar conductors simultaneously transport ions and electrons and provide the critical interface between chemical and electrical energy in devices such as fuel cells, ion transport membranes, and batteries. Enhancements in storage capacity, reversibility, power density and device lifetime all require new materials and a better understanding of the fundamentals of ambipolar conductivity and surface reactivity.The high temperature properties of the ordered perovksites AA’B2O5+x, where A = rare earth ion, Y and B = Ba, Sr were studied. The work was motivated by the high oxygen transport and surface exchange rates observed for members of this class of mixed ionic and electronic conductors. A combined experimental and computational approach, including structural, electrochemical, and transport characterization and modeling was used. The approach attacks the problem simultaneously at global (e.g., neutron diffraction and impedance spectroscopy), local (e.g., pair distribution function, nuclear magnetic resonance) and molecular (ab initio thermokinetic modeling) length scales. The objectives of the work were to understand how the cation and associated anion order lead to exceptional ionic and electronic transport properties and surface reactivity in AA’B2O5+x perovskites. A variety of compounds were studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction, measurements of thermodynamics and transport and theoretically. These included PrBaCo2O5+x and NdBaCo2O5+x, PrBaCo2-xFexO6- δ (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2) and LnBaCoFeO6- δ (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd), Sr3YCo4O10.5, YBaMn2O5+x. A0.5A’0.5BO3 (where A=Y, Sc, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm; A’= Sr

  16. Predicting students' intention to use stimulants for academic performance enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnet, Koen; Wouters, Edwin; Walrave, Michel; Heirman, Wannes; Van Hal, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The non-medical use of stimulants for academic performance enhancement is becoming a more common practice among college and university students. The objective of this study is to gain a better understanding of students' intention to use stimulant medication for the purpose of enhancing their academic performance. Based on an extended model of Ajzen's theory of planned behavior, we examined the predictive value of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, psychological distress, procrastination, substance use, and alcohol use on students' intention to use stimulants to improve their academic performance. The sample consisted of 3,589 Flemish university and college students (mean age: 21.59, SD: 4.09), who participated anonymously in an online survey conducted in March and April 2013. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the relationships among the study variables. Our results indicate that subjective norm is the strongest predictor of students' intention to use stimulant medication, followed by attitude and perceived behavioral control. To a lesser extent, procrastinating tendencies, psychological distress, and substance abuse contribute to students' intention. Conclusions/ Importance: Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations on how to curtail students' intention to use stimulant medication for the purpose of improving their academic performance. In addition, we urge researchers to identify other psychological variables that might be related to students' intention.

  17. Swiss University Students' Attitudes toward Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa J Maier

    Full Text Available Pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE refers to the nonmedical use of prescription or recreational drugs to enhance cognitive performance. Several concerns about PCE have been raised in the public. The aim of the present study was to investigate students' attitudes toward PCE. Students at three Swiss universities were invited by e-mail to participate in a web-based survey. Of the 29,282 students who were contacted, 3,056 participated. Of these students, 22% indicated that they had used prescription drugs (12% or recreational substances including alcohol (14% at least once for PCE. The use of prescription drugs or recreational substances including alcohol prior to the last exam was reported by 16%. Users of pharmacological cognitive enhancers were more likely to consider PCE fair (24% compared with nonusers (11%. Only a minority of the participants agreed with the nonmedical use of prescription drugs by fellow students when assuming weak (7% or hypothetically strong efficacy and availability to everyone (14%. Two-thirds (68% considered performance that is obtained with PCE less worthy of recognition. Additionally, 80% disagreed that PCE is acceptable in a competitive environment. More than half (64% agreed that PCE in academia is similar to doping in sports. Nearly half (48% claimed that unregulated access to pharmacological cognitive enhancers increases the pressure to engage in PCE and educational inequality (55%. In conclusion, Swiss students' main concerns regarding PCE were related to coercion and fairness. As expected, these concerns were more prevalent among nonusers than among users of pharmacological cognitive enhancers. More balanced information on PCE should be shared with students, and future monitoring of PCE is recommended.

  18. Encouraging Students to Enhance Their Listening Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Ocampo Sonia Patricia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spanish-speaking students constantly complain about the difficulty they have comprehending spoken English. It seems teachers do not often provide them with strategies to alleviate that. This article reports on a pedagogical experience carried out at a Colombian university to help pre-service teachers at an intermediate level of English to improve their aural comprehension. The students were given the task of designing listening activities to be worked on as micro-teaching sessions and were asked to describe their experience by answering a survey. The results showed that students developed the ability to think critically since they needed to make the best decisions regarding the audio level and the design of the activities. They also appeared to have become more autonomous as they realized they could be responsible for their improvement in listening. Additionally, there were evident changes in the teachers’ roles.Es común que los hablantes de español se quejen de su comprensión oral en inglés. Parece que los profesores no siempre dan a sus estudiantes estrategias para mejorar al respecto. En este artículo se describe la experiencia pedagógica desarrollada en una universidad colombiana con el propósito de ayudar a los estudiantes de inglés intermedio de una licenciatura a mejorar su comprensión auditiva. Se pidió a los estudiantes desarrollar actividades de escucha para ser trabajadas en sesiones de microenseñanza y describir su experiencia, contestando una encuesta. Los resultados evidenciaron que los estudiantes desarrollaron su pensamiento crítico en la medida que necesitaban tomar decisiones con respecto al nivel de dificultad del audio y al diseño de las actividades mismas. También se mostraron más autónomos por cuanto se hicieron conscientes de su responsabilidad en el mejoramiento de su comprensión oral. Adicionalmente, se dieron cambios en los papeles del profesor.

  19. Use of Electronic Medical Record–Enhanced Checklist and Electronic Dashboard to Decrease CLABSIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Christopher A.; Wood, Matthew; Cornfield, David N.; Suermondt, Jaap; Sharek, Paul J.; Franzon, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that a checklist enhanced by the electronic medical record and a unit-wide dashboard would improve compliance with an evidence-based, pediatric-specific catheter care bundle and decrease central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). METHODS: We performed a cohort study with historical controls that included all patients with a central venous catheter in a 24-bed PICU in an academic children’s hospital. Postintervention CLABSI rates, compliance with bundle elements, and staff perceptions of communication were evaluated and compared with preintervention data. RESULTS: CLABSI rates decreased from 2.6 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days before intervention to 0.7 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days after intervention. Analysis of specific bundle elements demonstrated increased daily documentation of line necessity from 30% to 73% (P < .001), increased compliance with dressing changes from 87% to 90% (P = .003), increased compliance with cap changes from 87% to 93% (P < .001), increased compliance with port needle changes from 69% to 95% (P < .001), but decreased compliance with insertion bundle documentation from 67% to 62% (P = .001). Changes in the care plan were made during review of the electronic medical record checklist on 39% of patient rounds episodes. CONCLUSIONS: Use of an electronic medical record–enhanced CLABSI prevention checklist coupled with a unit-wide real-time display of adherence was associated with increased compliance with evidence-based catheter care and sustained decrease in CLABSI rates. These data underscore the potential for computerized interventions to promote compliance with proven best practices and prevent patient harm. PMID:24567021

  20. Use of electronic medical record-enhanced checklist and electronic dashboard to decrease CLABSIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageler, Natalie M; Longhurst, Christopher A; Wood, Matthew; Cornfield, David N; Suermondt, Jaap; Sharek, Paul J; Franzon, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    We hypothesized that a checklist enhanced by the electronic medical record and a unit-wide dashboard would improve compliance with an evidence-based, pediatric-specific catheter care bundle and decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). We performed a cohort study with historical controls that included all patients with a central venous catheter in a 24-bed PICU in an academic children's hospital. Postintervention CLABSI rates, compliance with bundle elements, and staff perceptions of communication were evaluated and compared with preintervention data. CLABSI rates decreased from 2.6 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days before intervention to 0.7 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days after intervention. Analysis of specific bundle elements demonstrated increased daily documentation of line necessity from 30% to 73% (P < .001), increased compliance with dressing changes from 87% to 90% (P = .003), increased compliance with cap changes from 87% to 93% (P < .001), increased compliance with port needle changes from 69% to 95% (P < .001), but decreased compliance with insertion bundle documentation from 67% to 62% (P = .001). Changes in the care plan were made during review of the electronic medical record checklist on 39% of patient rounds episodes. Use of an electronic medical record-enhanced CLABSI prevention checklist coupled with a unit-wide real-time display of adherence was associated with increased compliance with evidence-based catheter care and sustained decrease in CLABSI rates. These data underscore the potential for computerized interventions to promote compliance with proven best practices and prevent patient harm.

  1. Improving the medical student experience using electronic timetabling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanantham S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sayinthen Vivekanantham, Rahul Prashanth Ravindran Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKTechnology within health care delivery is improving at an unprecedented rate.1 Medical students demonstrate a preference towards mobile learning2 and familiarity with technology is essential to medical practice.1 We believe electronic timetables are an underutilized technology that can be embraced by institutions delivering medical education.

  2. Advanced radiographic scanning, enhancement and electronic data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoie, C.; Rivest, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that radiographs deteriorate with time. Substantial cost is attributed to cataloguing and storage. To eliminate deterioration issues and save time retrieving radiographs, laser scanning techniques were developed in conjunction with viewing and enhancement software. This will allow radiographs to be successfully scanned and stored electronically for future reference. Todays radiographic laser scanners are capable Qf capturing images with an optical density of up to 4.1 at 256 grey levels and resolutions up to 4096 pixels per line. An industrial software interface was developed for the nondestructive testing industry so that, certain parameters such as scan resolution, number of scans, file format and location to be saved could be adjusted as needed. Once the radiographs have been scanned, the tiff images are stored, or retrieved into Radiance software (developed by Rivest Technologies Inc.), which will help to properly interpret the radiographs. Radiance was developed to allow the user to quickly view the radiographs correctness or enhance its defects for comparison and future evaluation. Radiance also allows the user to zoom, measure and annotate areas of interest. Physical cost associated with cataloguing, storing and retrieving radiographs can be eliminated. You can now successfully retrieve and view your radiographs from CD media or dedicated hard drive at will. For continuous searches and/or field access, dedicated hard drives controlled by a server would be the media of choice. All scanned radiographs will be archived to CD media (CD-R). Laser scanning with a proper acquisition interface and easy to use viewing software will permit a qualified user to identify areas of interest and share this information with his/her colleagues via e-mail or web data access. (author)

  3. A Novel Education and Training Program to Enhance Student Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alex J; Matzke, Gary R; McCall, Kenneth L

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a unique student advocacy program to train student pharmacists to be effective advocates for the profession of pharmacy and the patients it serves. Design. The Academy is a 2-day program hosted annually in Washington, DC, that combines didactic presentations on the legislative process, communication with policymakers, current legislation, and active-learning exercises such as mock congressional visits. The Academy culminates with visits to Capitol Hill where students meet with legislators and their staff to discuss pending legislation. Assessment. Nearly 350 students from 43 schools and colleges of pharmacy completed the program in its 4 years. Students are assessed following the active-learning exercises and meetings with legislators. Conclusion. Advocacy has been listed as a competency that requires more attention in pharmacy education. The Academy provides a model that schools may replicate to enhance their advocacy offerings.

  4. Using nursing students to enhance one college's immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, S B; Magaldi, M A; Kresse, E

    2001-11-01

    In New York State, all college students who were born on or after January 1, 1957, are required to show proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) before the 1st day of classes. Colleges have established immunization programs so that those students who do not have the required proof can be given the necessary injections. Often, our health service office does not have enough staff to administer the MMR shots during the registration period, resulting in long lines of students waiting to be immunized. In this article, the authors describe how one college used nursing students to assist with and enhance its immunization program. The 45 nursing students who participated in this project administered 694 injections over a 5-day period, They received credit from the nursing department for clinical time and all of the participants agree that the project was a success.

  5. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Z. [Physics and Accelerator School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  6. The Effect of Reticence on College Students' Use of Electronic Mail To Communicate with Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lynne; Duran, Robert L.; Zolten, J. Jerome

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of reticence on college students' use of electronic mail to communication with faculty. Notes the difference in the frequency of using electronic mail by reticent and non-reticent students. Considers how reticent students prefer to use electronic mail over speaking to faculty at their offices. (SG)

  7. Student Transcript-Enhanced Placement Study (STEPS). Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Prior research suggests that using high school transcripts may improve English and math placement accuracy at colleges. Between 2012 and 2013, the Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges (RP Group) conducted the Student Transcript Enhanced Placement Study (STEPS) in partnership with the California Community Colleges…

  8. Enhancing Students' Communication Skills through Treffinger Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaddad, Idrus; Kusumah, Yaya S.; Sabandar, Jozua; Dahlan, Jarnawi A.

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to investigate, compare, and describe the achievement and enhancement of students' mathematical communication skills (MCS). It based on the prior mathematical knowledge (PMK) category (high, medium and low) by using Treffinger models (TM) and conventional learning (CL). This research is an experimental study with the population…

  9. Enhancing Students' Communication Skills through Problem Posing and Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugito; E. S., Sri Mulyani; Hartono; Supartono

    2017-01-01

    This study was to explore how enhance communication skill through problem posing and presentation method. The subjects of this research were the seven grade students Junior High School, including 20 male and 14 female. This research was conducted in two cycles and each cycle consisted of four steps, they were: planning, action, observation, and…

  10. Enhancing Student Self-Worth in the Primary School Learning Environment: Teachers' Views and Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Penni; Cowan, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of teachers and students' views regarding self-worth in the primary school learning environment. The revised New Zealand curriculum recognises the importance of self-worth in students' motivation and ability to learn. While the need to enhance self-worth in the classroom has been well established in the…

  11. Supporting students' knowledge integration with technology-enhanced inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jennifer Lopseen

    Dynamic visualizations of scientific phenomena have the potential to transform how students learn and understand science. Dynamic visualizations enable interaction and experimentation with unobservable atomic-level phenomena. A series of studies clarify the conditions under which embedding dynamic visualizations in technology-enhanced inquiry instruction can help students develop robust and durable chemistry knowledge. Using the knowledge integration perspective, I designed Chemical Reactions, a technology-enhanced curriculum unit, with a partnership of teachers, educational researchers, and chemists. This unit guides students in an exploration of how energy and chemical reactions relate to climate change. It uses powerful dynamic visualizations to connect atomic level interactions to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The series of studies were conducted in typical classrooms in eleven high schools across the country. This dissertation describes four studies that contribute to understanding of how visualizations can be used to transform chemistry learning. The efficacy study investigated the impact of the Chemical Reactions unit compared to traditional instruction using pre-, post- and delayed posttest assessments. The self-monitoring study used self-ratings in combination with embedded assessments to explore how explanation prompts help students learn from dynamic visualizations. The self-regulation study used log files of students' interactions with the learning environment to investigate how external feedback and explanation prompts influence students' exploration of dynamic visualizations. The explanation study compared specific and general explanation prompts to explore the processes by which explanations benefit learning with dynamic visualizations. These studies delineate the conditions under which dynamic visualizations embedded in inquiry instruction can enhance student outcomes. The studies reveal that visualizations can be deceptively clear

  12. Concept mapping learning strategy to enhance students' mathematical connection ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, M.; Kadir, Fatra, Maifalinda

    2017-05-01

    The concept mapping learning strategy in teaching and learning mathematics has been investigated by numerous researchers. However, there are still less researchers who have scrutinized about the roles of map concept which is connected to the mathematical connection ability. Being well understood on map concept, it may help students to have ability to correlate one concept to other concept in order that the student can solve mathematical problems faced. The objective of this research was to describe the student's mathematical connection ability and to analyze the effect of using concept mapping learning strategy to the students' mathematical connection ability. This research was conducted at senior high school in Jakarta. The method used a quasi-experimental with randomized control group design with the total number was 72 students as the sample. Data obtained through using test in the post-test after giving the treatment. The results of the research are: 1) Students' mathematical connection ability has reached the good enough level category; 2) Students' mathematical connection ability who had taught with concept mapping learning strategy is higher than who had taught with conventional learning strategy. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that concept mapping learning strategycould enhance the students' mathematical connection ability, especially in trigonometry.

  13. Enhancing the Learning Environment by Learning all the Students' Names

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    Short abstract This paper describes how the teaching environment can be enhanced significantly by a simple method: learning the names of all the students. The method is time-efficient: In a course with 33 students I used 65 minutes in total. My own view of the effect was confirmed in a small study......: The students felt more valued, secure and respected. They also made an effort to learn each other's names. Long abstract In high school teachers know the students' names very soon - anything else is unthinkable (Wiberg, 2011). Not so in universities where knowing the names of all the students is the exception....... Most teachers get to know the names of the most active students. Many teachers feel bad about this and would love to know all the students' names, but the task seems insurmountable.Over the years I have developed a simple, systematic and time-efficient method to learn the names of all students that can...

  14. Enhancing scientific reasoning by refining students' models of multivariable causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla

    Inquiry learning as an educational method is gaining increasing support among elementary and middle school educators. In inquiry activities at the middle school level, students are typically asked to conduct investigations and infer causal relationships about multivariable causal systems. In these activities, students usually demonstrate significant strategic weaknesses and insufficient metastrategic understanding of task demands. Present work suggests that these weaknesses arise from students' deficient mental models of multivariable causality, in which effects of individual features are neither additive, nor constant. This study is an attempt to develop an intervention aimed at enhancing scientific reasoning by refining students' models of multivariable causality. Three groups of students engaged in a scientific investigation activity over seven weekly sessions. By creating unique combinations of five features potentially involved in earthquake mechanism and observing associated risk meter readings, students had to find out which of the features were causal, and to learn to predict earthquake risk. Additionally, students in the instructional and practice groups engaged in self-directed practice in making scientific predictions. The instructional group also participated in weekly instructional sessions on making predictions based on multivariable causality. Students in the practice and instructional conditions showed small to moderate improvement in their attention to the evidence and in their metastrategic ability to recognize effective investigative strategies in the work of other students. They also demonstrated a trend towards making a greater number of valid inferences than the control group students. Additionally, students in the instructional condition showed significant improvement in their ability to draw inferences based on multiple records. They also developed more accurate knowledge about non-causal features of the system. These gains were maintained

  15. Effect of virtual analytical chemistry laboratory on enhancing student research skills and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Bortnik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to determine the effect of a virtual chemistry laboratory on university student achievement. The article describes a model of a laboratory course that includes a virtual component. This virtual component is viewed as a tool of student pre-lab autonomous learning. It presents electronic resources designed for a virtual laboratory and outlines the methodology of e-resource application. To find out how virtual chemistry laboratory affects student scientific literacy, research skills and practices, a pedagogical experiment has been conducted. Student achievement was compared in two learning environments: traditional – in-class hands-on – learning (control group and blended learning – online learning combined with in-person learning (experimental group. The effectiveness of integrating an e-lab in the laboratory study was measured by comparing student lab reports of the two groups. For that purpose, a set of 10 criteria was developed. The experimental and control student groups were also compared in terms of test results and student portfolios. The study showed that the adopted approach blending both virtual and hands-on learning environments has the potential to enhance student research skills and practices in analytical chemistry studies.

  16. Enhancing the blended learning experience of Calculus I students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Ghassani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Blended Learning showed in the last two decades to be one of the effective ways in education and training. We illustrate our initiative experience with blended learning in the course Calculus I. The main goals we want to achieve are improving students understanding of the course concepts, increasing the level of uniformity in this multi-sections course and enhancing students blended learning experience online and offline. Consequently, this affects positively students' academic performance. We describe and discuss the results that we achieved and the challenges we encountered in view of the initiative aims and goals. The blended learning delivery methods were through Learning Management System (LMS as the online medium and through new offline activities inside and outside the classroom. The LMS we used is Moodle. We designed the resources and activities to cater for the learners different needs. The offline activities were chosen and designed to strengthen the weakness in students study skills based in our experience.

  17. Peer mentoring: Enhancing the transition from student to professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Margaret; Stanyer, Rachel

    2018-02-08

    to share the experience of a model of peer mentoring in a pre-qualification midwifery programme DESIGN: description of the framework and benefits of the model SETTING: University and practice PARTICIPANTS: third year midwifery students INTERVENTIONS: practical activities meeting regulatory body requirements in a pre-qualification mentorship module MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: informal evaluations by students of key activities undertaken during peer mentoring demonstrated a range of positive outcomes. These included enhanced confidence, self-awareness, interpersonal and teaching skills, team-working and leadership - factors also associated with emotional intelligence. Students developed an appreciation of the accountability of the mentor including making practice assessment decisions. They stated that the learning achieved had aided their professional development and enhanced employability. this module equips students with skills for their future role in facilitating learners and contributes to development of a 'professional persona', enhancing their transition to qualified midwives. The Peer Mentoring Model would be easily adapted to other programmes and professional contexts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing Pharmacy Student Learning and Perceptions of Medical Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aungst, Timothy Dy; Brown, Nicole V; Cui, Yan; Tam, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mobile apps in health care is growing. Current and future practitioners must be equipped with the skills to navigate and utilize apps in patient care, yet few strategies exist for training health care professional students on the usage of apps. Objective To characterize first-year pharmacy student use of medical apps, evaluate first-year pharmacy student's perception of skills in finding, evaluating, and using medical apps before and after a focused learning experience, and assess student satisfaction and areas for improvement regarding the learning experience. Methods Students listened to a recorded, Web-based lecture on finding, evaluating, and using mobile apps in patient care. A 2-hour, interactive workshop was conducted during which students were led by an instructor through a discussion on strategies for finding and using apps in health care. The students practiced evaluating 6 different health care–related apps. Surveys were conducted before and after the focused learning experience to assess students' perceptions of medical apps and current use and perspectives on satisfaction with the learning experience and role of technology in health care. Results This educational intervention is the first described formal, interactive method to educate student pharmacists on medical apps. With a 99% response rate, surveys conducted before and after the learning experience displayed perceived improvement in student skills related to finding (52/119, 44% before vs 114/120, 95% after), evaluating (18/119, 15% before vs 112/120, 93% after), and using medical apps in patient care (31/119, 26% before vs 108/120, 90% after) and the health sciences classroom (38/119, 32% before vs 104/120, 87% after). Students described satisfaction with the educational experience and agreed that it should be repeated in subsequent years (89/120, 74% agreed or strongly agreed). Most students surveyed possessed portable electronic devices (107/119, 90% mobile phone) and

  19. Use and perception of electronic cigarettes among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbo, Craig W; Harper, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into how electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) may affect the social normative environment for tobacco use among college students. Participants were 244 freshman and sophomore students. Students completed an online self-report survey in April 2011. There is a higher acceptance rate of e-cigarette smoking in public than traditional tobacco. For intention to use an e-cigarette, the strongest predictor is current tobacco use, followed by a positive orientation toward public use of e-cigarettes. Positive orientation toward public use of e-cigarettes is significantly predicted by the use of alternate tobacco, intention to use or try e-cigarettes, positive orientation toward public use of tobacco, positive attitude toward e-cigarettes, positive perception of social norms for use of e-cigarettes, and favorable orientation toward e-cigarettes as an innovation. These models suggest attitudinal, social normative, innovation, and behavioral factors may combine to bring the e-cigarette into wider use among college students.

  20. Using IT to Enhance the Educational Achievement of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya Stoyanova-Doycheva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the use of information technology (IT in the education of students in Software Engineering and in English at the Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics at Plovdiv University. The teaching process incorporates traditional methods with applications based on the E-learning standards QTI and SCORM. The use of IT has been applied to the education of full-time and part-time Bachelor degree students from the 1st to the 4th year of studies. Based on the statistics from the teaching some conclusions have been drawn regarding the students’ performance and possible ways of enhancing their educational achievement.

  1. ASPIRE: Teachers and researchers working together to enhance student learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lollie Garay

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM disciplines have become key focus areas in the education community of the United States. Newly adopted across the nation, Next Generation Science Standards require that educators embrace innovative approaches to teaching. Transforming classrooms to actively engage students through a combination of knowledge and practice develops conceptual understanding and application skills. The partnerships between researchers and educators during the Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE offer an example of how academic research can enhance K-12 student learning. In this commentary, we illustrate how ASPIRE teacher–scientist partnerships helped engage students with actual and virtual authentic scientific investigations. Crosscutting concepts of research in polar marine science can serve as intellectual tools to connect important ideas about ocean and climate science for the public good.

  2. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bäcke, Olof, E-mail: obacke@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R.; Müller, Christian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Kristiansen, Per Magnus [Institute of Polymer Nanotechnology (INKA), FHNW University of Applied Science and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Olsson, Eva, E-mail: eva.olsson@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV–vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000 kGy. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of a polymer: fullerne blend is increased using electron irradiation. • Using in-situ transmission electron microscopy the nanostructure is studied. • Electron irradiation stops phase separation between the polymer and fullerene. • Electron irradiation quenches the formation and nucleation of fullerene crystals.

  3. Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancer Use Among New Zealand Tertiary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sanyogita Sanya; Hussainy, Safeera; Henning, Marcus; Stewart, Kay; Jensen, Maree; Russell, Bruce

    2017-09-19

    Cognitive enhancement is the use of prescription stimulant medicines by healthy individuals for nonmedical use in academic settings. Commonly used cognitive enhancers (CEs) include methylphenidate, amphetamines, and modafinil. To understand the motivation to use CEs, it is important to look beyond prevalence and explore the extent to which attitudes, beliefs, and intentions predict the decision to use CEs. The study aimed to investigate what factors explain the decision to use CEs among tertiary students in New Zealand, using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Students from the Schools of Pharmacy, Nursing, Medicine, Law, and Accounting at a university in New Zealand were invited to complete a paper-based questionnaire. The questionnaire elicited students' attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control toward illicit use of CEs using TPB. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Response rate was 88.6% (442/499). Students who perceived CE use to be socially and ethically acceptable were more likely to use CEs (odds ratio, OR: 1.56, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 1.153-2.105, p = 0.004). Students who were concerned about the health impact of CE use were less likely to use CEs (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.492-0.826, p = 0.001). Students who believed that CE use was approved were more likely to use them (OR: 1.648, CI: 1.193-2.278, p = 0.002). This research supports the notion that the decision to use CEs is not just an autonomous choice that occurs in isolation. Attitudes on the ethical and social acceptability of CE use were more likely to drive the decision to use CEs. The study provides the impetus for an integrative discussion by health care professionals and academics on the impact of attitudes, social norms, and advocates on the decision to use CEs.

  4. Electron beam ion sources for student education at universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Erik [DREEBIT GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, Guenter [TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Ion beams have become essential tools used in many fields of fundamental research as well as industrial applications. Thus, it is important for todays physics students to understand the basics of ion beam creation, transportation as well as ion-surface interactions. We present results from laboratory training courses using table-top sized electron beam ion sources of the Dresden EBIT type which is able to produce a large spectrum of ions with low or high charge states. The initial ion beam is guided through several ion optical elements like Einzel lenses and deflectors, is separated by the charge-to-mass ratio of its components with a Wien-Filter or dipole analyzing magnet and is detected in a Faraday Cup. A specific assembly for laboratory training as used at the Technische Universitaet Dresden and the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, is introduced. In typical experiments, students analyze the charge-to-mass ratio spectrum from a Dresden EBIT measured using a Wien Filter. The composition of the extracted ion beam can be manipulated by the gas pressure or the ionisation time. In a wider context, the atomic physics processes occurring especially during the production of highly charged ions also appear in nuclear fusion facilities as well as in many astrophysical phenomena, for example supernovas. Such aspects can be discussed in order to help students connect to modern research carried out at large international facilities.

  5. Attitudes toward Electronic Monitoring among Monitored Offenders and Criminal Justice Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Brian K.; Gainey, Randy R.

    1999-01-01

    Examines what 180 students think about electronic monitoring and compares their perceptions to those of 29 electronically-monitored offenders. Results show that students were less supportive of electronic monitoring but when asked about what offenders have to give up, they viewed the sanction more punitively than did offenders. Implications…

  6. Temperature enhancement of secondary electron emission from hydrogenated diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Akhvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the stability of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield from ∼100-nm-thick continuous diamond films is reported. At room temperature, the SEE yield was found to decay as a function of electron irradiation dose. The SEE yield is observed to increase significantly upon heating of the diamond surface. Furthermore, by employing moderate temperatures, the decay of the SEE yield observed at room temperature is inhibited, showing a nearly constant yield with electron dose at 200 deg. C. The results are explained in terms of the temperature dependence of the electron beam-induced hydrogen desorption from the diamond surface and surface band bending. These findings demonstrate that the longevity of diamond films in practical applications of SEE can be increased by moderate heating.

  7. Improving Student Understanding of Lipids Concepts in a Biochemistry Course Using Test-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Savannah; Hernick, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    Test-enhanced learning has successfully been used as a means to enhance learning and promote knowledge retention in students. We have examined whether this approach could be used in a biochemistry course to enhance student learning about lipids-related concepts. Students were provided access to two optional learning modules with questions related…

  8. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  9. A biochemistry laboratory course designed to enhance students autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Laboratory sessions are responsible for promoting instrumentation skills desirable in biochemistry and biochemistry related careers. They are traditionally based on experimental protocols that lead to the expected results, and students usually have not autonomy to plan and execute their experiments. GOALS: This work aimed to enhance a traditional biochemistry lab course, applying pre-lab quizzes on protein biochemistry and lab techniques in order to have students better prepared to plan, execute and interpret experiments. This approach also aims to bring the laboratory sessions into an inquiry-based environment capable to improve students’ independent capabilities in 2 autonomy domains: learning and communication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Online quizzes are delivered one week before each laboratory session, containing questions regarding the experimental techniques and theoretical basis related to them. Laboratory activities are presented in an inquiry-based approach where the first class of each activity is dedicated to plan experiments in order to answer the research questions presented by instructors. Activities are also organized in order to enhance students’ autonomy. The first activity is the simplest and more instructor-controlled and the last one is the most complex and less driven, transferring gradually to students the responsibility for their decisions in laboratory, supporting students’ autonomy. RESULTS: Online quizzes allowed instructors to identify students’ difficulties and to timely intervene. Scientific reports presented by students at the end of each activity showed that they performed better on less driven activities in which autonomy support were more complex than in the instructor controlled activities. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific reports analysis reveals students capabilities related to different scopes of autonomy, such as: discuss different strategies; find multiple solutions to solve problems; make their

  10. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  11. Enhancing the Electron Mobility via Delta-Doping in SrTiO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozuka, Y.

    2011-08-11

    We fabricated high-mobility {delta}-doped structures in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films in order to investigate the low temperature electronic transport properties of confined carriers in this system. An enhancement of the electron mobility above the bulk value was observed as the doped layer thickness decreased. High-field Hall measurements revealed that this mobility enhancement originates from higher-mobility electrons in the undoped clean regions, which have quantum-mechanically broadened from the doped layer. Because of the absence of apparent lattice misfit between the layers, this structure is highly suitable for investigating two-dimensional electron gases in SrTiO{sub 3}

  12. “Instruction for Thinking” for Fundamental Experiments in Electrical and Electronic Engineering as a Base for Enhancing Creative Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Koji; Yoshimoto, Ken-Ichi

    Specialist knowledge and creative ability are important for engineers to solve various problems in manufacturing products. Creative ability cannot be acquired without real experiences and much knowledge. This paper discusses the educational effects of “instruction for thinking” in fundamental experiments in electrical and electronic engineering. An experiment was conducted in which students were required not only to use their previous knowledge but also to think by themselves in order to enhance creative ability. In this experiment, the present authors encouraged students to find out problems on their own, and waited until they worked out the solution. After the experiment, we conducted a questionnaire on students to the motivation for studying the technical subjects. As a result, it was confirmed that the practical ability for thinking was improved.

  13. Laser Acceleration of Electrons in Shock Wave Enhanced Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Dmitri; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Controlling the gas density gradient and profile is important for electron and proton acceleration. Using an optimized gas density profile, we have demonstrated 40 times higher electron energy compared to a Gaussian gas jet without lost of charge or stability. Propagation of a shock wave through a gas jet can modify the gas density profile and create sharp density gradients [1, 2]. Using different shock waves energies and shock originating positions, we were able to modify the plasma density profile of a ``typical'' Gaussian gas jet into a variety of profiles, from thin (foil-like) structure to elongated profiles with fast rise and slow fall. We used a plasma bubble Cherenkov diagnostic [3, 4] to optimize the acceleration process. Accelerated electron energy and charge were cross-correlated with the second harmonic diagnostic signal. The optimized gas density profile generated stable 0.5 nC of 40 MeV electrons using a 10 TW laser. The shock wave modified gas jet can be used as a stand alone electron source or as an injector coupled to additional acceleration structures. We demonstrated stable injection of electrons from the shock wave modified gas jet into a lower density plasma. The results are also being studied with numerical simulations. [4pt] [1] D. Kaganovich et al., Physics of Plasmas 18, 120701 (2011)[0pt] [2] D. Kaganovich et al., Applied Physics Letters 97, 191501 (2010)[0pt] [3] D. F. Gordon, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 045004 (2008)[0pt] [4] M. H. Helle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 105001 (2010)

  14. Enhancing Students' Speaking Skills through Peer Team Teaching: A Student Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, V. Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    The present paper attempts to establish that peer team teaching of a prescribed English lesson of 1st year B.Tech course by the students will provide more opportunities to enhance their public speaking skills. This kind of classroom activity will also help them to develop their vocabulary, reading skills, team working skills, etc. It is assumed…

  15. Mockup Didatic Set for Students Development in Automotive Electronic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Delatore

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The automotive engineering education area, specifically on internal combustion engine, requires the use of suitable systems, capable to simulate, test and obtain specifics data from its operation. Automotive engines are so complex due to it is a mix of engineering subjects, so, a mockup was created to help its study. The mockup is an exactly the same engine that equips a vehicle, but assembled in a mechanical base, equipped with all the necessary components for running it up. The objective of this work is to develop a mockup with a suitable Electronic Control Unit (ECU board, in order to obtain the sensors/actuators signals from the engine and control some important engine functions by using an external ECU, so that the students may test their own strategies, compare with the original ECU.

  16. GPS location data enhancement in electronic traffic records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this project we developed a new GPS-based Geographical Information Exchange : Framework (GIEF) to improve the correctness and accuracy of location data reported on : electronic police forms in Oklahoma. A second major goal was to provide a base le...

  17. Independent learning modules enhance student performance and understanding of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrat, Maria A; Dom, Aaron M; Buchanan, James T; Williams, Alison R; Efaw, Morgan L; Richardson, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Didactic lessons are only one part of the multimodal teaching strategies used in gross anatomy courses today. Increased emphasis is placed on providing more opportunities for students to develop lifelong learning and critical thinking skills during medical training. In a pilot program designed to promote more engaged and independent learning in anatomy, self-study modules were introduced to supplement human gross anatomy instruction at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University. Modules use three-dimensional constructs to help students understand complex anatomical regions. Resources are self-contained in portable bins and are accessible at any time. Students use modules individually or in groups in a structured self-study format that augments material presented in lecture and laboratory. Pilot outcome data, measured by feedback surveys and examination performance statistics, suggest that the activity may be improving learning in gross anatomy. Positive feedback on both pre- and post-examination surveys showed that students felt the activity helped to increase their understanding of the topic. In concordance with student perception, average examination scores on module-related laboratory and lecture questions were higher in the two years of the pilot program compared with the year before its initiation. Modules can be fabricated on a modest budget using minimal resources, making implementation practical for smaller institutions. Upper level medical students assist in module design and upkeep, enabling continuous opportunities for vertical integration across the curriculum. This resource offers a feasible mechanism for enhancing independent and lifelong learning competencies, which could be a valuable complement to any gross anatomy curriculum. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. Do Students Using Electronic Books Display Different Reading Comprehension and Motivation Levels than Students Using Traditional Print Books?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Casey L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of electronic books on the reading comprehension of middle and high school students was examined using an experimental posttest-only control-group design. A convenience sample of 140 randomly assigned middle and high school English students at an independent school in eastern North Carolina participated. Half of the students used…

  19. The Use of Pocket Electronic Dictionaries by Thai University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atipat Boonmoh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT: This article reports on a small-scale study of Thai-speaking learners using pocket electronic dictionaries (PEDs to read an English news article. It investigates how the subjects use their PEDs for reading comprehension. Thirty-nine undergraduate students completed a questionnaire survey. Of these, four were chosen to participate in the experiment. Observations and interviews were utilized to ascertain how the subjects used their PEDs. The findings showed superficial and partial reading of the dictionary entries. It also revealed several factors that may hinder dictionary look-up success. On the basis of this research, guidelines for buying PEDs and for teaching PED skills are proposed.

    OPSOMMING: Die gebruik van sak- elektroniese woordeboeke deur Thaise universiteitstudente. Hierdie artikel doen verslag van 'n kleinskaalse studie van Thaisprekende aanleerders wat sak- elektroniese woordeboeke (SEW's gebruik om 'n Engelse nuusartikel te lees. Dit ondersoek hoe die proefpersone hul SAW's gebruik vir leesbegrip. Nege-en-dertig voorgraadse studente het 'n vraelysopname voltooi. Uit hulle is vier gekies om aan die eksperiment deel te neem. Waarnemings en onderhoude is aangewend om te bepaal hoe die proefpersone hul SEW's gebruik het. Die bevindings het oppervlakkige en gedeeltelike lees van die woordeboekinskrywings getoon. Dit het ook verskeie faktore uitgewys wat woordeboekopsoeksukses mag belemmer. Op grond van hierdie navorsing word riglyne vir die koop van SEW's en vir die onderrig van SEWvaardighede voorgestel.

    Sleutelwoorde: WOORDEBOEKGEBRUIK, SAK- ELEKTRONIESE WOORDEBOEK, WOORDEBOEKRAADPLEGING, EENTALIGE WOORDEBOEK, TWEETALIGE WOORDEBOEK

  20. Can YouTube enhance student nurse learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Andrew; Mann, Claire

    2011-05-01

    The delivery of nurse education has changed radically in the past two decades. Increasingly, nurse educators are using new technology in the classroom to enhance their teaching and learning. One recent technological development to emerge is the user-generated content website YouTube. Originally YouTube was used as a repository for sharing home-made videos, more recently online content is being generated by political parties, businesses and educationalists. We recently delivered a module to undergraduate student nurses in which the teaching and learning were highly populated with YouTube resources. We found that the use of YouTube videos increased student engagement, critical awareness and facilitated deep learning. Furthermore, these videos could be accessed at any time of the day and from a place to suit the student. We acknowledge that there are some constraints to using YouTube for teaching and learning particularly around the issue of unregulated content which is often misleading, inaccurate or biased. However, we strongly urge nurse educators to consider using YouTube for teaching and learning, in and outside the classroom, to a generation of students who are native of a rapidly changing digital world. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Very large capacitance enhancement in a two-dimensional electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Richter, C; Paetel, S; Kopp, T; Mannhart, J; Ashoori, R C

    2011-05-13

    Increases in the gate capacitance of field-effect transistor structures allow the production of lower-power devices that are compatible with higher clock rates, driving the race for developing high-κ dielectrics. However, many-body effects in an electronic system can also enhance capacitance. Onto the electron system that forms at the LaAlO(3)/SrTiO(3) interface, we fabricated top-gate electrodes that can fully deplete the interface of all mobile electrons. Near depletion, we found a greater than 40% enhancement of the gate capacitance. Using an electric-field penetration measurement method, we show that this capacitance originates from a negative compressibility of the interface electron system. Capacitance enhancement exists at room temperature and arises at low electron densities, in which disorder is strong and the in-plane conductance is much smaller than the quantum conductance.

  2. Impact of Adding Internet Technology on Student Performance and Perception of Autonomy in Fundamentals of Electronics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero-Zambrano, Carlos Andrés; Avila, Alba; Osorio, Luz Adriana; Aguirre, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    The coupling of the traditional classroom instruction and a virtual learning environment (VLE) in an engineering course is critical to stimulating the learning process and to encouraging students to develop competencies outside of the classroom. This can be achieved through planned activities and the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), resources designed to complement students' autonomous learning needs. A quantitative analysis of students' academic performance using final course grades was performed for a fundamentals of electronics course and we examine students' perception of their autonomy using surveys. The students' progress and attitudes were monitored over four consecutive semesters. The first began with the design of the intervention and the following three consisted in the implementation. The strategy was focused on the development of course competencies through autonomous learning with ICT tools presented in the VLE. Findings indicate that the students who did the activities in the VLE showed an increase in performance scores in comparison with students who did not do them. The strategy used in this study, which enhanced perceived autonomy, was associated with a positive effect on their learning process. This research shows that a technology-enhanced course supported by ICT activities can both improve academic performance and foster autonomy in students.

  3. Impact of Adding Internet Technology on Student Performance and Perception of Autonomy in Fundamentals of Electronics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero-Zambrano, Carlos Andrés; Avila, Alba; Osorio, Luz Adriana; Aguirre, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    The coupling of the traditional classroom instruction and a virtual learning environment (VLE) in an engineering course is critical to stimulating the learning process and to encouraging students to develop competencies outside of the classroom. This can be achieved through planned activities and the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), resources designed to complement students' autonomous learning needs. A quantitative analysis of students' academic performance using final course grades was performed for a fundamentals of electronics course and we examine students' perception of their autonomy using surveys. The students' progress and attitudes were monitored over four consecutive semesters. The first began with the design of the intervention and the following three consisted in the implementation. The strategy was focused on the development of course competencies through autonomous learning with ICT tools presented in the VLE. Findings indicate that the students who did the activities in the VLE showed an increase in performance scores in comparison with students who did not do them. The strategy used in this study, which enhanced perceived autonomy, was associated with a positive effect on their learning process. This research shows that a technology-enhanced course supported by ICT activities can both improve academic performance and foster autonomy in students.

  4. Critical Thinking and Collaboration: A Strategy to Enhance Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Styron, Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In numerous studies relative to collaboration and critical thinking, an instructional strategy called Team- Based Learning has proven to be an effective approach to teaching and learning. Team-Based Learning utilizes a specific sequence of individual work, group work and immediate feedback to create a motivational framework in which students increasingly hold each other accountable for coming to class prepared and contributing to discussion. Using an action research conceptual model diffusion of innovation theory, the process of P-20 quality enhancement using Team-Based Learning is examined.

  5. [Teaching hygiene and public health with student facilitators an attempt to enhance student participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, E; Tamiya, N; Murata, K

    1999-08-01

    In order to enhance student participation in lectures of hygiene and public health, we introduced a student facilitator (SF) system into the lectures of the fourth grade medical students. All students were assigned to one of the 28 classes as SF, thus each class had 4 to 5 SFs. A few weeks before the lecture, each teacher gave SFs various instructions to prepare for the class depending on the theme and teaching strategies. Some classes consisted of dialogues between the teacher and SFs in other classes gave presentations related to the theme of the lecture. For example, SFs in a class of epidemiology performed a small epidemiological survey using their fellow students as study subjects, thus allowing students to learn epidemiological design and calculation of odds ratios. In a class of care management, SFs played roles of caregiver, family member, social worker, physician, etc., showing how actual care management is conducted. The evaluation survey for the SF system showed that in general, students rated the SF system positively, especially at the time they served as SFs. Most of the students showed more interest in the subjects and felt more confident about what they learned as compared to ordinary classes. This finding is important because, previously, the largest problem with the lectures of hygiene and public health used to be the poor interest of students in the subject itself. On the other hand, students sometimes complained about the poor quality of the presentation by SFs. Also, a few students sometimes felt that for obtaining the large volume of knowledge required by the national board examination for medical practice, the SF system was inefficient. In summary, the SF system has some advantage in evoking interests in learning hygiene and public health with sufficient systematic preparation. However, it may not be an efficient way to simply obtain large amounts of knowledge. To improve the SF system, well designed teaching strategies in addition to a

  6. Superradiant and stimulated-superradiant emission in prebunched electron-beam radiators. II. Radiation enhancement schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Further enhancement of the intense coherent superradiant and stimulated-superradiant emission from prebunched electron beams is possible, in schemes of prebunched beam radiation devices, and particularly free electron laser (FEL. The enhancement of coherent power and spectral power by use of a waveguide, particularly at the zero-slippage condition, is evaluated. A special scheme of a stimulated-superradiance FEL oscillator is analyzed and is shown to feature ultimate radiative energy conversion efficiency (near 100%.

  7. The Importance of Electron Source Population to the Remarkable Enhancement of Radiation belt Electrons during the October 2012 Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the October 8-9 2012 storm, the MeV electron fluxes in the heart of the outer radiation belt are first wiped out then exhibit a three-orders-of-magnitude increase on the timescale of hours, as observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. There is strong observational evidence that the remarkable enhancement is due to local acceleration by chorus waves, as shown in the recent Science paper by Reeves et al.1. However, the importance of the dynamic electron source population transported in from the plasma sheet, to the observed remarkable enhancement, has not been studied. We illustrate the importance of the source population with our simulation of the event using the DREAM 3D diffusion model. Three new modifications have been implemented in the model: 1) incorporating a realistic and time-dependent low-energy boundary condition at 100 keV obtained from the MagEIS data; 2) utilizing event-specific chorus wave distributions derived from the low-energy electron precipitation observed by POES and validated against the in situ wave data from EMFISIS; 3) using an ';open' boundary condition at L*=11 and implementing electron lifetimes on the order of the drift period outside the solar-wind driven last closed drift shell. The model quantitatively reproduces the MeV electron dynamics during this event, including the fast dropout at the start of Oct. 8th, low electron flux during the first Dst dip, and the remarkable enhancement peaked at L*=4.2 during the second Dst dip. By comparing the model results with realistic source population against those with constant low-energy boundary (see figure), we find that the realistic electron source population is critical to reproduce the observed fast and significant increase of MeV electrons. 1Reeves, G. D., et al. (2013), Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts, Science, DOI:10.1126/science.1237743. Comparison between data and model results during the October 2012 storm for

  8. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Shen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne and temperature (Te observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than −0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere, which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne–Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple

  9. Enhancement of the Number of Fast Electrons Generated in a Laser Inverse Cone Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Ling, Ji; Gang, Jiang; Wei-Dong, Wu; Ji-Cheng, Zhang; Yong-Jian, Tang

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to target electrons is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a laser-inverse cone interaction. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminates the inverse cone target, the electrons at the cone end are accelerated by the ponderomotive force. Then these electrons are guided and confined to transport along the inverse cone walls by the induced electromagnetic fields. A device consisting of inverse hollow-cone and multihole array plasma is proposed in order to increase the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to electrons. Particle-in-cell simulations present that the multiholes transpiercing the cone end help to enhance the number of fast electrons and the maximum electron energy significantly. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  10. Electron beam induced etching of carbon nanotubes enhanced by secondary electrons in oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hideto; Tomita, Yuto; Soma, Kentaro; Takeda, Seiji

    2017-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are subjected to electron-beam-induced etching (EBIE) in oxygen. The EBIE process is observed in situ by environmental transmission electron microscopy. The partial pressure of oxygen (10 and 100 Pa), energy of the primary electrons (80 and 200 keV), and environment of the CNTs (suspended or supported on a silicon nitride membrane) are investigated as factors affecting the etching rate. The EBIE rate of CNTs was markedly promoted by the effects of secondary electrons that were emitted from a silicon nitride membrane under irradiation by primary electrons. Membrane supported CNTs can be cut by EBIE with a spatial accuracy better than 3 nm, and a nanogap of 2 nm can be successfully achieved between the ends of two suspended CNTs.

  11. Algorithms for contrast enhancement of electronic portal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, S.; Sánchez, S.

    2015-11-01

    An implementation of two new automatized image processing algorithms for contrast enhancement of portal images is presented as suitable tools which facilitate the setup verification and visualization of patients during radiotherapy treatments. In the first algorithm, called Automatic Segmentation and Histogram Stretching (ASHS), the portal image is automatically segmented in two sub-images delimited by the conformed treatment beam: one image consisting of the imaged patient obtained directly from the radiation treatment field, and the second one is composed of the imaged patient outside it. By segmenting the original image, a histogram stretching can be independently performed and improved in both regions. The second algorithm involves a two-step process. In the first step, a Normalization to Local Mean (NLM), an inverse restoration filter is applied by dividing pixel by pixel a portal image by its blurred version. In the second step, named Lineally Combined Local Histogram Equalization (LCLHE), the contrast of the original image is strongly improved by a Local Contrast Enhancement (LCE) algorithm, revealing the anatomical structures of patients. The output image is lineally combined with a portal image of the patient. Finally the output images of the previous algorithms (NLM and LCLHE) are lineally combined, once again, in order to obtain a contrast enhanced image. These two algorithms have been tested on several portal images with great results.

  12. ASPIRE: Teachers and researchers working together to enhance student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, P. L.; Garay, D. L.; Warburton, J.

    2016-02-01

    Given the impact of human activities on the ocean, involving teachers, students, and their families in scientific inquiry has never been more important. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines have become key focus areas in the education community of the United States. Newly adopted across the nation, Next Generation Science Standards require that educators embrace innovative approaches to teaching. Transforming classrooms to actively engage students through a combination of knowledge and practice develops conceptual understanding and application skills. The partnerships between researchers and educators during the Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE) offer an example of how academic research can enhance K-12 student learning. In this presentation, we illustrate how ASPIRE teacher-scientist partnerships helped engage students with actual and virtual authentic scientific investigations. Scientists benefit from teacher/researcher collaborations as well, as funding for scientific research also depends on effective communication between scientists and the public. While contributing to broader impacts needed to justify federal funding, scientists also benefit by having their research explained in ways that the broader public can understand: collaborations with teachers produce classroom lessons and published work that generate interest in the scientists' research specifically and in marine science in general. Researchers can also learn from their education partners about more effective teaching strategies that can be transferred to the college level. Researchers who work with teachers in turn gain perspectives on the constraints that teachers and students face in the pre-college classroom. Crosscutting concepts of research in polar marine science can serve as intellectual tools to connect important ideas about ocean and climate science for the public good.

  13. Pre-storm electron density enhancements at middle latitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Laštovička, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 15 (2008), s. 1848-1855 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 091; GA MŠk 1P05OC030; GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA ČR GA205/08/1356 Grant - others:European Union(XE) COST 296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ionosphere * Electron density * Pre-stormenhancement Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.667, year: 2008

  14. Electron density enhancement in a quasi isochronous storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.

    1991-01-01

    The six dimensional phase-space density of an electron beam in a storage ring is determined by the emission of synchrotron radiation, and by the transverse and longitudinal focusing forces determining the particle trajectories. In the simplest case of uncoupled horizontal, vertical and longitudinal motion, the phase space volume occupied by the beam can be characterized by the product of its three projections on the single degree of freedom planes, the horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal emittances. To minimize the beam phase space volume the authors can minimize the transverse and longitudinal emittances. In the case of transverse emittances this problem is very important for synchrotron radiation sources, and has been studied by several authors. A method to minimize the longitudinal emittance, and produce electron bunches with a short pulse length, small energy spread and large peak current has been proposed and discussed recently by C. Pellegrini and D. Robin. This method uses a ring in which the revolution period is weakly dependent on the particle energy, Quasi Isochronous Ring (QIR), in other words a ring with a momentum compaction nearly zero. In this paper they will extend the previous analysis of the conditions for stable single particle motion in such a ring, and give simple criteria for the estimate of the energy spread and phase acceptance of a QIR

  15. Real-time monitoring of school absenteeism to enhance disease surveillance: a pilot study of a mobile electronic reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Khamsiriwatchara, Amnat; Liulark, Wongwat; Taweeseneepitch, Komchaluch; Sangvichean, Aumnuyphan; Thongprarong, Wiraporn; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Singhasivanon, Pratap

    2014-05-12

    School absenteeism is a common source of data used in syndromic surveillance, which can eventually be used for early outbreak detection. However, the absenteeism reporting system in most schools, especially in developing countries, relies on a paper-based method that limits its use for disease surveillance or outbreak detection. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic real-time reporting system on school absenteeism for syndromic surveillance. An electronic (Web-based) school absenteeism reporting system was developed to embed it within the normal routine process of absenteeism reporting. This electronic system allowed teachers to update students' attendance status via mobile tablets. The data from all classes and schools were then automatically sent to a centralized database for further analysis and presentation, and for monitoring temporal and spatial patterns of absent students. In addition, the system also had a disease investigation module, which provided a link between absenteeism data from schools and local health centers, to investigate causes of fever among sick students. The electronic school absenteeism reporting system was implemented in 7 primary schools in Bangkok, Thailand, with total participation of approximately 5000 students. During May-October 2012 (first semester), the percentage of absentees varied between 1% and 10%. The peak of school absenteeism (sick leave) was observed between July and September 2012, which coincided with the peak of dengue cases in children aged 6-12 years being reported to the disease surveillance system. The timeliness of a reporting system is a critical function in any surveillance system. Web-based application and mobile technology can potentially enhance the use of school absenteeism data for syndromic surveillance and outbreak detection. This study presents the factors that determine the implementation success of this reporting system.

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-05-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Healthcare Students' Perceptions of Electronic Feedback through GradeMark®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Diane; Dummer, Paul; Hawthorne, Kamila; Cousins, Judy; Emmett, Catherine; Johnson, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a study undertaken to explore students' perceptions of the timeliness, accessibility, consistency, and quality of feedback and grading received electronically. The system used was GradeMark®, an electronic tool available through the plagiarism software provider, Turnitin®. 296 students from the Schools of…

  18. Development of an Electronic Role-Play Assessment Initiative in Bioscience for Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Judy; Ainscough, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Devising authentic assessments for subjects with large enrolments is a challenge. This study describes an electronic role-play assessment for approximately 600 first-year nursing students to learn and apply pathophysiology (bioscience) concepts to nursing practice. Students used Microsoft Office PowerPoint[R] to prepare electronic role-plays both…

  19. The Role of Electronic Pocket Dictionaries as an English Learning Tool among Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hua-Li; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Law, Kris M. Y.; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed the role of electronic pocket dictionaries as a language learning tool among university students in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The target groups included engineering and humanities students at both undergraduate and graduate level. Speed of reference was found to be the main motivator for using an electronic pocket dictionary.…

  20. Use of Electronic Databases by Law Students at the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is based on a Masters study carried out at the University of KwaZulu Natal which investigated the use of electronic databases by undergraduate law students at the University of Botswana Library. The study aimed to establish whether law students used the electronic databases, which databases they used and ...

  1. Student Off-Task Electronic Multitasking Predictors: Scale Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuxia; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand factors contributing to students' off-task electronic multitasking behavior in class, the research included two studies that developed a scale of students' off-task electronic multitasking predictors (the SOTEMP scale), and explored relationships between the scale and various classroom communication processes and…

  2. MIS hot electron devices for enhancement of surface reactivity by hot electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    is monitored using the calibrated resistance of the metal layer. The MIS hot electron emitters are cleaned in-situ in a background pressure of 3 £ 10¡7 mbar O2. Thermal desorption experiments with labeled CO are carried out with a reproducibility of 7%. The detection limit of labeled CO for the mass...... spectrometer setup is estimated to 3 £ 109 s¡1 from the desorption experiments. The theoretical hot electron induced desorption rate is estimated to 2£104 s¡1....

  3. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  4. Gemstone color enhancement by electron beam irradiation-A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarada Idris; Zulkafli Ghazali; Shamshad Ahmad; Mohd Suhaimi Jusoh

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9 MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones mined in Pakistan and elsewhere. The study shows that EB Irradiation not only enhances the color but also improves the clarity of the gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite tourmaline topaz quartz aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 kGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the rough and the faceted gems. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market. (author)

  5. Electron flux enhancement in the inner radiation belt during moderate magnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tadokoro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available During moderate magnetic storms, an electron channel (300–1100 keV of the NOAA satellite has shown sudden electron flux enhancements in the inner radiation belt. After examinating the possibility of contamination by different energetic particles, we conclude that these electron flux enhancements are reliable enough to be considered as natural phenomena, at least for the cases of small to moderate magnetic storms. Here, we define small and moderate storms to be those in which the minimum Dst ranges between −30 and −100 nT. The electron flux enhancements appear with over one order of magnitude at L~2 during these storms. The enhancement is not accompanied by any transport of electron flux from the outer belt. Statistical analysis shows that these phenomena have a duration of approximately 1 day during the period, starting with the main phase to the early recovery phase of the storms. The flux enhancement shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry; the amount of increased flux is larger in the dusk side. We suggest that this phenomenon could not be caused by the radial diffusion but would be due to pitch-angle scattering at the magnetic equator. The inner belt is not in a stationary state, as was previously believed, but is variable in response to the magnetic activity.

  6. Electronic Interactions: How Students and Teachers Organize Schooling over the Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Shelley V.; Newman, Denis

    1992-01-01

    Examines features of electronic mail discourse among sixth-grade students and their teachers. Highlights include structures of the sixth-grade classrooms; common characteristics of and differences between electronic and face-to-face communication; metacommunication; consistency with print genres; hierarchy; and the potential of electronic mail in…

  7. Electronic Communities: A Forum for Supporting Women Professionals and Students in Technical and Scientific Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.; Cunningham, Christine M.; Single, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on electronic discussion lists (e-lists) sponsored by MentorNet, the National Electronic Industrial Mentoring Network for Women in Engineering in Science. Supports the hypothesis that electronic communications can be used to develop community among engineering and science students and professionals, and identifies factors influencing the…

  8. Enhancing International Students' Experiences: An Imperative Agenda for Universities in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan T.

    2011-01-01

    The role of international students as catalysts for internationalization and related reforms in the UK higher education sector is increasing. With the growing number of international students, administrators and academics are identifying ways to enable international students to adapt to the UK environment and enhance their experiences as students.…

  9. Test Retakes by Groups of Students as a Technique to Enhance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, R. K.; Beyrouty, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviewed is research which supports retesting students to enhance learning. Evaluation results, materials and methods used to implement the procedure are described. Included are tables on student responses concerning involved groups and the value and benefits of retakes. (RT)

  10. Interactive stereo electron microscopy enhanced with virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E.Wes; Bastacky, S.Jacob; Schwartz, Kenneth S.

    2001-12-17

    An analytical system is presented that is used to take measurements of objects perceived in stereo image pairs obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our system operates by presenting a single stereo view that contains stereo image data obtained from the SEM, along with geometric representations of two types of virtual measurement instruments, a ''protractor'' and a ''caliper''. The measurements obtained from this system are an integral part of a medical study evaluating surfactant, a liquid coating the inner surface of the lung which makes possible the process of breathing. Measurements of the curvature and contact angle of submicron diameter droplets of a fluorocarbon deposited on the surface of airways are performed in order to determine surface tension of the air/liquid interface. This approach has been extended to a microscopic level from the techniques of traditional surface science by measuring submicrometer rather than millimeter diameter droplets, as well as the lengths and curvature of cilia responsible for movement of the surfactant, the airway's protective liquid blanket. An earlier implementation of this approach for taking angle measurements from objects perceived in stereo image pairs using a virtual protractor is extended in this paper to include distance measurements and to use a unified view model. The system is built around a unified view model that is derived from microscope-specific parameters, such as focal length, visible area and magnification. The unified view model ensures that the underlying view models and resultant binocular parallax cues are consistent between synthetic and acquired imagery. When the view models are consistent, it is possible to take measurements of features that are not constrained to lie within the projection plane. The system is first calibrated using non-clinical data of known size and resolution. Using the SEM, stereo image pairs of grids and spheres of

  11. Tennis enhances well-being in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bulent Yazici

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sports and physical activity are widely recommended, both as guidelines and in clinical practice, because of their broad range of positive effects on health, depression, anxiety, and psychological well-being. While several studies have examined the anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects of physical activity in clinical populations, and fewer studies have focused on the nonclinical populations, the relationship between tennis and well-being has not been clearly investigated. This study was carried out with 76 student volunteers from Kocaeli University (Turkey who had chosen tennis lessons as their University. The tennis exercise program consisted of 90-minute basic tennis skills lessons for 13 weeks. At the beginning and at the end of the study, the students were given the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI scales, and were evaluated by the DeWitt- Dugan Tennis Service Test, the DeWitt-Dugan Speed Test, and the Dyer Backboard Tennis Test. Upon evaluating the students’ pre- and post-test scores, we concluded that their BDI and BAI scores had significantly decreased, with the most significant decreases seen in several sub-scores of the SCL-90-R; their tennis skills, meanwhile, increased significantly. This study shows that partaking in tennis exercise once a week decreases depression and anxiety symptoms and enhances well-being in healthy young people.

  12. Enhanced contrast separation in scanning electron microscopes via a suspended-thin sample approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Wang, Li; Guo, Zhenxi; Wei, Bin; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yinqi; Sui, Manling; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    A suspended-thin-sample (STS) approach for signal selection and contrast separation is developed in scanning electron microscopes with commonly used primary beam energies and traditional detectors. Topography contrast, electron channeling contrast and composition contrast are separated and largely enhanced from suspended thin samples of several hundred nanometers in thickness, which is less than the escape depth of backscattered electrons. This imaging technique enables to detect relatively pure secondary electron and elastic backscattered electron singles, whereas suppress multiple inelastic scattering effects. The provided contrast features are different from those of bulk samples, which are largely mixed with inelastic scattering effects. The STS imaging concept and method could be expected to have more applications in distinguishing materials of nanostructures, multilayers, compounds and composites, as well as in SEM-based electron backscatter diffraction, cathodoluminesence, and x-ray microanalysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 'Students-as-partners' scheme enhances postgraduate students' employability skills while addressing gaps in bioinformatics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Luciane V; Tregilgas, Luke; Cowley, Gwen; Gupta, Anshul; Makki, Fatima; Jhutty, Anjeet; Shanmugasundram, Achchuthan

    2017-01-01

    Teaching bioinformatics is a longstanding challenge for educators who need to demonstrate to students how skills developed in the classroom may be applied to real world research. This study employed an action research methodology which utilised student-staff partnership and peer-learning. It was centred on the experiences of peer-facilitators, students who had previously taken a postgraduate bioinformatics module, and had applied knowledge and skills gained from it to their own research. It aimed to demonstrate to peer-receivers, current students, how bioinformatics could be used in their own research while developing peer-facilitators' teaching and mentoring skills. This student-centred approach was well received by the peer-receivers, who claimed to have gained improved understanding of bioinformatics and its relevance to research. Equally, peer-facilitators also developed a better understanding of the subject and appreciated that the activity was a rare and invaluable opportunity to develop their teaching and mentoring skills, enhancing their employability.

  14. Bias-enhanced post-treatment process for enhancing the electron field emission properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H.; Dong, C. L.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The electron field emission (EFE) properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond films were markedly improved via the bias-enhanced plasma post-treatment (bep) process. The bep-process induced the formation of hybrid-granular structure of the diamond (bep-HiD) films with abundant nano-graphitic phase along the grain boundaries that increased the conductivity of the films. Moreover, the utilization of Au-interlayer can effectively suppress the formation of resistive amorphous-carbon (a-C) layer, thereby enhancing the transport of electrons crossing the diamond-to-Si interface. Therefore, bep-HiD/Au/Si films exhibit superior EFE properties with low turn-on field of E 0  = 2.6 V/μm and large EFE current density of J e  = 3.2 mA/cm 2 (at 5.3 V/μm)

  15. The Relationship of Electronic Grade Book Access to Student Achievement, Student Attendance, and Parent-Teacher Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing access to online databases from home has raised the value of computer use for retrieving student achievement information. This study's purpose was to examine the relationship of family use of an electronic reporting mechanism in the home to student achievement, attendance, and home-school communication. Using communication as a parent…

  16. Prevalence of cognitive enhancer use among New Zealand tertiary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sanyogita Sanya; Hussainy, Safeera; Henning, Marcus; Jensen, Maree; Russell, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive enhancers (CE) such as methylphenidate, amphetamines and modafinil are becoming more commonly used in non-medical situations. This study explored the prevalence and motivations for CE use in a New Zealand university. Students from the Schools of Pharmacy, Nursing, Medicine, Law and Accounting at a university in New Zealand were invited to complete a paper-based questionnaire that elicited their views on the prevalence, reasons for use and attitudes towards use of CEs. Questionnaires were distributed at the end of a third-year lecture (August-October 2012). Reasons for use and attitudes towards use was measured using a 7-point Likert scale from strongly agree (1) to strongly disagree (7). Descriptive and prevalence statistics were calculated. Inferential statistics were generated to explore the overall associations between CE use and how the respondents had first learnt about CEs, and to investigate reasons for CE use. The response fraction was 88.6 % (442/499) and the prevalence of CE use was 6.6% (95% confidence interval 4.5-9.0). Commonly cited reasons for use were to get high [M = 4.43, standard deviation (SD) 2.36], experimentation (M = 4.17, SD 2.36), increase alertness (M = 3.55, SD 2.48), to help concentrate (M = 3.48, SD 2.42), to help stay awake (M = 3.20, SD 2.33), to help study (M = 3.10, SD 2.47) and to concentrate better while studying (M = 3.00, SD 2.43). Use of CEs was uncommon in contrast to the prevalence reported in the USA. The reasons for use also varied depending on which CE was used. Students who use CEs have differing attitudes towards their acceptability, which warrants further research about how these attitudes influence their use and attitudes towards academic performance. [Ram S(S), Hussainy S, Henning M, Jensen M, Russell B. Prevalence of cognitive enhancer use among New Zealand tertiary students. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:245-351]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  17. Enhancing gold recovery from electronic waste via lixiviant metabolic engineering in Chromobacterium violaceum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Song Buck; Natarajan, Gayathri; Rahim, Muhammad Nadjad bin Abdul; Tan, Hwee Tong; Chung, Maxey Ching Ming; Ting, Yen Peng; Yew, Wen Shan

    2013-01-01

    Conventional leaching (extraction) methods for gold recovery from electronic waste involve the use of strong acids and pose considerable threat to the environment. The alternative use of bioleaching microbes for gold recovery is non-pollutive and relies on the secretion of a lixiviant or (bio)chemical such as cyanide for extraction of gold from electronic waste. However, widespread industrial use of bioleaching microbes has been constrained by the limited cyanogenic capabilities of lixiviant-producing microorganisms such as Chromobacterium violaceum. Here we show the construction of a metabolically-engineered strain of Chromobacterium violaceum that produces more (70%) cyanide lixiviant and recovers more than twice as much gold from electronic waste compared to wild-type bacteria. Comparative proteome analyses suggested the possibility of further enhancement in cyanogenesis through subsequent metabolic engineering. Our results demonstrated the utility of lixiviant metabolic engineering in the construction of enhanced bioleaching microbes for the bioleaching of precious metals from electronic waste. PMID:23868689

  18. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioli, Frances E; Elliot, Diane L; Palmer, Ryan T; Graichen, Carla C; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Ashok Kumar, Kaparaboyna; Galper, Ari B; Tysinger, James W

    2017-01-01

    Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011-2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013-2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students' EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students' EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice.

  19. Enhanced sputtering of Ge nanowires under synergetic effect of Mn ion and electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vincent

    Full Text Available To monitor the damage evolution in Ge nanowires during Mn implantation, in situ transmission electron microscopy observations were carried-out as a function of the Mn fluence. Special interest lies in the sputtering of nanowires. We evidence an enhanced sputtering under the synergetic effects of Mn implantation and electron beam which may alert experimenters to some possible artefacts related to in situ observations in the case of nanostructures.

  20. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19, prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15% by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag12+ at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 1012 ions/cm2 induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 1013 ions/cm2 has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  1. Increased electron photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles and photoemission enhanced solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Uskov, Alexander; Gritti, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation shows possibility to enhance substantially (by one-two orders) the electron photoemission through surface of metal nanoparticles embedded into photovoltaic structures. This, in turn, can lead to increase of the solar cells efficiency due to efficient light-to-electricity tran......Numerical simulation shows possibility to enhance substantially (by one-two orders) the electron photoemission through surface of metal nanoparticles embedded into photovoltaic structures. This, in turn, can lead to increase of the solar cells efficiency due to efficient light...

  2. Oxide nanomembrane hybrids with enhanced mechano- and thermo-sensitivity for semitransparent epidermal electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Do, Kyungsik; Kim, Jaemin; Son, Donghee; Koo, Ja Hoon; Park, Jinkyung; Song, Jun-Kyul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Minbaek; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-05-01

    Oxide nanomembrane hybrids with enhanced mechano- and thermo-sensitivity for semitransparent epidermal electronics are developed. The use of nanomaterials (single wall nanotubes and silver nanoparticles) embedded in the oxide nanomembranes significantly enhances mechanical and thermal sensitivities. These mechanical and thermal sensors are utilized in wheelchair control and hypothermia detection, which are useful for patients with strokes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  4. Enhancing Student Engagement Through Social Media A School of Business Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Glowatz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While many universities have been deploying both electronic learning (eLearning and social media applications for academic purposes, there is currently little research on the impact on their use on students’ overall learning experiences and associated learning possibilities. This paper elaborates on several online academic activities, such as Facebook, Twitter and quizzes for one classroom taught school of business undergraduate (UG module. The similarities and differences discovered across all aspects of this paper’s research findings are examined against Chickering & Gamson’s [1] seven principles of good practice teaching and Astin’s [2] five tenets of engagement. Online activities were tracked over a period of one academic semester (fifteen weeks and results insinuate that innovative and sustainable social media can indeed be utilised in higher education to enhance student learning and engagement.

  5. Active Learning and Self-Regulation Enhance Student Teachers' Professional Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Päivi; Niemi, Hannele M.; Nevgi, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The study identifies the relationships between active learning, student teachers' self-regulated learning and professional competences. Further, the aim is to investigate how active learning promotes professional competences of student teachers with different self-regulation profiles. Responses from 422 student teachers to an electronic survey…

  6. Enhancing the Learning Experience for Millennial Developmental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Denise

    2011-01-01

    The values and needs of today's college students are different from the needs of students from past generations. It is important that developmental educators recognize the characteristics of these students in their classroom and develop strategies to address their needs. This article focuses on the characteristics of the Millennial student, as…

  7. An Investigation of Institutional Enhancement Factors on Student College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaokoro, Amaechi Nkemakolem

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the importance of students' hard work and institutional factors--technology, advising, mentoring, and tutoring on student's academic performance. It is important for institutions to emphasize both students' hard work and effective institutional factors that will have positive impact on student success.

  8. Electronic Medical Records, Medical Students, and Ambulatory Family Physicians: A Multi-Institution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Anthony, David; WinklerPrins, Vince; Roskos, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Medical students commonly encounter electronic medical records (EMRs) in their ambulatory family medicine clerkships, but how students interact with this technology varies tremendously and presents challenges to students and preceptors. Little research to date has evaluated the impact of EMRs on medical student education in the ambulatory setting; this three-institution study aimed to identify behaviors of ambulatory family medicine preceptors as they relate to EMRs and medical students. In 2015, the authors sent e-mails to ambulatory preceptors who in the preceding year had hosted medical students during family medicine clerkships, inviting them to participate in the survey, which asked questions about each preceptor's methods of using the EMR with medical students. Of 801 ambulatory preceptors, 265 (33%) responded. The vast majority of respondents used an EMR and provided students with access to it in some way, but only 62.2% (147/236) allowed students to write electronic notes. Of those who allowed students electronic access, one-third did so by logging students in under their own (the preceptor's) credentials, either by telling the students their log-in information (22/202; 10.9%) or by logging in the student without revealing their passwords (43/202; 21.3%). Ambulatory medical student training in the use of EMRs not only varies but also requires many preceptors to break rules for students to learn important documentation skills. Without changes to the policies surrounding student access to and use of EMRs, future physicians will enter residency without the training they need to appropriately document patient care.

  9. Using Technology-Enhanced, Cooperative, Group-Project Learning for Student Comprehension and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Suhre, Cor; Hofman, Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning may improve students' motivation, understanding of course concepts, and academic performance. This study therefore enhanced a cooperative, group-project learning technique with technology resources to determine whether doing so improved students' deep learning and performance. A sample of 118 engineering students, randomly…

  10. Enhancement of quality in chemical inquiry by pre-university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rens, L.; Pilot, A.; van Dijk, H.

    2004-01-01

    Our pre-university chemistry students face problems achieving sufficient quality in chemical inquiry. To try to enhance the quality of student performance in chemical inquiry, Dutch pre-university chemistry students (age 17) carried out an authentic research project on 'Diffusion of ions in

  11. Enhancement of quality in chemical inquiry by pre-university students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rens, L.; Pilot, A.; van Dijk, H.

    2005-01-01

    Our pre-university chemistry students face problems achieving sufficient quality in chemical inquiry. To try to enhance the quality of student performance in chemical inquiry, Dutch pre-university chemistry students (age 17) carried out an authentic research project on 'Diffusion of ions in

  12. Factors Influencing Students' Use of Electronic Resources and their Opinions About this Use: The Case of Students at An-Najah National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic resources are becoming an integral part of the modern life and of the educational scene, especially the high education scene. In this research we wanted to verify what influences first degree university students' use of electronic resources and their opinions regarding this use. Collecting data from 202 students and analyzing it using SPSS, we found that more than one half of the participants had high level of electronic media use and more than one third had moderate level of electronic media use. These levels of use indicate the students' awareness of the role and benefits of electronic media use. Regarding the factors that influence the students' se of electronic resources we found that the student's use of electronic resources had significant strong positive relationships with the provision of electronic resources by the academic institution. It had significant moderate positive relationships with the resources characteristics and the course requirement, and had significant weak relationships with the instructor's support and the student's characteristics. We explained these relationships as resulting from the influence of the surrounding community. Regarding the students' opinions about the use of electronic resources, we found that the student's opinion of electronic resources has significant strong positive relationships with student's use of electronic resources, level of this use, the academic institution available facilities, student's characteristics and resources characteristics. It does not have significant relationships with the instructor's support or the course requirement. We explained these relationships depending on activity theory and its integration with ecological psychology.

  13. Evaluating a Web-enhanced bachelor of nursing curriculum: perspectives of third-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedy, Debra K; Mitchell, Marion; Seaton-Sykes, Philippa; Cooke, Marie; Patterson, Elizabeth; Purcell, Christine; Weeks, Patricia

    2007-10-01

    Little is known about nursing students' information literacy skills and perceptions of Web-enhanced educational approaches. This study examined graduating Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students' perceptions of a Web-enhanced learning environment, their computer literacy skills, and use of technology, and how these influenced their satisfaction. This Australian survey produced a 64% (n = 170) response rate. The 3-year BN program provides Web-enhanced learning opportunities by incorporating online activities and content such as quizzes, videos, and virtual laboratories that augment on-campus and off-campus learning approaches. Upon graduation, 61.4% of the students reported having competent information literacy skills. The quality and usefulness of the Web-enhanced material was rated fair to above average. The students' perception of technical and faculty support for Web-enhanced learning was low. Overall satisfaction with the Web-enhanced program was associated with level of information technology (IT) skills and perceived quality and usefulness of the Internet material. A regression analysis of factors contributing to students' overall satisfaction of a Web-enhanced learning environment (IT literacy skills, access, and perceived quality, usefulness, and support) accounted for 18.5% of variance. As more nursing programs use Web-based resources, greater attention should be given to the initial assessment and development of students' information literacy skills. Students with good IT skills are more likely to perceive Web-enhanced material as useful.

  14. Electronic laboratory quality assurance program: A method of enhancing the prosthodontic curriculum and addressing accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Marjan; Jahangiri, Leila

    2015-08-01

    An electronic quality assurance (eQA) program was developed to replace a paper-based system and to address standards introduced by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) and to improve educational outcomes. This eQA program provides feedback to predoctoral dental students on prosthodontic laboratory steps at New York University College of Dentistry. The purpose of this study was to compare the eQA program of performing laboratory quality assurance with the former paper-based format. Fourth-year predoctoral dental students (n=334) who experienced both the paper-based and the electronic version of the quality assurance program were surveyed about their experiences. Additionally, data extracted from the eQA program were analyzed to identify areas of weakness in the curriculum. The study findings revealed that 73.8% of the students preferred the eQA program to the paper-based version. The average number of treatments that did not pass quality assurance standards was 119.5 per month. This indicated a 6.34% laboratory failure rate. Further analysis of these data revealed that 62.1% of the errors were related to fixed prosthodontic treatment, 27.9% to partial removable dental prostheses, and 10% to complete removable dental prostheses in the first 18 months of program implementation. The eQA program was favored by dental students who have experienced both electronic and paper-based versions of the system. Error type analysis can yield the ability to create customized faculty standardization sessions and refine the didactic and clinical teaching of the predoctoral students. This program was also able to link patient care activity with the student's laboratory activities, thus addressing the latest requirements of the CODA regarding the competence of graduates in evaluating laboratory work related to their patient care. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Social Media and Electronic Networking Use and Preferences among Undergraduate Turf Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Cale A.; Kaminski, John E., III

    2016-01-01

    Most undergraduate students arrive on campus fluent in electronic communication methods and social media (SM). This cultural or communication shift presents both opportunities and challenges in pedagogy. Social media allows users to share and network with geographically diverse individuals and has the potential for engaging students both inside…

  16. The Effects of Multimedia and Learning Style on Student Achievement in Online Electronics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjono, Herman Dwi

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study investigated the effects of multimedia preferences and learning styles on undergraduate student achievement in an adaptive e-learning system for electronics course at the Yogyakarta State University Indonesia. The findings showed that students in which their multimedia preferences and learning style matched with the way the…

  17. Video Killed the Radio Star: Language Students' Use of Electronic Resources-Reading or Viewing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate language students' use of print and electronic resources for their research papers required in research techniques class, focusing on which reading strategies they used while reading these resources. The participants of the study were 90 sophomore students enrolled in the research techniques class offered at…

  18. Electronic Bullying and Victimization and Life Satisfaction in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Page Malmsjo; Huebner, E. Scott; Hills, Kimberly J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the nature and prevalence of electronic bullying and victimization in a sample of middle school students in a southeastern USA school. Relationships among measures of electronic bullying and victimization and global and domain-specific life satisfaction were also investigated. A total of 855 7th and 8th grade US students…

  19. Use of Electronic Versus Print Textbooks by Chilean Dental Students: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Pedro Christian; Schulz, Karen; Parra, Annemarie; Perez-Rojas, Francisco; Rosas, Cristian; Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    Electronic textbooks have become available in recent decades as replacements or alternatives for print versions. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to evaluate the use of electronic versus print textbooks by Chilean dental students. The target population was students from 14 Chilean dental schools. The questionnaire was adapted and translated to Spanish from a previous survey used in a similar study. It consisted of the following variables: preferred type, type used, frequency of use, source, electronic devices used to read, and disposal after use. The use of textbooks was analyzed and compared by gender and course (p≤0.05). The final sample consisted of 3,256 students (21.38±2.5 years of age, 50.8% women). Most of the participants reported using both types of texts, with most (63.9%) preferring print over electronic texts, including significantly more women (pelectronic books on a daily basis (47.3%) or at least twice a week (30.7%). The main source of electronic textbooks was the Internet (43.8%). A personal computer was the most widely used device for reading electronic texts (95.0%), followed by a cell phone (46.4%) and a tablet (24.5%). Overall, these Chilean dental students preferred print over electronic textbooks, despite having available electronic devices.

  20. The Association between Electronic Bullying and School Absenteeism among High School Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshteyn, Erin; Yang, Y. T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We examined the relationship between exposure to electronic bullying and absenteeism as a result of being afraid. Methods: This multivariate, multinomial regression analysis of the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data assessed the association between experiencing electronic bullying in the past year and how often students were absent…

  1. The Use of Electronic Dictionaries for Pronunciation Practice by University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metruk, Rastislav

    2017-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore how Slovak learners of English use electronic dictionaries with regard to pronunciation practice and improvement. A total of 24 Slovak university students (subjects) completed a questionnaire which contained pronunciation-related questions in connection with the use of electronic dictionaries. The questions primarily…

  2. Resonant enhancement in nanostructured thermoelectric performance via electronic thermal conductivity engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Urvesh; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2017-01-01

    The use of an asymmetric broadening in the transport distribution, a characteristic of resonant structures, is proposed as a route to engineer a decrease in electronic thermal conductivity thereby enhancing the electronic figure of merit in nanostructured thermoelectrics. Using toy models, we first demonstrate that a decrease in thermal conductivity resulting from such an asymmetric broadening may indeed lead to an electronic figure of merit well in excess of 1000 in an idealized situation and in excess of 10 in a realistic situation. We then substantiate with realistic resonant structures designed using graphene nano-ribbons by employing a tight binding framework with edge correction that match density functional theory calculations under the local density approximation. The calculated figure of merit exceeding 10 in such realistic structures further reinforces the concept and sets a promising direction to use nano-ribbon structures to engineer a favorable decrease in the electronic thermal conductivity.

  3. Harnessing two language games to enhance students' achievement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SS1) students' achievement in English vocabulary in Apa Local Government Area of Benue State. The study was carried out to determine whether puzzle and scramble games strategies would improve students' achievement in English ...

  4. Using real-worldness and cultural difference to enhance student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surprised', 'scared' or 'sad' are some of the words that student educators used to describe their feelings when they entered the childhood classrooms. Many students admitted that they had never been in Sesotho classrooms before. Hewitt (2008:89) ...

  5. Enhancing microelectronics education with large-scale student projects

    OpenAIRE

    Rumpf, Clemens; Lidtke, Aleksander; Weddell, Alex; Maunder, Rob

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefits of using large-scale projects, involving many groups of students with different backgrounds, in the education of undergraduate microelectronics engineering students. The benefits of involving students in large, industry-like projects are first briefly reviewed. The organisation of undergraduate programmes is presented, and it is described how students can be involved in such large projects, while maintaining compatibility with undergraduate programmes. The ge...

  6. An Electronic Wellness Program to Improve Diet and Exercise in College Students: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer, Amy L; Ross, Jamisha T; Klein, Catherine J; Lei, Kai Y; Mackey, Eleanor R

    2016-01-01

    Background In transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, college students are faced with significant challenges to their health habits. Independence, stress, and perceived lack of time by college students have been known to result in poor eating and exercise habits, which can lead to increased disease risk. Objective To assess the feasibility and to determine preliminary efficacy of an electronic wellness program in improving diet and physical activity in college students. Methods A 24-week...

  7. Streaming Video to Enhance Students' Reflection in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijen, Ali; Lam, Ineke; Wildschut, Liesbeth; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation case study that describes the experiences of 15 students and 2 teachers using a video-based learning environment, DiViDU, to facilitate students' daily reflection activities in a composition course and a ballet course. To support dance students' reflection processes streaming video was applied as follows: video…

  8. Using Guided Notes to Enhance Instruction for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Moira; Joseph, Laurice M.; Itoi, Madoka

    2011-01-01

    Taking notes from lectures or reading material can be challenging, especially for those who have learning disabilities. An alternative to traditional note-taking is a method called "guided notes," which has been found to improve the accuracy of students' notes, increase the frequency of student responses, and improve students' quiz and test…

  9. Enhancing Student Outcomes through Mentoring, Peer Counselling and Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottie, Cynthia Akorfa; Dubus, Nicole; Sossou, Marie-Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    The government of Ghana has designed various initiatives to achieve the Millennium Development Goals on education and the Education for All goals. Despite these initiatives, student outcomes continue to be poorer than desired. Although access to education has improved, student dropout remains a problem and student scores on achievement tests…

  10. College students' electronic victimization in friendships and dating relationships: anticipated distress and associations with risky behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Diana C; Guran, Elyse L; Ramos, Michelle C; Margolin, Gayla

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated college students' reports of electronic victimization in friendships and dating relationships. We examined 22 items representing four categories of electronic victimization: hostility, humiliation, exclusion, and intrusiveness. Nearly all participants (92%) reported some electronic victimization in the past year, with males reporting more victimization and females anticipating more distress. Both females and males anticipated more distress from electronic victimization in dating relationships than friendships. More actual experience with electronic victimization related to lower anticipated distress. Electronic victimization was associated with females' alcohol use, even after controlling for other victimization experiences. Discussion focuses on the contextualized nature of electronic victimization, and on the importance of understanding what makes electronic victimization highly distressing for some individuals.

  11. Preliminary examination of international students' adjustment and loneliness related to electronic communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy B; Shwalb, David A

    2007-02-01

    Electronic communication, e.g., e-mail, internet, may facilitate international students' adjustment through contacts maintained in their native country. In the present study, the scores of 45 international students on a measure of adjustment and the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale were significantly associated with their electronic communications involving their native country, but not with general internet or e-mail use. International students' scores on the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure were positively correlated with amount of contact with people in their native country but not with scores on measures of adjustment or loneliness.

  12. Implementing Critical Incident Technique to Enhance the Students Writing Ability in Recount Text

    OpenAIRE

    Misnawati

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is entitled implementing critical incident technique to enhance the students' writing ability in recount text (a collaborative classroom action research to the first year students of MAN Gandapura). This research was done because many of the students in MAN Gandapura would unable to make a good paragraph of writing although for one paragraph because of that the researcher needed form this research to increase the students' ability in writing, especially in writing recount text. Th...

  13. Hot carrier-enhanced interlayer electron-hole pair multiplication in 2D semiconductor heterostructure photocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Fatemeh; Grossnickle, Max; Su, Shanshan; Lake, Roger K.; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M.

    2017-12-01

    Strong electronic interactions can result in novel particle-antiparticle (electron-hole, e-h) pair generation effects, which may be exploited to enhance the photoresponse of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Highly efficient e-h pair multiplication has been demonstrated in several important nanoscale systems, including nanocrystal quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The small Fermi velocity and nonlocal nature of the effective dielectric screening in ultrathin layers of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) indicates that e-h interactions are very strong, so high-efficiency generation of e-h pairs from hot electrons is expected. However, such e-h pair multiplication has not been observed in 2D TMD devices. Here, we report the highly efficient multiplication of interlayer e-h pairs in 2D semiconductor heterostructure photocells. Electronic transport measurements of the interlayer I-VSD characteristics indicate that layer-indirect e-h pairs are generated by hot-electron impact excitation at temperatures near T = 300 K. By exploiting this highly efficient interlayer e-h pair multiplication process, we demonstrate near-infrared optoelectronic devices that exhibit 350% enhancement of the optoelectronic responsivity at microwatt power levels. Our findings, which demonstrate efficient carrier multiplication in TMD-based optoelectronic devices, make 2D semiconductor heterostructures viable for a new class of ultra-efficient photodetectors based on layer-indirect e-h excitations.

  14. Quantifying Extremely Rapid Flux Enhancements of Radiation Belt Relativistic Electrons Associated With Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si; Yan, Qi; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Gao, Zhonglei; Xiao, Fuliang

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have revealed a typical picture that seed electrons are transported inward under the drive of radial diffusion and then accelerated via chorus to relativistic energies. Here we show a potentially different process during the 2-3 October 2013 storm when Van Allen Probes observed extremely rapid (by about 50 times in 2 h) flux enhancements of relativistic (1.8-3.4 MeV) electrons but without distinct chorus at lower L-shells. Meanwhile, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites simultaneously measured enhanced chorus and fluxes of energetic (˜100-300 keV) seed electrons at higher L-shells. Numerical calculations show that chorus can efficiently accelerate seed electrons at L ˜ 8.3. Then radial diffusion further increased the phase space density of relativistic electrons throughout the outer radiation belts, with a remarkable agreement with the observation in magnitude and timescale. The current results provide a different physical scenario on the interplay between radial diffusion and local acceleration in outer radiation belt.

  15. Hot carrier-enhanced interlayer electron-hole pair multiplication in 2D semiconductor heterostructure photocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Fatemeh; Grossnickle, Max; Su, Shanshan; Lake, Roger K; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2017-12-01

    Strong electronic interactions can result in novel particle-antiparticle (electron-hole, e-h) pair generation effects, which may be exploited to enhance the photoresponse of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Highly efficient e-h pair multiplication has been demonstrated in several important nanoscale systems, including nanocrystal quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The small Fermi velocity and nonlocal nature of the effective dielectric screening in ultrathin layers of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) indicates that e-h interactions are very strong, so high-efficiency generation of e-h pairs from hot electrons is expected. However, such e-h pair multiplication has not been observed in 2D TMD devices. Here, we report the highly efficient multiplication of interlayer e-h pairs in 2D semiconductor heterostructure photocells. Electronic transport measurements of the interlayer I-V SD characteristics indicate that layer-indirect e-h pairs are generated by hot-electron impact excitation at temperatures near T = 300 K. By exploiting this highly efficient interlayer e-h pair multiplication process, we demonstrate near-infrared optoelectronic devices that exhibit 350% enhancement of the optoelectronic responsivity at microwatt power levels. Our findings, which demonstrate efficient carrier multiplication in TMD-based optoelectronic devices, make 2D semiconductor heterostructures viable for a new class of ultra-efficient photodetectors based on layer-indirect e-h excitations.

  16. Determination of dose enhancement in cortical bone substitute material for electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Dose measurements in Witt liquid, which simulates cortical bone, have been compared with dose in water for 6-, 9-, 12-, and 15-MeV electron beams. Measurements were made using a Farmer ionization chamber. The results of the study show dose enhancement in Witt liquid of 5%, 7%, 4%, and 0.4% for 6-, 9-, 12-, and 15 MeV electrons at shallow depths. The dose to a small mass of soft tissue in bone has also been estimated using ionization measurements. The results show a significantly higher dose in bone

  17. Stitching Codeable Circuits: High School Students' Learning About Circuitry and Coding with Electronic Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litts, Breanne K.; Kafai, Yasmin B.; Lui, Debora A.; Walker, Justice T.; Widman, Sari A.

    2017-10-01

    Learning about circuitry by connecting a battery, light bulb, and wires is a common activity in many science classrooms. In this paper, we expand students' learning about circuitry with electronic textiles, which use conductive thread instead of wires and sewable LEDs instead of lightbulbs, by integrating programming sensor inputs and light outputs and examining how the two domains interact. We implemented an electronic textiles unit with 23 high school students ages 16-17 years who learned how to craft and code circuits with the LilyPad Arduino, an electronic textile construction kit. Our analyses not only confirm significant increases in students' understanding of functional circuits but also showcase students' ability in designing and remixing program code for controlling circuits. In our discussion, we address opportunities and challenges of introducing codeable circuit design for integrating maker activities that include engineering and computing into classrooms.

  18. Networking in Sport Management: Ideas and Activities to Enhance Student Engagement and Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan S. Kornspan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this paper is to present information regarding the development of networking skills to enhance the career development of sport management students. Specifically, literature is reviewed which supports the importance of networking in the attainment of employment and career advancement in the sport industry. This is followed by an overview of emerging networking activities that allow opportunities for sport management students to expand their network. Sport industry career fairs and career conferences that students can attend are discussed. Additionally, sport industry professional associations that students can become involved with are presented. This is then followed with information related to the development of sport management clubs and various events that can be promoted to enhance the networking process. Specifically, activities provided by university faculty to enhance the educational experience of sport management students are detailed. Finally, a sample schedule of semester activities focused on student engagement and networking activities is provided.

  19. Electronic Information Access and Utilization by Makerere University Students in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisam Magara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The objectives of this study were to establish the level of computer utilization skills of Makerere University (Uganda Library and Information Science (LIS students; to determine the use of electronic information resources by LIS students; to determine the attitudes of LIS students towards electronic information resources; and to establish the problems faced by LIS students in accessing electronic information resources.Methods – A questionnaire survey was used for data collection.Results – The majority of Library and Information Science students at Makerere University depend on university computers for their work, and very few of them access the library’s e-resources. The few who access e-resources are self-taught. The majority of students surveyed were unaware of Emerald and EBSCO databases relevant to Library and Information Science students, and they found accessing eresources time-consuming. Conclusion – The study concluded that a concerted effort is needed by both LIS lecturers and university librarians in promoting use of the library’s electronic resources.

  20. Practical method and device for enhancing pulse contrast ratio for lasers and electron accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shukui; Wilson, Guy

    2014-09-23

    An apparatus and method for enhancing pulse contrast ratios for drive lasers and electron accelerators. The invention comprises a mechanical dual-shutter system wherein the shutters are placed sequentially in series in a laser beam path. Each shutter of the dual shutter system has an individually operated trigger for opening and closing the shutter. As the triggers are operated individually, the delay between opening and closing first shutter and opening and closing the second shutter is variable providing for variable differential time windows and enhancement of pulse contrast ratio.

  1. The use of dialogic electronic journal writing to develop students' understanding of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Sarah Collard

    The intent of this study is to examine how the implementation of a dialogic electronic journal writing environment continues the development of students' understanding of chemistry, specifically chemical bonding, through written communication between the individual students and their chemistry teacher. This study is framed within a constructivist theoretical context where students' understanding is constructed through written discussions with the educator, the students' interaction with the classroom environment, and his/her interaction with the computer environment. The research design of collective case study was employed to allow multiple perspectives and processes conveyed by the participants to be examined in the context in which they occurred while considering multiple sources of information. Data sources included electronic journal entries, classroom artifacts, and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, which involved coding, categorizing, and interpreting for patterns and relationships. Four cases were reported in detail. This study found that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was an effective venue in revealing previously undiscovered students' alternative conceptions of chemical bonding. Opportunities to actively confront and reconcile such conceptions were afforded through educator/student dialogic written interaction. The dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was also critical in the identification of gaps in students' conceptual understanding linked to improper sequencing of chemistry content. This study also found that the on-line environment provided the educator the opportunity to scaffold chemical bonding concepts to meet the needs of the students involved in the study. This study concluded that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment positively contributed to the development of student understanding. These findings may have practical implications for teachers in

  2. Enhancing undergraduate nursing students' global health competencies in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonseo; Han, Kihye; Yoo, Hae Young

    2017-09-01

    As the need for greater global health competency increases for health care professionals in South Korea, educational efforts for nursing students have begun. This study examined the effectiveness of two educational courses for freshmen and sophomores that were designed to improve students' global health competencies. A trend study was conducted for all undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a 4-year undergraduate nursing program in 2013 and 2014. We assessed students' global health competencies (1-knowledge and interests in global health and health equity, 2-global health skills, and 3-learning needs) in 2013 and 2014 and analyzed variance between mean scores by year and by course exposure, using 95% confidence intervals. Students who took both global health courses (sophomores in both years) reported higher global health-related knowledge and interests than did freshmen (p students' global health competencies. Reinforcement of knowledge in later courses may be needed to build on the global competencies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Students' usage of electronic journals at the Kwame Nkrumah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among some of the recommendations made were further sensitization of students about the importance of the resources, and the intensification of user education in the form of an online training manual in both audio and text and its incorporation into the curriculum of the proposed information literacy skills programme to be ...

  4. College Students' Use of Electronic Communication Technologies: Introverts versus Extraverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackin, Taryn; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Skelly, Brian; Chambliss, Catherine

    This paper discusses a study that examines the responses of introverted and extraverted college students (N=72) to the use of e-mail. Results show that extraverts use e-mail as a form of procrastination more than introverts and that extraverts find e-mail more disruptive to their work than introverts. No significant differences were found in terms…

  5. The Use of Pocket Electronic Dictionaries by Thai University Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    online dictionary use (through keystroke logging and screenshots), it cannot be loaded into the standard PED. Although PED consultation is a private activity, observing its use may provide us with a better understanding of how students really use their PEDs. 2. Purposes of the study. The purposes of this study are to find out.

  6. Does Mechanism Matter? Student Recall of Electronic versus Handwritten Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbur, Megan E.; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost; Hammer, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Student consumption and recall of feedback are necessary preconditions of successful formative assessment. Drawing on Sadler's (1998) definition of formative assessment as that which is intended to accelerate learning and improve performance through the providing of feedback, we examine how the mechanism of transmission may impact student…

  7. Responding electronically to student drafts on campus: Dis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... comments which do not promote dialogue. The study's main recommendations are that writing respondents should ensure that feedback phrasing is dialogical to encourage students to critique and explore discourses and for discipline experts to incorporate draft dialogue as a feedback practice into their writing practices.

  8. Enhancing Pharmacy Student Learning and Perceptions of Medical Apps

    OpenAIRE

    Rodis, Jennifer; Aungst, Timothy Dy; Brown, Nicole V; Cui, Yan; Tam, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mobile apps in health care is growing. Current and future practitioners must be equipped with the skills to navigate and utilize apps in patient care, yet few strategies exist for training health care professional students on the usage of apps. Objective To characterize first-year pharmacy student use of medical apps, evaluate first-year pharmacy student's perception of skills in finding, evaluating, and using medical apps before and after a focused learning experience, ...

  9. Bosnian and American students' attitudes toward electronic monitoring: is it about what we know or where we come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftić, Lisa R; Payne, Brian K; Maljević, Almir

    2015-06-01

    The use of community corrections continues to grow across the globe as alternatives to incarceration are sought. Little research attention, however, has been directed at correctional alternatives from a global orientation. The purpose of this research study is to compare the way that a sample of criminal justice students from the United States (n = 118) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (n = 133) perceive electronic monitoring. Because electronic monitoring is a newer sentencing alternative and it is used differently in Bosnia and Herzegovina than it is in the United States, it is predicted that Bosnian students will view electronic monitoring differently than will students from the United States. This study finds that while students are largely supportive of electronic monitoring sentences, support is affected by offender type and student nationality. For example, Bosnian students are more supportive of electronic monitoring sentences for drug offenders while American students are more supportive of electronic monitoring sentences for juvenile offenders. Differences were also found across student groups when attitudes toward electronic monitoring and the costs and pains associated with electronic monitoring were assessed. Specifically, American students were less likely to view electronic monitoring as meeting the goals of rehabilitation and more likely to view the conditions and restrictions associated with electronic monitoring as being punitive than Bosnian students were. Implications from these findings, as well as limitations and suggestions for further research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Enhancing Student Communication Skills Through Arabic Language Competency and Simulated Patient Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Sanah; Tarazi, Hamadeh M Khier; Halim Hilal, Dana Abdel

    2017-05-01

    Objective. To assess student communication and patient management skill with introduction of Arabic and use of simulated patient assessments to a communication and counseling course. Design. Five, 3-hour tutorials (clinical skill laboratory) were added to the course covering: listening and empathic responding, non-verbal communications, interviewing skills, assertiveness, counseling in special situations: conflict, anger, worry or rushed situations, and professional decision making. Arabic content was introduced to the course to enhance Arabic communications and competence among students. Simulated patient assessment was used to evaluate student skills. Students' feedback about course changes was evaluated. Assessment. The course now covers a wider content and Arabic language. Students' scores were similar in the assessment and other assessments within the course and between Arabic and English groups. Students favorably rated the changes in the course and provided constructive feedback on content usefulness and adequacy. Conclusion. Expanding the course to include Arabic language and content and simulated patient assessments enhanced student communication skills.

  11. Electron spin relaxation can enhance the performance of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Sowa, Jakub K; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    The radical pair model of the avian magnetoreceptor relies on long-lived electron spin coherence. Dephasing, resulting from interactions of the spins with their fluctuating environment, is generally assumed to degrade the sensitivity of this compass to the direction of the Earth's magnetic field...... to an Earth-strength magnetic field. Supported by calculations using toy radical pair models, we argue that these enhancements could be consistent with the molecular dynamics and magnetic interactions in avian cryptochromes....

  12. Behavior of Parameters of Nighttime Electron Density Enhancements of the Ionospheric F2 Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina

    2017-04-01

    There is known a wide class of disturbances of the F2-layer of the ionosphere, which are superimposed on the regular diurnal variations of the electron density. Different types of disturbances are characterized by different mechanisms of their generation. Traveling ionospheric disturbances appear to be the most characteristic features of the inhomogeneous structure of the ionosphere. Another type of ionospheric disturbances presents the nighttime electron density enhancements in the ionospheric F2- layer maximum (NmF2). This type of irregularities is described in numerous papers. There is a concept that, in spite of the various mechanisms of ionospheric disturbances generation a response of F2-layer parameters exhibits similar features associated with the upward lift and the simultaneous expansion of the layer and then its subsequent downward movement, including layer compression, which results in the formation of the electron density peak in the layer maximum at the moment of greatest compression. The aim of this study is a verification of this concept on the example of disturbances related with the nighttime electron density enhancements, and the definition of precise quantitative relationships between the variations of different F2-layer parameters for such disturbances. By using the data of the ionospheric vertical sounding in Almaty, (76° 55'E, 43°15'N) during 2001-2012, analysis of the behavior the F2-layer parameters during the night electron density enhancements was carried out within framework of a single concept of effects of various types of ionospheric plasma perturbations in variations of height and half-thickness of the F2-layer, accompanied by increasing and decreasing NmF2 at moments of maximum compression and expansion of the layer. For a quantitative analysis of the parameters of nighttime enhancements we have selected 20 nights characterized by low magnetic activity (Dst> - 50 nT) and evident manifestations of the nighttime electron density

  13. Ionizing radiation changes the electronic properties of melanin and enhances the growth of melanized fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Bryan, Ruth A; Huang, Xianchun; Moadel, Tiffany; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Aisen, Philip; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Casadevall, Arturo

    2007-05-23

    Melanin pigments are ubiquitous in nature. Melanized microorganisms are often the dominating species in certain extreme environments, such as soils contaminated with radionuclides, suggesting that the presence of melanin is beneficial in their life cycle. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation could change the electronic properties of melanin and might enhance the growth of melanized microorganisms. Ionizing irradiation changed the electron spin resonance (ESR) signal of melanin, consistent with changes in electronic structure. Irradiated melanin manifested a 4-fold increase in its capacity to reduce NADH relative to non-irradiated melanin. HPLC analysis of melanin from fungi grown on different substrates revealed chemical complexity, dependence of melanin composition on the growth substrate and possible influence of melanin composition on its interaction with ionizing radiation. XTT/MTT assays showed increased metabolic activity of melanized C. neoformans cells relative to non-melanized cells, and exposure to ionizing radiation enhanced the electron-transfer properties of melanin in melanized cells. Melanized Wangiella dermatitidis and Cryptococcus neoformans cells exposed to ionizing radiation approximately 500 times higher than background grew significantly faster as indicated by higher CFUs, more dry weight biomass and 3-fold greater incorporation of (14)C-acetate than non-irradiated melanized cells or irradiated albino mutants. In addition, radiation enhanced the growth of melanized Cladosporium sphaerospermum cells under limited nutrients conditions. Exposure of melanin to ionizing radiation, and possibly other forms of electromagnetic radiation, changes its electronic properties. Melanized fungal cells manifested increased growth relative to non-melanized cells after exposure to ionizing radiation, raising intriguing questions about a potential role for melanin in energy capture and utilization.

  14. Enhanced epidermal dose caused by localized electron contamination from lead cutouts used in kilovoltage radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lye, J. E.; Butler, D. J.; Webb, D. V. [Australian Radiation and Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Melbourne 3085 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate and quantify electron contamination from the lead cutouts used in kilovoltage x-ray radiotherapy. Methods: The lead cutouts were modeled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc user codes DOSXYZnrc and DOSRZnrc for x-ray beams ranging from 50 to 300 kV{sub p}. The results from the model were confirmed with Gafchromic film measurements. The model and measurements investigated the dose distribution with and without gladwrap shielding under the lead, and dose distributions with round, square, and serrated edge cutouts. Results: Large dose enhancement near the edges of the lead was observed due to electron contamination. At the epidermal/dermal border, there is double the dose at the edge of the lead compared to the central dose due to electron contamination for a 150 kV{sub p} beam and three times the dose for a 300 kV{sub p} beam. gladwrap shielding effectively removes the contaminant dose enhancement using ten and four layers for 300 and 150 kV{sub p} beams, respectively. Conclusions: The contaminant dose enhancement is undesirable as it could cause unnecessary erythema and hyperpigmentation at the border of the treated and untreated skin and lead to a poorer cosmetic outcome. The contamination is easily removed by gladwrap shielding placed under or around the lead cutout.

  15. A Survey of Substance Use for Cognitive Enhancement by University Students in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Johanna Schelle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Pharmacological cognitive enhancement, using chemicals to change cellular processes in the brain in order to enhance one’s cognitive capacities, is an often discussed phenomenon. The prevalence among Dutch university students is unknown.Methods:The study set out to achieve the following goals: (1 give an overview of different methods in order to assess the prevalence of use of prescription, illicit and lifestyle drugs for cognitive enhancement (2 investigate whether polydrug use and stress have a relationship with cognitive enhancement substance use (3 assessing opinions about cognitive enhancement prescription drug use. A nationwide survey was conducted among 1572 student respondents of all government supported Dutch universities. Results:The most detailed level of analysis ─ use of specific substances without a prescription and with the intention of cognitive enhancement ─ shows that prescription drugs, illicit drugs and lifestyle drugs are respectively used by 1.7%, 1.3% and 45.6% of the sample. The use of prescription drugs and illicit drugs is low compared to other countries. We have found evidence of polydrug use in relation to cognitive enhancement. A relation between stress and the use of lifestyle drugs for cognitive enhancement was observed. We report the findings of several operationalizations of cognitive enhancement drug use to enable comparison with a wider variety of previous and upcoming research.Conclusions:Results of this first study among university students in the Netherlands revealed a low prevalence of cognitive enhancement drug use compared to other countries. Multiple explanations, such as a difference in awareness of pharmacological cognitive enhancement among students, accessibility of drugs in the student population and inclusion criteria of enhancement substances are discussed. We urge enhancement researchers to take the different operationalizations and their effects on the prevalence numbers into

  16. Enhancing Student Engagement through Simulation in Programming Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiaq, Sakirulai Olufemi; Jamil, Md Golam

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of a simulator for teaching programming to foster student engagement and meaningful learning. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory mixed-method research approach was adopted in a classroom-based environment at a UK university. A rich account of student engagement dimensions…

  17. International Students' Enhanced Academic Performance: Effects of Campus Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjong, Delphine N.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates international students' challenges, such as financial, English proficiency, loneliness/homesickness in the United States. In addition, it assesses how these students coped with such difficulties by making use of resources on campus, such as an international center, writing center, counseling center, and the student…

  18. Enhancing the Student Learning Experience in Software Engineering Project Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maira; Ochoa, Sergio F.; Bastarrica, Maria Cecilia; Gutierrez, Francisco J.

    2018-01-01

    Carrying out real-world software projects in their academic studies helps students to understand what they will face in industry, and to experience first-hand the challenges involved when working collaboratively. Most of the instructional strategies used to help students take advantage of these activities focus on supporting agile programming,…

  19. Project-Based Learning in Consumer Sciences: Enhancing Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although some students initially experienced difficulty in managing their responsibilities as part of the CS project, results confirmed the proposed theory and the value thereof in lifelong learning. This theory emphasises the development of responsible independent learners as well as students who are responsible for and ...

  20. Enhancing Student Learning and Social Behavior through Mnemonic Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinheksel, Karen A.; Summy, Sarah E.

    2003-01-01

    This article on using mnemonics with students having learning and behavior problems first offers a case study of a 7th grade student and then describes the letter strategy, the keyword mnemonic method, and the pegword method. Seven steps for implementing mnemonic strategies are offered. An inset reviews the research literature on using mnemonic…

  1. TELIDON as an Enhancer of Student Interest and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Thom

    The use of different instructional methods/materials in a college course on the behavioral aspects of drug action (caffeine) was studied at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. The course employed the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). Although students were highly successful in completing the course, student evaluations indicated…

  2. Teaching Writing Skills That Enhance Student Success in Future Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, James P.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to write well is often critical for effective work performance. Although basic writing courses provide a foundation for college and university students, discipline-specific writing tasks and methods are frequently learned indirectly. Incorporating occupational writing skills in course curriculum better prepares students for future…

  3. Using Cultural Assets to Enhance Assessment of Latino Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganza, Joaquin S.; Godinez, Armando; Smith, Deidra; Gonzalez, Liliana G.; Robinson-Zañartu, Carol

    2015-01-01

    In assessment of Latino and other bilingual-bicultural students, culture and language are rarely seen as central; in contrast, they are often seen as peripheral. School psychologists infrequently consider the culture of the student to be integral to their assessment and seldom consider it as a source of learning-related assets. However, when the…

  4. Strategic and Bonding Effects of Enhancing the Student Feedback Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nadine M.; Celuch, Kevin G.

    2016-01-01

    In order to produce distinctiveness that leads to competitive advantage, higher education institutions must remain cognizant that students are co-creators. Thus, to create genuine value in educational service delivery, there is a need for a more highly developed understanding of the student-institutional intersection. The present research…

  5. Enhancing the Performance of Female Students in Spoken English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inegbeboh, Bridget O.

    2009-01-01

    Female students have been discriminated against right from birth in their various cultures and this affects the way they perform in Spoken English class, and how they rate themselves. They have been conditioned to believe that the male gender is superior to the female gender, so they leave the male students to excel in spoken English, while they…

  6. Enhancing student occupational therapists' client-centred counselling skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wener, Pamela F; Bergen, Carolyn O; Diamond-Burchuk, Lisa G; Yamamoto, Cynthia M; Hosegood, Alana E; Staley, James D

    2015-12-01

    Client-centred practice is the cornerstone of the occupational therapy profession. However, there has been little focus on how to teach students to be client-centred practitioners while engaged in counselling. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the use of a client-completed rating scale on student occupational therapists' client-centred counselling skills. A time-series design was used to measure the changes in students' counselling skills over time. Demographic information was collected prior to time one. An online questionnaire was administered after study completion to explore students' experiences of using the Session Rating Scale. The impact of using the Session Rating Scale as a measure of students' client-centred counselling skills performance significantly improved over time. Most students valued using the rating scale and would recommend its use for future students. The process of supporting students to learn how to engage clients in providing timely feedback and using this feedback to design treatment sets the stage for integration and application of client-centred practice. © CAOT 2015.

  7. Issues in student training and use of electronic bibliographic databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Catterall

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to bibliographic databases, online and on CD-ROM, is advantageous for the academic community (East, 1993; Squires, 1993. Developments in communications and information technology mean that students, as well as academic staff, now have direct access to these databases (Tenopir and Ennis, 1998. This permits them to access a wider range of journal articles for research and project work than is usually available in a university library. There is an additional pay-off for business studies students since they have opportunities to develop the database search and retrieval skills they will need when they enter business and the professions (Taylor, 1996; Wisendanger, 1994. In some professions, such as law and public relations, access to specialist databases is essential to undertaking certain types of professional work (Taylor, 1996. Graduates who know where to locate information and how to access, retrieve and use information are valuable assets to employers.

  8. Curriculum considerations for enhancing baccalaureate learning for international students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Karen T; Haas, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    International students studying nursing in the United States present unique teaching opportunities and challenges. Student language, culture, and academic expectations are major factors for faculty to consider in delivering international education. An RN to BSN program provides baccalaureate completion study for registered nurses residing in Israel. Students can choose to complete the final semester in the United States. Israeli nursing students demonstrate a strong collectivistic orientation to their academic work. Issues related to English language fluency and academic paper preparation were identified. Success in international teaching endeavors is facilitated when faculty carefully evaluate course materials and assignments. Clarity of language, cultural expectations, and availability of academic resources are important considerations for promoting student success.

  9. Elements of Technology Enabled/Enhanced Active Learning (TEAL to Enhance Quality and Employability of Bachelor’s Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Nur Farha Bte

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of technology innovation is rapidly increasing in industries and educational institutions. This phenomenon has led to the emergence of Technology Enabled/Enhanced Active Learning (TEAL which emphasizes the use of various techniques and technologies. TEAL is a new learning format that combines educational content from a lecturer, simulation, and student’s experiences using technological tools to provide a rich collaborative learning experience for students. This approach is used to provide academic professional development that brings innovation to the learning content, practically by using pedagogy, technology and classroom design. TEAL ensures the enhanced development of student's knowledge and skills in order to produce quality skilful workers with adequate employability skills. Technology is an effective tool used to facilitate the teaching and learning process, which can, in turn, create an active environment for students to build their knowledge, skill and experience. This paper determines the elements of TEAL based on interview sessions with expert academicians and from a systematic literature review. The selection of TEAL elements for this study was carried out using thematic analysis approach. Findings show that these TEAL elements would help institutions to promote students in involving themselves in active learning in order to enhance the quality of graduates in improving their technical knowledge, thereby enhancing their employability skills.

  10. Teaching Electronics to Aeronautical Engineering Students by Developing Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Sánchez, Luís; Masot Peris, Rafael; Alcañiz Fillol, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    (c) 2015 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works. Teaching electronics to an aerospace engineer with a very limited number of credits has been a major challenge for us. This goal has...

  11. Auger electron spectroscopy for the advanced student laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greczylo, Tomasz; Mazur, Piotr; Debowska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents Auger electron spectroscopy with a retarding field analyser designed for an advanced physics experiment carried out in 'Physics Laboratory II' at the Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Wroclaw, Poland. The authors discuss the process of setting up the experiment and the results of the measurement of Auger spectra. The advantages and disadvantages of the apparatus are discussed along with its implementation in the teaching process

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanoparticle/nanohole arrays fabricated through electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsunghsueh; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates from gold nanoparticle and gold nanohole arrays were successfully fabricated through electron beam lithography with precise computer-aided control of the unit size and intergap distance. Their SERS performance was evaluated using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA). These gold arrays yielded strong SERS signals under 785 nm laser excitation. The enhancement factors for 4-MBA molecules on the prepared gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays maxed at 1.08 × 107 and 8.61 × 106, respectively. The observed increase in SERS enhancement was attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength shifting toward the near-infrared regime when the gold nanohole diameter increased, in agreement with the theoretical prediction in this study. The contribution of LSPR to the Raman enhancement from nanohole arrays deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass was elucidated by comparing SERS and transmission spectra. This simple fabrication procedure, which entails employing electron beam lithography and the controllability of the intergap distance, suggests highly promising uses of nanohole arrays as functional components in sensing and photonic devices.

  13. Effect of Virtual Analytical Chemistry Laboratory on Enhancing Student Research Skills and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnik, Boris; Stozhko, Natalia; Pervukhina, Irina; Tchernysheva, Albina; Belysheva, Galina

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to determine the effect of a virtual chemistry laboratory on university student achievement. The article describes a model of a laboratory course that includes a virtual component. This virtual component is viewed as a tool of student pre-lab autonomous learning. It presents electronic resources designed for a virtual laboratory…

  14. Effective Use of Pause Procedure to Enhance Student Engagement and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bachhel, Rachna; Thaman, Richa Ghay

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Active learning strategies have been documented to enhance learning. We created an active learning environment in neuromuscular physiology lectures for first year medical students by using ‘Pause Procedure’.

  15. Active Learning and Self-Regulation Enhance Student Teachers’ Professional Competences

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Päivi; Niemi, Hannele M.; Nevgi, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The study identifies the relationships between active learning, student teachers’ self-regulated learning and professional competences. Further, the aim is to investigate how active learning promotes professional competences of student teachers with different self-regulation profiles. Responses from 422 student teachers to an electronic survey were analysed using statistical methods. It was found that the use of active learning methods, such as goal-oriented and intentional learning as well a...

  16. Effect of virtual analytical chemistry laboratory on enhancing student research skills and practices

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Bortnik; Natalia Stozhko; Irina Pervukhina; Albina Tchernysheva; Galina Belysheva

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to determine the effect of a virtual chemistry laboratory on university student achievement. The article describes a model of a laboratory course that includes a virtual component. This virtual component is viewed as a tool of student pre-lab autonomous learning. It presents electronic resources designed for a virtual laboratory and outlines the methodology of e-resource application. To find out how virtual chemistry laboratory affects student scientific literacy, research s...

  17. Applied information system-based in enhancing students' understanding towards higher order thinking (HOTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ang Kean; Ping, Owi Wei

    2017-05-01

    The application of information and communications technology (ICT) had become more important in our daily life, especially in educational field. Teachers are encouraged to use information system-based in teaching Mathematical courses. Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) approach is unable to explain using chalk and talk methods. It needs students to analyze, evaluate, and create by their own natural abilities. The aim of this research study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application information system-based in enhance the students understanding about HOTS question. Mixed-methods or quantitative and qualitative approach was applied in collecting data, which involve only the standard five students and the teachers in Sabak Bernam, Selangor. Pra-postests was held before and after using information system-based in teaching to evaluate the students' understanding. The result from post-test indicates significant improvement which proves that the use of information system based able to enhance students' understanding about HOTS question and solve it. There were several factor influenced the students such as students' attitude, teachers attraction, school facilities, and computer approach. Teachers play an important role in attracting students to learn. Therefore, the school should provide a conducive learning environment and good facilities for students to learn so that they are able to access more information and always exposed to new knowledge. As conclusion, information system-based are able to enhance students understanding the need of HOTS questions and solve it.

  18. The Enhancement of Mathematical Problem Solving Ability of Senior High School Students Through Quantum Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Julita, Julita

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed to examine the quality of quantum learning imfluence toward the enhancement of mathematical problem solving ability of Senior High School students, both viewed entirely and based on mathematical initial ability (MIA) category.  In particular, this study is aimed to examine enhancement difference of students’ mathematical problem solving ability in a whole and in each level of mathematical initial ability (high, medium and low) between students who receive quantum learning ...

  19. Enhancing Dental Students' Understanding of Poverty Through Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampiris, Lewis N; White, Alex; Sams, Lattice D; White, Tiffany; Weintraub, Jane A

    2017-09-01

    Dental students should develop an understanding of the barriers to and frustrations with accessing dental care and maintaining optimal oral health experienced by persons with limited resources rather than blaming the patient or caregiver. Developing this understanding may be aided by helping students learn about the lives of underserved and vulnerable patients they will encounter not only in extramural rotations, but throughout their careers. The aim of this study was to determine if dental students' understanding of daily challenges faced by families with low income changed as a result of a poverty simulation. In 2015 and 2016, an experiential poverty simulation was used to prepare third-year dental students at one U.S. dental school for their upcoming required community-based rotations. In 2015, United Way staff conducted the simulation using the Missouri Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS); in 2016, faculty members trained in CAPS conducted the simulation using a modified version of the tool. In the simulation, students were assigned to family units experiencing various types of hardship and were given specific identities for role-playing. A retrospective pretest and a posttest were used to assess change in levels of student understanding after the simulation. Students assessed their level of understanding in five domains: financial pressures, difficult choices, difficulties in improving one's situation, emotional stressors, and impact of community resources for those living in poverty. The survey response rates in 2015 and 2016 were 86% and 74%, respectively. For each of the five domains, students' understanding increased from 58% to 74% per domain. The majority reported that the exercise was very valuable or somewhat valuable (74% in 2015, 88% in 2016). This study found that a poverty simulation was effective in raising dental students' understanding of the challenges faced by low-income families. It also discovered that framing the issues in the

  20. Enhancing an Intermediate Syllabus for ESL Students with BYOD Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilar-Magdziarz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices such as tablets and smart phones have entered education and started being used by teachers and learners for studying. This evidence-based case study focuses on the enhancement of a syllabus with BYOD classes and the role it played in boosting motivation and classroom engagement. It shows how to enhance a syllabus for Intermediate…

  1. Enhancing a Syllabus for Intermediate ESL Students with BYOD Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilar-Magdziarz, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices such as tablets and smart phones have entered education and started being used by teachers and learners for studying. This evidence-based case study focuses on the enhancement of a syllabus with BYOD classes and the role it played in boosting motivation and classroom engagement. It shows how to enhance a syllabus for Intermediate…

  2. Photography & Physics: A Way to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Fred

    2007-10-01

    A teaching/learning strategy that I have developed over the years for high school students involves the use of photographic images of ordinary objects or scenes to help engage students in the intrigue and beauty of physics. The images help focus classroom discussions, raise curiosity levels among students, and promote creativity of thinking. The photographs can be used in a variety of ways, including assessment, framing discussions, homework assignment, and constructive classroom games. This presentation will describe the various ways photography can be used and will model some techniques. Dozens of ``physics images'' will be shown.

  3. Exchange enhancement of the electron g factor in strained InGaAs/InP heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Maremyanin, K. V.; Kalinin, K. P.; Spirin, K. E.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Baidus, N. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    The exchange enhancement of the electron g factor in strained InGaAs/InP heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas is studied. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the resistance in the minima of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in perpendicular magnetic fields up to 12 T in the vicinity of the odd filling factors of the Landau levels yields the values of the effective electron Lande factor g* from −8.6 to −10.1. The experimental values are compared with the results of theoretical calculations of the g factor of quasiparticles. The calculations are performed using an eight-band k · p Hamiltonian and take into account exchange interaction in the two-dimensional electron gas. It is shown that, under the conditions of a large overlap between the spin-split Landau levels, the maximum value of the quasiparticle g factor can be attained in the vicinity of even filling factors. This is caused by the nonparabolicity of the electron dispersion relation

  4. Adhesion enhancement by a dielectric barrier discharge of PDMS used for flexible and stretchable electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morent, R; Geyter, N De; Axisa, F; Smet, N de; Gengembre, L; Leersnyder, E De; Leys, C; Vanfleteren, J; Rymarczyk-Machal, M; Schacht, E; Payen, E

    2007-01-01

    Currently, there is a strong tendency to replace rigid electronic assemblies by mechanically flexible and stretchable equivalents. This emerging technology can be applied for biomedical electronics, such as implantable devices and electronics on skin. In the first step of the production process of stretchable electronics, electronic interconnections and components are encapsulated into a thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Afterwards, the electronic structures are completely embedded by placing another PDMS layer on top. It is very important that the metals inside the electronic circuit do not leak out in order to obtain a highly biocompatible system. Therefore, an excellent adhesion between the 2 PDMS layers is of great importance. However, PDMS has a very low surface energy, resulting in poor adhesion properties. Therefore, in this paper, PDMS films are plasma treated with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in air at medium pressure (5.0 kPa). Contact angle and XPS measurements reveal that plasma treatment increases the hydrophilicity of the PDMS films due to the incorporation of silanol groups at the expense of methyl groups. T-peel tests show that plasma treatment rapidly imparts adhesion enhancement, but only when both PDMS layers are plasma treated. Results also reveal that it is very important to bond the plasma-treated PDMS films immediately after treatment. In this case, an excellent adhesion is maintained several days after treatment. The ageing behaviour of the plasma-treated PDMS films is also studied in detail: contact angle measurements show that the contact angle increases during storage in air and angle-resolved XPS reveals that this hydrophobic recovery is due to the migration of low molar mass PDMS species to the surface

  5. Patterns of electronic cigarette use in current and ever users among college students in France: a cross?sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Vasiliu, Anca; Romo, Lucia; Kotbagi, Gayatri; Kern, Laurence; Ladner, Jo?l

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is sparse information on electronic cigarette use and health behaviours among college student populations. Our objectives were to identify the patterns of electronic cigarette use in current and ever users among college students in France. Design Cross-sectional study. Settings A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted on two major campuses in France. Students filled in an anonymous questionnaire on their use of electronic cigarettes and on targeted behaviours such as ...

  6. A Program to Enhance Self-Concept of Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James H.

    This research analyzes the results of a program to enhance the self concepts of junior high students. Subjects were 80 students identified as having low self concepts. They participated in an eight-week program to develop skills in personal and social awareness. Pretest posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory indicated that…

  7. Enhancing Science Instruction through Student-Created PowerPoint Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerido, Leona; Curran, Mary Carla

    2014-01-01

    Technology use in science classes can enhance lessons and reinforce scientific content. The creation of multimedia projects is a great way to engage students in lessons about estuarine ecosystems. In this activity, students can learn about estuarine organisms and use their creativity to write a story, create artwork, and develop a multimedia…

  8. Visualization: A Tool for Enhancing Students' Concept Images of Basic Object-Oriented Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: to investigate students' concept images about class, object, and their relationship and to help them enhance their learning of these notions with a visualization tool. Fifty-six second-year university students participated in the study. To investigate his/her concept images, the researcher developed a survey…

  9. Enhancement of Students' Independent Learning through Their Critical Thinking Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopzhassarova, Umit; Akbayeva, Gulden; Eskazinova, Zhanar; Belgibayeva, Gulbarshyn; Tazhikeyeva, Akerke

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the problem of developing students' critical thinking skills, which help them become independent learners. Analysis of research works of educators and scholars enable the authors to reveal qualities, necessary for students to enhance their critical thinking skills and become independent learners. Different points of view on…

  10. Is Twitter for the Birds? Using Twitter to Enhance Student Learning in a Marketing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Ben; Laffey, Des

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen unprecedented possibilities for the use of different technologies to enhance learning in marketing courses. Given the rapid and widespread diffusion of these technologies, particularly within the demographic of the student population, it is pertinent to explore and examine how such technologies can benefit student learning.…

  11. Engaging the Unengaged: Using Visual Images to Enhance Students' "Poli Sci 101" Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbig, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    As the nation witnesses a distinct decline in civic engagement among young adults, political science instructors across the nation face the formidable task of engaging students in lower-level, general education courses outside students' primary domain of interest. The research presented here seeks to understand if visually enhanced lecture…

  12. Enhancing Intercultural Communication and Understanding: Team Translation Project as a Student Engagement Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on a team translation project on Aboriginal culture designed to enhance university students' intercultural communication competence and understanding through engaging in an interactive team translation project funded by the Australia-China Council. A selected group of Chinese speaking translation students participated in the…

  13. Drug Testing US Student-Athletes for Performance-Enhancing Substance Misuse: A Flawed Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrke, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The author argues that drug testing of U.S. high school students for performance-enhancing substance misuse is invasive, expensive, and the low number of positive test results do not justify the costs, especially in financially strapped school districts where this money would be better spent on injury prevention for athletes and the education of all students.

  14. Executive Function in the Classroom: Practical Strategies for Improving Performance and Enhancing Skills for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Students with strong executive function skills hold the keys to school and social success--from attention and impulse control to time management and organization. Now K-12 teachers have a practical, highly readable guide to enhancing these critical skills for "all" students, with and without learning disabilities. Through the author's memorable…

  15. The Effect of Blended Learning in Enhancing Female Students' Satisfaction in the Saudi Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al lHassan, Sarah; Shukri, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The present study intended to investigate the effect of utilizing Learning Management System (LMS), Blackboard® on enhancing English as a Foreign Language (EFL) female students' satisfaction in the Saudi context. It is found that the effectiveness of utilizing the supplementary materials on Blackboard® is leading up to EFL students' satisfaction.…

  16. Using the Student Lifecycle Approach to Enhance Employability: An Example from Criminology and Criminal Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lyndel; Hayes, Hennessey

    2017-01-01

    Universities are increasingly focusing on the employability of students after they graduate from their studies. While practicums is one way of enhancing students' employability, the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice embeds employability throughout its degree programs using a range of strategies. These methods are based on the student…

  17. Enhancing Student Explanations of Evolution: Comparing Elaborating and Competing Theory Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Dermot F.; Namdar, Bahadir; Vitale, Jonathan M.; Lai, Kevin; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore how two different prompt types within an online computer-based inquiry learning environment enhance 392 7th grade students' explanations of evolution with three teachers. In the "elaborating" prompt condition, students are prompted to write explanations that support the accepted theory of evolution. In the…

  18. The Role of Gratitude in Enhancing the Relationship between Doctoral Research Students and Their Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Kerry; Stafford, Karen; Guijt, Rosanne; Breadmore, Michael

    2017-01-01

    While increasing attention is being placed on the crucial importance of a positive supervisor-student relationship, few studies have investigated how to enhance this. Our paper investigates the effect of gratitude practices, proposing it brings both focus and intentionality to the student-supervisor relationship resulting in better research…

  19. Does Using E-Portfolios for Reflective Writing Enhance High School Students' Self-Regulated Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun; Shu, Kuen-Ming; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to examine whether reflective writing using e-portfolios enhances high school students' self-regulated learning. Participants included two classes of eighth-graders majoring in Information Processing and taking a course called "Website Design" at a vocational high school in Taiwan. There were 41 students, with 18 males and…

  20. Improving Reading Comprehension for Elementary Students with Learning Disabilities: UDL Enhanced Story Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkon, Drue E.; Wells, Jenny C.

    2013-01-01

    Story mapping is an effective visual strategy to enhance comprehension of narrative text in students, with or without disabilities. This article demonstrates how instruction can be designed using principles of universal design for learning with the evidence-based story-mapping strategy to improve reading comprehension for elementary students with…

  1. College students' use of electronic communication with parents: links to loneliness, attachment, and relationship quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzler, Amy L; Oberhauser, Ann M; Westerman, David; Nadorff, Danielle K

    2011-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of new communication technologies, gaps in our knowledge remain regarding who is likely to rely on particular technologies and potential ramifications of these forms of communication on individuals' relationships and adjustment. In an online survey, 211 college students reported on their use of electronic communication with a parent who they identified as their closest family member. Results indicated that students who report more frequent phone conversations with parents also report more satisfying, intimate, and supportive parental relationships, but those students who use a social-networking site to communicate with parents report higher levels of loneliness, anxious attachment, as well as conflict within the parental relationship. The findings offer new evidence on how electronic communication technology with parents is related to adjustment in college students. Our study also suggests that further research is needed using longitudinal designs to understand better young adults' use of technology to communicate in today's society.

  2. Promoting innovation: Enhancing transdisciplinary opportunities for medical and engineering students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazile, Tiffany; Hostetter Shoop, Glenda; McDonough, Christine M; Van Citters, Douglas W

    2018-01-30

    Addressing current healthcare challenges requires innovation and collaboration. Current literature provides limited guidance in promoting these skills in medical school. One approach involves transdisciplinary training in which students from different disciplines work together toward a shared goal. We assessed the need for such a curriculum at Dartmouth College. We surveyed medical and engineering students' educational values; learning experiences; professional goals; and interest in transdisciplinary education and innovation. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Shared values among student groups included leadership development, innovation, collaboration, and resource sharing. Medical students felt their curriculum inadequately addressed creativity and innovation relative to their engineering counterparts (p design factors. Despite strong interest, collaboration was less than 50% of indicated interest. Medical and engineering students share an interest in the innovation process and need a shared curriculum to facilitate collaboration. A transdisciplinary course that familiarizes students with this process has the potential to promote physicians and engineers as leaders and innovators who can effectively work across industry lines. A transdisciplinary course was piloted in Spring 2017.

  3. Benefits/problems of enhancing students' intercultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    European nursing has responded to the challenges of multicultural society by integrating student exchange programmes into nursing education since the 1990s. For students, these programmes provide opportunities to study in another EU member state and to develop intercultural competence as part of the training. The aim of this study was to describe the process of gaining intercultural competence among British undergraduate nursing students during their study abroad in Finland. Fifteen British students participated in this study. Data were obtained from interviews, observations, background questionnaires and research diary notes. The data were analysed with Spradley's developmental research sequence (DRS) method. Campinha-Bacotes' model of cultural competence was used as a framework of rendering the results. Students' intercultural desire, i.e. their effort to become interculturally competent, turned out to be the foundation of the entire process. Study abroad is an intensive experience, and therefore the preparation, the selection of exchange students, the design of the programme and intercultural tutoring warrant careful attention.

  4. The Use of Prescription Drugs, Recreational Drugs, and "Soft Enhancers" for Cognitive Enhancement among Swiss Secondary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakoni, Evangelia; Schaub, Michael P; Maier, Larissa J; Glauser, Gaëlle-Vanessa; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-01-01

    The use of prescription or recreational drugs for cognitive enhancement (CE) is prevalent among students. However, the prevalence of CE among Swiss school students is unknown. We therefore performed a cross-sectional online survey including ≥ 16-year-old students from bridge-year schools (10th grade), vocational schools, and upper secondary schools (10th-12th grade) in the Canton of Zurich to investigate the prevalence of and motives for the use of prescription drugs, recreational drugs, and/or freely available soft enhancers for CE. A total of 1,139 students were included. Of these, 54.5% reported the use of prescription drugs (9.2%), recreational drugs including alcohol (6.2%), or soft enhancers (51.3%) explicitly for CE at least once in their lives. The last-year and last-month prevalence for CE considering all substances was 45.5% and 39.5%, respectively. Soft enhancers were the substances that were most commonly used (ever, last-year, and last-month, respectively), including energy drinks (33.3%, 28.4%, and 24.6%), coffee (29.8%, 25.1%, and 21.9%), and tobacco (12.6%, 9.3%, and 8.3%). CE with methylphenidate was less prevalent (4.0%, 2.8%, and 2.0%). However, the use of prescription drugs, alcohol, or illegal drugs for CE was reported by 13.3% of the participants. The most common motives for use were to stay awake and improve concentration. CE was more prevalent among students who reported higher levels of stress or performance pressure and students with psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, half of the school students had used a substance at least once in their lives to improve school performance. Soft enhancers were most commonly used. Prevalence rates were similar to those reported by Swiss university students, indicating that the use of prescription or recreational drugs for CE already occurs before starting higher education. Performance pressure, stress, and psychiatric disorders may be associated with CE.

  5. The Use of Prescription Drugs, Recreational Drugs, and "Soft Enhancers" for Cognitive Enhancement among Swiss Secondary School Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Liakoni

    Full Text Available The use of prescription or recreational drugs for cognitive enhancement (CE is prevalent among students. However, the prevalence of CE among Swiss school students is unknown. We therefore performed a cross-sectional online survey including ≥ 16-year-old students from bridge-year schools (10th grade, vocational schools, and upper secondary schools (10th-12th grade in the Canton of Zurich to investigate the prevalence of and motives for the use of prescription drugs, recreational drugs, and/or freely available soft enhancers for CE. A total of 1,139 students were included. Of these, 54.5% reported the use of prescription drugs (9.2%, recreational drugs including alcohol (6.2%, or soft enhancers (51.3% explicitly for CE at least once in their lives. The last-year and last-month prevalence for CE considering all substances was 45.5% and 39.5%, respectively. Soft enhancers were the substances that were most commonly used (ever, last-year, and last-month, respectively, including energy drinks (33.3%, 28.4%, and 24.6%, coffee (29.8%, 25.1%, and 21.9%, and tobacco (12.6%, 9.3%, and 8.3%. CE with methylphenidate was less prevalent (4.0%, 2.8%, and 2.0%. However, the use of prescription drugs, alcohol, or illegal drugs for CE was reported by 13.3% of the participants. The most common motives for use were to stay awake and improve concentration. CE was more prevalent among students who reported higher levels of stress or performance pressure and students with psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, half of the school students had used a substance at least once in their lives to improve school performance. Soft enhancers were most commonly used. Prevalence rates were similar to those reported by Swiss university students, indicating that the use of prescription or recreational drugs for CE already occurs before starting higher education. Performance pressure, stress, and psychiatric disorders may be associated with CE.

  6. “Academic Coaching” for Enhanced Learning, Higher Levels of Student Responsibility, and Greater Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Barkley, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between teachers and students has changed. Many writers have put forth hypotheses and ideas about how the current generation of students (Gen‐Y; the “Me Generation”) differs from previous generations. Others focus on teaching methods, course strategies, and technological tools that are effective in the new environment. The objective of this research is to investigate the possibility of “academic coaching” for enhanced student responsibility, higher levels of learning, and gre...

  7. Observations in equatorial anomaly region of total electron content enhancements and depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dashora

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A GSV 4004A GPS receiver has been operational near the crest of the equatorial anomaly at Udaipur, India for some time now. The receiver provides the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC, the phase and amplitude scintillation index, σφ and S4, respectively. This paper presents the first results on the nighttime TEC depletions associated with the equatorial spread F in the Indian zone. The TEC depletions are found to be very well correlated with the increased S4 index. A new feature of low-latitude TEC is also reported, concerning the observation of isolated and localized TEC enhancements in the nighttime low-latitude ionosphere. The TEC enhancements are not correlated with the S4 index. The TEC enhancements have also been observed along with the TEC depletions. The TEC enhancements have been interpreted as the manifestation of the plasma density enhancements reported by Le et al. (2003.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Ionospheric irregularities

  8. Teachers' Use of Interactive Technology to Enhance Students' Metacognition: Awareness of Student Learning and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Chun; Irving, Karen; Pape, Stephen; Owens, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Increased teacher awareness of student thinking and understanding enables teachers to better support students' learning by allowing for increased formative feedback that clarifies students' understanding and supports their construction of knowledge. However, many science teachers do not possess skills related to assessing student learning and…

  9. Enhancing mental activity and cognitive independence through information and communication technologies in students pharmacist cosmetologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Burlaka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research is to summarize the techniques used at the Department of Drug Technologyof Zaporozhye State Medical University to enhance mental performance and cognitive independence of pharmacists-cosmetologistsstudent. Results and discussion.In order to present summary information on the characteristics of cause-effect relationships for students we use lecture as method of teaching. Duration of lectures is two academic hours. Students focus on the presentation of all the sections of thematic plan. Integrated information environment in the form of multimedia content promotes effective learning of complex material. Analysis and synthesis of information obtained in lectures is held in the practice. Practical solution on making one or another cosmetic form consists of several stages. So initially, students analyze the task, offering the use of auxiliary substances and rational technology manufacturing. Then collectively with the teacher discuss the proposed solution of the problem. We found that at the stage of finding an effective choice of ingredients and manufacturing techniques learning level of the studentsgrows. For efficient memorization of cosmetic manufacturing process it is efficiently to apply a lecture discussionas a method of teaching. A group of students was divided into subgroups, each of which expresses a reasoned point of view on the proposed manufacturing technology. Each subgroup is appropriate to include informal leaders who contribute to competition between subgroups and discussion the manufacturing techniques. It is especially efficiently to create educational discussion on the use of Internet technologies. The role of the teacher in this technique is effective in moderating the debate. Modern communication services and communication in the form of electronic mail systems, online forums, document management systems, and multimedia services offer unlimited opportunities to exchange any information. At the present stage

  10. Applying Questioning or Reading Strategy to Review Technology Enhanced Coedited Notes of Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Cheng, Hsiao-Wei; Wu, Chiu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined whether applying questioning review better enhances elementary level students' learning from technology-enhanced coediting-based note taking than does traditional reading review. A nonequivalent comparison group quasi-experimental design was implemented and replicated on four independent units. Two sixth grade elementary…

  11. Guiding Curriculum Development: Student Perceptions for the Second Language Learning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürleyik, Sinan; Akdemir, Elif

    2018-01-01

    Developing curriculum to enhance student learning is the primer purpose of all curricular activities. Availability of recent tools supporting to teach various skills including reading, listening, speaking and writing has opened a new avenue for curricular activities in technology-enhanced learning environments. Understanding the perceptions of…

  12. Enhancement of biodegradability of real textile and dyeing wastewater by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Shijun; Sun, Weihua; Wang, Jianlong; Chen, Lvjun; Zhang, Youxue; Yu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    A textile and dyeing wastewater treatment plant is going to be upgraded due to the stringent discharge standards in Jiangsu province, China, and electron beam irradiation is considering to be used. In order to determine the suitable location of the electron accelerator in the process of wastewater treatment plant, the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on the biodegradability of various real wastewater samples collecting from the different stages of the wastewater treatment plant, the values of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5 ), and the ratio of BOD 5 and COD (BOD 5 /COD), were compared before and after EB irradiation. During EB irradiation process, color indices and absorbance at 254 nm wavelength (UV 254 ) of wastewater were also determined. The results showed that EB irradiation pre-treatment cannot improve the biodegradability of raw textile and dyeing wastewater, which contains a large amount of biodegradable organic matters. In contrast, as to the final effluent of biological treatment process, EB irradiation can enhance the biodegradability to 224%. Therefore, the promising way is to apply EB irradiation as a post-treatment of the conventional biological process. - Highlights: • Irradiation pre-treatment did not improve the raw textile wastewater biodegradability. • Irradiation can highly enhance the biodegradability of biological treated effluent. • EB irradiation can be used as a post-treatment after biological process.

  13. Light-Induced Conversion of Chemical Permeability to Enhance Electron and Molecular Transfer in Nanoscale Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgley, Renata; de Ruiter, Graham; Evmenenko, Guennadi; Bendikov, Tatyana; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E.

    2016-12-21

    In this paper, we demonstrate how photochemically enhancing the permeability of metal–organic assemblies results in a significant enhancement of the electrochemical activity of metal complexes located within the assembly. The molecular assemblies consist of different layers of redox-active metal complexes ([M(mbpy-py)3][PF6]2; M = Ru or Os) that are separated by redox-inactive spacers consisting of 1,4-bis[2-(4-pyridyl)ethenyl]benzene (BPEB) and PdCl2 of variable thicknesses (0–13.4 nm). UV-irradiation (λ = 254 nm) of our assemblies induces a photochemical reaction in the redox-inactive spacer increasing the permeability of the assembly. The observed increase was evident by trapping organic (nBu4NBF4) and inorganic (NiCl2) salts inside the assemblies, and by evaluating the electrochemical response of quinones absorbed inside the molecular assemblies before and after UV irradiation. The increase in permeability is reflected by higher currents and a change in the directionality of electron transfer, i.e., from mono- to bidirectional, between the redox-active metal complexes and the electrode surface. The supramolecular structure of the assemblies dominates the overall electron transfer properties and overrules possible electron transfer mediated by the extensive π-conjugation of its individual organic components.

  14. Enhancing Carrier Injection Using Graded Superlattice Electron Blocking Layer for UVB Light-Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2014-12-01

    We have studied enhanced carrier injection by having an electron blocking layer (EBL) based on a graded superlattice (SL) design. Here, we examine, using a selfconsistent 6 × 6 k.p method, the energy band alignment diagrams under equilibrium and forward bias conditions while also considering carrier distribution and recombination rates (Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates). The graded SL is based on AlxGa1-xN (larger bandgap) Al0:5Ga0:5N (smaller bandgap) SL, where x is changed from 0.8 to 0.56 in steps of 0.06. Graded SL was found to be effective in reducing electron leakage and enhancing hole injection into the active region. Due to our band engineering scheme for EBL, four orders-of-magnitude enhancement were observed in the direct recombination rate, as compared with the conventional bulk EBL consisting of Al0:8Ga0:2N. An increase in the spatial overlap of carrier wavefunction was obtained due to polarization-induced band bending in the active region. An efficient single quantum-well ultraviolet-B light-emitting diode was designed, which emits at 280 nm. This is the effective wavelength for water disinfection application, among others.

  15. Enhanced flashover strength in polyethylene nanodielectrics by secondary electron emission modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the correlation between secondary electron emission (SEE characteristics and impulse surface flashover in polyethylene nanodielectrics both theoretically and experimentally, and illustrates the enhancement of flashover voltage in low-density polyethylene (LDPE through incorporating Al2O3 nanoparticles. SEE characteristics play key roles in surface charging and gas desorption during surface flashover. This work demonstrates that the presence of Al2O3 nanoparticles decreases the SEE coefficient of LDPE and enhances the impact energy at the equilibrium state of surface charging. These changes can be explained by the increase of surface roughness and of surface ionization energy, and the strong interaction between nanoparticles and the polymer dielectric matrix. The surface charge and flashover voltage are calculated according to the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA model, which reveals that the positive surface charges are reduced near the cathode triple point, while the presence of more nanoparticles in high loading samples enhances the gas desorption. Consequently, the surface flashover performance of LDPE/Al2O3 nanodielectrics is improved.

  16. How Social-Media Enhanced Learning Platforms Support Students in Taking Responsibility for Their Own Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet; Mondahl, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The paper is based on the chapter “How Social Media Enhanced Learning Platforms Challenge and Motivate Students to Take Charge of Their Own Learning Processes – A Few Examples” from the publication Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using Social Technologies: Facebook, e...... and how social media enhanced learning platforms challenge and motivate students in their learning processes. Findings – The paper provides examples from didactic experiments carried out at the Copenhagen Business School and in Danish high schools. The authors focus on the changing role of teachers from...

  17. Gamification Approach to Enhance Students Engagement in Studying Language course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahyani Andharini Dwi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have attempted to utilize gamification to increase student engagement, motivation and achievement in the classroom with varying degrees of accomplishment. This research attempts to review of existing literature on the subject as well as the implementation of gamification on Language course. It aims to get better understanding of how gamification can efficiently be used in education. This analysis reveals that the underlying fact that make games engaging are already utilized in pedagogical practices. There are two important recommendations from this research. First, use gamified learning scenario as an activity, to encourage students trying new things and avoiding fear to make a mistakes. Secondly, the gamification in education setting needs students to participate deliberately to ensure the gamification retains the game-like nature.

  18. Life context of pharmacological academic performance enhancement among university students--a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildt, Elisabeth; Lieb, Klaus; Franke, Andreas Günter

    2014-03-07

    Academic performance enhancement or cognitive enhancement (CE) via stimulant drug use has received increasing attention. The question remains, however, whether CE solely represents the use of drugs for achieving better academic or workplace results or whether CE also serves various other purposes. The aim of this study was to put the phenomenon of pharmacological academic performance enhancement via prescription and illicit (psycho-) stimulant use (Amphetamines, Methylphenidate) among university students into a broader context. Specifically, we wanted to further understand students' experiences, the effects of use on students and other factors, such as pressure to perform in their academic and private lives. A sample of 18 healthy university students reporting the non-medical use of prescription and illicit stimulants for academic performance enhancement was interviewed in a face-to-face setting. The leading questions were related to the situations and context in which the students considered the non-medical use of stimulants. Based on the resultant transcript, two independent raters identified six categories relating to the life context of stimulant use for academic performance enhancement: Context of stimulant use beyond academic performance enhancement, Subjective experience of enhancement, Timing of consumption, Objective academic results, Side effects, Pressure to perform. The answers reveal that academic performance enhancement through the use of stimulants is not an isolated phenomenon that solely aims at enhancing cognition to achieve better academic results but that the multifaceted life context in which it is embedded is of crucial relevance. The participants not only considered the stimulants advantageous for enhancing academic performance, but also for leading an active life with a suitable balance between studying and time off. The most common reasons given for stimulant use were to maximize time, to increase motivation and to cope with memorizing

  19. Enhancing the learning experience of student radiographers with dyslexia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Irene [Cranfield University, Centre for Radiographic and Medical Studies, RMCS, Shrivenham, Swindon, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: irene.foster@uwe.ac.uk

    2008-02-15

    Widening participation policies and increased awareness of dyslexia has resulted in a marked increase in the numbers of students with dyslexia being identified in higher education in recent years. This study was conducted to not only gain a greater understanding of teaching and learning strategies, but also provide opportunities for improved learning experiences and achievement of students who do not respond well to written forms of assessment. Although a small scale study, the outcomes demonstrate a useful pilot for future scrutiny and basis for further study.

  20. Cross-sectional study of use of electronic media by secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatrungrit, Komsan; Hongsanguansri, Sirichai

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing concern about the negative psychological effects of excessive use of various electronic media by adolescents but the monitoring of these behaviors in low- and middle-income countries has some methodological flaws. Assess the use of all types of electronic media among secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. A stratified random sample of students from four schools in Bangkok completed a modified version of a questionnaire used in a major study in the United States. Among the 768 participants, 443 (57.7%) were female and 325 (42.3%) were male; their mean (sd) age was 15.4 (1.5) years. Almost all respondents had easy access to multiple types of electronic media; 94% had mobile phones, 77% had a television in their bedroom, and 47% had internet access in their bedroom. Over the prior day 39% had watched television shows or movies for more than 3 hours, 28% spent more than 3 hours on social networking sites, 25% listened to music for more than 3 hours, and 18% played computer games for more than 3 hours. Overall, 27% reported using electronic devices for more than 12 hours in the previous day. Only 19% reported parental rules about the use of electronic devices in the home that were regularly enforced. Time engaged in the various activities was not related to parental education or, with the exception of time playing computer games, to students' grade point average. Younger students and male students spent less time than older students and female students using these devices to engage in interactive social activities (e.g., talking on the phone or social networking), while male students spent much more time than female students playing games on the devices. Adolescents spend a substantial part of every single day using different types of electronic devices. Longitudinal studies with precise time logs of device usage and descriptions of the type of content accessed are needed to determine the extent to which these activities have negative (or

  1. Enhancement of tunnel conductivity by Cooper pair fluctuations in electron-hole bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimkin, D K; Lozovik, Yu E

    2012-01-01

    Influence of Cooper pair fluctuations that are precursor of pairing of electrons and holes located on opposite surfaces of topological insulator film on tunnel conductivity between the surfaces is investigated. Due to restrictions caused by momentum and energy conservation dependence of tunnel conductivity on external bias voltage has peak that becomes more prominent with decreasing of disorder and temperature. We have shown that Cooper pair fluctuations considerably enhance tunneling and height of the peak diverges in vicinity of critical temperature with critical index ν = 2. Width of the peak tends to zero in proximity of critical temperature. Pairing of electrons and holes can be suppressed by disorder and in vicinity of quantum critical point height of the peak also diverges as function of Cooper pair damping with critical index μ = 2.

  2. Enhanced Schottky signals from electron-cooled, coasting beams in a heavy-ion storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, C., E-mail: claude.krantz@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blaum, K.; Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Repnow, R.; Wolf, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-02-11

    Measurements at the Test Storage Ring of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg (Germany) have shown that the signal amplitude induced in a Schottky-noise pickup electrode by a coasting electron-cooled ion beam can be greatly enhanced by exposure of the latter to a perturbing radiofrequency signal which is detuned from the true beam revolution frequency. The centre frequencies obtained from harmonic analysis of the observed pickup signal closely follow those imposed on the ions by the electron cooling force. The phenomenon can be exploited to measure the true revolution frequency of ion beams of very low intensity, whose pure Schottky noise is too weak to be measurable under normal circumstances.

  3. Photosensitized electron transport across lipid vesicle walls: Enhancement of quantum yield by ionophores and transmembrane potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, Colja; Ford, William E.; Otvos, John W.; Calvin, Melvin

    1981-01-01

    The photosensitized reduction of heptylviologen in the bulk aqueous phase of phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing EDTA inside and a membrane-bound tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(2+) derivative is enhanced by a factor of 6.5 by the addition of valinomycin in the presence of K+. A 3-fold stimulation by gramicidin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone is observed. The results suggest that, under these conditions, the rate of photoinduced electron transfer across vesicle walls in the absence of ion carriers is limited by cotransport of cations. The rate of electron transfer across vesicle walls could be influenced further by generating transmembrane potentials with K+ gradients in the presence of valinomycin. When vesicles are made with transmembrane potentials, interior more negative, the quantum yield of heptylviologen reduction is doubled, and, conversely, when vesicles are made with transmembrane potentials, interior more positive, the quantum yield is decreased and approaches the value found in the absence of valinomycin. PMID:16593002

  4. Enhancement of negative hydrogen ion production in an electron cyclotron resonance source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugar-Zhabon, V D; Murillo, M T; Karyaka, V I

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for improving the negative hydrogen ion yield in the electron cyclotron resonance source with driven plasma rings where the negative ion production is realized in two stages. First, the hydrogen and deuterium molecules are excited in collisions with plasma electrons to high-laying Rydberg and high vibration levels in the plasma volume. The second stage leads to negative ion production through the process of repulsive attachment of low-energy electrons by the excited molecules. The low-energy electrons originate due to a bombardment of the plasma electrode surface by ions of a driven ring and the thermoelectrons produced by a rare earth ceramic electrode, which is appropriately installed in the source chamber. The experimental and calculation data on the negative hydrogen ion generation rate demonstrate that very low-energy thermoelectrons significantly enhance the negative-ion generation rate that occurs in the layer adjacent to the plasma electrode surface. It is found that heating of the tungsten filaments placed in the source chamber improves the discharge stability and extends the pressure operation range. (paper)

  5. Strain-Induced Enhancement of the Electron Energy Relaxation in Strongly Correlated Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gadermaier

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We use femtosecond optical spectroscopy to systematically measure the primary energy relaxation rate Γ_{1} of photoexcited carriers in cuprate and pnictide superconductors. We find that Γ_{1} increases monotonically with increased negative strain in the crystallographic a axis. Generally, the Bardeen-Shockley deformation potential theorem and, specifically, pressure-induced Raman shifts reported in the literature suggest that increased negative strain enhances electron-phonon coupling, which implies that the observed direct correspondence between a and Γ_{1} is consistent with the canonical assignment of Γ_{1} to the electron-phonon interaction. The well-known nonmonotonic dependence of the superconducting critical temperature T_{c} on the a-axis strain is also reflected in a systematic dependence T_{c} on Γ_{1}, with a distinct maximum at intermediate values (∼16  ps^{−1} at room temperature. The empirical nonmonotonic systematic variation of T_{c} with the strength of the electron-phonon interaction provides us with unique insight into the role of electron-phonon interaction in relation to the mechanism of high-T_{c} superconductivity as a crossover phenomenon.

  6. Block Copolymer-Tuned Fullerene Electron Transport Layer Enhances the Efficiency of Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsi-Kuei; Su, Yu-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Jiun; Wei, Kung-Hwa

    2016-09-21

    In this study, we enhanced the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells by employing an electron transfer layer (ETL) comprising [6,6]phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) and, to optimize its morphology, a small amount of the block copolymer polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO), positioned on the perovskite active layer. When incorporating 0.375 wt % PS-b-PEO into PC61BM, the PCE of the perovskite photovoltaic device increased from 9.4% to 13.4%, a relative increase of 43%, because of a large enhancement in the fill factor of the device. To decipher the intricate morphology of the ETL, we used synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering for determining the PC61BM cluster size, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for probing the surface, and transmission electron microscopy for observing the aggregation of PC61BM in the ETL. We found that the interaction between PS-b-PEO and PC61BM resulted in smaller PC61BM clusters that further aggregated into dendritic structures in some domains, a result of the similar polarities of the PS block and PC61BM; this behavior could be used to tune the morphology of the ETL. The optimal PS-b-PEO-mediated PC61BM cluster size in the ETL was 17 nm, a large reduction from 59 nm for the pristine PC61BM layer. This approach of incorporating a small amount of nanostructured block copolymer into a fullerene allowed us to effectively tune the morphology of the ETL on the perovskite active layer and resulted in enhanced fill factors of the devices and thus their device efficiency.

  7. Analysing tutor feedback to students: first steps towards constructing an electronic monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Whitelock

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Learning Environments provide the possibility of offering additional support to tutors, monitors and students in writing and grading essays and reports. They enable monitors to focus on the assignments that need most attention. This paper reports the findings from phase one of a feasibility study to assist the monitoring of student essays. It analyses tutor comments from electronically marked assignments and investigates how they match the mark awarded to each essay by the tutor. This involved carrying out a category analysis of the tutors' feedback to the students using Bales's 'interactional categories' as a theoretical basis. The advantage of this category system is that it distinguishes between task-orientated contributions, and the 'socio-emotive' element used by tutors to maintain student motivation. This reveals both how the tutor makes recommendations to improve the assignment content, and how they provide emotional support to students. Bales's analysis was presented to a group of tutors who felt an electronic feedback system based on this model would help them to get the right balance of responses to their students. These findings provide a modest start to designing a model of feedback for tutors of distance education students. Future work will entail refining these categories and testing this model with a larger sample from a different subject domain.

  8. The Study of the Electron Enhancements during Garuda-1 Satellite anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neflia, Neflia

    Garuda-1 Satellite is one of Indonesian geostationary satellite. On April 5, 2005 Garuda-1 experienced power loss. According to space weather condition, This anomaly could be caused by the enhancement of electron during the day of anomaly and geomagnetic activity. The electron enhancement during quite solar activity have been associated with solar wind speed and IMF. For this study I will use solar wind speed, IMF , AE, Kp, Dst and Plasma Flow Pressure. The result of this study show that before the electron fluxes exceed 1000 pfu on April 5 at 13 UT, solar wind plasma speed exceed 500 km/s from April 4 at 16 UT until April 6 at 21 UT, with maximum speed, 646 km/s, occur on April 5 at 9 UT. AE index also increase from April 4 at 16 UT until April 6 at 09 UT, with maximum AE, 1024 nT, occur on April 5 at 18 and 21 UT. From April 4 at 14 UT until April 5 at 7 UT, Bz index directed southward, with minimum Bz, -8.8 nT, occur at April 5 at 1 UT. Kp index also increase from April 4 at 16 UT until April 6 at 09 UT, with maximum Kp, 7, occur on April 5 at 0-3 UT. Dst decrease from April 4 at 21 UT until April 6 at 09 UT, with minimum Dst occur on April 5 at 5-6 UT. The plasma flow pressure increase from April4 at 18 UT until April 5 at 3 UT, with maximum pressure, 6.9 nPa, occur on April 4 at 21 UT. This result indicate that plasma condition was disturbed which started with geomagnetic subtorm in the Auroral region before electron flux increase.

  9. Nursing Students' Use of Electronic and Social Media: Law, Ethics, and E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the promotion of professionalism in nursing students with regard to the use of electronic and social media. Misuse of social media can lead to disciplinary actions and program dismissal for students and to legal actions and lawsuits for nursing programs. Programs are concemed about breaches of patient confidentiality and release of private or inappropriate information that jeopardizes clinical placements and relationships. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and National Council of State Boards of Nursing social media guidelines provide a foundation for promoting e-professionalism in students. Recent law cases involving students who were dismissed from nursing programs due to social media misuse are analyzed. Schools need policies that clearly establish expectations and the consequences of misuse of social media platforms. Lessons learned from the legal cases presented provide further guidance for both nursing students and nursing programs.

  10. Assessing student understanding of sound waves and trigonometric reasoning in a technology-rich, project-enhanced environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jennifer Anne

    This case study examined what student content understanding could occur in an inner city Industrial Electronics classroom located at Tree High School where project-based instruction, enhanced with technology, was implemented for the first time. Students participated in a project implementation unit involving sound waves and trigonometric reasoning. The unit was designed to foster common content learning (via benchmark lessons) by all students in the class, and to help students gain a deeper conceptual understanding of a sub-set of the larger content unit (via group project research). The objective goal of the implementation design unit was to have students gain conceptual understanding of sound waves, such as what actually waves in a wave, how waves interfere with one another, and what affects the speed of a wave. This design unit also intended for students to develop trigonometric reasoning associated with sinusoidal curves and superposition of sinusoidal waves. Project criteria within this design included implementation features, such as the need for the student to have a driving research question and focus, the need for benchmark lessons to help foster and scaffold content knowledge and understanding, and the need for project milestones to complete throughout the implementation unit to allow students the time for feedback and revision. The Industrial Electronics class at Tree High School consisted of nine students who met daily during double class periods giving 100 minutes of class time per day. The class teacher had been teaching for 18 years (mathematics, physics, and computer science). He had a background in engineering and experience teaching at the college level. Benchmark activities during implementation were used to scaffold fundamental ideas and terminology needed to investigate characteristics of sound and waves. Students participating in benchmark activities analyzed motion and musical waveforms using probeware, and explored wave phenomena using waves

  11. Low-energy rate enhancement in recombination processes of electrons into bare uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yong; Zeng Siliang; Duan Bin; Yan Jun; Wang Jianguo; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou; Dong Chenzhong; Ma Xinwen

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Dirac-Fork-Slater method combined with the multichannel quantum defect theory, the recombination processes of electrons into bare uranium ions (U 92+ ) are investigated in the relative energy range close to zero, and the x-ray spectrum emitted in the direct radiative recombination and cascades processes are simulated. Compared with the recent measurement, it is found that the rate enhancement comes from the additional populations on high Rydberg states. These additional populations may be produced by other recombination mechanisms, such as the external electric-magnetic effects and the many-body correlation effects, which still remains an open problem. (authors)

  12. Enhanced radiative recombination rate for electron-hole droplets in a silicon photonic crystal nanocavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Yasushi; Noda, Susumu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-07-01

    We investigate photoluminescence (PL) spectra and dynamics of clean silicon photonic crystal nanocavities at 10 K. A sharp emission peak due to the nanocavity mode has the largest intensity when the energy of the nanocavity mode is equal to the emission energy of the electron-hole droplets (EHDs). Time-resolved PL spectroscopy indicates that the PL lifetime of the EHD is reduced to as short as 1.2 ns by the nanocavity mode. A careful analysis of the lifetimes indicates that the radiative recombination rate for EHD is enhanced by a factor of larger than 5 by the Purcell effect.

  13. Enhancement in characteristics of sewage sludge and anaerobic treatability by electron beam pre-treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wooshin; Hwang, Moon-Hyun; Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Myun-Joo; Kim, In S.

    2009-02-01

    Electron beam was studied to enhance the biodegradability of sewage sludge. Changes in physicochemical characteristics of the sludge were examined with various irradiation doses, sludge thicknesses and exposure times. Irradiation thickness was suggested as the key factor affecting the efficiency of solublization of solid organic matter, whereas exposure time would be the most critical parameter in inducing cell lysis in sewage sludge. In addition, biogas production was improved as much as 22% when the sludge thickness was 0.5 cm with a dose of 7 kGy.

  14. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Longqing; Syed, Ahad; Wong, Kimchong; Wang, Xianbin

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. (paper)

  15. Electron beam irradiation: a novel technology to enhance the quality of soybean seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalla, Shashi; Srinivasan, K.; Singh, Subadas; Thakur, Manju; Sharma, S.K.; Pramod, R.; Dwivedi, J.; Bapna, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Soybean seeds, rich in protein and oil, maintain their germinability only for short durations under ambient conditions. Loss of viability of stored seeds often hampers soybean production in harsh environments worldwide. Physiological factors favored by high temperature and high moisture content accelerate the seed deterioration in the tropics. Several chemical and physical treatments are being used to enhance quality. Irradiation is a novel technology for food preservation and is gaining importance all over the world. Low doses of irradiation bring about improvement in quality of food/seeds, which can be beneficial in several ways. Electron Beam (EB) irradiation is a new approach in this area. The objective of present study was to investigate the effect of EB irradiation in enhancing the quality of low vigour soybean seeds

  16. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Field trips as an intervention to enhance pharmacy students' positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine whether students' experience of field trips influenced their perceptions regarding a management module as part of their training as future pharmacists. Methods. A mixed-method sequential exploratory research design was used. Data were gathered through written narratives and focus group interviews, ...

  18. Use of Creative Space in Enhancing Students' Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Maja; Atlay, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the effect teaching in a specially designed "creative learning space" has on students' engagement with the learning process, their motivation to explore, experience and discover (i.e. to be creative), and on them becoming more active, autonomous learners. It examines the notion of creative space, how it differs from teaching…

  19. Enhancing Student Engagement: A Group Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Aakash

    2014-01-01

    Computing professionals work in groups and collaborate with individuals having diverse backgrounds and behaviors. The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) characterizes that a computing program must enable students to attain the ability to analyze a problem, design and evaluate a solution, and work effectively on teams to…

  20. Developing a Technology Enhanced CS0 Course for Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkila, Erno; Kaila, Erkki; Lindén, Rolf; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi; Sutinen, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    The CS0 course in the curriculum typically has the role of introducing students into basic concepts and terminology of computer science. Hence, it is used to form a base on which the subsequent programming courses can build on. However, much of the effort to build better methodologies for courses is spent on introductory programming courses…

  1. Enhancing L2 Reading Comprehension with Hypermedia Texts: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Rucks, Paula; Howles, Les; Lake, William M.

    2015-01-01

    This study extends current research about L2 hypermedia texts by investigating the combined use of audiovisual features including: (a) Contextualized images, (b) rollover translations, (c) cultural information, (d) audio explanations and (e) comprehension check exercises. Specifically, student perceptions of hypermedia readings compared to…

  2. Short Videos to Enhance Student Learning in Microbiological Laboratory Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann

    This poster describes the use of short videos demonstrating basic microbiological techniques in a second semester course in Biological Chemistry at the Technical University of Denmark. Videos were a useful complement to the laboratory compendium, allowing students to focus on conceptual...

  3. Technology and Pedagogy: Using Big Data to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Christopher Greg

    2016-01-01

    The "big data revolution" has penetrated many fields, from network monitoring to online retail. Education and learning are quickly becoming part of it, too, because today, course delivery platforms can collect unprecedented amounts of behavioral data about students as they interact with learning content online. This data includes, for…

  4. Tangible Technology-Enhanced Learning for Improvement of Student Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneva, Reneta P.; Gelsomini, Federico; Kanev, Kamen; Bottoni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration among students in the course of learning plays an important role in developing communication skills. In particular, it helps for team building and brainstorming on solutions of complex problems. While an effective group organization is critical for the success of such collaborative learning, many instructors would make arbitrary…

  5. Effective Compiler Error Message Enhancement for Novice Programming Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Brett A.; Glanville, Graham; Iwashima, Ricardo; McDonnell, Claire; Goslin, Kyle; Mooney, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Programming is an essential skill that many computing students are expected to master. However, programming can be difficult to learn. Successfully interpreting compiler error messages (CEMs) is crucial for correcting errors and progressing toward success in programming. Yet these messages are often difficult to understand and pose a barrier to…

  6. Nature Journaling: Enhancing Students' Connections to the Environment through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormell, Janita; Ivey, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Today's youth are increasingly spending more time indoors and less time outside. As a result, many children have a "nature deficit" (Louv 2005) and little awareness of their role in nature. In this article, the first author describes how she shared her passion for nature with her sixth-grade students through nature journaling and how her…

  7. Using real-worldness and cultural difference to enhance student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thentic early childhood learning experiences with the aim to develop both knowledge and skills which are transferable to ... processes and activities (Martin, 2009). Ashton (2010) suggests that renewed ... students being unable to make the transition from theory to practice with confidence and effectiveness; it is therefore ...

  8. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Enhancing Teacher-Student Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, John H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Defines Neurolinguistic Programming (NCP) and discusses specific dimensions of the model that have applications for classroom teaching. Describes five representational systems individuals use to process information and gives examples of effective and ineffective teacher-student communication for each system. (MCF)

  9. Enhancing Student Teachers' Teaching Skills through a Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albhnsawy, Abeer Abdalhalim; Aliweh, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a blended learning program on student teachers' teaching skills in an undergraduate microteaching course. The blended learning program lasted for nine weeks. This program aimed at integrating social network tasks and face-to-face teaching activities. Pre- and post-tests were administered to assess student…

  10. LOL Teacher! Using Humor to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Shelly

    2015-01-01

    Laughing with students can help them connect on a deeper level with the teacher and the learning. This article offers the following four strategies to incorporate humor into teaching: (1) Integrate humorous bits to boost engagement; (2) Choose humorous materials; (3) Create interest with humorous web tools and apps; and (4) Teach with silly…

  11. Enhancing Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Students' Misconceptions in Learning Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naah, Basil Mugaga

    2015-01-01

    Preservice teachers enrolled in a modified introductory chemistry course used an instructional rubric to improve and evaluate their understanding of students' misconceptions in learning various chemistry concepts. A sample of 79 preservice teachers first explored the state science standards to identify chemistry misconceptions associated with the…

  12. Does concept mapping enhance learning outcome of nursing students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafarpour, Molouk; Aazami, Sanaz; Mozafari, Mosayeb

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the concept mapping as a teaching method in the academic achievement of nursing students. This quasi-experimental study was conducted using a crossover design among two groups of total 64 nursing students. Participants were asked to create concept maps (group A) or were evaluated with the traditional method of quiz (group B) for eight weeks and then take a cumulative test (no. 1). Consequently, subjects used the alternate method for another eight weeks and then take the second cumulative test (no. 2). The results of this study showed that the mean scores for cumulative tests (both no. 1 and no. 2) was higher in the group that engaged in map construction compared to the group that only take the quizzes. In addition, there was a gradual increase in the mean scores of developed map during the eight sessions of intervention. In conclusion, concept mapping has a positive effect on students' academic achievement. These findings could provide valuable evidence for establishing concept mapping as a continuous teaching strategy for nursing students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Complementing theory with practice to enhance Students' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Muhammad Imran; Imran, Faiqa; Ahmed, Syed Ahsanuddin; Rahim, Ikram Ur; Shafiq, Anser; Qayum, Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Combining cognitive skills teaching related to the techniques leads to better understanding in a skill training course; but still there a substantial disagreement in curriculum on such combinations. This study aims to help guide the designers in making the outline of instructional plan for a Clinical Skills Module (CSM) for the undergraduates. Objectives were to assess performance of students on a clinical skill after training by two different models of (hands-on only or with cognitive skills) instructions and explore their perception on the employment of educational strategies through Focus Group Discussions (FGD) through a Sequential mixed method study design: (1) Quantitative (Pre- and post-assessments and comparing their results (2) Qualitative (Exploration of perspectives through constructivist approach using qualitative phenomenological design) The study was conducted during the month of September, 2015 at Rabigh Medical College, King Abdul Aziz University, Jeddah. Students entering fourth year were randomized to two groups to participate in pre-post OSCE using global rating scale and their scores were compared. The examiners were kept blinded to the randomization of students undergoing two separate training methods. The test group (group A) was trained for both procedural as well as cognitive skills whereas the control group (Group-B) was trained only with hands-on practice. Later their perception about the addition of cognitive skills to improve of procedural skills was explored through focus group discussions. The recorded audio tapes of FGDs were transcribed and analysed thematically. Triangulation of themes and trends was achieved by relating the content analysis to the relevant frequency of quotes. Auditing of the data verification was done by all the authors separately.. A total of 42 students completed both pre- and post-tests. As a result, student performance in OSCE significantly increased from pre- to post-test (pdisadvantages of combining theory

  14. Technology-Enhanced Pathology Education: Nigerian Medical Students Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhriterhire, Raymond A.; Orkuma, Joseph A.; Jegede, Olushola O.; Omotosho, Ayodele J.; Adekwu, Amali

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of pathology education traditionally through instructor centred didactic lectures, small group tutorials, and practical demonstrations using microscope glass slides, gross pot specimens and autopsy sessions, is paving way for electronic learner-centred methods. Successful adoption and implementation of rapidly advancing educational…

  15. Does integrating research into the prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate curriculum enhance students' clinical practice? An interview study on students' perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qaroot, Bashar S; Sobuh, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Problem-based learning (where rather than feeding students the knowledge, they look for it themselves) has long been thought of as an ideal approach in teaching because it would encourage students to acquire knowledge from an undetermined medium of wrong and right answers. However, the effect of such approach in the learning experience of prosthetics and orthotics students has never been investigated. This study explores the implications of integrating problem-based learning into teaching on the students' learning experience via implementing a research-informed clinical practice module into the curriculum of last year prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate students at the University of Jordan (Amman, Jordan). Qualitative research pilot study. Grounded theory approach was used based on the data collected from interviewing a focus group of four students. Students have identified a number of arguments from their experience in the research-informed clinical practice where, generally speaking, students described research-informed clinical practice as a very good method of education. Integrating problem-based learning into teaching has many positive implications. In particular, students pointed out that their learning experience and clinical practice have much improved after the research-informed clinical practice. Findings from this investigation demonstrate that embedding problem-based learning into prosthetics and orthotics students' curriculum has the potential to enhance students' learning experience, particularly students' evidence-based practice. This may lead to graduates who are more knowledgeable and thus who can offer the optimal patient care (i.e. clinical practice). © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  16. The Impact of Electronic Mind Maps on Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaidat, Mohammad Mahmoud Talal

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of the electronic mind map (IMindMap) on the development of reading comprehension among the ninth grade students in Jordan. The sample of the study consisted of two ninth grade sections from two public schools in Irbid First Directorate during the academic 2016-2017. Each section consisted of (30)…

  17. Engagement with Electronic Screen Media among Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Beth A.; Ziegler, William; Gill, Susan; Salkin, Donna

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relative engagement potential of four types of electronic screen media (ESM): animated video, video of self, video of a familiar person engaged with an immersive virtual reality (VR) game, and immersion of self in the VR game. Forty-two students with autism, varying in age and expressive communication ability, were…

  18. Student Perceptions of a Trial of Electronic Text Matching Software: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Lindemann, Iris; Marshall, Kelly; Wilkinson, Grette

    2005-01-01

    It is accepted that using electronic detection methods has benefits within an overall strategy to promote academic integrity in an institution. Little attention has been paid to obtaining student perceptions to evaluate the cost/benefit of using such methods. This study reports on the evaluation of a trial of Turnitin software. 728 students…

  19. Electronic Cigarette Use among College Students: Links to Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Smoking, and Heavy Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Andrew K.; Gottlieb, Joshua C.; Cohen, Lee M.; Trotter, David R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use continues to rise, and current data regarding use of e-cigarettes among college students are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine e-cigarette use and the relation of such use with gender, race/ethnicity, traditional tobacco use, and heavy drinking. Participants and Methods: A sample of…

  20. Stitching Codeable Circuits: High School Students' Learning about Circuitry and Coding with Electronic Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litts, Breanne K.; Kafai, Yasmin B.; Lui, Debora A.; Walker, Justice T.; Widman, Sari A.

    2017-01-01

    Learning about circuitry by connecting a battery, light bulb, and wires is a common activity in many science classrooms. In this paper, we expand students' learning about circuitry with electronic textiles, which use conductive thread instead of wires and sewable LEDs instead of lightbulbs, by integrating programming sensor inputs and light…

  1. Using Electronic Portfolios to Foster Literacy and Self-Regulated Learning Skills in Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrami, Philip C.; Venkatesh, Vivek; Meyer, Elizabeth J.; Wade, C. Anne

    2013-01-01

    The research presented here is a continuation of a line of inquiry that explores the impacts of an electronic portfolio software called ePEARL, which is a knowledge tool designed to support the key phases of self-regulated learning (SRL)--forethought, performance, and self-reflection--and promote student learning. Participants in this study were…

  2. Technology Trumping Sleep: Impact of Electronic Media and Sleep in Late Adolescent Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Kerry L.; Chung, Chia-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore with what impact evening media use interfered with either schoolwork and/or sufficient healthy sleep. In addition, the study examined with what impact there may be a compromise in students' ability or aptitude for positive academic success, related to either lack of sleep or electronic media use.…

  3. Using an educational electronic documentation system to help nursing students accurately identify patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobocik, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative research study used a pretest/posttest design and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate "related to" statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case study. Students in the sample population were senior nursing students in a bachelor of science nursing program in the northeastern United States. Two distinct groups were used for a control and intervention group. The intervention group used the educational electronic documentation system for three class assignments. Both groups were given a pretest and posttest case study. The Accuracy Tool was used to score the students' responses to the related to statement of a nursing diagnosis given at the end of the case study. The scores of the Accuracy Tool were analyzed, and then the numeric scores were placed in SPSS, and the paired t test scores were analyzed for statistical significance. The intervention group's scores were statistically different from the pretest scores to posttest scores, while the control group's scores remained the same from pretest to posttest. The recommendation to nursing education is to use the educational electronic documentation system as a teaching pedagogy to help nursing students prepare for nursing practice. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  4. Exploring Conditions to Enhance Student/Host Family Interaction Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Susan M.; Schmidt-Rinehart, Barbara C.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of task-based learning in the study abroad experience in order to enhance interaction with the host family. Tasks were incorporated into a Family Interaction Journal and implemented under four evolving, though different, conditions over a 5-year period. The conditions were: (1) home campus administered/student…

  5. Enhancing Student Learning and Teacher Development in Transnational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joan

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the views and experiences of UK teaching staff delivering transnational education. The report explores some of the current practice and prospective ways to promote equitable and high-quality learning and teaching. It concludes with a number of recommendations for UK higher education providers on working to enhance the…

  6. Using a Student-Manipulated Model to Enhance Student Learning in a Large Lecture Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kyle; Steer, David; McConnell, David; Owens, Katharine

    2010-01-01

    Despite years of formal education, approximately one-third of all undergraduate students still cannot explain the causes of the seasons. Student manipulation of a handheld model is one approach to teaching this concept; however, the large number of students in many introductory classes can dissuade instructors from utilizing this teaching…

  7. Senior physiotherapy students as standardised patients for junior students enhances self-efficacy and satisfaction in both junior and senior students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrusiak, Allison M; Isles, Rosemary; Chang, Angela T; Choy, Nancy L Low; Toppenberg, Rowena; McCook, Donna; Smith, Michelle D; O'Leary, Karina; Brauer, Sandra G

    2014-05-23

    Standardised patients are used in medical education to expose students to clinical contexts and facilitate transition to clinical practice, and this approach is gaining momentum in physiotherapy programs. Expense and availability of trained standardised patients are factors limiting widespread adoption, and accessing clinical visits with real patients can be challenging. This study addressed these issues by engaging senior students as standardised patients for junior students. It evaluated how this approach impacted self-reported constructs of both the junior and senior students. Learning activities for undergraduate physiotherapy students were developed in five courses (Neurology, Cardiorespiratory and three Musculoskeletal courses) so that junior students (Year 2 and 3) could develop skills and confidence in patient interview, physical examination and patient management through their interaction with standardised patients played by senior students (Year 4). Surveys were administered before and after the interactions to record junior students' self-reported confidence, communication, preparedness for clinic, and insight into their abilities; and senior students' confidence and insight into what it is like to be a patient. Satisfaction regarding this learning approach was surveyed in both the junior and senior students. A total of 253 students completed the surveys (mean 92.5% response rate). Across all courses, junior students reported a significant (all P Senior students demonstrated a significant improvement in their confidence in providing feedback and insight into their own learning (P senior students as standardised patients resulted in positive experiences for both junior and senior students across a variety of physiotherapy areas, activities, and stages within a physiotherapy program. These findings support the engagement of senior students as standardised patients to enhance learning within physiotherapy programs, and may have application across other

  8. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  9. Critical Thinking and Collaboration: A Strategy to Enhance Student Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald A. Styron, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    In numerous studies relative to collaboration and critical thinking, an instructional strategy called Team- Based Learning has proven to be an effective approach to teaching and learning. Team-Based Learning utilizes a specific sequence of individual work, group work and immediate feedback to create a motivational framework in which students increasingly hold each other accountable for coming to class prepared and contributing to discussion. Using an action research conceptual model diffusion...

  10. Life context of pharmacological academic performance enhancement among university students – a qualitative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Academic performance enhancement or cognitive enhancement (CE) via stimulant drug use has received increasing attention. The question remains, however, whether CE solely represents the use of drugs for achieving better academic or workplace results or whether CE also serves various other purposes. The aim of this study was to put the phenomenon of pharmacological academic performance enhancement via prescription and illicit (psycho-) stimulant use (Amphetamines, Methylphenidate) among university students into a broader context. Specifically, we wanted to further understand students’ experiences, the effects of use on students and other factors, such as pressure to perform in their academic and private lives. Methods A sample of 18 healthy university students reporting the non-medical use of prescription and illicit stimulants for academic performance enhancement was interviewed in a face-to-face setting. The leading questions were related to the situations and context in which the students considered the non-medical use of stimulants. Results Based on the resultant transcript, two independent raters identified six categories relating to the life context of stimulant use for academic performance enhancement: Context of stimulant use beyond academic performance enhancement, Subjective experience of enhancement, Timing of consumption, Objective academic results, Side effects, Pressure to perform. Conclusions The answers reveal that academic performance enhancement through the use of stimulants is not an isolated phenomenon that solely aims at enhancing cognition to achieve better academic results but that the multifaceted life context in which it is embedded is of crucial relevance. The participants not only considered the stimulants advantageous for enhancing academic performance, but also for leading an active life with a suitable balance between studying and time off. The most common reasons given for stimulant use were to maximize time, to increase

  11. Investigating student learning in upper-division laboratory courses on analog electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzer, Mackenzie

    2017-04-01

    There are many important learning goals associated with upper-division laboratory instruction; however, until recently, relatively little work has focused on assessing the impact of these laboratory-based courses on students. As part of an ongoing, in-depth investigation of student learning in upper-division laboratory courses on analog electronics, we have been examining the extent to which students enrolled in these courses develop a robust and functional understanding of both canonical electronics topics (e.g., diode, transistor, and op-amp circuits) and foundational circuits concepts (e.g., Kirchhoff's laws and voltage division). This focus on conceptual understanding is motivated in part by a large body of research revealing significant student difficulties with simple dc circuits at the introductory level and by expectations that students finish electronics courses with a level of understanding suitable for building circuits for a variety of practical, real-world applications. We have also recently extended the scope of our investigation to include more laboratory-focused learning goals such as the development of (1) troubleshooting proficiency and (2) circuit chunking and design abilities. This talk will highlight findings from written questions and interview tasks that have been designed to probe student understanding in sufficient depth to identify conceptual and reasoning difficulties. Specific examples will be used to illustrate the ways in which this research may inform instruction in upper-division laboratory courses on analog electronics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. DUE-1323426, DUE-1022449, DUE-0962805, and DUE-0618185.

  12. A Development English Language Learning Management Strategies Model to Enhance Communicative Competence for High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitiya Ruennakarn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives for this research are to 1 build a development English language learning management strategies model to enhance communicative competence for high school students 2 study the results of using the model. A target group is seven English teachers in Pibulwittayalai School and the sample for studying the results of model to students are ten English club students in Pibulwittayalai School.The research tools are focus group discussion forms, communication plans, English skills evaluation forms, communicative competence test, communicative competence evaluation forms and 21st century skills evaluation forms. This model is examined by connoisseurship.The statistics for analyzing data are frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation and Wilcoxon test. The results of the research were as follows: 1. The development English language learning management strategies model to enhance communicative competence for high school students had4components ; 1 SWOT–Analysis, 2 strategy development, 3 strategy assessment and 4 strategy adjustment.This model had 6 strategies such as 1 genius academic strategy 2 English through AEC 3 English through World Class 4 enhancing for genius academic in communication with foreigners 5 enhancing English through world class standard and 6 enhancing for potential in English skills learning through world class standard. These were merged as only one strategy as “ Development of students’ potential for communication”. 2. The results of using the model comprised of 2.1 The results to teachers were teachers could analyze SWOT- analysis for determining strength, weakness,opportunity and threat about English language learning management, received guideline and could appropriately and efficiently construct strategies of English language learning management to enhance communicative competence. 2.2 The results to students: The students had 4 English skills, such as listening,speaking, reading and writing. It was

  13. Enhanced phenol-photodegradation by particulate semiconductor mixtures: interparticle electron-jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, C; Dhanalakshmi, R; Gomathisankar, P; Manikandan, G

    2010-04-15

    Degradation of phenol on suspended TiO(2), ZnO, CdO, Fe(2)O(3), CuO, ZnS and Nb(2)O(5) particles under UV-A light exhibit identical photokinetic behavior; follow first-order kinetics, display linear dependence on the photon flux and slowdown with increase of pH. All the semiconductors show sustainable photocatalytic activity. Dissolved O(2) is essential for the photodegradation and oxidizing agents like H(2)O(2), Na(2)BO(3), K(2)S(2)O(8), KBrO(3), KIO(3) and KIO(4), reducing agents such as NaNO(2) and Na(2)SO(3) and sacrificial electron donors like hydroquinone, diphenyl amine and trimethyl amine enhance the degradation. However, the photocatalysis is insensitive to pre-sonication. Two particulate semiconductors present together, under suspension and at continuous motion, enhance the photocatalytic degradation up to about four-fold revealing interparticle electron-jump. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PMSE strength during enhanced D region electron densities: Faraday rotation and absorption effects at VHF frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Jorge L.; Röttger, Jürgen; Rapp, Markus

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we study the effects of absorption and Faraday rotation on measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). We found that such effects can produce significant reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the D region electron densities (Ne) are enhanced, and VHF radar systems with linearly polarized antennas are used. In particular we study the expected effects during the strong solar proton event (SPE) of July 2000, also known as the Bastille day flare event. During this event, a strong anti-correlation between the PMSE SNR and the D-region Ne was found over three VHF radar sites at high latitudes: Andøya, Kiruna, and Svalbard. This anti-correlation has been explained (a) in terms of transport effects due to strong electric fields associated to the SPE and (b) due to a limited amount of aerosol particles as compared to the amount of D-region electrons. Our calculations using the Ne profiles used by previous researchers explain most, if not all, of the observed SNR reduction in both time (around the SPE peak) and altitude. This systematic effect, particularly the Faraday rotation, should be recognized and tested, and possibly avoided (e.g., using circular polarization), in future observations during the incoming solar maximum period, to contribute to the understanding of PMSE during enhanced D region Ne.

  15. Phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation free-electron laser with a normal modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhouyu; Li, Heting; Jia, Qika

    2017-09-01

    A phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation free-electron laser (FEL) was proposed to increase the harmonic conversion efficiency of seeded FELs and promote the radiation wavelength towards the X-ray spectral region. However, this requires a specially designed transverse gradient undulator (TGU) as the modulator to couple the transverse and longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. In this paper, the generation of the phase-merging effect is explored using the natural field gradient of a normal planar undulator. In this method, a vertical dispersion on the electron beam is introduced and then the dispersed beam travels through a normal modulator in a vertical off-axis orbit where the vertical field gradient is selected properly in terms of the vertical dispersion strength and modulation amplitude. The phase-merging effect will be generated after passing through the dispersive chicane. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for a seeded soft X-ray FEL based on parameters of the Shanghai Soft X-ray FEL project are presented. Compared with a TGU modulator, using the natural gradient of a normal planar modulator has the distinct advantage that the gradient can be conveniently tuned in quite a large range by adjusting the beam orbit offset.

  16. Plasmonic photocatalytic reactions enhanced by hot electrons in a one-dimensional quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The plasmonic endothermic oxidation of ammonium ions in a spinning disk reactor resulted in light energy transformation through quantum hot charge carriers (QHC, or quantum hot electrons, during a chemical reaction. It is demonstrated with a simple model that light of various intensities enhance the chemical oxidization of ammonium ions in water. It was further observed that light illumination, which induces the formation of plasmons on a platinum (Pt thin film, provided higher processing efficiency compared with the reaction on a bare glass disk. These induced plasmons generate quantum hot electrons with increasing momentum and energy in the one-dimensional quantum well of a Pt thin film. The energy carried by the quantum hot electrons provided the energy needed to catalyze the chemical reaction. The results indicate that one-dimensional confinement in spherical coordinates (i.e., nanoparticles is not necessary to provide an extra excited state for QHC generation; an 8 nm Pt thin film for one-dimensional confinement in Cartesian coordinates can also provide the extra excited state for the generation of QHC.

  17. Electronic white cane with GPS radar-based concept as blind mobility enhancement without distance limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Suharsono; Handafiah, Finna; Aprilliyani, Ria; Udhiarto, Arief

    2018-02-01

    The Indonesian Ministry of Social Affairs, in July 2012, informed that the number of blind in Indonesia has been the largest among to the people with other disabilities. The most common tools utilized to help the blind was a conventional cane which has limited features and therefore it was difficult to be used as a mobilization tools. Moreover, the conventional cane cannot assist them or their family when the blind gets lost. In this research, we designed and implemented an electronic white cane with the concept of radar and global positioning system (GPS). The purpose of this research was to design and develop an electronic white cane which can enhance the mobility of the blind without distance coverage limitation. Utilizing ultrasonic sensors as a distance measurement and a servo motor as an actuator, the produced radar system is able to map an area with maximum distance and coverage angle of 5 meters and 180° respectively. The blind senses the obstacle around them from the vibration generated by five vibration motors. The vibration becomes more intense when the obstacle is detected closer. In addition, we implemented a GPS to monitor the blind's position and allow their family to find them easily when the blind need a help. Based on the tests performed, we have successfully developed an electronic white cane that can be a solution to improve the blind's mobility.

  18. Reading Ella: using literary patients to enhance nursing students' reflective thinking in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Shawn

    2013-11-23

    This action research study was designed to explore, in-depth, how 70 senior nursing students experienced an assignment that involved reading and reflecting on a short story, Ella, and the educator's experience during the process. Four sources of data were collected: student reflections, field notes, a classroom process recording by an expert educator/observer, and a focus group interview. Four themes emerged: (1) student reflections revealed their inner, often hidden landscapes; (2) Ella prompted clarification of the past and/or triggered future projective thinking; (3) Ella clarified difficult-to-teach concepts; and (4) the interface between students' thoughts and teacher responses provided a platform of connectivity. I propose that reading well-written stories may enhance students' clinical reasoning skills and ethical comportment within the confines of a classroom. In addition, when students are introduced to literary patients like Ella, they can dwell with the characters at a more peaceful pace which, in itself, may encourage reflectivity.

  19. Using a kinesthetic learning strategy to engage nursing student thinking, enhance retention, and improve critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Elissa A

    2014-06-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a kinesthetic learning strategy used during a cardiac lecture to engage students and to improve the use of classroom-acquired knowledge in today's challenging clinical settings. Nurse educators are constantly faced with finding new ways to engage students, stimulate critical thinking, and improve clinical application in a rapidly changing and complex health care system. Educators who deviate from the traditional pedagogy of didactic, content-driven teaching to a concept-based, student-centered approach using active and kinesthetic learning activities can enhance engagement and improve clinical problem solving, communication skills, and critical thinking to provide graduates with the tools necessary to be successful. The goals of this learning activity were to decrease the well-known classroom-clinical gap by enhancing engagement, providing deeper understanding of cardiac function and disorders, enhancing critical thinking, and improving clinical application. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Enhancing student motivation using LectureTools: A cloud-based teaching and learning platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Patrio Chiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A cloud-based teaching and learning platform, LectureTools, was piloted at City University of Hong Kong in the 2012-13 academic year. LectureTools is an online platform that provides a suite of cloud-based teaching and learning applications. It combines the functions of interactive presentation, real-time student response system, student inquiry and online note-taking synchronised with the presentation slides, into one cloud-based platform. A comprehensive study investigated the effectiveness of the platform for enhancing student motivation among graduate (n=158 and undergraduate (n=96 students. Both groups of students reported enhanced motivation when using LectureTools. The scores on all six learning motivation scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, a psychometric instrument based on the cognitive view of motivation, increased when students engaged with the tool in class. Those who used the tool scored significantly higher on intrinsic goal orientation than those who did not use the tool. The students’ quantitative feedback showed that they found the tool useful and that it improved their motivation. Qualitative feedback from the instructors indicated that the tool was useful for engaging passive students. They reported that the most useful function was the interactive online questions with real-time results, while the in-class student inquiry function was difficult to use in practice.

  1. PBL wrap up sessions: an approach to enhance generic skills in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Zubia; Ahsin, Sadia

    2011-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) tutorials are being used in various medical schools world wide. Students' active participation is a must for the success of a teaching program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PBL Wrap-up sessions in an integrated modular medical curriculum in enhancing the generic skills of medical students. This study was conducted on 100 students of 2nd year MBBS who had been taking PBL sessions since 1 1/2 years. Each session concluded with a wrap-up session where students demonstrated their acquired knowledge in the form of PowerPoint presentations, concept maps, skits, models etc. A questionnaire based survey was conducted to find out overall effectiveness of PBL sessions including wrap-up sessions. The questionnaire comprised of 15 questions. Students were asked to rate all those sessions on a likert scale of 1 to 5. Student's responses showed 'Moderate improvement' in 8 out of 15 skills like communication with peers and teachers, presentation skills, self confidence, application of acquired knowledge, using internet and other resources and understanding group dynamics. Improvement in abilities like problem solving, time management, creativity, motivation in studies and self-directed learning was 'Minimal'. In addition students recommended continuation of PBL in the same way for future classes. PBL with wrap-up sessions contributed in bringing moderate enhancement of generic learning skills in students which were not properly addressed in the traditional curriculum and are therefore recommended for future implementation.

  2. Effective use of pause procedure to enhance student engagement and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhel, Rachna; Thaman, Richa Ghay

    2014-08-01

    Active learning strategies have been documented to enhance learning. We created an active learning environment in neuromuscular physiology lectures for first year medical students by using 'Pause Procedure'. One hundred and fifty medical students class is divided into two Groups (Group A and Group B) and taught in different classes. Each lecture of group A (experimental Group) undergraduate first year medical students was divided into short presentations of 12-15 min each. Each presentation was followed by a pause of 2-3min, three times in a 50 min lecture. During the pauses students worked in pairs to discuss and rework their notes. Any queries were directed towards the teacher and discussed forthwith. At the end of each lecture students were given 2-3 minutes to write down the key points they remembered about the lecture (free-recall). Fifteen days after completion of the lectures a 30 item MCQ test was administered to measure long term recall. Group B (control Group) received the same lectures without the use of pause procedure and was similarly tested. Experimental Group students did significantly better on the MCQ test (p-valuelecture recall. Pause procedure is a good active learning strategy which helps students review their notes, reflect on them, discuss and explain the key ideas with their partners. Moreover, it requires only 6-7 min of the classroom time and can significantly enhance student learning.

  3. Enhanced performance of thermal-assisted electron field emission based on barium oxide nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yunkang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Nanjing Institute of technology, Nanjing, 211167 (China); Chen, Jing, E-mail: chenjingmoon@gmail.com [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210096 (China); Zhang, Yuning; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei; Di, Yunsong [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210096 (China); Zhang, Zichen, E-mail: zz241@ime.ac.cn [Integrated system for Laser applications Group, Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100029, Beijing (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A possible mechanism for thermal-assisted electric field was demonstrated. • A new path for the architecture of the novel nanomaterial and methodology for its potential application in the field emission device area was provided. • The turn-on field, the threshold field and the field emission current density were largely related to the temperature of the cathode. • The relationship between the work function of emitter material and the temperature of emitter was found. - Abstract: In this paper, thermal-assisted field emission properties of barium oxide (BaO) nanowire synthesized by a chemical bath deposition method were investigated. The morphology and composition of BaO nanowire were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) respectively. The turn-on field, threshold field and the emission current density could be affected relatively due to the thermal-assisted effect when the electric field was applied, in the meanwhile, the turn-on field for BaO nanowire was measured to be decreased from 1.12 V/μm to 0.66 V/μm when the temperature was raised from 293 K to 593 K, whereas for the threshold field was found to decrease from 3.64 V/μm to 2.12 V/μm. The improved performance was demonstrated due to the reduced work function of the BaO nanowire as the agitation temperature increasing, leading to the higher probability of electrons tunneling through the energy barrier and enhancement of the field emission properties of BaO emitters.

  4. Enhanced Au induced lateral crystallization in electron-irradiated amorphous Ge on SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Shin; Kaneko, Takahiro; Ootsubo, Takanobu; Sakai, Takatsugu; Nakashima, Kazutoshi; Moto, Kenta; Yoneoka, Masashi; Takakura, Kenichiro; Tsunoda, Isao, E-mail: isao_tsunoda@kumamoto-nct.ac.jp

    2014-04-30

    We have investigated the low temperature of Au induced lateral crystallization of electron irradiated amorphous Ge on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The reduction of the critical annealing time to cause the Au induced lateral crystallization is realized by high energy electron irradiation. In addition, the lateral crystallization region of the sample with electron irradiation has high crystalline quality as well as the sample without electron irradiation. We have speculated that the Au induced lateral crystallization of amorphous Ge on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate was enhanced by electron irradiation, due to the introduction of point defects into amorphous Ge able to diffuse easily of Au atoms. - Highlights: • Au induced lateral crystallization of electron irradiated Ge is investigated. • Crystallization annealing time is significantly reduced. • High crystalline quality of lateral region was not changed by electron irradiation.

  5. The effects of an enhanced simulation programme on medical students? confidence responding to clinical deterioration

    OpenAIRE

    Hogg, George; Miller, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical deterioration in adult hospital patients is an identified issue in healthcare practice globally. Teaching medical students to recognise and respond to the deteriorating patient is crucial if we are to address the issue in an effective way. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an enhanced simulation exercise known as RADAR (Recognising Acute Deterioration: Active Response), on medical students? confidence. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted; the in...

  6. Enhancing learning with the social media: student teachers’ perceptions on Twitter in a debate activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gemma Tur; Victoria I. Marín

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents research focused on the educational experience of students using the microblogging platform Twitter for debate activities in three groups in different teacher education programmes at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain. The implementation of this technology-based task in a face-to-face class was introduced as an innovative experience as a way of enhancing student learning and fostering participation in the context of formal learning. The educational objectives of...

  7. Enhancing student explanations of evolution: Comparing elaborating and competing theory prompts

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, DF; Namdar, B; Vitale, JM; Lai, K; Linn, MC

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. In this study, we explore how two different prompt types within an online computer-based inquiry learning environment enhance 392 7th grade students’ explanations of evolution with three teachers. In the elaborating prompt condition, students are prompted to write explanations that support the accepted theory of evolution. In the competing prompt condition, students are prompted to write explanations that differentiate two views of evolution associated with Darw...

  8. Australian University Students' Coping Strategies and Use of Pharmaceutical Stimulants as Cognitive Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charmaine; Forlini, Cynthia; Partridge, Brad; Hall, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    There are reports that some university students are using prescription stimulants for non-medical 'pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (PCE)' to improve alertness, focus, memory, and mood in an attempt to manage the demands of study at university. Purported demand for PCEs in academic contexts have been based on incomplete understandings of student motivations, and often based on untested assumptions about the context within which stimulants are used. They may represent attempts to cope with biopsychosocial stressors in university life by offsetting students' inadequate coping responses, which in turn may affect their cognitive performance. This study aimed to identify (a) what strategies students adopted to cope with the stress of university life and, (b) to assess whether students who have used stimulants for PCE exhibit particular stress or coping patterns. We interviewed 38 university students (with and without PCE experience) about their experience of managing student life, specifically their: educational values; study habits; achievement; stress management; getting assistance; competing activities and demands; health habits; and cognitive enhancement practices. All interview transcripts were coded into themes and analyzed. Our thematic analysis revealed that, generally, self-rated coping ability decreased as students' self-rated stress level increased. Students used emotion- and problem-focused coping for the most part and adjustment-focused coping to a lesser extent. Avoidance, an emotion-focused coping strategy, was the most common, followed by problem-focused coping strategies, the use of cognition on enhancing substances, and planning and monitoring of workload. PCE users predominantly used avoidant emotion-focused coping strategies until they no longer mitigated the distress of approaching deadlines resulting in the use of prescription stimulants as a substance-based problem-focused coping strategy. Our study suggests that students who choose coping

  9. Teaching Science Through the Language of Students in Technology-Enhanced Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Kihyun

    2015-02-01

    This study examines whether and how tapping into students' everyday language in a web-based learning environment can improve all students' science learning in linguistically heterogeneous classrooms. A total of 220 fifth-grade English Language Learners (ELLs) and their non-ELL peers were assigned to either an everyday English approach condition or a textbook approach condition, and completed technology-enhanced instruction focusing on respiration and photosynthesis. Students in the everyday English approach condition were taught the concepts in everyday, conversational English before content-specific scientific terms were introduced, while students in the textbook approach condition were taught the same concepts and vocabulary simultaneously. The results show that the everyday English approach was significantly more effective in helping both ELLs and non-ELL students develop a coherent understanding of abstract concepts related to photosynthesis and respiration. Students in the everyday English approach condition were also better able to link content-specific terms to their understanding of the concepts. These findings show the potential advantage of using students' everyday English as a resource to make science more accessible to linguistically diverse students in mainstream classrooms. By integrating students' everyday language in science instruction, it is possible for all students including ELLs to acquire both the content and language of science.

  10. Critical thinking instruction and technology enhanced learning from the student perspective: A mixed methods research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    Critical thinking is acclaimed as a valuable asset for graduates from higher education programs. Technology has advanced in quantity and quality; recognized as a requirement of 21st century learners. A mixed methods research study was undertaken, examining undergraduate nursing student engagement with critical thinking instruction, platformed on two technology-enhanced learning environments: a classroom response system face-to-face in-class and an online discussion forum out-of-class. The Community of Inquiry framed the study capturing constructivist collaborative inquiry to support learning, and facilitate critical thinking capability. Inclusion of quantitative and qualitative data sources aimed to gather a comprehensive understanding of students' development of critical thinking and engagement with technology-enhanced learning. The findings from the students' perspectives were positive toward the inclusion of technology-enhanced learning, and use in supporting their development of critical thinking. Students considered the use of two forms of technology beneficial in meeting different needs and preferences, offering varied means to actively participate in learning. They valued critical thinking instruction being intentionally aligned with subject-specific content facilitating understanding, application, and relevance of course material. While the findings are limited to student participants, the instructional strategies and technology-enhanced learning identified as beneficial can inform course design for the development of critical thinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth DeVore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems. We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their

  12. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-06-01

    As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their own pace. We

  13. Business oriented educational experiments enhance active learning by engineering students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nynne Mia; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Simon, Jens

    2012-01-01

    exploration symposium on bridging the gap between engineering education and business is proposed on the basis of the Copenhagen University College of Engineering (IHK) being involved in a DKK 50m ongoing project “Business Oriented Educational Experiments” financed by the Capital Region of Denmark...... and the European Social Fund. The project is carried out with other major educational institutions in the Copenhagen area and organized in five themes: 1) world class competences, 2) new interactions between education and business, 3) the experimenting organization, 4) education on demand, and 5) new career paths...... benefits from the CIE activities: Businesses execute innovative solutions, students practice active learning and build a platform for their future professional career, and professors leave the classrooms and get an opportunity to reality check their theories. CIE is operating on a network platform made up...

  14. Enhancing Student Adaption to a Case Based Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Since Aalborg University (AAU) was started it has been using an educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students on the Engineering Educations form groups of 3-6 persons, which uses half of the study time within the semester to solve...... and document a real-world engineering problem. Four years ago a new engineer education: “Medicine with an industrial specialization” started, and for the Medicine part of the education (Bachelor level) it was decided to use a case based PBL model in combination with project work (app. 1/3 of each semester...... and a good adaption to it. Based on a deeper investigation of the results presented in chapter 4 it will be concluded if the experiment was a success or not and give recommendations to further development. REFERENCES [1]Hull York Medical School curriculum: http://www.hyms.ac.uk/undergraduate/HYMS-curriculum.aspx...

  15. Resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitation of Cu-like gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, J.; Li, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-09-01

    Employing the independent-process and isolated-resonance approximations using distorted-waves (IPIRDW), we have performed a series of calculations of the resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitations (EIE) among 27 singly excited levels from the n ≤ 6 configurations of Cu-like gold (Au, Z = 79). Resonance excitation (RE) contributions from both the n = 4 → 4 - 7 and n = 3 → 4 core excitations have been considered. Our results demonstrate that RE contributions are significant and enhance the effective collision strengths (ϒ) of certain excitations by up to an order of magnitude at low temperature (106.1 K), and are still important at relatively high temperature (107.5 K). Results from test calculations of the resonance-enhanced EIE processes among 16 levels from the n ≤ 5 configurations using both the Dirac R-matrix (DRM) and IPIRDW approaches agree very well with each other. This means that the close-coupling effects are not important for this ion, and thus warrants the reliability of present resonance-enhanced EIE data among the 27 levels. The results from the collisional-radiative model (CRM) show that, at 3000 eV, near where Cu-like Au is most abundant, RE contributions have important effects (up to 25%) on the density diagnostic line intensity ratios, which are sensitive near 1020 cm-3. The present work is the first EIE research including RE contributions for Cu-like Au. Our EIE data are more accurate than previous results due to our consideration of RE contributions, and the data should be helpful for modeling and diagnosing a variety of plasmas.

  16. Enhancing Student Learning: An Examination of the Student Use of Textbooks in Financial Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jefferson P.

    2011-01-01

    As accounting instructors, we provide our students with guidance that will assist them in more effectively and efficiently learning the required material. Often, this guidance includes prescriptive advice on how to properly use their textbook. However, little evidence exists as to whether students actually follow our advice on how to use their…

  17. Enhancing Student Experiences Abroad: The Potential of Dynamic Assessment to Develop Student Interculturality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, Claudia; Poehner, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions are acknowledging the requirements of a globalized world on students' mobility, interculturality, and language skills by offering study-abroad programmes. These need to be accompanied by procedures to assess student needs prior to and during their time abroad as well as upon their return. In the exploratory study reported…

  18. Students helping students: vertical peer mentoring to enhance the medical school experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Christine; Deerin, Jessica; Leykum, Luci

    2017-05-02

    Effective mentoring is an important component of medical student professional development. We provide a description of the mentoring program at our institution. Our institution UTHSCSA implemented a student-advising program (Veritas) with clinical faculty mentors and senior students (MiMs). The MiMs provided vertical peer mentoring to more junior students as an adjunct to faculty advising. The MiMs lead small group discussions that foster camaraderie, share academic and career information and promote professional identity. An optional MiM elective more intensively develops mentorship and leadership skills through a formal curriculum. The authors used annual survey data of all students as well as student mentors to evaluate program effectiveness. Overall, student perception of the program improved each year across multiple domains, including feeling more prepared, supported and satisfied with their overall experience in medical school. Student mentors also found the process rewarding and helpful to their future careers as physicians. The authors suggest implementing a vertical peer-mentoring program can be an effective adjunct to faculty mentoring.

  19. Online Students' Expectations: Enhancing the Fit between Online Students and Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkerhoff, Jonathan; Koroghlanian, Carol M.

    2007-01-01

    Learner analysis and needs assessments are basic elements of all instructional design models and are of concern to those designing distance education courses. Mismatches between students' expectations and actual course features may impact learning. This investigation surveyed 249 geographically dispersed online students for the course features…

  20. Creating a web-enhanced interactive preclinic technique manual: case report and student response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberick, Kenneth G

    2004-12-01

    This article describes the development, use, and student response to an online manual developed with off-the-shelf software and made available using a web-based course management system (Blackboard) that was used to transform a freshman restorative preclinical technique course from a lecture-only course into an interactive web-enhanced course. The goals of the project were to develop and implement a web-enhanced interactive learning experience in a preclinical restorative technique course and shift preclinical education from a teacher-centered experience to a student-driven experience. The project was evaluated using an anonymous post-course survey (95 percent response rate) of 123 freshman students that assessed enabling (technical support and access to the technology), process (the actual experience and usability), and outcome criteria (acquisition and successful use of the knowledge gained and skills learned) of the online manual. Students responded favorably to sections called "slide galleries" where ideal and non-ideal examples of projects could be viewed. Causes, solutions, and preventive measures were provided for the errors shown. Sections called "slide series" provided cookbook directions allowing for self-paced and student-directed learning. Virtually all of the students, 99 percent, found the quality of the streaming videos adequate to excellent. Regarding Internet connections and video viewing, 65 percent of students successfully viewed the videos from a remote site; cable connections were the most reliable, dial-up connections were inadequate, and DSL connections were variable. Seventy-three percent of the students felt the videos were an effective substitute for in-class demonstrations. Students preferred video with sound over video with subtitles and preferred short video clips embedded in the text over compilation videos. The results showed it is possible to develop and implement web-enhanced and interactive dental education in a preclinical

  1. Enhancing medical students' reflectivity in mentoring groups for professional development - a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gabriele; Pankoke, Nina; Goldblatt, Hadass; Hofmann, Marzellus; Zupanic, Michaela

    2017-07-14

    Professional competence is important in delivering high quality patient care, and it can be enhanced by reflection and reflective discourse e.g. in mentoring groups. However, students are often reluctant though to engage in this discourse. A group mentoring program involving all preclinical students as well as faculty members and co-mentoring clinical students was initiated at Witten-Herdecke University. This study explores both the attitudes of those students towards such a program and factors that might hinder or enhance how students engage in reflective discourse. A qualitative design was applied using semi-structured focus group interviews with preclinical students and semi-structured individual interviews with mentors and co-mentors. The interview data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Students' attitudes towards reflective discourse on professional challenges were diverse. Some students valued the new program and named positive outcomes regarding several features of professional development. Enriching experiences were described. Others expressed aversive attitudes. Three reasons for these were given: unclear goals and benefits, interpersonal problems within the groups hindering development and intrapersonal issues such as insecurity and traditional views of medical education. Participants mentioned several program setup factors that could enhance how students engage in such groups: explaining the program thoroughly, setting expectations and integrating the reflective discourse in a meaningful way into the curriculum, obliging participation without coercion, developing a sense of security, trust and interest in each other within the groups, randomizing group composition and facilitating group moderators as positive peer and faculty role models and as learning group members. A well-designed and empathetic setup of group mentoring programs can help raise openness towards engaging in meaningful reflective discourse. Reflection on and communication of

  2. Reflections on learning and enhancing communication skills through community engagement: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, S; Marples, C; Wall, E

    2016-07-22

    Students in Peninsula School of Dentistry (PSD), Plymouth, undertake community engagement projects during the first two years of their undergraduate curriculum. These projects involve interaction with a variety of specific community groups and the planning and delivery of an appropriate and meaningful oral health intervention. Many of the project outcomes are based on enhancing communication skills and encouraging students to transfer these into their patient treatment sessions. This report draws on the experience of students who undertook two specific projects to demonstrate how they feel this is achieved.

  3. Using Powder Cored Tubular Wire Technology to Enhance Electron Beam Freeform Fabricated Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Devon; Liu, Stephen; Domack, Marcia; Hafley, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is an additive manufacturing technique, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, capable of fabricating large scale aerospace parts. Advantages of using EBF3 as opposed to conventional manufacturing methods include, decreased design-to-product time, decreased wasted material, and the ability to adapt controls to produce geometrically complex parts with properties comparable to wrought products. However, to fully exploit the potential of the EBF3 process development of materials tailored for the process is required. Powder cored tubular wire (PCTW) technology was used to modify Ti-6Al-4V and Al 6061 feedstock to enhance alloy content, refine grain size, and create a metal matrix composite in the as-solidified structures, respectively.

  4. Development of microalgae biomaterials with enhanced antioxidant activity using electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younghwa; Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Soojeong; Lee, Jaehwa

    2013-01-01

    By increasing the antioxidant products (e. g. antioxidant enzyme, carotenoid, phycobiliproteins, chlorophyll, lipid phenolic compounds, etc.) in microalgae, it could be useful for industry. In this study, mutants of fresh water microalgae Arthrospira platensis (A. platensis) by high energy electron beam were isolated and characterized. Those selected mutants showed higher growth rate than parental strain. The antioxidant enzyme activity (SOD and POD), flavonoid, phenolic compound and phycocyanin of mutants were increased about 2 times compared to wild type. Moreover, DPPH radical scavenging activity was increased about 20%. Microalgae species with improved growth rate and enhanced active compounds make the commercial process more feasible in industry. Using microalgae mutants with increased antioxidant products, it is useful to develop microalgae biomaterials for neutraceuticals

  5. Development of microalgae biomaterials with enhanced antioxidant activity using electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younghwa; Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Soojeong; Lee, Jaehwa [Silla Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    By increasing the antioxidant products (e. g. antioxidant enzyme, carotenoid, phycobiliproteins, chlorophyll, lipid phenolic compounds, etc.) in microalgae, it could be useful for industry. In this study, mutants of fresh water microalgae Arthrospira platensis (A. platensis) by high energy electron beam were isolated and characterized. Those selected mutants showed higher growth rate than parental strain. The antioxidant enzyme activity (SOD and POD), flavonoid, phenolic compound and phycocyanin of mutants were increased about 2 times compared to wild type. Moreover, DPPH radical scavenging activity was increased about 20%. Microalgae species with improved growth rate and enhanced active compounds make the commercial process more feasible in industry. Using microalgae mutants with increased antioxidant products, it is useful to develop microalgae biomaterials for neutraceuticals.

  6. Ever Use of Nicotine and Nonnicotine Electronic Cigarettes Among High School Students in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hayley A; Ferrence, Roberta; Boak, Angela; Schwartz, Robert; Mann, Robert E; O'Connor, Shawn; Adlaf, Edward M

    2015-10-01

    There are limited data on the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) among youth, particularly with regard to the use of nicotine versus nonnicotine products. This study investigates ever use of nicotine and nonnicotine e-cigarettes and examines the demographic and behavioral correlates of e-cigarette use in Ontario, Canada. Data for 2,892 high school students were derived from the 2013 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. This province-wide school-based survey is based on a 2-stage cluster design. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate the factors associated with ever use of e-cigarettes. Ever use of e-cigarettes was derived from the question, "Have you ever smoked at least one puff from an electronic cigarette?" All analyses included appropriate adjustments for the complex study design. Fifteen percent of high school students reported using e-cigarettes in their lifetime. Most students who ever used e-cigarettes reported using e-cigarettes without nicotine (72%), but 28% had used e-cigarettes with nicotine. Male, White/Caucasian, and rural students, as well as those with a history of using tobacco cigarettes, were at greater odds of e-cigarette use. Seven percent of students who had never smoked a tobacco cigarette in their lifetime reported using an e-cigarette. Five percent of those who had ever used an e-cigarette had never smoked a tobacco cigarette. More students reported ever using e-cigarettes without nicotine than with nicotine in Ontario, Canada. This underscores the need for greater knowledge of the contents of both nicotine and nonnicotine e-cigarettes to better guide public health policies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Enhancing learning with the social media: student teachers’ perceptions on Twitter in a debate activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Tur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research focused on the educational experience of students using the microblogging platform Twitter for debate activities in three groups in different teacher education programmes at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain. The implementation of this technology-based task in a face-to-face class was introduced as an innovative experience as a way of enhancing student learning and fostering participation in the context of formal learning. The educational objectives of these activities, besides working on the topics of the debate, were to empower student teachers’ Personal Learning Environments, engage student participation and enhance their use of social media and mobile devices for learning. Student perceptions were assessed by means of a questionnaire completed by them at the end of the courses. Tweets related to the debate were also collected in order to obtain some statistical data on student participation. Data collected allowed the researchers to observe student teacher engagement with the use of Twitter for the debate activity and its impact on their learning and understanding of the debate topic. Results also showed positive perceptions towards the use of social media in education and students’ willingness for future use, learning opportunities from Twitter and the use of mobile technology were also envisioned. Finally, conclusions argue the implications for practice of the current study and highlight some issues for further research, such as the exploration of new and innovative uses for teachers’ professional development and the empowerment of new activities and habits in learning on the move.

  8. A preliminary study on cognitive enhancer consumption behaviors and motives of French Medicine and Pharmacology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; MacGregor, A; Fond, G

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical neuroenhancer consumption in college students is a rather unknown phenomenon in Europe and particularly in France, where surprisingly only one study was conducted in 1988. Our objective is to assess prevalence and motivations for licit (use inside medical indication) and illicit pharmaceutical neuroenhancer consumption (tablet form) in a non-selected French sample of Medicine and Pharmacology students. A validated questionnaire was send to French sample of Medicine and Pharmacology students using email. The questionnaire investigate motives for use of pharmaceutical licit (vitamin C and caffeine tablets) and illicit (methylphenidate, amphetamines, modafinil, piracetam). Among 206 undergraduate students, 139 students (67.4%) declared to have consumed at least one cognitive enhancer in the past 12 months. Twelve students (8.6% of cognitive enhancers users and 5.8% of our total sample) used illicit pharmaceutical neuroenhancer. The motivations were first to improve their academic performances, second to improve their wakefulness/ vigilance, and third to improve their attention/concentration. Neuroenhancement is a widespread means of using pharmaceutical drugs in French as well as in US college campuses. Despites some limitations, these preliminary results highlight the need to boost the interest of professionals for the neuroenhancement issue in French and European students.

  9. Enhancing the language development of immigrant ESL nursing students: a case study with recommendations for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, K F; Figlear, M R

    1998-01-01

    Immigrant nursing students who use English as a Second Language (ESL) are becoming a significant population in nursing education classrooms today. Frequently, nurse educators feel at a loss as they struggle to help students achieve their educational goals. The authors offer an analysis of one of the problems nurse educators and immigrant ESL nursing students face: language development. A case study that has as its theme the problem of language development is presented. Relevant second language acquisition research findings are outlined and appropriate teaching practices are suggested. This research and these practices are used to identify actions that nurse educators and their students can take to enhance and improve the language development of immigrant ESL nursing students.

  10. Student-reported satisfaction with academic enhancement services at an academic health science center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughf, Natalie White; Foster, Penni Smith; Williams, Dara A

    2014-01-01

    Although support services are needed to address students' concerns associated with academic demands, there is little research exploring these interventions within health sciences education. The current study examined students' perceptions of academic enhancement services at an academic health science center. Academic enhancement services provided to students included assessment of learning approaches and problems interfering with academic performance. Specific services may have addressed the transition to professional school, study skills assessment and training, time management and organization, testing strategies, clarifying career goals and interests, increasing self-confidence and coping with self-doubt, coping with depression and/or anxiety, stress management, relationship issues, and/or loss and bereavement. All students receiving academic enhancement services received a survey for programmatic improvement at the end of each semester. The online survey was voluntary and anonymous and solicited feedback about the students' experiences. Sixty-three percent of respondents (N = 104; 62% female, 38% male; 62% White, 27% Black/African American, 10% Asian; 2% Hispanic) reported receiving a one-session intervention, while 34% received 2-6 sessions. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that academic enhancement services improved their situation and 89% reported overall satisfaction. The individual services rated as most helpful addressed time management, study skills training, increasing self-confidence, and testing strategies. It is recommended that health science centers (i) consider providing brief-term academic enhancement services to students addressing time management/organization, study skills, self-confidence, and testing strategies and (ii) engage in empirical investigations of these academic interventions.

  11. Enhancing students' science literacy using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyawati, Sunarya, Yayan; Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    This research attempts to enhance students' science literacy in the aspects of students' science content, application context, process, and students' attitude using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology. The quasi-experimental method with pre-post test design was used to achieve these objectives. Seventy-two students of class XII at a high school were employed as research's subject. Thirty-six students were in control class and another thirty-six were in experiment class. Variance test (t-test) was performed on the average level of 95% to identify the differences of students' science literacy in both classes. As the result, there were significant different of learning outcomes between experiment class and control class. Almost half of students (41.67%) in experiment class are categorized as high. Therefore, the learning using solar cell learning multimedia can improve students' science literacy, especially in the students' science content, application context, and process aspects with n-gain(%) 59.19 (medium), 63.04 (medium), and 52.98 (medium). This study can be used to develop learning multimedia in other science context.

  12. Profile correction to electron temperature and enhancement factor in soft-x-ray pulse-height-analysis measurements in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.; Diesso, M.; Hill, K.; Holland, A.; Pohl, F.

    1988-01-01

    Because soft-x-ray pulse-height-analysis spectra contain chordal information, the electron temperature and the radiation intensity (enhancement factor) measurements do not represent the local values. The correction factors for the electron temperature and the enhancement factor as a function of the temperature and density profile parameters and the energy are obtained. The spectrum distortion due to pulse pileup effects is also evaluated. A set of curves is given from which the distortion of the spectrum can be obtained if the electron temperature, the Be filter thickness, and the electronic parameters of the acquisition system are known. PG 1810,1812 ID 131801CON N X-ray diagnostics TT Profile correction to electron temperature and enhancement factor in soft-x-ray pulse-height-analysis measurements in tokamaks AU S. Sesnic, M. Diesso, K. Hill, and A. Holland LO Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 AU F. Pohl LO Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 8046-Garching, Federal Republic of Germany SD (Presented on 16 March 1988) AB Because soft-x-ray pulse-height-analysis spectra contain chordal information, the electron temperature and the radiation intensity (enhancement factor) measurements do not represent the local values. The correction factors for the electron temperature and the enhancement factor as a function of the temperature and density profile parameters and the energy are obtained. The spectrum distortion due to pulse pileup effects is also evaluated. A set of curves is given from which the distortion of the spectrum can be obtained if the electron tempe

  13. The attitudes of undergraduate students and staff to the use of electronic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; White, D A; Walmsley, A D

    2004-04-24

    Computer-aided learning (CAL) offers advantages over traditional methods of learning as it allows students to work in their own time and pace. The School of Dentistry at the University of Birmingham has created an electronic learning website, named the Ecourse. This is designed to be a web-based supplement to the dental undergraduate curriculum. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of third year dental students and members of staff about the Ecourse website. A questionnaire was produced and piloted before being distributed to all 65 third year dental students to obtain their opinions about the Ecourse website. The views of Ecourse were sought from four members of staff by performing qualitative, semi-structured interviews. Lecture handouts and textbooks were reported as the sources used most often, by 96% of students. Eighty-six per cent of students are accessing the Ecourse mainly at the School of Dentistry, but 53% are also accessing it at home. Students liked the multiple-choice questions, downloading extra notes and looking at pictures and animation to explain clinical procedures. The majority of the students (79%) want the Ecourse to be used as a supplement to the undergraduate programme and 7% wanted it to replace formal lectures. Staff recognised the benefits of the Ecourse but were concerned about plagiarism, the effect on lecture attendance and the lack of feedback from students on existing CAL material. Students consider the Ecourse as a positive method of supplementing traditional methods of learning in the dental undergraduate programme. However in contrast teaching staff expressed negative views on the use of e-learning.

  14. The Use of Substances Other Than Nicotine in Electronic Cigarettes Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Deric R Kenne; Rebecca L Fischbein; Andy SL Tan; Mark Banks

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have grown in popularity, especially among youth and young adults. Although e-cigarettes were originally intended to vaporize a liquid mixture containing nicotine, there appears to be an increasing trend in other substance use in e-cigarettes (OSUE). Materials and methods: Cross-sectional data from 1542 undergraduate college student e-cigarette users from a large Midwestern university were collected via online survey to assess prevalence of e...

  15. The electronic properties and enhanced photocatalytic mechanism of TiO2 hybridized with MoS2 sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengjuan; Jia, Jun; Dai, Dongmei; Gao, Hongtao

    2018-03-01

    In this work, first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT) was used to explore the enhanced photocatalytic mechanism of TiO2 by combined with both pristine and defective monolayer MoS2. It was demonstrated that the combination of TiO2 with MoS2 was favorable thermodynamically. The charge densities between the interface of TiO2 and MoS2 were investigated to clarify the improved property of TiO2. Electrons migrated from TiO2 to MoS2 across the interface under irradiation, which caused the electrons accumulating on the MoS2 side and electrons depleting on the other TiO2 side. There appeared a built-in electric field in the interface between TiO2 and monolayer MoS2. And due to its presence, electrons and holes recombination was effectively suppressed, contributing to the enhanced photocatalytic performance of TiO2/MoS2. The electrons dispersed from highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), promoting the separation of the electrons and holes. The efficient separation of photoexcited electrons and holes prolonged the lifetime of photoexcited carriers, which effectively improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2. The theoretical study could provide credible evidence to understand the mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2/MoS2.

  16. Modulating indium doped tin oxide electrode properties for laccase electron transfer enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, Mirela; Chira, Ana; Radu, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were functionalized with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and cysteamine monolayer to enhance the heterogeneous electron transfer process of laccase from Trametes versicolor. The assembly of GNP on ITO support was performed through generation of H + species at the electrode surface by hydroquinone electrooxidation at 0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticle aggregates on electrode surfaces was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The size of GNP aggregates was in the range of 200–500 nm. The enhanced charge transfer at the GNP functionalized ITO electrodes was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Electrocatalytic behavior of laccase immobilized on ITO modified electrode toward oxygen reduction reaction was evaluated using CV in the presence of 2,2′-azino-bis 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfuric acid (ABTS). The obtained sigmoidal-shaped voltammograms for ABTS reduction in oxygen saturated buffer solution are characteristic for a catalytic process. The intensity of catalytic current increased linearly with mediator concentration up to 6.2 × 10 −4 M. The registered voltammogram in the absence of ABTS mediator clearly showed a significant faradaic current which is the evidence of the interfacial oxygen reduction. - Highlights: • Assembly of gold nanoparticles on indium tin oxide support at positive potentials • Electrochemical and morphological evaluation of the gold nanoparticle layer assembly • Bioelectrocatalytic oxygen reduction on laccase modified electrode

  17. Modulating indium doped tin oxide electrode properties for laccase electron transfer enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaconu, Mirela [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Centre of Bioanalysis, 296 Spl. Independentei, Bucharest 060031 (Romania); Chira, Ana [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Centre of Bioanalysis, 296 Spl. Independentei, Bucharest 060031 (Romania); Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1-7 Polizu Str., 011061 (Romania); Radu, Lucian, E-mail: gl_radu@chim.upb.ro [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1-7 Polizu Str., 011061 (Romania)

    2014-08-28

    Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were functionalized with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and cysteamine monolayer to enhance the heterogeneous electron transfer process of laccase from Trametes versicolor. The assembly of GNP on ITO support was performed through generation of H{sup +} species at the electrode surface by hydroquinone electrooxidation at 0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticle aggregates on electrode surfaces was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The size of GNP aggregates was in the range of 200–500 nm. The enhanced charge transfer at the GNP functionalized ITO electrodes was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Electrocatalytic behavior of laccase immobilized on ITO modified electrode toward oxygen reduction reaction was evaluated using CV in the presence of 2,2′-azino-bis 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfuric acid (ABTS). The obtained sigmoidal-shaped voltammograms for ABTS reduction in oxygen saturated buffer solution are characteristic for a catalytic process. The intensity of catalytic current increased linearly with mediator concentration up to 6.2 × 10{sup −4} M. The registered voltammogram in the absence of ABTS mediator clearly showed a significant faradaic current which is the evidence of the interfacial oxygen reduction. - Highlights: • Assembly of gold nanoparticles on indium tin oxide support at positive potentials • Electrochemical and morphological evaluation of the gold nanoparticle layer assembly • Bioelectrocatalytic oxygen reduction on laccase modified electrode.

  18. Preparation and thermal conductivity enhancement of composite phase change materials for electronic thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weixiong; Zhang, Guoqing; Ke, Xiufang; Yang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Ziyuan; Liu, Chenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A kind of composite phase change material board (PCMB) is prepared and tested. • PCMB presents a large thermal storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. • PCMB displays much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling. • PCMB presents different cooling characteristics in comparison to ribbed radiator. - Abstract: A kind of phase change material board (PCMB) was prepared for use in the thermal management of electronics, with paraffin and expanded graphite as the phase change material and matrix, respectively. The as-prepared PCMB presented a large thermal storage capacity of 141.74 J/g and enhanced thermal conductivity of 7.654 W/(m K). As a result, PCMB displayed much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling, i.e., much lower heating rate and better uniformity of temperature distribution. On the other hand, compared with ribbed radiator technology, PCMB also presented different cooling characteristics, demonstrating that they were suitable for different practical application

  19. The electron beam deposition of titanium on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and the resulting enhanced biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cheol-Min; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Keung N; Ha, Yoon; Kuh, Sung-Uk

    2010-05-01

    The surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was coated with a pure titanium (Ti) layer using an electron beam (e-beam) deposition method in order to enhance its biocompatibility and adhesion to bone tissue. The e-beam deposition method was a low-temperature coating process that formed a dense, uniform and well crystallized Ti layer without deteriorating the characteristics of the PEEK implant. The Ti coating layer strongly adhered to the substrate and remarkably enhanced its wettability. The Ti-coated samples were evaluated in terms of their in vitro cellular behaviors and in vivo osteointegration, and the results were compared to a pure PEEK substrate. The level of proliferation of the cells (MC3T3-E1) was measured using a methoxyphenyl tetrazolium salt (MTS) assay and more than doubled after the Ti coating. The differentiation level of cells was measured using the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and also doubled. Furthermore, the in vivo animal tests showed that the Ti-coated PEEK implants had a much higher bone-in-contact (BIC) ratio than the pure PEEK implants. These in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the e-beam deposited Ti coating significantly improved the potential of PEEK for hard tissue applications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gender disparities in the experience, effects and reporting of electronic aggression among secondary school students in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Olumide, Adesola O; Adebayo, Emmanuel; Oluwagbayela, Babatunde

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic aggression is the use of electronic communication technologies to harass others. It is a problem among adolescents and young people worldwide. There is a dearth of information on this problem in developing countries in spite of the increasing use of electronic media technology in these countries. Objective To explore gender differences in the prevalence, effects and reporting of electronic aggression among secondary school students in Oyo state, Nigeria. Methods A cross-...

  1. Electronic voting in dental materials education: the impact on students' attitudes and exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michele E

    2008-09-01

    Dental materials is an integral part of any undergraduate dental curriculum and is most commonly taught in a traditional didactic, lecture-based format. It suffers from the ignominy of being viewed by many as a dry, factual subject with little to excite or engage the student. In this article, the author presents the experimental use of an electronic voting (eVoting) system in an undergraduate dental materials course. The practical and aspirational aspects of its application are described. The objective was to assess the student perception of the experiment and the impact on end-of-course examination results. The eVoting system proved overwhelmingly popular with the students with 95 percent in favor of its use at the beginning of the course and 91 percent at the end. There was, however, no statistically significant impact on the results of the examination at the end of the course, when compared to the previous year's cohort of students for whom eVoting was not used. eVoting encouraged student interaction and engagement and contributed to student satisfaction but was not seen to affect the outcome measurement (end-of-course examination result).

  2. The use of electronic books in midwifery education: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are: (i) to illustrate the use of e-books by health studies students at a college of higher education; (ii) to provide a demonstration of how e-books may be facilitated by library and information services staff working across the health and academic sectors; (iii) to comment upon the experiences of health studies students, in using e-books. A focus group of 10 student midwives was used to gain insight into how e-books may be used in an academic context for health professionals. The findings of the student midwives' focus group are reported and discussed. In this instance, the student midwives were encouraged to use e-books as part of a structured information skills programme. The paper concentrates on how the e-books were used within this context and addresses the potential benefits and disadvantages from a student perspective. The results provide evidence of a largely positive experience of using e-books as an electronic information resource. The focus group reveals many benefits and advantages in the facilitation and use of e-books, as well as addressing areas for development. It is concluded that e-books have a place in health library and information resources, but further development of e-books and e-book collections is required and subsequent investigation into their most effective use.

  3. The Association Between Electronic Bullying and School Absenteeism Among High School Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshteyn, Erin; Yang, Y T

    2017-02-01

    We examined the relationship between exposure to electronic bullying and absenteeism as a result of being afraid. This multivariate, multinomial regression analysis of the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data assessed the association between experiencing electronic bullying in the past year and how often students were absent in the last month due to feeling unsafe at/in transit to school. The model controlled for other predictors of school absence including demographics, physical/behavioral health, and risk factors. Missing data were multiply imputed. Electronic bullying was significantly associated with absences. Controlling for model covariates, the relative risk of missing 1 day of school was 1.77 times higher, the relative risk of missing 2 to 3 days of school per month increased by a factor of 2.08, and the relative risk of missing 4 or more days of school per month increased by a factor of 1.77 for those who experienced electronic bullying in the past year compared with those who were not electronically bullied. Electronic bullying's association with absenteeism places it among already recognized negative influences such as depression and binge drinking, necessitating schools to implement policies to mediate the resulting harmful effects. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  4. The Role of Guidance and Counseling in Enhancing Student Discipline in Secondary Schools in Koibatek District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgong, Victor Kipkemboi; Ngumi, Owen; Chege, Kimani

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the role of guidance and counseling in enhancing student discipline in secondary schools in Koibatek district. The study was guided by Alfred Adler (1998) theory of personality, and humanistic theory of Albert Bandura (1995) social learning model. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design.…

  5. Exploitation or Opportunity? Student Perceptions of Internships in Enhancing Employability Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Henrietta; Bodicoat, Maxine

    2017-01-01

    Internships are now widely promoted as a valuable means of enhancing graduate employability. However, little is known about student perceptions of internships. Drawing on data from a pre-1992 university, two types of graduate are identified: engagers and disengagers. The engagers valued internship opportunities while the disengagers perceived…

  6. Hot for Teacher: Using Digital Music to Enhance Students' Experience in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Joanna C.; Lowenthal, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a review of the instructional potential of digital music to enhance postsecondary students' experience in online courses by involving them in music-driven instructional activities. The authors describe how music-driven instructional activities, when used appropriately, can (a) humanize, personalize, and energize online…

  7. Animated Pedagogical Agents Effects on Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning in a Science Inquiry Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students' perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science classrooms, special attention was given to…

  8. Using Open-Book Exams to Enhance Student Learning, Performance, and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steve G.; Ferrante, Claudia J.; Heppard, Kurt A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated an alternative testing protocol used in an undergraduate managerial accounting course. Specifically, we assert that consistent open-book testing approaches will enhance learning and better prepare students for the real-world decision-making they will encounter. A semester-long testing protocol was executed incorporating a…

  9. Notes on Accounting Capstone Course Design: Contemporary Issues versus Case Analysis Enhances Student Interest and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehoff, Clemense, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents how the Internet can be used to bring contemporary issues into the accounting capstone course to enhance student interest and learning. While existing cases have been reviewed and structured, they focus on issues that may not be at the forefront of the items currently under examination and/or debate by the accounting…

  10. Exploring the Malaysian Rural School Teachers' Professional Local Knowledge in Enhancing Students' Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Hazri; Arbaa, Rohani; Ahmad, Mohamad Zohir

    2017-01-01

    This paper discussed a qualitative research findings on the case of Malaysian teachers employed their professional local knowledge for enhancing students' thinking skills in classroom practices. In this paper, a teacher's professional local knowledge is viewed as a teacher's professional knowledge and skills developed through the combination of…

  11. Teachers' Opinions about the Responsibilities of Parents, Schools, and Teachers in Enhancing Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Isa

    2007-01-01

    Enhancing student learning is a complex process in itself and is related to a variety of factors. This study deals with the three of these factors (i.e., parents, schools, and teachers) based on teachers' perceptions. A short survey composed of three open-ended questions was administered to 148 teachers. The teachers were asked to write their…

  12. Use of Immersive Simulations to Enhance Graduate Student Learning: Implications for Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Robert H.; Johnson, Christie W.; Gilbert, Kristen A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present how one university incorporates immersive simulations through platforms which employ avatars to enhance graduate student understanding and learning in educational leadership programs. While using simulations and immersive virtual environments continues to grow, the literature suggests limited evidence of…

  13. Enhancing the Written Narrative Skills of an AAC Student with Autism: Evidence-Based Research Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Jan; Lasker, Joanne; Speidel, Kristina; Politsch, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    This article describes an intervention study designed to enhance the skills needed in the planning and writing of stories by an adolescent with autism who was using augmentative and alternative communication and working with a typical peer. Overall, the student's postintervention story was dramatically improved over his preintervention story.…

  14. The Enhancement of Students' Teacher Mathematical Reasoning Ability through Reflective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohana

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the enhancement of mathematical reasoning ability through reflective learning. This study used quasi-experimental method with nonequivalent pretest and posttest control group design. The subject of this study were students of Mathematics Education Program in one of private universities in Palembang, South Sumatera,…

  15. National Writing Project's Multimodal Literacies and Teacher Collaboration: Enhanced Student Learning on Global Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Kalpana; Hood, Caleb

    2016-01-01

    Iyengar and Hood, both teacher consultants with the San Antonio Writing Project (SAWP), and instructors of an undergraduate society and social issues class, collaborated to enhance their undergraduate students' writing experiences using the National Writing Project model (Lieberman & Wood, 2003). Iyengar and Hood used strategies such as…

  16. Self-Assessment of Gerontology Teaching Practice: A First-Step in Enhancing Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonDras, Dean D.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses self-assessment of gerontology teaching practice. Through a process of self-reflection one may find insight into their teaching and, concomitantly, develop best-practices for enhancing student learning in gerontology. A self-assessment framework is presented, illuminating best-practices in the areas of the lecture-discussion…

  17. Improving employability through research Informed Learning: enhancing student engagement on a vocational outdoor degree

    OpenAIRE

    Hickman, M.; Gray, P.; Inkster, Allison; Passenger, N.; Stokes, Peter; Beard, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Hickman, M., Gray, P., Inkster, A., Passenger, N., Stokes P., and Beard, C. (2015) ‘Improving employability through research Informed Learning: enhancing student engagement on a vocational outdoor degree’, Inspire: Sharing great practice in Social Science teaching and learning Annual Social Sciences Conference2015, Higher Education Academy, The Studio, Manchester, 3-4 December.

  18. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  19. Undergraduate Students' Opinions with Regard to Ubiquitous MOOC for Enhancing Cross-Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangsorn, Boonrat; Na-Songkhla, Jaitip; Luetkehans, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study undergraduate students' opinions with regard to the ubiquitous massive open online course (MOOC) for enhancing cross-cultural competence. This descriptive research applied a survey method. The survey data were collected by using survey questionnaires and online questionnaires from 410 undergraduate students…

  20. Student-Designed Public Service Announcement (PSA) Videos to Enhance Motivation and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Educators often focus on enhancing student motivation and engagement. This article describes an activity with these aims, in which undergraduates (a) learn about theories and research on means of persuasion and (b) in small groups design and record a public service announcement (PSA) video, write a brief paper that outlines the theories used to…

  1. Caffeine Consumption, Expectancies of Caffeine-Enhanced Performance, and Caffeinism Symptoms among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John R.; Petree, Allen

    1990-01-01

    Gathered self-report data on college students' (n=797) expectations of caffeine-enhanced performance, level of beverage caffeine consumed daily, and caffeinism signs experienced after consumption of caffeinated beverages. Results supported extending the expectancies model of substance use motivation from alcohol to caffeine. (Author/ABL)

  2. Improving Professional Development to Enhance Reading Outcomes for Students in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Conway, Sheila J.; Mellado De La Cruz, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to focus specifically on professional development that is needed to ensure that preservice and in-service teachers are prepared to deliver intensive intervention to enhance reading outcomes of students in special education. Our aim is to provide recommendations to ensure that special educators are prepared to design…

  3. Enhancing student motivation: a longitudinal intervention study based on future time perspective theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitema, J.; Peetsma, T.; van der Veen, I.

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of an intervention developed to enhance student motivation in the first years of secondary education. The intervention, based on future time perspective (FTP) theory, has been found to be effective in prevocational secondary education (T. T. D. Peetsma & I. Van

  4. Student Team Achievement Divisions (STAD) Technique through the Moodle to Enhance Learning Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiantong, Monchai; Teemuangsai, Sanit

    2013-01-01

    One of the benefits of using collaborative learning is enhancing learning achievement and increasing social skills, and the second benefits is as the more students work together in collaborative groups, the more they understand, retain, and feel better about themselves and their peers, moreover working together in a collaborative environment…

  5. Enhancing the Students' Positive Attitude in Learning Business English by Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Lia

    2017-01-01

    Many research findings have stated that the use of technology in EFL classroom results invaluable achievements and develops positive attitudes. Technology may integrate sounds, pictures, motions, and colors that fi ure out a natural picture of real life. The aim of the study was to enhance the students' attitude toward learning English by using…

  6. Teachers' learning about research for enhancing students' thinking skills in science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammungkhun, Wisanugorn; Satchukorn, Sureerat; Saenpuk, Nudchanard; Yuenyong, Chokchai; Chantharanuwong, Warawun

    2018-01-01

    This paper aimed to clarify teachers' learning about research for enhancing students' thinking skills in science learning. The study applied the lens of sociocultural view of learning to discuss teachers' learning about research. Participants included teachers who participated in the project of thinking research schools: research for enhancing students' thinking skills. The project of thinking research schools provided participants chance to learn knowledge about research and thinking research, doing research and publication, and participate in the international conference. Methodology regarded ethnographic research. The tools of interpretation included participant observation, interview, and document analysis. The researchers as participants of the research project of thinking research schools tried to clarify what they learned about research from their way of seeing the view of research about enhancing students' thinking skills through participant observation. The findings revealed what and how teachers as apprenticeship learn about research through legitimate peripheral participation in the research project community of practice. The paper clarified teachers' conceptualization about research for enhancing students' thinking through the workshop, doing research, writing up research article with supported by experts, presenting research in the international conference, editing their research article on the way of publishing, and so on.

  7. Biology in bloom: implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to enhance student learning in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested for a study in which we ranked almost 600 science questions from college life science exams and standardized tests. The BBT was then implemented in three different collegiate settings. Implementation of the BBT helped us to adjust our teaching to better enhance our students' current mastery of the material, design questions at higher cognitive skills levels, and assist students in studying for college-level exams and in writing study questions at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. From this work we also created a suite of complementary tools that can assist biology faculty in creating classroom materials and exams at the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy and students to successfully develop and answer questions that require higher-order cognitive skills.

  8. Integrating Model-Based Learning and Animations for Enhancing Students' Understanding of Proteins Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Hussein-Farraj, Rania

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the context of chemistry education reforms in Israel. The study examined a new biochemistry learning unit that was developed to promote in-depth understanding of 3D structures and functions of proteins and nucleic acids. Our goal was to examine whether, and to what extent teaching and learning via model-based learning and animations of biomolecules affect students' chemical understanding. Applying the mixed methods research paradigm, pre- and post-questionnaires as well as class-observations were employed in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data. The research population included 175 grade twelve students, divided into three research groups: (a) hands-on exploration of animations, (b) teacher's demonstrations of animations, (c) traditional learning using textbooks. Findings indicated that the integration of model-based learning and 3D animations enhanced students' understanding of proteins' structure and function and their ability to transfer across different levels of chemistry understanding. Findings also indicated that teachers' demonstrations of animations may enhance students' `knowledge'—a low order thinking skill; however, in order to enhance higher levels of thinking, students should be able to explore 3D animations on their own. Applying constructivist and interpretative analysis of the data, three themes were raised, corresponding to cognitive, affective, and social aspects of learning while exploring web-based models and animations.

  9. Late enhancement of the left ventricular myocardium in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by electron beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Kenichi; Yoshibayashi, Muneo; Tsukano, Shinya; Ono, Yasuo; Arakaki, Yoshio; Naito, Hiroaki; Echigo, Shigeyuki [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    In the assessment of myocardial characteristics with computed tomography, late enhancement (intense stain in delayed phase image of contrast enhancement) is an abnormal finding and thought to represent fibrotic change. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of late enhancement in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Forty-five patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aged 1 to 24 years, were examined by electron beam computed tomography. We also assessed the clinical data on these patients. Late enhancement was found in 29 (64%) patients, usually as a patchy, stained area in the myocardium. In 29 patients with late enhancement, seven (24%) has syncopal episode and seven (24%) had a family history of sudden death. In contrast, none (0%) of 16 patients without late enhancement had syncopal episode nor a family history of sudden death (p<0.05). Twenty-four hour electrocardiographic monitoring was performed for 31 patients. Al patients with ventricular tachycardia were in the group with late enhancement [10/23 (43%) vs 0/8 (0%), p<0.05]. Thirty-seven patients were examined by thallium scintigraphy. The perfusion defect was more frequently found in patients with late enhancement than in patients without [14/26 (54%) vs 2/11 (18%), p<0.05]. These data suggest that late enhancement shown with electron beam computed tomography is related to syncopal episode, family history of sudden death, ventricular tachycardia, and myocardial damage in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  10. Late enhancement of the left ventricular myocardium in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by electron beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Kenichi; Yoshibayashi, Muneo; Tsukano, Shinya; Ono, Yasuo; Arakaki, Yoshio; Naito, Hiroaki; Echigo, Shigeyuki

    2001-01-01

    In the assessment of myocardial characteristics with computed tomography, late enhancement (intense stain in delayed phase image of contrast enhancement) is an abnormal finding and thought to represent fibrotic change. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of late enhancement in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Forty-five patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aged 1 to 24 years, were examined by electron beam computed tomography. We also assessed the clinical data on these patients. Late enhancement was found in 29 (64%) patients, usually as a patchy, stained area in the myocardium. In 29 patients with late enhancement, seven (24%) has syncopal episode and seven (24%) had a family history of sudden death. In contrast, none (0%) of 16 patients without late enhancement had syncopal episode nor a family history of sudden death (p<0.05). Twenty-four hour electrocardiographic monitoring was performed for 31 patients. Al patients with ventricular tachycardia were in the group with late enhancement [10/23 (43%) vs 0/8 (0%), p<0.05]. Thirty-seven patients were examined by thallium scintigraphy. The perfusion defect was more frequently found in patients with late enhancement than in patients without [14/26 (54%) vs 2/11 (18%), p<0.05]. These data suggest that late enhancement shown with electron beam computed tomography is related to syncopal episode, family history of sudden death, ventricular tachycardia, and myocardial damage in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  11. Engaging and Assessing Students through their Electronic Devices and Real Time Quizzes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ferrándiz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a teaching experience using Socrative, a third party electronic tool, for real-time questioning in lectures of Econometrics.  Econometrics is a theoretical-practical subject, but traditionally a large proportion of our students tend to focus on the practical and discard the theory, often skipping classes on theory and avoiding studying its content, probably motivated by its complexity. As a consequence, students’ marks obtained in the theoretical part of the exam are usually low. In this context, we put forward a change in our teaching methodology to include the use of Socrative, a freely available app, that allows students to answer teachers’ short, true/false, or multiple choice questions posed during each class using their smartphones (or other electronic devices with Internet connection. The objectives of this project are twofold: 1 to engage students and increase attendance at lectures; 2 to improve feedback on the learning process. The results of a survey of a sample of 186 students reveal that Socrative has been an effective tool for achieving these objectives.

  12. THE USE OF ELECTRONIC JOURNALS IN SCORE RATING ACCOUNTING SYSTEM OF EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И Н Куринин

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a method of using electronic journals as a tool for efficient organization of teacher’s practical work in conditions of computerization of educational process and the widespread implementation of credit-modular system of educational process organization and grade-rating system for basic educational programs proficiency examination. A version of the electronic journal designed by the authors and realized in the program MS Excel is also presented in the article. An example of a completed “Academic Progress” page of the university educational web portal is discussed. It contains a marked electronic student grade book section and the stated conditions and criteria for grades allocation, according to a 100-point scale.

  13. From Bench to Bedside: A communal utility value intervention to enhance students' biomedical science motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth R; Smith, Jessi L; Thoman, Dustin B; Allen, Jill M; Muragishi, Gregg

    2015-11-01

    Motivating students to pursue science careers is a top priority among many science educators. We add to the growing literature by examining the impact of a utility value intervention to enhance student's perceptions that biomedical science affords important utility work values. Using an expectancy-value perspective we identify and test two types of utility value: communal (other-oriented) and agentic (self-oriented). The culture of science is replete with examples emphasizing high levels of agentic value, but communal values are often (stereotyped as) absent from science. However, people in general want an occupation that has communal utility. We predicted and found that an intervention emphasizing the communal utility value of biomedical research increased students' motivation for biomedical science (Studies 1-3). We refined whether different types of communal utility value (working with, helping, and forming relationships with others) might be more or less important, demonstrating that helping others was an especially important predictor of student motivation (Study 2). Adding agentic utility value to biomedical research did not further increase student motivation (Study 3). Furthermore, the communal value intervention indirectly impacted students' motivation because students believed that biomedical research was communal and thus subsequently more important (Studies 1-3). This is key, because enhancing student communal value beliefs about biomedical research (Studies 1-3) and science (Study 4) was associated both with momentary increases in motivation in experimental settings (Studies 1-3) and increased motivation over time among students highly identified with biomedicine (Study 4). We discuss recommendations for science educators, practitioners, and faculty mentors who want to broaden participation in science.

  14. Utilizing visual art to enhance the clinical observation skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasani, Sona K; Saks, Norma S

    2013-07-01

    Clinical observation is fundamental in practicing medicine, but these skills are rarely taught. Currently no evidence-based exercises/courses exist for medical student training in observation skills. The goal was to develop and teach a visual arts-based exercise for medical students, and to evaluate its usefulness in enhancing observation skills in clinical diagnosis. A pre- and posttest and evaluation survey were developed for a three-hour exercise presented to medical students just before starting clerkships. Students were provided with questions to guide discussion of both representational and non-representational works of art. Quantitative analysis revealed that the mean number of observations between pre- and posttests was not significantly different (n=70: 8.63 vs. 9.13, p=0.22). Qualitative analysis of written responses identified four themes: (1) use of subjective terminology, (2) scope of interpretations, (3) speculative thinking, and (4) use of visual analogies. Evaluative comments indicated that students felt the exercise enhanced both mindfulness and skills. Using visual art images with guided questions can train medical students in observation skills. This exercise can be replicated without specially trained personnel or art museum partnerships.

  15. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, I. M.; Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior

  16. Large area plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline graphite on insulator for electronic device application

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Marek E.; Xu, Cigang; Cooke, Mike; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Chong, H.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on large area plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of nanocrystalline graphite (NCG) on thermally grown SiO2 wafer, quartz and sapphire substrates. Grown films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrical characterization and optical transmission measurementsindicate promising properties of this material for use as transparent electrodes and for electronic device applicati...

  17. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, I. M.; Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  18. Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

  19. Introducing regular formative assessment to enhance learning among dental students at Islamic International Dental College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Fatima; Yasmin, Shahina; Yasmin, Raheela

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Formative Assessment in enhancing learning among dental students, and to interpret the assessment from students' perspective in this regard. The experimental non-randomised controlled study was conducted from January to June 2013 at Islamic International Dental College, Islamabad, and comprised first year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students attending regular physiology lectures and tutorials. Summative assessments conducted at the end of each unit were included as pre-intervention tests. After one month's planning, central nervous system unit was delivered in a month's trial with four formative assessment and feedback sessions (one per week). Likert scale-based student feedback questionnaire was administered. Post-intervention summative assessment was done by Multiple Choice and Short Essay Questions. Data was analysed using SPSS 17. Out of 68 students, 64(94.1%) agreed that a conducive environment was maintained and 62(90%) agreed that such sessions should be continued throughout the year; 59(87%) reflected that the feedback provided by the teacher was timely and positive and ensured equitable participation; 56(82%)agreed that it enhanced their interest in the subject; 56(68%) agreed that they were now more focussed; and43(63%)were of the opinion that they have progressed in the subject through these sessions. There was highly significant improvement in the monthly post-intervention test scores compared to pre-intervention test (p=0.000). Formative assessment sessions enhanced motivation and learning in first year dental students. Organised regular sessions with students' feedback may contribute to the development of pedagogic practice.

  20. The role of instability-enhanced friction on ‘anomalous’ electron and ion transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Trevor; Chabert, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    Using a self-consistent 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation, we investigate the electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters. The PIC simulation is explicit in time and models the axial and azimuthal directions of a thruster without using any artificial parametric or geometric scaling factors. The applied discharge voltage and external magnetic field causes electrons to drift in the azimuthal direction, and this drives an instability in the plasma that produces large amplitude oscillations in both the plasma density and azimuthal electric field. A Fourier transform in time and space shows that the oscillations follow a dispersion relation similiar to that for an ion acoustic instability (in agreement with a recent kinetic theory). Correlated with the presence of this instability is an enhanced electron cross-field transport; even in the absence of electron-wall collisions and secondary electron emission. The amplitude of plasma density oscillations (but not electric field oscillations) is found to decrease significantly in a region just downstream of the thruster exit (before then increasing again), and reaches levels similar to those measured experimentally with collective light scattering techniques. By taking relevant velocity moments of the electron distribution function in the PIC simulations, we reconstruct each term in the electron momentum conservation equation and demonstrate that ‘anomalous’ electron transport can be explained entirely due to an instability-enhanced friction force between electrons and ions. This friction force acts as an additional momentum loss allowing electrons to cross the magnetic field, and as an accelerating force causing ions to rotate azimuthally in the same direction as the electrons. Clear evidence of ion-wave trapping in the instability electric field is observed.

  1. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-02

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

  2. Enhancing social support, hardiness, and acculturation to improve mental health among Asian Indian international students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Amar; Sharma, Manoj; Atri, Ashutosh

    International students, upon relocation to a foreign country, undergo a major life event which can cause distress that can potentially affect their mental health. This study pilot tested an internet-based intervention to enhance the social support, hardiness, and acculturation among students of Asian Indian origin at a large midwestern university. A pretest-posttest randomized design was employed. The pretest was administered to 60 students who were then randomly assigned to experimental and comparison groups. The experimental group was offered online instruction about social support, hardiness, and acculturation through Blackboard over 2 months. The comparison group received an equivalent protocol based on general wellness. Repeated measures ANOVA was done which showed significant improvement in mental health variable (F(1, 37) = 4.768, p < 0.05). Recommendations for replicating such interventions in other groups of international students are presented.

  3. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience. PMID:25663734

  4. Ω-doubling and a limit for the enhancement of the electron EDM effect in diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubukov, D.V.; Labzowsky, L.N.

    2014-01-01

    The recent experimental results for the upper limit for the electron EDM in heavy diatomic molecules with open electron shells YbF, ThO as well as proposals for the similar measurements in other heavy heteronuclear diatomic molecules are analyzed. It is argued that the enhancement factor for the electron EDM in a molecule, presented as an “effective” electric field E eff is limited by the value E eff,max ≈100⋅10 9 V/cm for the molecular states with any value of Ω in diatomic molecules

  5. The use of prescription stimulants to enhance academic performance among college students in health care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Lawrence; Shtayermman, Oren; Aksnes, Brittany; Anzalone, Michelle; Cormerais, Andre; Liodice, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Prescription stimulant use as academic performance enhancers is increasingly widespread among college students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of prescription stimulant use among health care students attending a university in the northeastern United States. The study investigated the specific stimulants being used and the frequency of usage. It also examined the rates of nicotine, alcohol, and drug abuse versus dependence. A web-based survey was administered to medical and health profession students regarding prescription stimulant use for nonprescribed purposes. Tobacco, alcohol, and recreational drug use were also surveyed. Approximately 10.4% (32) of students surveyed have either used a stimulant or are currently using prescription stimulants illegally. The most common reason for stimulant use was to focus and concentrate during studying (93.5%). Of the 308 students, 45.2% were female, 83.9% were Caucasian, and amphetamine-dextroamphetamine was the most commonly abused stimulant (71.4%). Results from this study are consistent with previous research of undergraduate students regarding prescription stimulant use for nonprescribed purposes, specifically for academic performance enhancement. Data from the study support that alcohol abuse and dependence among students is a pertinent concern, suggesting that substance abuse in general must be addressed. Substance abuse and awareness programs combined with stress management programs in an overall substance-abuse reduction strategy, including the use of prescription stimulant use beyond the originally intended purpose, may be beneficial. Because of the lack of research focusing on graduate health care students, further investigations should use similar populations.

  6. An Electronic Wellness Program to Improve Diet and Exercise in College Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Amy L; Ross, Jamisha T; Klein, Catherine J; Lei, Kai Y; Mackey, Eleanor R

    2016-02-29

    In transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, college students are faced with significant challenges to their health habits. Independence, stress, and perceived lack of time by college students have been known to result in poor eating and exercise habits, which can lead to increased disease risk. To assess the feasibility and to determine preliminary efficacy of an electronic wellness program in improving diet and physical activity in college students. A 24-week diet and physical activity program was delivered via email to 148 college students. The intervention involved weekly, tailored, and interactive diet and physical activity goals. The control group received nondiet and nonexercise-related health fact sheets. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, as well as food frequency and physical activity surveys were conducted at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Students' choice of fruit as a snack was also monitored at study visits. Students were 18-20 years old, 69% female, and from a diverse college campus (46% Caucasian, 23% Asian, 20% African American, 11% other). At week 24, 84% of students reported reading at least half of all emails. Mean change (standard error [SE]) from baseline of saturated fat intake was marginally significant between the treatment groups at week 24, 0.7 (SE 0.42) % kcal for control and -0.3 (SE 0.30) % kcal for intervention (P=0.048). A significant difference in percent of snacks chosen that were fruit (χ(2)1, N=221 = 11.7, Pstudents and resulted in a decrease in saturated fat intake and an increase in observed fruit intake compared to a control group.

  7. Developing design-based STEM education learning activities to enhance students' creative thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinasa, Siwa; Siripun, Kulpatsorn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    Creative thinking on applying science and mathematics knowledge is required by the future STEM career. The STEM education should be provided for the required skills of future STEM career. This paper aimed to clarify the developing STEM education learning activities to enhance students' creative thinking. The learning activities were developed for Grade 10 students who will study in the subject of independent study (IS) of Khon Kaen Wittayayon School, Khon Kaen, Thailand. The developing STEM education learning activities for enhancing students' creative thinking was developed regarding on 6 steps including (1) providing of understanding of fundamental STEM education concept, (2) generating creative thinking from prototype, (4) revised ideas, (5) engineering ability, and (6) presentation and discussion. The paper will clarify the 18 weeks activities that will be provided based these 6 steps of developing learning activities. Then, these STEM learning activities will be discussed to provide the chance of enhancing students' creative thinking. The paper may have implication for STEM education in school setting.

  8. Integrating Facebook into a University Cohort to Enhance Student Sense of Belonging: A Pilot Program in Sport and Exercise Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Teneale Alyce; Sealey, Rebecca Maree

    2013-01-01

    University initiatives that enhance a students' sense of belonging may increase student retention and the overall student experience. Previous initiatives have largely focussed on face-to-face interactions however with the high usage of social networking, an online initiative may prove beneficial. The aim of this study was to establish a Facebook…

  9. Changing the Metacognitive Orientation of a Classroom Environment to Enhance Students' Metacognition Regarding Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory P.; Anderson, David

    2014-01-01

    Concerns persist regarding science classroom learning environments and the lack of development of students' metacognition and reasoning processes within such environments. Means of shaping learning environments so that students are encouraged to develop their metacognition are required in order to enhance students' reasoning and…

  10. Enhancing teamwork using a creativity-focussed learning intervention for undergraduate nursing students - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, O M; Laird, E A; Reid, B B; Deeny, P G; McGarvey, H E

    2018-02-22

    A cohort of year two students (n = 181) was exposed to a transformational and experiential learning intervention in the form of team-led poster development workshops to enhance competence and interpersonal skills for working in teams. The aims of this study were to test the suitability of an amended TeamSTEPPS teamwork perceptions questionnaire (T-TPQ) for measuring the impact of the intervention on students' perceptions of team working, and to ascertain students' views about the experience. This was a two phase pilot study. Phase 1 was a repeated measures design to test the T-TPQ for evaluating the impact of the experiential intervention, and Phase 2 was a survey of students' views and opinions. Descriptive and statistical analysis of the data were performed. Our findings suggest that age and part-time employment mediate towards more positive teamwork perceptions. Teamwork perceptions increased from week 3 to week 9 of the experiential intervention, and students viewed the experience positively. This was the first time that the T-TPQ was tested for suitability for measuring the impact of an experiential learning intervention among nursing students. Despite limitations, our study indicates that the amended T-TPQ is sensitive to changes in teamwork perceptions in repeated measures design studies among nursing students. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing interest in statistics among computer science students using computer tool entrepreneur role play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judi, Hairulliza Mohamad; Sahari @ Ashari, Noraidah; Eksan, Zanaton Hj

    2017-04-01

    Previous research in Malaysia indicates that there is a problem regarding attitude towards statistics among students. They didn't show positive attitude in affective, cognitive, capability, value, interest and effort aspects although did well in difficulty. This issue should be given substantial attention because students' attitude towards statistics may give impacts on the teaching and learning process of the subject. Teaching statistics using role play is an appropriate attempt to improve attitudes to statistics, to enhance the learning of statistical techniques and statistical thinking, and to increase generic skills. The objectives of the paper are to give an overview on role play in statistics learning and to access the effect of these activities on students' attitude and learning in action research framework. The computer tool entrepreneur role play is conducted in a two-hour tutorial class session of first year students in Faculty of Information Sciences and Technology (FTSM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, enrolled in Probability and Statistics course. The results show that most students feel that they have enjoyable and great time in the role play. Furthermore, benefits and disadvantages from role play activities were highlighted to complete the review. Role play is expected to serve as an important activities that take into account students' experience, emotions and responses to provide useful information on how to modify student's thinking or behavior to improve learning.

  12. The effects of a technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model on students' understanding of science in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertwanasiriwan, Chaiwuti

    The study examined the effects of a technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model on students' understanding of science in Thailand. A mixed quantitative research design was selected for the research design. A pretest-posttest control-group design was implemented for the experimental research. A causal-comparative design using questionnaire and classroom observation was employed for the non-experimental research. Two sixth-grade classrooms at a medium-sized public school in Bangkok, Thailand were randomly selected for the study - one as the control group and the other as the experimental group. The 34 students in the control group only received the inquiry instructional model, while the 35 students in the experimental group received the technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model. Both groups of students had been taught by the same science teacher for 15 weeks (three periods per week). The results and findings from the study seemed to indicate that both the technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model and the inquiry instructional model significantly improve students' understanding of science. However, it might be claimed that students receiving the technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model gain more than students only receiving the inquiry instructional model. In addition, the technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model seemed to support the assessment during the 5E Model's evaluation stage. Most students appeared to have very good attitudes toward using it in the science classroom suggesting that the technology-enhanced inquiry instructional model motivates students to learn science.

  13. Electron-enhanced nano scaled atomic processes in classic semiconductors and polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaeva, N.N.

    2007-06-01

    Key words:quasiparticles, self-trapping, polaron, inversion, fluctuon, exciton, defect, quantum diffusion, dislocation, dispersion, amorphization, polymer, hydrogen key, photo-destruction, conformation, persistent length, mutation, self-compensation. Subjects of the inquiry: silicon, hydrogenated amorphous silicon, porous semiconductors, polymers, DNA, polymer solutions. Aim of the inquiry: Investigation of electron-enhanced atomic re buildings in classic semiconductors and polymers on nano scales. Method of inquiry: solid states theory, quantum mechanics, statistic physics, thermodynamics, theory aspects of radiation physics of condensed matter, self-trapping theory, scattering theory, polymer physics. The results achieved and their novelty: For the first time it was shown that electron-phonon interaction was able to amplify the quantum nature of atomic subsystem in condensed matter by means of De Boer parameter increasing of one and multi-atomic defects. It was constructed the exciton theory of Staebler Wronsky effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon which was based on the Rice, Kossel, Paspreger mechanism of hydrogen atom dissociation. It was constructed the theoretical model of radiation defect production in porous semiconductors by particle (electrons and neutrons) irradiation in frames of stochastic model of defect production. In frames of scattering matrix formalism was received the dispersion law of the quasiparticle-inversion responsible for interstitial atom migration at low temperatures in semiconductors. It was constructed the theoretical model of nano scaled dislocation kinks tunneling amplifying by electrons self-trapping on them. It was worked out the theoretical model of disordering and annealing in semiconductors taking into account the electrons stopping at ionic irradiation. It was shown that disordering was the accumulation of nano scaled exciton-lattice excitements(fluctuons). It was worked out the Auger-destruction theory in polymers taking

  14. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs. PMID:22230259

  15. Electron beam pretreatment of switchgrass to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis to produce sugars for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Smith; Bergey, N Scott; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Stipanovic, Arthur; Driscoll, Mark

    2014-01-16

    Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to value added products such as ethanol and other platform chemicals is enhanced by pretreatment, which reduces the crystallinity and molecular weight of cell wall polymers, thus increasing the available reaction sites. In this study, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was pretreated with high energy electron beam (EB) irradiation to reduce its recalcitrance and achieve higher sugar conversion rates during treatment with cellulases and β-glucosidase. Conversion rates to sugars were compared before and after hot water (HW) extraction of EB-treated and control samples of switchgrass. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to determine peak degradation temperature of these EB-treated biomass samples before and after HW extraction, and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used as a rapid technique to determine cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents in the samples. TGA data confirm previously reported results that EB pretreatment reduces the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose and hemicellulose. This leaves hemicellulose more amenable to HW extraction and creates more cellulase-accessible sites, as shown by NIR and glucose yield data, respectively. Hemicellulose content was reduced from 30.2 to 16.9% after HW extraction and 1000 kGy EB treatment, and ultimate glucose yield after cellulase hydrolysis increased more than 4-fold. This study provides evidence that when EB pretreatment is utilized in combination with HW extraction, higher conversion rates and yields of glucose can be obtained from the cellulosic fraction of switchgrass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minggang Xia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga+ implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga+ implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 103 Ω−1m−1 to 1.46 × 104 Ω−1m−1 and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm−1K−1 to 1.22 Wm−1K−1 for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga+ implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga+ point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga+-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  17. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + [6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  18. Alternate charging and discharging of capacitor to enhance the electron production of bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peng; Wu, Wenlong; Wei, Jincheng; Yuan, Lulu; Xia, Xue; Huang, Xia

    2011-08-01

    A bioelectrochemical system (BES) can be operated in both "microbial fuel cell" (MFC) and "microbial electrolysis cell" (MEC) modes, in which power is delivered and invested respectively. To enhance the electric current production, a BES was operated in MFC mode first and a capacitor was used to collect power from the system. Then the charged capacitor discharged electrons to the system itself, switching into MEC mode. This alternate charging and discharging (ACD) mode helped the system produce 22-32% higher average current compared to an intermittent charging (IC) mode, in which the capacitor was first charged from an MFC and then discharged to a resistor, at 21.6 Ω external resistance, 3.3 F capacitance and 300 mV charging voltage. The effects of external resistance, capacitance and charging voltage on average current were studied. The average current reduced as the external resistance and charging voltage increased and was slightly affected by the capacitance. Acquisition of higher average current in the ACD mode was attributed to the shorter discharging time compared to the charging time, as well as a higher anode potential caused by discharging the capacitor. Results from circuit analysis and quantitatively calculation were consistent with the experimental observations.

  19. Evidence for the enhancement of stress-induced ordering in Ag-27 at % Zn alloy due to electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbwachs, M.; Hillairet, J.

    1975-01-01

    Internal friction measurements of rate of stress-induced ordering in a silver-zinc alloy during bombardment by electrons are reported. This alloy exhibits a Zener relaxation, i.e. a change in the degree of order with a change in the applied stress, and the rate of relaxation can provide information concerning the enhancement of the rate of ordering [fr

  20. A Proposed Integration Environment for Enhanced User Interaction and Value-Adding of Electronic Documents: An Empirical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chern Li; Chennupati, K. R.; Foo, Schubert

    2001-01-01

    Explores the potential and impact of an innovative information environment in enhancing user activities in using electronic documents for various tasks, and to support the value-adding of these e-documents. Discusses the conceptual design and prototyping of a proposed environment, PROPIE. Presents an empirical and formative evaluation of the…

  1. Reproductive Science for High School Students: A Shared Curriculum Model to Enhance Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Megan; Cleveland, Charlotte; Gordon, Diana; Jones, Lynda; Zelinski, Mary; Winter, Patricia; Chang, Jeffrey; Senegar-Mitchell, Ericka; Coutifaris, Christos; Shuda, Jamie; Mainigi, Monica; Bartolomei, Marisa; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    The lack of a national reproductive biology curriculum leads to critical knowledge gaps in today's high school students' comprehensive understanding of human biology. The Oncofertility Consortium developed curricula that address the basic and clinical aspects of reproductive biology. Launching this academy and creating easy-to-disseminate learning modules allowed other universities to implement similar programs across the country. The expansion of this informal, extracurricular academy on reproductive health from Northwestern University to the University of California, San Diego, Oregon Health & Science University, and the University of Pennsylvania magnifies the scope of scientific learning to students who might not otherwise be exposed to this important information. To assess the experience gained from this curriculum, we polled alumni from the four centers. Data were collected anonymously from de-identified users who elected to self-report on their experiences in their respective reproductive science academy. The alumni survey asked participants to report on their current academic standing, past experiences in the academy, and future academic and career goals. The results of this national survey suggest the national oncofertility academies had a lasting impact on participants and may have contributed to student persistence in scientific learning. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  2. Just-in-Time or Plenty-of-Time Teaching? Different Electronic Feedback Devices and Their Effect on Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Martinez, Brandon; Seli, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how incorporating different electronic feedback devices (i.e., clickers versus web-based polling) may affect specific types of student engagement (i.e., behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement), whether students' self-efficacy for learning and performance may differ between courses that have integrated clickers and…

  3. An Electromagnetic Spectrum for Millennial Students: Teaching Light, Color, Energy, and Frequency Using the Electronic Devices of Our Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a comparison of student learning outcomes is made in sophomore-level physical science classes using a "traditional" pedagogical approach versus a "modern" approach. Specifically, when students were taught the electromagnetic spectrum using diagrams and examples that incorporate technological advances and electronic devices of our…

  4. The Effectiveness of Electronic Mind Maps in Developing Academic Achievement and the Attitude towards Learning English among Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaser, Afaf M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the effect of using electronic Mind Maps on the academic achievement of the fifth-grade primary female students in the English language curriculum compared to the traditional teaching method adopted in the teacher's guide. It also aimed to indicate the attitudes of the fifth-grade female students towards the use…

  5. A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukkala, Angela M; Miltner, Rebecca S; Morrison, Shannon L; Gisiger-Camata, Sylvia; Todd, Allison; Moneyham, Linda D; Meneses, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession.

  6. Directions of use of electronic resources at training to computer science of students of a teacher training college

    OpenAIRE

    Светлана Анатольева Баженова

    2009-01-01

    Article is devoted questions of use of electronic resources at training to computer science in a teacher training college, principles of pedagogical expediency of use of electronic resources at training are specified computer science and positive aspects of such use for different forms of work of the student and the teacher are allocated.

  7. Enhancing Teacher and Student Engagement and Understanding of Marine Science Through Classroom Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    Overview This paper presentation shares findings from a granted funded project that sought to expand teacher content knowledge and pedagogy within the fields of marine science and coastal resource management through the implementation of classroom citizen science projects. A secondary goal was to increase middle and high school student interest and participation in marine science and natural resources research. Background A local science & engineering fair has seen a rapid decline in secondary student participants in the past four years. Research has demonstrated that when students are a part of a system of knowledge production (citizen science) they become much more aware, involved and conscious of scientific concepts compared to traditional school laboratory and nature of science activities. This project's primary objectives were to: (a) enhance teacher content expertise in marine science, (b) enrich teacher professional learning, (c) support citizen science classroom projects and inspire student activism and marine science engagement. Methods Project goals were addressed through classroom and meaningful outdoor educational experiences that put content knowledge into field based practices. Teachers learned to apply thier expanded content knowlege through classroom citizen science projects that focus on marine resource conservation issues such as fisheries management, water quality, turtle nesting and biodiversity of coastal ecosystems. These projects would eventually become potential topics of citizen science research topics for their students to pursue. Upon completion of their professional development, participants were urged to establish student Marine Science clubs with the goal of mentoring student submissions into the local science fair. Supplemental awards were possible for the students of project participants. Findings Based on project measures participants significantly increased their knowledge and awareness of presented material marine science and

  8. Technopedagogical Design of Electronic Learning Portfolios: An Experience with Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Díaz Barriga Arceo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article the technopedagogical design of electronic learning portfolios with eighteen undergraduate psychology students is reported. The e-portfolio model is based on the approach of situated learning and authentic assessment, and relies on the metaphors of the portfolio as mirror, map and sonnet. It includes a description of the e-portfolio; the skills and learnings expected of the student; key questions for reflection; minimum input required; the type of evidence or artifacts expected; and the technological resources employed. Examples of the students’ reflections and of the self-assessments and co-assessments performed are provided. The findings suggest that e-learning portfolios enable the recovery and systematization of learning productions and experiences, and can function as a tool for monitoring learning as well as for reflection on the individual’s own professional identity, personal and academic trajectory.

  9. Business Students' Perceptions of Electronic Commerce - Will They Join the Revolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Fink

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic impact of Electronic Commerce (EC is attracting much attention, most of which is directed towards emerging Internet technology. However, it is generally acknowledged that it will take a few more years before EC becomes mainstream. The perceptions of business students, the future business leaders, on the promises and perils of EC are therefore vital. Our research indicated that they believe that the capabilities of the Internet for marketing and distribution are achieved to a greater extent than those for accounting and finance. The use of digital money appears to be still unrealistic in their opinion. Their main concern is for the insecurity of EC in such areas as computer viruses, theft of information, and unauthorised access to data by intruders. As a consequence, the trust the students currently have in EC is relatively low. However, they are optimistic about future prospects of EC, which they perceive will significantly improve over the next few years.

  10. Novel Photoanode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Enhanced Light-Harvesting and Electron-Collection Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weixing; Gong, Yudong; Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong; Zhao, Huabo; Sun, Chunwen

    2016-06-01

    A novel photoanode structure modified by porous flowerlike CeO2 microspheres as a scattering layer with a thin TiO2 film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is prepared to achieve a significantly enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The light scattering capability of the photoanode with the porous CeO2 microsphere layer is considerably improved. The interconnection of particles and electrical contact between bilayer and conducting substrate is further enhanced by an ALD-deposited TiO2 film, which effectively reduces the electron recombination and facilitates electron transport and thus enhances the charge collection efficiency of DSSCs. As a result, the overall efficiency of the obtained TiO2-CeO2-based cells reaches 9.86%, which is 31% higher than that of the DSSCs with a conventional TiO2 photoanode.

  11. Prevalence of and beliefs about electronic cigarettes and hookah among high school students with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, David A; Barnett, Tracey E; Dekevich, David; Gibson-Young, Linda M; Martinasek, Mary; Jagger, Meredith A

    2016-12-01

    To assess current cigarette, hookah, and electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among high school students with and without asthma. Beliefs and use of tobacco products by a household member were also examined. The 2014 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey was administered to high school students to assess current use of cigarettes, hookah, and e-cigarettes (i.e., within past 30 days). Student's home exposure and beliefs about cigarettes, hookah, and e-cigarettes were also assessed. Students were randomly selected using a two-stage cluster probability design. Adolescents with asthma had a higher prevalence of current hookah (14.0%) and e-cigarette use (12.4%) compared with their peers (10.9%, 10.2%, respectively). Adolescents with asthma were also at increased risk for current use of cigarettes (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.24), hookah (AOR: 1.32), and e-cigarettes (AOR: 1.34). Adolescents with asthma reported positive beliefs about tobacco products and were more likely to report living with individuals who used cigarettes (31.5%), hookah (12.1%), and e-cigarettes (15.5%) compared with their peers (26.5%, 8.5%, 12.5%, respectively). Adolescents with asthma reported tobacco product use, positive beliefs about tobacco products, and high potential home exposure to tobacco products. There is a pressing need for education regarding potential harm of alternative tobacco products among adolescents with asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electronic book and its use by undergraduate students of a federal university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bogliolo Sirihal Duarte

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electronic books (e-books has been gaining notoriety in the market and in academic research. University libraries bet on loan contents, and do not believe on borrow devices for reading purposes. Purpose: Presents the results of a research carried out with undergraduate students and librarians of the Library System of Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - UFMG designed to investigate how the students are using e-books and e-readers and if the library system is prepared to provide support in terms of services and collections. Methodology: Regarding the methodology, the research was conducted in three steps including literature review, qualitative research with librarians(conducting interviews and quantitative research with students (questionnaires. Results: The main results show that over 50% of students have made use of ebooks but about 75% prefer the p-books to perform their activities of reading and research. The main format used is PDF. The most used features include changing the font size, underline, consult the dictionary and annotate. The provision of e-books by the Library System of UFMG is still limited and occurs through isolated initiatives by units. Librarians point out advantages and disadvantages of e-book usage. Conclusions: The public has not demanded more than it is been offered. Given the choice, the vast preference of UFMG reader is still the book in the printed version.

  13. Nanoscale investigation of enhanced electron field emission for silver ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Kalpataru; Hyeok, Jeong Jin; Park, Jeong Young; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Balakrishnan, Sundaravel; Lin, I-Nan

    2017-11-24

    Silver (Ag) ions are implanted in ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to enhance the electron field emission (EFE) properties, resulting in low turn-on field of 8.5 V/μm with high EFE current density of 6.2 mA/cm 2 (at an applied field of 20.5 V/μm). Detailed nanoscale investigation by atomic force microscopy based peak force-controlled tunneling atomic force microscopy (PF-TUNA) and ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) based current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) reveal that the UNCD grain boundaries are the preferred electron emission sites. The two scanning probe microscopic results supplement each other well. However, the PF-TUNA measurement is found to be better for explaining the local electron emission behavior than the STM-based CITS technique. The formation of Ag nanoparticles induced abundant sp 2 nanographitic phases along the grain boundaries facilitate the easy transport of electrons and is believed to be a prime factor in enhancing the conductivity/EFE properties of UNCD films. The nanoscale understanding on the origin of electron emission sites in Ag-ion implanted/annealed UNCD films using the scanning probe microscopic techniques will certainly help in developing high-brightness electron sources for flat-panel displays applications.

  14. Enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Ji

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The target consists of a cone attached to a double-layer hollow channel with a near-critical-density inner layer. The periodic electron beams are generated by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal laser electric field. Then a stable electron propagation is achieved in the double-layer channel over a much longer distance without evident divergency, compared with a normal cone-channel target. Detailed simulations show that the much better long-distance collimation and guidance of energetic electrons is attributed to the much stronger electromagnetic fields at the inner wall surfaces. Furthermore, a continuous electron acceleration is obtained by the more intense laser electric fields and extended electron acceleration length in the channel. Our investigation shows that by employing this advanced target, both the forward-going electron energy flux in the channel and the energy coupling efficiency from laser to electrons are about threefold increased in comparison with the normal case.

  15. Enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanling; Duan, Tao; Zhou, Weimin; Li, Boyuan; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Ye, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Chunrong; Tang, Yongjian

    2018-02-01

    An enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The target consists of a cone attached to a double-layer hollow channel with a near-critical-density inner layer. The periodic electron beams are generated by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal laser electric field. Then a stable electron propagation is achieved in the double-layer channel over a much longer distance without evident divergency, compared with a normal cone-channel target. Detailed simulations show that the much better long-distance collimation and guidance of energetic electrons is attributed to the much stronger electromagnetic fields at the inner wall surfaces. Furthermore, a continuous electron acceleration is obtained by the more intense laser electric fields and extended electron acceleration length in the channel. Our investigation shows that by employing this advanced target, both the forward-going electron energy flux in the channel and the energy coupling efficiency from laser to electrons are about threefold increased in comparison with the normal case.

  16. Actions improving the image of a nurse in electronic media. Opinion of students at medical courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Klaudia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of study was to define actions improving the image of nurses in electronic media. Material and method. 219 women and 44 men took part in a survey. They were the students of the following courses: nursing, medical rescue, obstetrics, medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutics, physiotherapy, public health. The studies were undertaken with use of own questionnaire in 2015. Results. Majority of respondents 64,6% (n=169 stated that improvement of image of their own profession belongs to the nurses, and only 35,4% (n=93 respondents indicated that the professional organizations of nurses and midwives have their impact on it. According to the students, the most crucial action that should be undertaken by professional organizations in order to improve the image of profession in electronic media was the improvement of wages and working conditions (72,2%, n=189 and better promotion of the profession in electronic media (73,8%, n=193. The nurses can influence the improvement of their image in media by taking care of the good opinion about the profession by setting good example (32%, n=84, and also by creating blogs, social forum, online information services, etc. (26,2%, n=69. Conclusions. According to the respondents, the image of a nurse in electronic media is shaped by the television and radio. The mentioned media tend to present nursing environment in a negative light. The data analysis shows that according to the respondents, the professional organizations of nurses and midwives and nurses themselves should be responsible for improvement of the situation. In order to improve the image, the nurses should promote professional achievements, change the stereotype used in shows and movies, and familiarize the public with the profession. The following branches of mass media should be used: internet websites, television and radio.

  17. Immediate dissemination of student discoveries to a model organism database enhances classroom-based research experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Emily A; Stover, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Use of inquiry-based research modules in the classroom has soared over recent years, largely in response to national calls for teaching that provides experience with scientific processes and methodologies. To increase the visibility of in-class studies among interested researchers and to strengthen their impact on student learning, we have extended the typical model of inquiry-based labs to include a means for targeted dissemination of student-generated discoveries. This initiative required: 1) creating a set of research-based lab activities with the potential to yield results that a particular scientific community would find useful and 2) developing a means for immediate sharing of student-generated results. Working toward these goals, we designed guides for course-based research aimed to fulfill the need for functional annotation of the Tetrahymena thermophila genome, and developed an interactive Web database that links directly to the official Tetrahymena Genome Database for immediate, targeted dissemination of student discoveries. This combination of research via the course modules and the opportunity for students to immediately "publish" their novel results on a Web database actively used by outside scientists culminated in a motivational tool that enhanced students' efforts to engage the scientific process and pursue additional research opportunities beyond the course.

  18. The Influence of Interactive Multimedia Technology to Enhance Achievement Students on Practice Skills in Mechanical Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Made Rajendra, I.; Made Sudana, I.

    2018-01-01

    Interactive multimedia technology empowers the educational process by means of increased interaction between teachers and the students. The utilization of technology in the instructional media development has an important role in the increase of the quality of teaching and learning achievements of students. The application of multimedia technology in the instructional media development is able to integrate aspects of knowledge and skills. The success of multimedia technology has revolutionized teaching and learning methods. The design of the study was quasi-experimental with pre and post. The instrument used is the form of questionnaires and tests This study reports research findings indicated that there is a significance difference between the mean performances of students in the experimental group than those students in the control group. The students in the experimental group performed better in mechanical technology practice and in retention test than those in the control group. The study recommended that multimedia instructional tool is an effective tool to enhance achievement students on practice skills in mechanical Technology.

  19. Enhanced zinc oxide and graphene nanostructures for electronics and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ved Prakash

    Zinc oxide and graphene nanostructures are important technological materials because of their unique properties and potential applications in future generation of electronic and sensing devices. This dissertation investigates a brief account of the strategies to grow zinc oxide nanostructures (thin film and nanowire) and graphene, and their applications as enhanced field effect transistors, chemical sensors and transparent flexible electrodes. Nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) and low-gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin films were synthesized by a magnetron sputtering process. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZNWs) were grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. Field effect transistors (FETs) of ZnO and GZO thin films and ZNWs were fabricated by standard photo and electron beam lithography processes. Electrical characteristics of these devices were investigated by nondestructive surface cleaning, ultraviolet irradiation treatment at high temperature and under vacuum. GZO thin film transistors showed a mobility of ˜5.7 cm2/V·s at low operation voltage of high on-to-off ratio (˜106) and mobility (˜28 cm2/V·s). A bottom gated FET showed large hysteresis of ˜5.0 to 8.0 V which was significantly reduced to ˜1.0 V by the surface treatment process. The results demonstrate charge transport in ZnO nanostructures strongly depends on its surface environmental conditions and can be explained by formation of depletion layer at the surface by various surface states. A nitric oxide (NO) gas sensor using single ZNW, functionalized with Cr nanoparticles was developed. The sensor exhibited average sensitivity of ˜46% and a minimum detection limit of ˜1.5 ppm for NO gas. The sensor also is selective towards NO gas as demonstrated by a cross sensitivity test with N2, CO and CO2 gases. Graphene film on copper foil was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method. A hot press lamination process was developed for transferring graphene film to flexible polymer substrate. The graphene

  20. Pulse electromagnetic fields enhance extracellular electron transfer in magnetic bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huihui; Liu, Bingfeng; Wang, Qisong; Sun, Jianmin; Xie, Guojun; Ren, Nanqi; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Xing, Defeng

    2017-01-01

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is essential in driving the microbial interspecies interaction and redox reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and magnetic fields (MFs) were recently reported to promote microbial EET, but the mechanisms of MFs stimulation of EET and current generation in BESs are not known. This study investigates the behavior of current generation and EET in a state-of-the-art pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF)-assisted magnetic BES (PEMF-MBES), which was equipped with magnetic carbon particle (Fe 3 O 4 @N-mC)-coated electrodes. Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was also conducted to reveal the changes of microbial communities and interactions on the anode in response to magnetic field. PEMF had significant influences on current generation. When reactors were operated in microbial fuel cell (MFC) mode with pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF-MMFCs), power densities increased by 25.3-36.0% compared with no PEMF control MFCs (PEMF-OFF-MMFCs). More interestingly, when PEMF was removed, the power density dropped by 25.7%, while when PEMF was reintroduced, the value was restored to the previous level. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicon and principal component analysis (PCA) based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs) indicate that PEMFs led to the shifts in microbial community and changes in species evenness that decreased biofilm microbial diversity. Geobacter spp. were found dominant in all anode biofilms, but the relative abundance in PEMF-MMFCs (86.1-90.0%) was higher than in PEMF-OFF-MMFCs (82.5-82.7%), indicating that the magnetic field enriched Geobacter on the anode. The current generation of Geobacter -inoculated microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) presented the same change regularity, the accordingly increase or decrease corresponding with switch of PEMF, which confirmed the reversible stimulation of PEMFs on microbial electron transfer. The pulse electromagnetic

  1. Educating Students for a Lifetime of Physical Activity: Enhancing Mindfulness, Motivation, and Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Catherine D

    2017-09-01

    For many years, pedagogical scholars and physical education (PE) teachers have worked to enhance effective teaching and learning environments. Yet for some children, youth, and young adults, many of the benefits associated with a physically active lifestyle remain elusive. Enhancing programming and performance to meet physical activity goals may require moving programs beyond "effective." It will require teachers and program leaders to focus programmatic attention on strategies to actually increase students' out-of-class physical activity behavior. Transformative PE provides physical activity content within a nurturing and motivating environment that can change students' lives. It focuses on PE students' role in cognitive decision making, self-motivation, and their search for personal meaning that can add connection and relevance to physical activities. In this SHAPE America - Society of Health and Physical Educators Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport Lecture, I have synthesized the research on these topics to emphasize useful findings applicable to teachers' everyday planning and teaching. Using sport, physical activity, dance, and adventure activities as the means to an end for personal and social growth, we can meet our commitment to effective standards-based education while preparing students for a lifetime of physical activity.

  2. Reducing Alcohol Risk in Adjudicated Male College Students: Further Validation of a Group Motivational Enhancement Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBRIE, JOSEPH W.; CAIL, JESSICA; PEDERSEN, ERIC R.; MIGLIURI, SAVANNAH

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a single-session group motivational enhancement alcohol intervention on adjudicated male college students. Over two sequential academic years, 230 students sanctioned by the university for alcohol-related infractions attended a 60- to 75-minute group intervention. The intervention consisted of a timeline followback, social norms education, decisional balance for behavioral change, blood alcohol content (BAC) information, expectancy challenge, and generation of behavioral goals. Participants were followed weekly for three months and showed reductions in drinking (29%) and alcohol-related consequences (32%) at three-month follow-up. The intervention was successful in reducing drinking for both first-year students and upperclassmen, with reductions appearing to be a function of the intervention and not the citation itself. Furthermore, a post hoc control condition revealed that those participants randomly assigned to the intervention group condition reduced drinking (19%) and alcohol-related consequences (44%) more than participants in the control condition over one month. These results provide continued evidence of the effectiveness of group motivational enhancement interventions with adjudicated male college students. PMID:25525319

  3. Documenting clinical performance problems among medical students: feedback for learner remediation and curriculum enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Mavis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We operationalized the taxonomy developed by Hauer and colleagues describing common clinical performance problems. Faculty raters pilot tested the resulting worksheet by observing recordings of problematic simulated clinical encounters involving third-year medical students. This approach provided a framework for structured feedback to guide learner improvement and curricular enhancement. Methods: Eighty-two problematic clinical encounters from M3 students who failed their clinical competency examination were independently rated by paired clinical faculty members to identify common problems related to the medical interview, physical examination, and professionalism. Results: Eleven out of 26 target performance problems were present in 25% or more encounters. Overall, 37% had unsatisfactory medical interviews, with ‘inadequate history to rule out other diagnoses’ most prevalent (60%. Seventy percent failed because of physical examination deficiencies, with missing elements (69% and inadequate data gathering (69% most common. One-third of the students did not introduce themselves to their patients. Among students failing based on standardized patient (SP ratings, 93% also failed to demonstrate competency based on the faculty ratings. Conclusions: Our review form allowed clinical faculty to validate pass/fail decisions based on standardized patient ratings. Detailed information about performance problems contributes to learner feedback and curricular enhancement to guide remediation planning and faculty development.

  4. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Carbon sources, nitrate as electron acceptor, and characterization of the sludge community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensson, M.

    1997-10-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was studied in laboratory scale experiments as well as in a full scale EBPR process. The studies were focused on carbon source transformations, the use of nitrate as an electron acceptor and characterisation of the microflora. A continuous anaerobic/aerobic laboratory system was operated on synthetic wastewater with acetate as sole carbon source. An efficient EBPR was obtained and mass balances over the anaerobic reactor showed a production of 1.45 g poly-{beta}-hydroxyalcanoic acids (PHA), measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), per g of acetic acid (as COD) taken up. Furthermore, phosphate was released in the anaerobic reactor in a ratio of 0.33 g phosphorus (P) per g PHA (COD) formed and 0.64 g of glycogen (COD) was consumed per g of acetic acid (COD) taken up. Microscopic investigations revealed a high amount of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) in the sludge. Isolation and characterisation of bacteria indicated Acinetobacter spp. to be abundant in the sludge, while sequencing of clones obtained in a 16S rDNA clone library showed a large part of the bacteria to be related to the high mole % G+C Gram-positive bacteria and only a minor fraction to be related to the gamma-subclass of proteobacteria to which Acinetobacter belongs. Operation of a similar anaerobic/aerobic laboratory system with ethanol as sole carbon source showed that a high EBPR can be achieved with this compound as carbon source. However, a prolonged detention time in the anaerobic reactor was required. PHA were produced in the anaerobic reactor in an amount of 1.24 g COD per g of soluble DOC taken up, phosphate was released in an amount of 0.4-0.6 g P per g PHA (COD) produced and 0.46 g glycogen (COD) was consumed per g of soluble COD taken up. Studies of the EBPR in the UCT process at the sewage treatment plant in Helsingborg, Sweden, showed the amount of volatile fatty acids (VFA) available to the PAO in the anaerobic stage to be

  5. Production of Solar Cells in Space from Non Specific Ores by Utilization of Electronically Enhanced Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    An ideal method of construction in space would utilize some form of the Universal Differentiator and Universal Constructor as described by Von Neumann (1). The Universal Differentiator is an idealized non ore specific extractive device which is capable of breaking any ore into its constituent elements, and the Universal Constructor can utilize these elements to build any device with controllability to the nanometer scale. During the Human Exploration Initiative program in the early 1990s a conceptual study was done (2) to understand whether such devices were feasible with near term technology for the utilization of space resources and energy. A candidate system was proposed which would utilize electronically enhanced sputtering as the differentiator. Highly ionized ions would be accelerated to a kinetic energy at which the interaction between them and the lattice elections in the ore would be at a maximum. Experiments have shown that the maximum disintegration of raw material occurs at an ion kinetic energy of about 5 MeV, regardless of the composition and structure of the raw material. Devices that could produce charged ion beams in this energy range in space were being tested in the early 1990s. At this energy, for example an ion in a beam of fluorine ions yields about 8 uranium ions from uranium fluoride, 1,400 hydrogen and oxygen atoms from ice, or 7,000 atoms from sulfur dioxide ice. The ions from the disintegrated ore would then be driven by an electrical field into a discriminator in the form of a mass spectrometer, where the magnetic field would divert the ions into collectors for future use or used directly in molecular beam construction techniques. The process would require 10-7 Torr vacuum which would be available in space or on the moon. If the process were used to make thin film silicon solar cells (ignoring any energy inefficiency for beam production), then energy break even for solar cells in space would occur after 14 days.

  6. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  7. Student Readiness for Technology Enhanced History Education in Turkish High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Turan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether the Turkish high school social sciences major students would feel adequate and fit in atechnology-enhanced educational environment, particularly in history classrooms. To this extent, this study investigated highschool students’ level of proficiency in technology-use and their attitudes toward the use of educational technologies inclassrooms. The data for this study was collected using Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (LSI Version-3 and a 27-item TechnologyQuestionnaire. The results revealed that from the point of proficiency and attitude Turkish high school social sciences majorstudents have the essential technology skills and knowledge to feel adequate in a technology-enhanced learning environment.They also have positive attitudes toward use of educational technologies in history classrooms. Therefore they seem to beready for technology-enhanced instruction.

  8. Body appreciation, interest in cosmetic enhancements, and need for uniqueness among U.S. college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Meghan M; Dunaev, Jamie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine associations between body appreciation and putative correlates that focus on self-enhancement and self-expression. Students (N=261; mean age=20.16years, SD=3.68; 60.9% female) from a non-residential college in the northeastern United States completed a questionnaire measuring body appreciation, interest in cosmetic enhancements, and need for uniqueness. Individuals with higher body appreciation and African Americans/Blacks reported significantly higher self-attributed need for uniqueness and significantly higher investment in a distinctive appearance. The association between body appreciation and interest in cosmetic enhancements (e.g., hair coloring) was not significant. Results suggest that body appreciation may be linked to a desire to express one's own unique qualities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. IR-Driven Ultrafast Transfer of Plasmonic Hot Electrons in Nonmetallic Branched Heterostructures for Enhanced H2Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Benkang; Guo, Lijiao; Lu, Na; Wang, Li; Huang, Jindou; Liu, Kuichao; Dong, Bin

    2018-03-01

    The ultrafast transfer of plasmon-induced hot electrons is considered an effective kinetics process to enhance the photoconversion efficiencies of semiconductors through strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of plasmonic nanostructures. Although this classical sensitization approach is widely used in noble-metal-semiconductor systems, it remains unclear in nonmetallic plasmonic heterostructures. Here, by combining ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with theoretical simulations, IR-driven transfer of plasmon-induced hot electron in a nonmetallic branched heterostructure is demonstrated, which is fabricated through solvothermal growth of plasmonic W 18 O 49 nanowires (as branches) onto TiO 2 electrospun nanofibers (as backbones). The ultrafast transfer of hot electron from the W 18 O 49 branches to the TiO 2 backbones occurs within a timeframe on the order of 200 fs with very large rate constants ranging from 3.8 × 10 12 to 5.5 × 10 12 s -1 . Upon LSPR excitation by low-energy IR photons, the W 18 O 49 /TiO 2 branched heterostructure exhibits obviously enhanced catalytic H 2 generation from ammonia borane compared with that of W 18 O 49 nanowires. Further investigations by finely controlling experimental conditions unambiguously confirm that this plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity arises from the transfer of hot electron rather than from the photothermal effect. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Enhancement in electron and ion temperatures due to solar flares as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sharma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The observations on the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures (Te and Ti measured by the RPA payload aboard the SROSS-C2 satellite have been used to study the effect of solar flares on ionospheric heating. The data on solar flare has been obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC Boulder, Colorado (USA. It has been found that the electron and ion temperatures have a consistent enhancement during the solar flares on the dayside Earth's ionosphere. The estimated enhancement for the average electron temperature is from 1.3 to 1.9 times whereas for ion temperature it is from 1.2 to 1.4 times to the normal days average temperature. The enhancement of ionospheric temperatures due to solar flares is correlated with the diurnal variation of normal days' ionospheric temperatures. The solar flare does not have any significant effect on the nightside ionosphere. A comparison with the temperature obtained from the IRI-95 model also shows a similar enhancement.

  11. Enhancement in electron and ion temperatures due to solar flares as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sharma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The observations on the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures (Te and Ti measured by the RPA payload aboard the SROSS-C2 satellite have been used to study the effect of solar flares on ionospheric heating. The data on solar flare has been obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC Boulder, Colorado (USA. It has been found that the electron and ion temperatures have a consistent enhancement during the solar flares on the dayside Earth's ionosphere. The estimated enhancement for the average electron temperature is from 1.3 to 1.9 times whereas for ion temperature it is from 1.2 to 1.4 times to the normal days average temperature. The enhancement of ionospheric temperatures due to solar flares is correlated with the diurnal variation of normal days' ionospheric temperatures. The solar flare does not have any significant effect on the nightside ionosphere. A comparison with the temperature obtained from the IRI-95 model also shows a similar enhancement.

  12. An Action Research Study into the Role of Student Negotiation in Enhancing Perceived Student Engagement during English Speaking Classes at University Level in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

    2018-01-01

    A major issue in English language teaching in Turkey and other monolingual countries is the teaching of spoken English. This article reports the initial and final stages of an action research study which used student negotiation to enhance student engagement in speaking classes. The research was conducted in the English Language Teaching…

  13. Engineers' Responsibilities for Global Electronic Waste: Exploring Engineering Student Writing Through a Care Ethics Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ryan C; Wilson, Denise

    2017-04-01

    This paper provides an empirically informed perspective on the notion of responsibility using an ethical framework that has received little attention in the engineering-related literature to date: ethics of care. In this work, we ground conceptual explorations of engineering responsibility in empirical findings from engineering student's writing on the human health and environmental impacts of "backyard" electronic waste recycling/disposal. Our findings, from a purposefully diverse sample of engineering students in an introductory electrical engineering course, indicate that most of these engineers of tomorrow associated engineers with responsibility for the electronic waste (e-waste) problem in some way. However, a number of responses suggested attempts to deflect responsibility away from engineers towards, for example, the government or the companies for whom engineers work. Still other students associated both engineers and non-engineers with responsibility, demonstrating the distributed/collective nature of responsibility that will be required to achieve a solution to the global problem of excessive e-waste. Building upon one element of a framework for care ethics adopted from the wider literature, these empirical findings are used to facilitate a preliminary, conceptual exploration of care-ethical responsibility within the context of engineering and e-waste recycling/disposal. The objective of this exploration is to provide a first step toward understanding how care-ethical responsibility applies to engineering. We also hope to seed dialogue within the engineering community about its ethical responsibilities on the issue. We conclude the paper with a discussion of its implications for engineering education and engineering ethics that suggests changes for educational policy and the practice of engineering.

  14. Enhancing students' higher order thinking skills through computer-based scaffolding in problem-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Ju

    This multiple paper dissertation addressed several issues in Problem-based learning (PBL) through conceptual analysis, meta-analysis, and empirical research. PBL is characterized by ill-structured tasks, self-directed learning process, and a combination of individual and cooperative learning activities. Students who lack content knowledge and problem-solving skills may struggle to address associated tasks that are beyond their current ability levels in PBL. This dissertation addressed a) scaffolding characteristics (i.e., scaffolding types, delivery method, customization) and their effects on students' perception of optimal challenge in PBL, b) the possibility of virtual learning environments for PBL, and c) the importance of information literacy for successful PBL learning. Specifically, this dissertation demonstrated the effectiveness of scaffolding customization (i.e., fading, adding, and fading/adding) to enhance students' self-directed learning in PBL. Moreover, the effectiveness of scaffolding was greatest when scaffolding customization is self-selected than based on fixed-time interval and their performance. This suggests that it might be important for students to take responsibility for their learning in PBL and individualized and just-in-time scaffolding can be one of the solutions to address K-12 students' difficulties in improving problem-solving skills and adjusting to PBL.

  15. Enhanced teaching and student learning through a simulator-based course in chemical unit operations design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-07-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes through simulators. A case study presenting the teaching method was evaluated using student surveys and faculty assessments, which were designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively demonstrate that this method is an extremely efficient way of teaching a simulator-based course. In addition to that, this teaching method can easily be generalised and used in other courses. A student's final mark is determined by a combination of in-class assessments conducted based on cooperative and peer learning, progress tests and a final exam. Results revealed that peer learning can improve the overall quality of student learning and enhance student understanding.

  16. Improved Electron Yield and Spin-Polarization from III-V Photocathodes via Bias Enhanced Carrier Drift: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    In this DOE STTR program, Saxet Surface Science, with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as partner, designed, built and tested photocathode structures such that optimal drift-enhanced spin-polarization from GaAs based photoemitters was achieved with minimal bias supply requirements. The forward bias surface grid composition was optimized for maximum polarization and yield, together with other construction parameters including doping profile. This program has culminated in a cathode bias structure affording increased electron spin polarization when applied to III-V based photocathodes. The optimized bias structure has been incorporated into a cathode mounting and biasing design for use in a polarized electron gun.

  17. Enhancing students' moral competence in practice: Challenges experienced by Malawian nurse teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solum, Eva Merethe; Maluwa, Veronica Mary; Tveit, Bodil; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Nurses and student nurses in Malawi often encounter challenges in taking a moral course of action. Several studies have demonstrated a need for increased awareness of ethical issues in the nursing education. To explore the challenges experienced by nurse teachers in Malawi in their efforts to enhance students' moral competence in clinical practice. A qualitative hermeneutic approach was employed to interpret the teachers' experiences. Individual interviews (N = 8) and a focus group interview with teachers (N = 9) from different nursing colleges were conducted. Ethical approval was granted and all participants signed their informed consent. Two overall themes emerged: (1) authoritarian learning climate, with three subthemes: (a) fear of making critical comments about clinical practice, (b) fear of disclosing mistakes and lack of knowledge and (c) lack of a culture of critical discussion and reflection that promotes moral competence; and (2) discrepancy between expectations on learning outcome from nursing college and the learning opportunities in practice comprising three subthemes: (a) gap between the theory taught in class and learning opportunities in clinical practice, (b) lack of good role models and (c) lack of resources. Our findings indicated that showing respect was a central objective when the students were assessed in practice. A number of previous studies have enlightened the need for critical reflection in nursing education. Few studies have linked this to challenges experienced by teachers for development of moral competence in practice. This is one of the first such studies done in an African setting. There is a clear relationship between the two themes. A less authoritarian learning climate may enhance critical reflection and discussion between students, teachers and nurses. This can narrow the gap between the theory taught in college and what is demonstrated in clinical practice. Moral competence must be enhanced in order to ensure patients' rights

  18. Role of Electronic-Vibrational Mixing in Enhancing Vibrational Coherences in the Ground Electronic States of Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ian Seungwan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Bioscience Division; Dong, Hui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Bioscience Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Bioscience Division

    2014-01-24

    Described is the polarization controlled two-color coherence photon echo studies of the reaction center complex from a purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Long-lived oscillatory signals that persist up to 2 ps are observed in neutral, oxidized, and mutant (lacking the special pair) reaction centers, for both (0,0,0,0) and (45,-45,90,0) polarization sequences. We show that the long-lived signals arise via vibronic coupling of the bacteriopheophytin (H) and accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) pigments that leads to vibrational wavepackets in the B ground electronic state. Fourier analysis of the data suggests that the 685 cm-1 mode of B may play a key role in the H to B energy transfer.

  19. School Libraries Addressing the Needs of ELL Students: Enhancing Language Acquisition, Confidence, and Cultural Fluency in ELL Students by Developing a Targeted Collection and Enriching Your Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Peggy Henderson

    2018-01-01

    English Language Learner (ELL) students are sometimes a small constituency. Many resources already in the library can be used to enhance their language acquisition, confidence, and cultural fluency--resources such as graphic novels, hi-lo books, and makerspace materials. This article discusses enhancing language acquisition, confidence, and…

  20. Enhancement of heat dissipation in an electronic chip cooling system using graphite fins

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Dong; Wu, Long; Xun, Lian

    2017-01-01

    As electronic devices get smaller, cooling systems with higher thermal efficiency is demanding by fast growing electronic industry. Great amount of research has been performed on the cooling systems but research on the materials of the cooling systems needs more work. Graphite with high thermal conductivity and light weight is a great candidate to be used in electronic devices. The bottleneck of using graphene in the cooling systems is the thermal transport among the interface from the substr...