WorldWideScience

Sample records for electronic transition lasers

  1. Recombinational laser employing electron transitions of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biriukov, A S; Prokhorov, A M; Shelepin, L A; Shirokov, N N

    1974-12-01

    Conditions are established for obtaining laser action in the visible and uv regions of the spectrum, using transitions between electronic states of diatomic molecules during recombination of a dissociated gas. The mechanism of population inversion was studied for the oxygen molecule, and gain estimates were obtained for laser action at a wavelength of 4881 A. The feasibility of laser action at other wavelengths was examined.

  2. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  3. Instantaneous nonvertical electronic transitions with shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Is it possible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2003-01-01

    In molecular electronic transitions, a vertical transition can be induced by an ultrashort laser pulse. That is, a replica of the initial nuclear state-times the transition dipole moment of the electronic transition-can be created instantaneously (on the time scale of nuclear motion) in the excited...

  4. Nuclear fission fragment excitation of electronic transition laser media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorents, D.C.; McCusker, M.V.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of high energy electronic transition lasers excited by fission fragments are expanded. Specific characteristics of the media including density, excitation rates, wavelength, kinetics, fissile material, scale size, and medium uniformity are assessed. The use of epithermal neutrons, homogeneously mixed fissile material, and special high cross section nuclear isotopes to optimize coupling of the energy to the medium are shown to be important considerations maximizing the scale size, energy deposition, and medium uniformity. A performance limit point of approximately 1000 J/l in approximately 100 μs pulses is established for a large class of systems operating in the near ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. It is demonstrated that e-beam excitation can be used to simulate nuclear pumping conditions to facilitate the search for candidate media. Experimental data for the kinetics of a XeF* laser operating in Ar/Xe/F 2 /UF 6 mixtures are given. These reactor-pumped systems are suitable for scaling to volumes on the order of (meters) 3

  5. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  6. Coherent transition radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator as an electron bunch diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Martin, M.C.; Hao, Z.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    The observation and modeling of coherent transition radiation from femtosecond laser accelerated electron bunches is discussed. The coherent transition radiation, scaling quadratically with bunch charge, is generated as the electrons transit the plasma-vacuum boundary. Due to the limited transverse radius of the plasma boundary, diffraction effects will strongly modify the angular distribution and the total energy radiated is reduced compared to an infinite transverse boundary. The multi-nC electron bunches, concentrated in a length of a few plasma periods (several tens of microns), experience partial charge neutralization while propagating inside the plasma towards the boundary. This reduces the space-charge blowout of the beam, allowing for coherent radiation at relatively high frequencies (several THz). The charge distribution of the electron bunch at the plasma-vacuum boundary can be derived from Fourier analysis of the coherent part of the transition radiation spectrum. A Michelson interferometer was used to measure the coherent spectrum, and electron bunches with duration on the order of 50 fs (rms) were observed

  7. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields and Debye Potential at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-helium ion in the ground state and embedded in a Debye potential in the presence of an external laser field at very low incident electron energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen as monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing Volkov wave function for it. The scattering wave function for the incident electron on the target embedded in a Debye potential is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange. We calculate the laser-assisted differential and total cross sections for free-free transition for absorption/emission of a single photon or no photon exchange. The results will be presented at the conference.

  8. Feasibility of Optical Transition Radiation Imaging for Laser-driven Plasma Accelerator Electron-Beam Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Rule, D. W. [Unlisted, US, MD; Downer, M. C. [Texas U.

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/γ and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.

  9. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Phase control of the probability of electronic transitions in the non-perturbative laser field intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Keiichi; Sugita, Akihiro; Yamada, Hidetaka; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    A preparatory study on the quantum control of the selective transition K(4S 1/2 ) → K(4P J ) (J=1/2, 3/2) in intense laser field is reported. To generate high average power femtosecond laser pulses with enough field intensity, a Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier system with a repetition rate of 1 kHz is constructed. The bandwidth and pulse energy are shown to qualify the required values for the completely selective transition with 100% population inversion. A preliminary experiment of the selective excitation shows that the fringe pattern formed by a phase related pulse pair depends on the laser intensity, indicating that the perturbative behavior of the excitation probabilities is not valid any more and the laser intensity reaches a non-perturbative region. (author)

  11. Amorphous to crystalline phase transition in carbon induced by intense femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaudin, J.; Peyrusse, O.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Toufarová, Martina; Vyšín, Luděk; Hájková, Věra; Sobierajski, R.; Burian, Tomáš; Dastjani-Farahani, S.; Graf, A.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, L.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Hoffmann, G.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; London, R.A.; Moeller, S.; Sinn, H.; Schorb, S.; Störmer, M.; Tschentscher, T.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Vu, H.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2012), "024103-1"-"024103-7" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : amorphous carbon * phase transition * graphitization * x-ray laser * free-electron laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  12. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured...... on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal...

  13. Free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.M.; Billardon, M.

    1986-01-01

    Operation principle of a laser and an oscillator are recalled together with the klystron one. In the free electron laser, electrons go through an undulator or an optical klystron. Principles of the last one are given. The two distinct ways of producing coherent radiation with an undulator and an optical klystron are presented. The first one is the use of the free electron laser, the second is to make use of the spontaneous emission generation (harmonics generation). The different current types of free electron lasers are presented (Stanford, Los Alamos, Aco at Orsay). Prospects and applications are given in conclusion [fr

  14. Free-Free Transitions of e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen in the ground state at low incident energies in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser-field inside a hot dense plasma.The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit, assuming that the plasma frequency is much higher than the laser frequency. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption /emission and no photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  15. Free-Free Transitions of the e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident-Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen atom in ground state when a low-energy electron (external) is injected into hydrogenic plasma in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser field. The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption or emission and no-photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  16. Transition to electronic publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowning, Sam

    Previous communications have described some of the many changes that will occur in the next few months as AGU makes the transition to fully electronic publishing. With the advent of the new AGU electronic publishing system, manuscripts will be submitted, edited, reviewed, and published in electronic formats. This piece discusses how the electronic journals will differ from the print journals. Electronic publishing will require some adjustments to the ways we currently think about journals from our perspective of standard print versions. Visiting the Web site of AGU's Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G-Cubed) is a great way to get familiar with the look and feel of electronic publishing. However, protocols, especially for citations of articles, are still evolving. Some of the biggest changes for users of AGU publications may be the lack of page numbers, the use of a unique identifier (DOI),and changes in citation style.

  17. Electronic phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Kopaev, YuV

    1992-01-01

    Electronic Phase Transitions deals with topics, which are presently at the forefront of scientific research in modern solid-state theory. Anderson localization, which has fundamental implications in many areas of solid-state physics as well as spin glasses, with its influence on quite different research activities such as neural networks, are two examples that are reviewed in this book. The ab initio statistical mechanics of structural phase transitions is another prime example, where the interplay and connection of two unrelated disciplines of solid-state theory - first principle ele

  18. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  19. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.; Gerardo, J.B.; Patterson, E.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Rice, J.K.; Bingham, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe 2 / sup *(1)/, Kr:O(2 1 S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  20. Transition densities with electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisenberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the ground state and transition charge densities in nuclei via electron scattering. Using electrons as a spectroscopic tool in nuclear physics, these transition densities can be determined with high precision, also in the nuclear interior. These densities generally ask for a microscopic interpretation in terms of contributions from individual nucleons. The results for single particle transitions confirm the picture of particle-phonon coupling. (Auth.)

  1. Magnetic field effect on the laser-driven density of states for electrons in a cylindrical quantum wire: transition from one-dimensional to zero-dimensional behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, C P; Lima, F M S; Fonseca, A L A; Nunes, O A C

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a uniform magnetic field on the density of states (DoS) for carriers confined in a cylindrical semiconductor quantum wire irradiated by a monochromatic, linearly polarized, intense laser field is computed here non-perturbatively, following the Green's function scheme introduced by some of the authors in a recent work (Lima et al 2009 Solid State Commun. 149 678). Besides the known changes in the DoS provoked by an intense terahertz laser field-namely, a significant reduction and the appearance of Franz-Keldysh-like oscillations-our model reveals that the inclusion of a longitudinal magnetic field induces additional blueshifts on the energy levels of the allowed states. Our results show that the increase of the blueshifts with the magnitude of the magnetic field depends only on the azimuthal quantum number m (m=0, 1, 2, ...), being more pronounced for states with higher values of m, which leads to some energy crossovers. For all states, we have obtained, even in the absence of a magnetic field, a localization effect that leads to a transition in the DoS from the usual profile of quasi-1D systems to a peaked profile typical of quasi-0D systems, as e.g. those found for electrons confined in a quantum dot.

  2. Free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.E.; Brau, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.; Young, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier experiment was designed to demonstrate high efficiency for transfer of energy from an electron beam to a light beam in the magnetic field of a tapered wiggler. Initial results indicate an energy transfer consistent with theory. Distinct groups of decelerated electrons as well as accelerated electrons are clearly present in the energy spectrum of electrons emerging from the wiggler when the laser light is present. The observed energy decrease for the electrons captured in the decelerating bucket is approx. 6% and the average decrease of the entire energy distribution is approx. 2% for the conditions of these initial measurements

  3. Photonic Free-Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Denis, T.; Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) produces coherent Cerenkov radiation from a set of parallel electron beams streaming through a photonic crystal. The function of the crystal is to slow down the phase velocity of a copropagating electromagnetic wave, such that also mildly relativistic electrons

  4. Laser-driven electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The following possibilities are discussed: inverse free electron laser (wiggler accelerator); inverse Cerenkov effect; plasma accelerator; dielectric tube; and grating linac. Of these, the grating acceleraton is considered the most attractive alternative

  5. Decay of cystalline order and equilibration during the solid-to-plasma transition induced by 20-fs microfocused 92-eV free-electron-laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galtier, E.; Rosmej, F.B.; Dzelzainis, T.; Riley, D.; Khattak, F.Y.; Heimann, P.; Lee, R. W.; Nelson, A.J.; Vinko, S.M.; Whitcher, T.; Wark, J. S.; Tschentscher, T.; Toleikis, S.; Fäustlin, R.R.; Sobierajski, R.; Jurek, M.; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír; Hájková, Věra; Kozlová, Michaela; Krzywinski, J.; Nagler, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 16 (2011), "164801-1"-"164801-4" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : X-ray lasers * free-electron lasers * X-ray emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  6. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-01-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-11-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  8. Electronic transitions and intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemert, M.C. van.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis describes two different subjects - electronic transitions and intermolecular forces - that are related mainly by the following observation: The wavenumber at which an electronic transition in an atom or molecule occurs, depends on the environment of that atom or molecule. This implies, for instance, that when a molecule becomes solvated its absorption spectrum may be shifted either to the blue or to the red side of the original gasphase spectrum. In part I attention is paid to the experimental aspects of VUV spectroscopy, both in the gasphase and in the condensed phase. In part II a series of papers are presented, dealing with the calculation of intermolecular forces (and some related topics) both for the ground state and for the excited state interactions, using different non-empirical methods. The calculations provide, among other results, a semiquantitative interpretation of the spectral blue shifts encountered in our experiments. (Auth.)

  9. Laser control of electron matter waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, E.; Becker, M.; Luiten, O.J.; Batelaan, H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years laser light has been used to control the motion of electron waves. Electrons can now be diffracted by standing waves of light. Laser light in the vicinity of nanostructures is used to affect free electrons, for example, femto-second and atto-second laser-induced electrons are emitted

  10. Free-electron lasers 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroff, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents papers on free-electron laser technology. The authors cover technological developments on existing FELs, new FEL research, and the use of FELs in experimental investigations. Among the studies reported are lasing in the visible and UV on the Novosibirsk VEPP-3 storage ring, description of Japanese FEL research, and Mark III FEL, and the Paladin results

  11. Free Electron Lasers in 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, W B; Voughs, T

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-eight years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  12. Free Electron Lasers in 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, William B

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-seven years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs operating in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  13. Electron beam cooling by laser

    CERN Document Server

    Urakawa, J; Terunuma, N; Taniguchi, T; Yamazaki, Y; Hirano, K; Nomura, M; Sakai, I; Takano, M; Sasao, N; Honda, Y; Noda, A; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Mystykov, A; Zelinsky, A; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In 1997, Z.Huang and R.Ruth proposed a compact laser-electron storage ring (LESR) for electron beam cooling or x-ray generation. Because the laser-wire monitor in the ATF storage ring has worked well and demonstrated the achievement of the world's smallest transverse emittance for a circulating electron beam, we have started the design of a small storage ring with about 10 m circumference and the development of basic technologies for the LESR. In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results of pulse stacking in a 42-cm long optical cavity. Since our primary purpose is demonstrating the proof-of-principle of the LESR, we will then discuss the future experimental plan at the KEK-ATF for the generation of high average-brilliance gamma-rays.

  14. Free-electron laser theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1989-01-01

    The essential features of the theory of the free electron laser (FEL) are given in some detail. Beginning with an explanation of the basic gain mechanism, the lectures continue with a discussion of the problems associated with single-passage and recirculated (storage-ring) operation. Pulse propagation effects and the so-called 'lethargic' behaviour are analysed more completely. Finally, elements of FEL quantum theory are reported, in order to clarify the laser process from the microscopic point of view. Appendices give a fuller treatment of optical cavities and undulator magnets. (orig.)

  15. Laser induced single-crystal transition in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Foti, G.; Rimini, E.

    1978-01-01

    Transition to single crystal of polycrystalline Si material underlying a Si crystal substrate of 100 orientation was obtained via laser irradiation. The changes in the structure were analyzed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and by channeling effect technique using 2.0 MeV He Rutherford scattering. The power density required to induce the transition in a 4500 A thick polycrystalline layer is about 70 MW/cm 2 (50ns). The corresponding amorphous to single transition has a threshold of about 45 MW/cm 2 . (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  16. Free Electron Laser in Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The idea of building a new IVth generation of light sources of high luminosity, which use accelerators, arose in the 80ties of XXth century. Now, in a numerable synchrotron and laser laboratories in Europe, there is carried out, since a couple of years, intense applied research on free electron lasers (FEL) [17,18]. Similarly, in this country, free electron laser in Poland – POLFEL [9] is, in a design, a coherent light source of the IVth generation, characterized by very short pulses in the range of 10-100fs, of big power 0,2GW and UV wavelength of 27nm, of average power 1W, with effective high power third harmonic of 9nm. The laser consists of a linear superconducting accelerator 100m in length, undulator and experimental lines. It generates a monochromatic and coherent radiation and can be tuned from THz range via IR, visible to UV, and potentially to X-rays. The linac works in quasi-CW or real-CW mode. It is planned by IPJ [9,10] and XFEL-Poland Consortium [16] as a part of the ESFRI [1] priority EuroFEL...

  17. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e - beam and the 10 11 Watt CO 2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ∼ 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO 2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO 2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented

  18. Laser-induced multiphoton transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, S.

    1978-06-01

    Laser induced multiphoton processes are reviewed. The effects of strong fields on atoms are discussed. The perturbation treatment is presented and also its generalization to treat intermediate resonances. The influence of atomic coherence is discussed heuristically and the relation between quantal and classical descriptions of the field is elucidated by reference to the dressed atom description. Atomic ionization experiments are reviewed and the present understanding of multiphoton dissociation of molecules is explained. Finally some prospects for the future are discussed. (author)

  19. Electron-beam initiated HF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, R.A.; Patterson, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    Electron beams were used to ignite hydrogen/fluorine mixtures, producing laser energies up to 4.2 kJ, and giving hope that this approach may soon produce energy levels suitable for laser-fusion studies. (auth)

  20. Laser frequency modulation with electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, T. J.; Latorre, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    When laser beam passes through electron plasma its frequency shifts by amount proportional to plasma density. This density varies with modulating signal resulting in corresponding modulation of laser beam frequency. Necessary apparatus is relatively inexpensive since crystals are not required.

  1. Free-electron laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    2003-01-01

    The principle and history of free-electron laser (FEL), first evidenced in 1977, the relationship between FEL wavelength and output power, the high-power FEL driven by the superconducting linac, the X-ray FEL by the linac, and the medical use are described. FEL is the vacuum oscillator tube and essentially composed from the high-energy linac, undulator and light-resonator. It utilizes free electrons in the vacuum to generate the beam with wavelength ranging from microwave to gamma ray. The first high-power FEL developed in Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is based on the development of superconducting linac for oscillating the highest power beam. In the medical field, applications to excise brain tumors (in US) and to reconstruct experimentally blood vessels in the pig heart (in Gunma University) by lasing and laser coagulator are in progress with examinations to remove intra-vascular cholesterol mass by irradiation of 5.7μm FEL beam. Cancer cells are considered diagnosed by FEL beam of far-infrared-THz range. The FEL beam CT is expected to have a wide variety of application without the radiation exposure and its resolution is equal or superior to that of usual imaging techniques. (N.I.)

  2. High frequency free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Newman, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    By looking at the free-electron laser as a particle accelerator working backwards, Morton realized that the techniques used to accelerate particles could be used to improve the performance of free-electron lasers. In particular, he predicted the capture of electrons in ''stable-phase'' regions, or ''buckets'' in the electron phase space, and proposed that by decelerating the buckets, the trapped electrons could be decelerated to extract significant amounts of their energy as optical radiation. In fact, since electrons not trapped in the stable regions are forever excluded from them--at least in the adiabatic approximation--displacement techniques could also be used to accelerate or decelerate electrons in a free-electron laser. This paper explains the principle behind ''phase-displacement'' acceleration and details an experiment carried out with a 20-MeV electron beam to test these predictions. Results obtained with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser demonstrate the concepts proposed by Morton for enhanced efficiency. They show deceleration of electrons by as much as 7% and extraction of more than 3% of the total electron-beam energy as laser energy when the laser is operated as an amplifier. The experiment is presently being reconfigured to examine its performance as a laser oscillator

  3. Free-electron lasers considered for CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Spinoff development of industrial free-electron lasers is in prospect for an industry-universitylaboratory consortium centred at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, site of the CEBAF 4 GeV superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator, now being commissioned (see page 42). Together with several US corporations and universities, the Laboratory is now also addressing the potential of smaller SRF electron accelerators for ''driving'' free-electron lasers (FELs)

  4. Amorphous-polycrystal transition induced by laser pulse in self-ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foti, G.; Rimini, E.; Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.

    1977-01-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction has been used to investigate the amorphous to polycrystalline structure transition in silicon induced by laser pulse. The power density of the ruby laser pulse, in the free generation mode, has been maintained below the threshold to induce surface damage. Depth analysis has been carried out in silicon crystal using the channeling effect technique. (orig.) [de

  5. High-intensity-laser-electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    In the field of an intense laser, photon-electron scattering becomes nonlinear when the oscillatory energy of the electron approaches its rest mass. The electron wave function is dressed by the field with a concomitant increase in the effective electron mass. When the photon energy in the electron rest frame is comparable to the electron rest mass, multiphoton Compton scattering occurs. When the photon energy is significantly lower than the electron rest mass, the electron acquires momentum from the photon field and emits harmonics. This paper reviews nonlinear photon-electron scattering processes and results from two recent experiments where they have been observed

  6. Wettability transition of laser textured brass surfaces inside different mediums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huangping; Abdul Rashid, Mohamed Raiz B.; Khew, Si Ying; Li, Fengping; Hong, Minghui

    2018-01-01

    Hydrophobic surface on brass has attracted intensive attention owing to its importance in scientific research and practical applications. Laser texturing provides a simple and promising method to achieve it. Reducing wettability transition time from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity or superhydrophobicity remains a challenge. Herein, wettability transition of brass surfaces with hybrid micro/nano-structures fabricated by laser texturing was investigated by immersing the samples inside different mediums. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface contact angle measurement were employed to characterize surface morphology, chemical composition and wettability of the fabricated surfaces of brass samples. Wettability transition time from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity was shortened by immersion into isopropyl alcohol for a period of 3 h as a result of the absorption and accumulation of organic substances on the textured brass surface. When the textured brass sample was immersed into sodium bicarbonate solution, flower-like structures on the sample surface played a key role in slowing down wettability transition. Moreover, it had the smallest steady state contact angle as compared to the others. This study provides a facile method to construct textured surfaces with tunable wetting behaviors and effectively extend the industrial applications of brass.

  7. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  8. Free electron laser as a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, D.; Schlitt, L.

    1981-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) is shown to be a potentially attractive solution to the problem of finding a suitable short wavelength fusion driver. The design of a 3 MJ, 250 nm FEL fusion driver is discussed

  9. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  10. Brightness and coherence of synchrotron radiation and high-gain free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    The characteristics of synchrotron radiation are reviewed with particular attention to its phase-space properties and coherence. The transition of the simple undulator radiation to more intense, more coherent high-gain free electron lasers, is discussed

  11. Charge exchange induced X-ray transitions of hollow ions in laser field ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosmej, F.B.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Magunov, A.I.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Auguste, T.; D'Oliveira, P.; Hulin, S.; Monot, P.

    2000-01-01

    Double electron charge exchange is proposed for the formation of hollow He-like ions when laser field ionized nuclei penetrate into the residual gas. Using transitions from different configurations in hollow ions a method for the determination of the electron temperature in the long lasting recombination phase is developed

  12. From quantum transitions to electronic motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Ferenc

    2017-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy and chromoscopy permit precision measurement of quantum transitions and captures atomic-scale dynamics, respectively. Frequency- and time-domain metrology ranks among the supreme laser disciplines in fundamental science. For decades, these fields evolved independently, without interaction and synergy between them. This has changed profoundly with controlling the position of the equidistant frequency spikes of a mode-locked laser oscillator. By the self-referencing technique invented by Theodor Hänsch, the comb can be coherently linked to microwaves and used for precision measurements of energy differences between quantum states. The resultant optical frequency synthesis has revolutionized precision spectroscopy. Locking the comb lines to the resonator round-trip frequency by the same approach has given rise to laser pulses with controlled field oscillations. This article reviews, from a personal perspective, how the bridge between frequency- and time-resolved metrology emerged on the turn of the millennium and how synthesized several-cycle laser fields have been instrumental in establishing the basic tools and techniques for attosecond science.

  13. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  14. Control system for JAERI Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    A control system comprising of the personal computers network and the CAMAC stations for the JAERI Free Electron Laser is designed and is in the development stage. It controls the equipment and analyzes the electron and optical beam experiments. The concept and the prototype of the control system are described. (author)

  15. Laser-assisted electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    New developments in our understanding of the electron-atom collision process have been made possible by combining the use of highly monochromatic electron beams and intense CO 2 lasers. This paper reviews such experiments and discusses possible future progress in what is a new field in atomic collision physics. (author)

  16. Electronic topological transitions in Zn under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechin, Vladimir V.

    2001-01-01

    The electronic structure of hcp Zn under pressure up to 10 GPa has been calculated self-consistently by means of the scalar relativistic tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. The calculations show that three electronic topological transitions (ETT's) occur in Zn when the c/a axial ratio diminishes under compression. One transition occurs at c/a~=1.82 when the ``needles'' appear around the symmetry point K of the Brillouin zone. The other two transitions occur at c/a~=3, when the ``butterfly'' and ``cigar'' appear simultaneously both around the L point. It has been shown that these ETT's are responsible for a number of anomalies observed in Zn at compression.

  17. Linac technology for free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Morton, P.L.; Wilson, P.B.; Keefe, D.; Faltens, A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on the properties of high-energy electron linear accelerators for use in free-electron lasers operating principally in the Compton regime. To fix our focus somewhat, we shall consider electron energies in the 20- to 200-MeV range and consider requirements for high-power free-electron lasers operating in the 0.5- to 10-μm range. Preliminary remarks are made on high-power free-electron laser amplifiers and oscillators and some desirable characteristics of the linacs that deliver electron beams for these devices. Both the high peak-current requirements of the amplifier and the high pulse-repetition frequency requirements of the oscillator can be met by present-day linac technology, although not necessarily by the same machine. In this papers second and third section, the technology of two rather different types of linear accelerators, the rf linac and the induction linac, is reviewed. In conclusion, applications to the Free Electron Lasers are stated

  18. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  19. Electron distribution function in laser heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.; Sydora, R.; Kirkby, C.; Capjack, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Baldis, H. A.

    2001-01-01

    A new electron distribution function has been found in laser heated homogeneous plasmas by an analytical solution to the kinetic equation and by particle simulations. The basic kinetic model describes inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and electron--electron collisions. The non-Maxwellian distribution function is comprised of a super-Gaussian bulk of slow electrons and a Maxwellian tail of energetic particles. The tails are heated due to electron--electron collisions and energy redistribution between superthermal particles and light absorbing slow electrons from the bulk of the distribution function. A practical fit is proposed to the new electron distribution function. Changes to the linear Landau damping of electron plasma waves are discussed. The first evidence for the existence of non-Maxwellian distribution functions has been found in the interpretation, which includes the new distribution function, of the Thomson scattering spectra in gold plasmas [Glenzer , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 97 (1999)

  20. Increasing Laser Stability with Improved Electronic Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Daylin; Bennett, Aaron; Erickson, Christopher J.; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2010-03-01

    We present several electronic instruments developed to implement an ultra-stable laser lock. These instruments include a high speed, low noise homodyne photo-detector; an ultrahigh stability, low noise current driver with high modulation bandwidth and digital control; a high-speed, low noise PID controller; a low-noise piezo driver; and a laser diode temperature controller. We will present the theory of operation for these instruments, design and construction techniques, and essential characteristics for each device.

  1. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  2. Runaway electron beam control for longitudinally pumped metal vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbychev, G. V.; Kolbycheva, P. D.

    1995-08-01

    Physics and techniques for producing of the pulsed runaway electron beams are considered. The main obstacle for increasing electron energies in the beams is revealed to be a self- breakdown of the e-gun's gas-filled diode. Two methods to suppress the self-breakdown and enhance the volumetric discharge producing the e-beam are offered and examined. Each of them provides 1.5 fold increase of the ceiling potential on the gun. The methods also give the ways to control several guns simultaneously. Resulting in the possibility of realizing the powerful longitudinal pumping of metal-vapor lasers on self-terminated transitions of atoms or ions.

  3. Laser-pulsed relativistic electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic (β ≅ 0.8) electron gun with good emittance and subnanosecond pulse duration which can be synchronized to picosecond laser pulses is being developed at NRC for use in studies of particle acceleration by lasers. Bursts of electron pulses exceeding 280 keV in energy have been extracted into air form a laser-driven vacuum photodiode. Trains of 5 ps pulses of ultraviolet UV light illuminate a magnesium cathode. Photoelectrons emitted from the cathode are accelerated in a graded electrostatic potential set up by a 360 kV Marx-generator. The UV pulses are obtained by doubling the frequency of a 606 nm dye laser modelocked at 160 MHz. Electron energies were measured by residual range in an echelon of Al foils. Total charge per burst was measured by picoammeter. Time structure of the bursts has been examined with plastic scintillator and a fast photomultiplier. Tests on a low voltage photodiode achieved a current density of 180 A/cm/sup 2/ from an Mg cathode, with quantum efficiency of 2.4 x 10/sup -6/ electron per UV photon. The brevity and intensity of the laser pulses cause the electric charge collected per pulse to increase linearly with bias voltage rather than according to the Langmuir-Child law. Gun emittance is about 150 mm-msr and beam brightness is about 1A/cm/sup 2/-sr. Estimated duration of individual electron pulses of a burst is about 400 ps with instantaneous current of about 0.1 mA. Energy spread within one pulse is expected to be about 15%. This gun has the potential to be a useful source of relativistic electrons for laser acceleration studies

  4. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.V.; Green, M.A.; Jacobs, K.; Kleman, K.J.; Kulpin, J.; Rogers, G.C.; Lawler, J.E.; Yavuz, D.; Legg, R.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R and D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R and D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  5. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation (λ = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1 w1 = 1.43cm) and then absorbed (∼ 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1 w2 = 1.8 - 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup (∼ 9%) of electrons to ∼ 1MeV

  6. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  7. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  8. The stability of free-electron lasers against filamentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Yu, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, the high electromagnetic fields propagating through a relatively dense plasma can result in a transverse instability, causing the matter and light to form filaments oriented parallel to the light beam. We examine whether a similar instability exists in the electron beam of a free-electron laser, where such an instability could interfere with the transfer of beam kinetic energy into optical wave energy. We heuristically examine the instability in a relativistic beam through which an intense laser beam is propagating. We ignore the FEL effects. We estimate how the altered index of refraction in an FEL affects the dispersion relation. Finally, we estimate the effect that the instability could have on the phase coherence of a particle as it transits an FEL. 10 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  10. Electron acceleration in a plane laser beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petržílka, Václav; Krlín, Ladislav; Tataronis, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, supplement D (2002), s. 279-282 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/20th./. Prague, 10.06.2002-13.06.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : electron acceleration, laser beam Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  11. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  12. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  13. Electron spectroscopic investigation of metal–insulator transition in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Electronic structure of transition metal (TM) oxides has been under detailed investi- ..... Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi for a fellowship. ... Maiti K 1998 Novel electronic structures in transition metal oxides, Ph D thesis, Solid.

  14. On the possibility of developing quasi-CW high-power high-pressure laser on 4p-4s transition of ArI with electron beam—optical pumping: quenching of 4s (3P2) lower laser level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kholin, I. V.; L'dov, A. Yu; Seleznev, L. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Zayarnyi, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    A new electron beam-optical procedure is proposed for quasi-cw pumping of high-pressure large-volume He-Ar laser on the 4p[1/2]1-4s[3/2]20 argon atom transition at the wavelength of 912.5 nm. It consists of creation and maintenance of a necessary density of the 4s[3/2]20 metastable state in the gain medium by a fast electron beam and subsequent optical pumping of the upper laser level via the classical three-level scheme using a laser diode. Absorption probing is used to study collisional quenching of Ar* metastable in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He-Ar mixtures with a low content of argon. The rate constants for plasma-chemical reactions Ar*  +  He  +  Ar  >  Ar2*   +  He (3.6  ±  0.4)  ×  10-33 cm6 s-1, Ar*  +  2He  >  HeAr*  +  He (4.4  ±  0.9)  ×  10-36 cm6 s-1 and Ar*  +  He  >  Products  +  He (2.4  ±  0.3)  ×  10-15 cm3 s-1 were for the first time measured.

  15. UV laser ionization and electron beam diagnostics for plasma lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, R.; Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.

    1995-04-01

    A comprehensive study of focusing of relativistic electron beams with overdense and underdense plasma lenses requires careful control of plasma density and scale lengths. Plasma lens experiments are planned at the Beam Test Facility of the LBL Center for Beam Physics, using the 50 MeV electron beam delivered by the linac injector from the Advanced Light Source. Here we present results from an interferometric study of plasmas produced in tri-propylamine vapor with a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. To study temporal dynamics of plasma lenses we have developed an electron beam diagnostic using optical transition radiation to time resolve beam size and divergence. Electron beam ionization of the plasma has also been investigated

  16. Los Alamos advanced free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. C. D.; Kraus, R. H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K. L.; Meyer, R. E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Sigler, F. L.; Young, L. M.; Wang, T. S.; Wilson, W. L.; Wood, R. L.

    1992-07-01

    Los Alamos researchers are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported by permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. The resulting electron beam will have an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10πmm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends from 3.7 μm to 0.4 μm.

  17. Dosimetric Properties of Plasma Density Effects on Laser-Accelerated VHEE Beams Using a Sharp Density-Transition Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Geun Beom; Kim, Kum Bae [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung Jun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaehoon [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hojin [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kitae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-15

    In this paper, the effects of the plasma density on laser-accelerated electron beams for radiation therapy with a sharp density transition are investigated. In the sharp density-transition scheme for electron injection, the crucial issue is finding the optimum density conditions under which electrons injected only during the first period of the laser wake wave are accelerated further. In this paper, we report particle-in-cell simulation results for the effects of both the scale length and the density transition ratio on the generation of a quasi-mono-energetic electron bunch. The effects of both the transverse parabolic channel and the plasma length on the electron-beam's quality are investigated. Also, we show the experimental results for the feasibility of a sharp density-transition structure. The dosimetric properties of these very high-energy electron beams are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Simulations of free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1979-01-01

    The generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a static helical magnetic field is investigated using one- and two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic plasma simulation codes. In the one-dimensional simulations, we observed the coupling between the negative energy beam mode and the positive energy electromagnetic wave. Substantial growth rate (omega 1 approx. 0.1 omega/sub pe/) of the unstable electromagnetic wave has been observed and efficiency of radiation production is found to be between 25 to 30% depending on various parameters. In the two-dimensional simulations, we observed a decrease in the growth rate, but increased efficiency due to the decrease in the phase velocity of the unstable electrostatic wave. In addition, we also observed waves propagating at an angle with respect to the electron beam. Consequently, the beam is bunched in the radial as well as the axial directions. These waves are believed to be generated by another instability which saturates at relatively low level

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance of transition ions

    CERN Document Server

    Abragam, Anatole

    1970-01-01

    This book is a reissue of a classic Oxford text, and provides a comprehensive treatment of electron paramagnetic resonance of ions of the transition groups. The emphasis is on basic principles, with numerous references to publications containing further experimental results and more detailed developments of the theory. An introductory survey gives a general understanding, and a general survey presents such topics as the classical and quantum resonance equations, thespin-Hamiltonian, Endor, spin-spin and spin-lattice interactions, together with an outline of the known behaviour of ions of each

  20. Two-stage free electron laser research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.

    1984-10-01

    KMS Fusion, Inc. began studying the feasibility of two-stage free electron lasers for the Office of Naval Research in June, 1980. At that time, the two-stage FEL was only a concept that had been proposed by Luis Elias. The range of parameters over which such a laser could be successfully operated, attainable power output, and constraints on laser operation were not known. The primary reason for supporting this research at that time was that it had the potential for producing short-wavelength radiation using a relatively low voltage electron beam. One advantage of a low-voltage two-stage FEL would be that shielding requirements would be greatly reduced compared with single-stage short-wavelength FEL's. If the electron energy were kept below about 10 MeV, X-rays, generated by electrons striking the beam line wall, would not excite neutron resonance in atomic nuclei. These resonances cause the emission of neutrons with subsequent induced radioactivity. Therefore, above about 10 MeV, a meter or more of concrete shielding is required for the system, whereas below 10 MeV, a few millimeters of lead would be adequate.

  1. First-principles assessment of potential ultrafast laser-induced structural transition in Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J.P., E-mail: jean.philippe.colombier@univ-st-etienne.fr; Stoian, R.

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • First-principles theory calculations in nonequilibrium conditions. • Electronic temperatures fully and consistently taken into account. • Evaluation of an ultrafast laser-induced solid-to-solid transition in Ni. • Relative energies, phonon spectra and energy path are evaluated. • Discussion on the generation of non-thermal forces in metals. - Abstract: The possibility to trigger ultrafast solid-to-solid transitions in transition metals under femtosecond laser irradiation is investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Electronic heating can drastically modify screening, charge distribution and atomic binding features, potentially determining new structural relaxation paths in the solid phase, before thermodynamic solid-to-liquid transformations set in. Consequently, we evaluate here the effect of electronic excitation on structural stability and conditions for structural transitions. Ni is chosen as a case study for the probability of a solid transition, and the stability of its FCC phase is compared to the non-standard HCP structure while accounting for the heating of the electronic subsystem. From a phonon spectra analysis, we show that the thermodynamic stability order reverses at an electronic temperature of around 10{sup 4} K. Both structures exhibit a dynamic stability, indicating they present a metastability depending on the heating. However, the general hardening of phonon modes with the increase of the electronic temperature points out that no transformation will occur, as confirmed by the study of a typical FCC to HCP diffusionless transformation path, showing an increasing energy barrier. Finally, based on electronic density of states interpretation, the tendency of different metal categories to undergo or not an ultrafast laser-induced structural transition is discussed.

  2. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart

  3. Calculation of nuclear excitation in an electron transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisk, K. (Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Kaliman, Z. (Rijeka Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Pedagogics); Logan, B.A. (Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Ottawa-Carleton Centre for Physics)

    1989-11-06

    We have made a theoretical investigation of nuclear excitation during an electron transition (NEET). Our approach allows us to express the NEET probabilities in terms of the excited nuclear level width, the energy difference between the nuclear and electron transition, the Coulomb interaction between the initial electron states, and the electron level width. A comparison is made with the available experimental results. (orig.).

  4. Electronic traffic signs: Reflecting upon its transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbaiza Martin, A.E.; Alba, A.L.; Hernando Mazon, A.; Blanch Mico, M.T.

    2016-07-01

    In our days we face a fundamental issue concerning road signs. We may display contents in vertical and horizontal format (static signs, variable message signs, road markings), either on a post, a gantry or a dashboard. And we foresee a coming age where the excellent matrix resolution of painted signs will be truly approached by the resolution of full matrix displays. But we also risk a babel context threatening the universal approach encouraged by international catalogues as the 1968 Convention (ECE/TRANS/196, 2007). And the fundamental risk comes from our decisions regarding how the transition from the contents and formats displayed on static message signs to the ones displayed on electronic signs (in gantries or dashboards) should be. Our work explores this issue specifically, considering the transition from Advance Direction Signs (static message signs, class G, 1 in the 1968 Convention) to what could be termed Advance Location Signs (signs concerning the location of variable events with regards to certain landmarks) developed as an adaptation of the G, 1 class to electronic traffic signs.(Author)

  5. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Steenbergen, A. van; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    The study of the Inverse Free-Electron Laser, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, has been pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory for a number of years. More recent studies focused on the development of a low energy (few GeV), high gradient, multistage linear accelerator. The authors are presently designing a short accelerator module which will make use of the 50 MeV linac beam and high power (2 x 10 11 W) CO 2 laser beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These elements will be used in conjunction with a fast excitation (300 μsec pulse duration) variable period wiggler, to carry out an accelerator demonstration stage experiment

  6. Elsa: an infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimbal, P.; Chaix, P.

    1998-01-01

    Since the first experiments, twenty years ago, free-electron lasers (FEL) have known a strong development because of their promise: broadband tunability from X-rays to microwaves and high (peak or average) power, limited only by technological issues. ELSA has been designed as a research tool to investigate the physics of high-power FELs. After a brief introduction of the FEL field of research, we point out the unique characteristics of ELSA and why it is a valuable tool for the study of FEL interaction in the strong electron-photon coupling. The main experimental results are reviewed. We conclude on the concept of Two-Frequency-Wiggler. (author)

  7. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions

  8. The waveguide Free-Electron Laser. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The general characteristics of free-electron lasers (FELs) which employ a waveguiding structure to confine electromagnetic fields and to couple them to the electron beam is discussed. The mode structure of the basic parallel plate waveguide and its adaptation via quasi-optical techniques to FEL resonator design are considered in detail. A summary of the theory of FEL systems which depend intrinsically on a guide structure (micro-undulator, Cerenkov and metal-grating FELs) and a review of progress on waveguide FEL experiments are also presented. (author). 44 refs.; 16 figs

  9. High-efficiency free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Baru, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Results obtained with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser demonstrate the concepts proposed by Morton for enhanced efficiency and show deceleration of electrons by as much as 7%, and extraction of more than 3% of the total electron-beam energy as laser energy when the laser is operated as an amplifier. The experiment is presently being reconfigured to examine its performance as a laser oscillator

  10. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  11. Wave function of free electron in a strong laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shitong; Shen Wenda; Guo Qizhi

    1993-01-01

    The wave function of free electron in a strong laser plasma is obtained by solving exactly the Dirac equation in a curved space-time with optical metric for the laser plasma. When the laser field is diminished to zero, the wave function is naturally reduced to relativistic wave function of free electron. The possible application of the wave function is discussed

  12. Electron-hydrogen collisions with dressed target and Volkov projectile states in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.H.G.; Flannery, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Cross sections for the 1S-2S and 1S-2P O transitions in laser-assisted e - -H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multi-channel eikonal treatment and the Born wave approximation, as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane-polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV) with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. The first part of this paper confines the laser perturbation to the bound electrons of the atom. The second part extends the laser perturbation to the projectile electron, and the familiar Volkov dressed states are used. (author)

  13. An Inverse Free-Electron-Laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, Jyan-Min

    1993-01-01

    Recent work at BNL on electron acceleration using the Inverse Free-Electron Laser (IFEL) has considered a low-energy, high-gradient, multi-stage linear accelerator. Experiments are planned at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility using its 50-MeV linac and 100-GW CO 2 laser. We have built and tested a fast-excitation wiggler magnet with constant field, tapered period, and overall length of 47 cm. Vanadium-Permendur ferromagnetic laminations are stacked in alternation with copper, eddy-current-induced, field reflectors to achieve a 1.4-T peak field with a 4-mm gap and a typical period of 3 cm. The laser beam will pass through the wiggler in a low-loss, dielectric-coated stainless-steel, rectangular waveguide. The attenuation and transverse mode has been measured in waveguide sections of various lengths, with and without the dielectric. Results of 1-D and 3-D IFEL simulations, including wiggler errors, will be presented for several cases: the initial, single-module experiment with ΔE = 39 MeV, a four-module design giving ΔE = 100 MeV in a total length of 2 m, and an eight-module IFEL with ΔE = 210 MeV

  14. Laser pulse propagation and enhanced energy coupling to fast electrons in dense plasma gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R J; Carroll, D C; Yuan, X H; Brenner, C M; Coury, M; Quinn, M N; Tresca, O; McKenna, P; Burza, M; Wahlström, C-G; Lancaster, K L; Neely, D; Lin, X X; Li, Y T

    2014-01-01

    Laser energy absorption to fast electrons during the interaction of an ultra-intense (10 20 W cm −2 ), picosecond laser pulse with a solid is investigated, experimentally and numerically, as a function of the plasma density scale length at the irradiated surface. It is shown that there is an optimum density gradient for efficient energy coupling to electrons and that this arises due to strong self-focusing and channeling driving energy absorption over an extended length in the preformed plasma. At longer density gradients the laser filaments, resulting in significantly lower overall energy coupling. As the scale length is further increased, a transition to a second laser energy absorption process is observed experimentally via multiple diagnostics. The results demonstrate that it is possible to significantly enhance laser energy absorption and coupling to fast electrons by dynamically controlling the plasma density gradient. (paper)

  15. High gain free electron laser at ETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzechowski, T.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Halbach, K.

    1983-01-01

    A single pass, tapered electron wiggler and associated beam transport has been constructed at the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The system is designed to transport 1 kA of 4.5 MeV electrons with an emittance of 30 millirad-cm. The planar wiggler is provided by a pulsed electromagnet. The interaction region is an oversized rectangular waveguide. Quadrupole fields stabilize the beam in the plane parallel to the wiggler field. The 3 meter long wiggler has a 9.8 cm period. The Free Electron Laser (FEL) will serve as an amplifier for input frequencies of 35 GHz and 140 GHz. The facility is designed to produce better than 500 Megawatts peak power

  16. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ 2 , where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  17. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  18. Free-electron lasers in ultraviolet photobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coohill, T.P.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The potential uses for a free-electron laser (FEL), tunable in wavelength from 10 to 400 nm, for photobiological experiments is discussed. Inherent problems of cell and molecular absorption, especially in certain regions of the ultraviolet (UV), are addressed. Absorption values for living cells and viruses at selected wavelengths in the UV are tabulated, and a calculation of the flux needed to inactivate mammalian cells is included. A comparison is made of the UV output of a proposed rf-linac FEL with those of a monochromator, a tunable dye laser, and a synchrotron. The advantages of a UV FEL are apparent, especially in the wavelength regions where the cross section for absorption by biological molecules is low, i.e., 300 to 400 nm and 10 to 200 nm. It is apparent that a UV FEL would be an ideal source for a variety of biological studies that use both intact organisms and isolated cells and viruses

  19. Free electron laser and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Nguyen, Federico

    2018-03-01

    This review paper is devoted to the understanding of free-electron lasers (FEL) as devices for fundamental physics (FP) studies. After clarifying what FP stands for, we select some aspects of the FEL physics which can be viewed as fundamental. Furthermore, we discuss the perspective uses of the FEL in FP experiments. Regarding the FP aspects of the FEL, we analyze the quantum electrodynamics (QED) nature of the underlying laser mechanism. We look for the truly quantum signature in a process whose phenomenology is dominated by classical effects. As to the use of FEL as a tool for FP experiments we discuss the realization of a device dedicated to the study of non-linear effects in QED such as photon-photon scattering and shining-through-the-wall experiments planned to search for dark matter candidates like axions.

  20. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.

    1964-07-01

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [fr

  1. Pump requirements for betatron-generated femtosecond X-ray laser at saturation from inner-shell transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribiere, M.; Grunenwald, J.; Ribeiro, P.; Sebban, S.; Phuoc, K.Ta; Gautier, J.; Kozlova, M.; Zeitoun, P.; Rousse, A.; Jacquemot, S.; Cheron, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    We study pump requirements to produce femtosecond X-ray laser pulses at saturation from inner-shell transitions in the amplified spontaneous emission regime. Since laser-based betatron radiation is considered as the pumping source, we first study the impact of the driving laser power on its intensity. Then we investigate the amplification behavior of the K-a transition of nitrogen at 3.2 nm (395 eV) from radiative transfer calculations coupled with kinetics modeling of the ion population densities. We show that the saturation regime may be experimentally achieved by using PW-class laser-accelerated electron bunches. Finally, we show that this X-ray laser scheme can be extended to heavier atoms and we calculate pump requirements to reach saturation at 1.5 nm (849 eV) from the K-a transition of neon. (authors)

  2. Transition radiation electron beam diagnostic study at ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, X.Z.; Wang, X.J.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-01-01

    Recently we have started a program to develop transition radiation based electron beam diagnostics at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we will discuss a technique to estimate the lower limit in electron beam divergence measurement with single foil transition radiation and two-foil transition radiation interferometer. Preliminary experimental data from 4.5 MeV electron beam will be presented

  3. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  4. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  5. Free electron lasers on superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapierrre, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Analysing the results of several Free Electron Laser experiments, we show that the best accelerator should be a superconducting linear accelerator: it can provide a c.w. high quality beam (energy spread and emittance). The technology of RF superconductivity provide the opportunity to build such an accelerator. In this paper, we present the foreseen results one can expect from a FEL based on such a machine: - Average power > 1 Kw, - Total efficiency > 2.5%, - Tunability between 0.6 and 5 μm [fr

  6. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future. (invited comment)

  7. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  8. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  9. Electronic transitions of fluorene, dibenzofuran, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duy Duc; Trunk, John; Nakhimovsky, Lina

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study of the electronic transitions of fluorene and its hetero-analogues dibenzofuran, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene was performed in a wide energy range. Gas phase, crystal phase, and linear dichroism electronic transmittance spectra were measured with synchrotron radiation...

  10. Theory of coherent transition radiation generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Root, op 't W.P.E.M.; Smorenburg, P.W.; Oudheusden, van T.; Wiel, van der M.J.; Luiten, O.J.

    2007-01-01

    We present the theory of coherent transition radiation (CTR) generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches. We calculate analytical expressions for the electric field spectrum, the power spectrum, and the temporal electric field of CTR, generated by cylindrically symmetric ellipsoidal electron bunches

  11. Externally Controlled Injection of Electrons by a Laser Pulse in a Laser Wakefield Electron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Szu Yuan; Chen Wei Ting; Chien, Ting-Yei; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2005-01-01

    Spatially and temporally localized injection of electrons is a key element for development of plasma-wave electron accelerator. Here we report the demonstration of two different schemes for electron injection in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) by using a laser pulse. In the first scheme, by implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. We found that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the pump pulse. In the second scheme, by using a transient density ramp we achieve self-injection of electrons in a SM-LWFA with spatial localization. The transient density ramp is produced by a prepulse propagating transversely to drill a density depression channel via ionization and expansion. The same mechanism of injection with comparable efficiency is also demonstrated wi...

  12. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Crooker, P P; Armstead, R L; Blau, J

    2004-01-01

    Conventional free electron laser (FEL) oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. A new FEL interaction is described and analyzed with a Rayleigh length that is only one tenth the undulator length, or less. The effect of mirror vibration and positioning are more critical in the short Rayleigh length design, but we find that they are still within normal design tolerances.

  13. Free electron laser variable bridge coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalek, G.; Billen, J.H.; Garcia, J.A.; McMurry, D.E.; Harnsborough, L.D.; Giles, P.M.; Stevens, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) is being modified to test a scheme for recovering most of the power in the residual 20-MeV electron beam by decelerating the microbunches in a linear standing-wave accelerator and using the recovered energy to accelerate new beam. A variable-coupler low-power model that resonantly couples the accelerator and decelerator structures has been built and tested. By mixing the TE 101 and TE 102 modes, this device permits continuous variation of the decelerator fields relative to the accelerator fields through a range of 1:1 to 1:2.5. Phase differences between the two structures are kept below 1 0 and are independent of power-flow direction. The rf power is also fed to the two structures through this coupling device. Measurements were also made on a three-post-loaded variable coupler that is a promising candidate for the same task

  14. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Difilippo, F.C.; Perez, R.B.

    1990-05-01

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics

  15. Transition probabilities of some Si II lines obtained by laser produced plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Botho, B.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    The absolute transition probabilities for 28 Si II spectral lines have been determined by measurement of emission line intensities from laser-produced plasmas of Si in Ar and Kr atmospheres. The studied plasma has a temperature of about 2 . 10 4 K and 10 17 cm -3 electron density. The local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions and plasma homogeneity have been checked. The results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and with present Hartree-Fock calculations in LS coupling. (orig.)

  16. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  17. Fast-electron-relaxation measurement for laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.; Shepherd, R.; Chung, H. K.; Kemp, A.; Hansen, S. B.; Wilks, S. C.; Ping, Y.; Widmann, K.; Fournier, K. B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dyer, G.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the fast-electron-relaxation time in short-pulse (0.5 ps) laser-solid interactions for laser intensities of 10 17 , 10 18 , and 10 19 W/cm 2 , using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. We find that the laser coupling to hot electrons increases as the laser intensity becomes relativistic, and that the thermalization of fast electrons occurs over time scales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. The experimental data are analyzed using a combination of models that include Kα generation, collisional coupling, and plasma expansion

  18. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail. (AIP) copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM) alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable high-strength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO 2 laser . This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloy, over the last years. (Author) 16 refs

  20. Laser applications in the electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Kunihiko

    1999-07-01

    This paper explains current status and technological trends in laser materials processing applications in electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan. Various laser equipment based on solid state lasers or gas lasers such as excimer lasers or CO2 lasers has been developed and applied in manufacturing electronic and optoelectronic devices to meet the strong demands for advanced device manufacturing technologies for high-performance, lightweight, low power-consumption portable digital electronic appliances, cellular mobile phones, personal computers, etc. Representative applications of solid-state lasers are, opaque and clear defects repairing of photomasks for LSIs and LCDs, trimming of thick-film chip resistors and low resistance metal resistors, laser cutting and drilling of thin films for high-pin count semiconductor CSP packages, laser patterning of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells, and laser welding of electronic components such as hard-disk head suspensions, optical modules, miniature relays and lithium ion batteries. Compact and highly efficient diode- pumped and Q-switched solid-state lasers in second or third harmonic operation mode are now being increasingly incorporated in various laser equipment for fine material processing. Representative applications of excimer lasers are, sub-quarter micron design-rule LSI lithography and low- temperature annealing of poly-silicon TFT LCD.

  1. Influence of non-collisional laser heating on the electron dynamics in dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilleau, L.; Duchateau, G.; Chimier, B.; Geoffroy, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron dynamics in dielectric materials induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically addressed. The laser driven temporal evolution of the energy distribution of electrons in the conduction band is described by a kinetic Boltzmann equation. In addition to the collisional processes for energy transfer such as electron-phonon-photon and electron-electron interactions, a non-collisional process for photon absorption in the conduction band is included. It relies on direct transitions between sub-bands of the conduction band through multiphoton absorption. This mechanism is shown to significantly contribute to the laser heating of conduction electrons for large enough laser intensities. It also increases the time required for the electron distribution to reach the equilibrium state as described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Quantitative results are provided for quartz irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm and for intensities in the range of tens of TW cm-2, lower than the ablation threshold. The change in the energy deposition induced by this non-collisional heating process is expected to have a significant influence on the laser processing of dielectric materials.

  2. Dissociative photoionization of molecular hydrogen. A joint experimental and theoretical study of the electron-electron correlations induced by XUV photoionization and nuclear dynamics on IR-laser dressed transition states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2015-01-13

    In this thesis, the dissociative single-ionization of molecular hydrogen is investigated in a kinematically complete experiment by employing extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains and infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Induced by the absorption of a single XUV photon, a pronounced energy-dependent asymmetry of the relative emission direction of the photoelectron and the ion is observed. The asymmetry pattern is explained in terms of an interference of two ionization pathways involving a doubly-excited state. This interpretation is validated by a semi-classical model which only takes the nuclear motion into account. Using this model and the observed asymmetry, it is furthermore possible to disentangle the two dissociation pathways which allows for the determination of the autoionization lifetime of the contributing doubly-excited state as a function of the internuclear distance. Moreover, using a pump-probe experiment the dissociation dynamics of molecular hydrogen is investigated. A time-delay dependent momentum distribution of the fragments is observed. With a combined quantum mechanical and semi-classical approach the mechanism giving rise to the observed time-dependence is identified in terms of an intuitive elevator mechanism.

  3. Shake-off processes at the electron transitions in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.; Parilis, Eh.S.

    1982-01-01

    Elementary processes in multielectron atoms - radiative and Auger transitions, photoionization and ionization by an electron impact etc. are usually followed by the relaxation of electron shells. The conditions under which such multielectron problem could be solved in the shake-off approximation are considered. The shake-off processes occurring. as a result of the electron transitions are described from the general point of view. The common characteristics and peculiar features of this type of excitation in comparison with the electron shake-off under nuclear transformations are pointed out. Several electron shake-off processes are considered, namely: radiative Auger effect, the transition ''two electrons-one photon'', dipole ionization, spectral line broadening, post collision interaction, Auger decay stimulated by collision with fast electrons, three-electron Auger transitions: double and half Auger effect. Their classification is given according to the type of the electron transition causing the shake-off process. The experimental data are presented and the methods of theoretical description are reviewed. Other similar effects, which could follow the transitions in electron shells are pointed out. The deduction of shake-off approximation is presented, and it is pointed out that this approach is analogous to the distorted waves approximation in the theory of scattering. It was shown that in atoms the shake-off approximation is a very effective method, which allows to obtain the probability of different electronic effects

  4. Transition from isentropic to isothermal expansion in laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrero, A; Santartin, J R

    1980-07-01

    The transition that the expansion flow of laser-produced plasmas experiences when ones moves from long, low intensity pulses (temperature vanishing at the Isentropic plasma-vacuum front, lying at finite distance) to short, intense ones (non-zero, uni- form temperature at the plasma-vacuum front, lying at infinity) is studied. For planar geometry and large Ion number Z{sub j} the transition occurs for d {phi} / d t {approx_equal} 0.14(27/8)k{sup 7}/2 Z{sub j}{sup 3}/2/m{sub j}{sup 3}/2 K; {phi}, k, m{sub j}, and K are laser intensity, Boltzmann s constant, ion mass, and Spitzer s heat conduction coefficient. This result remains valid for finite Z{sub j} though the numerical factor in d{phi} / d t is different. In spherical geometry a similar transition occurs even in steady conditions. Shorter wavelength lasers and higher Z{sub j} plasmas allow faster rising pulses below transition. (Author) 13 refs.

  5. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  6. The Two-Beam Free Electron Laser Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Neil R

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a free-electron laser operating simultaneously with two electron beams of different energies [1] is extended to an oscillator configuration. The electron beam energies are chosen so that an harmonic of the lower energy beam is at the fundamental radiation wavelength of the higher energy beam. Potential benefits over a single-beam free-electron laser oscillator are discussed.

  7. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  8. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  9. Determination of molecular parameters by electron collisions and laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colon, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a general procedure to study diatomic molecules in intermediate coupling scheme has been developed. This study allows to obtain expressions to calculate molecular line strengths and rotational transition intensities. These results are used in a numerical program to synthetize vibrational and rotational band spectra of any diatomic molecule. With this technique the experimental spectra of the first negative system of N 2 + and the fist positive system of N 2 are reproduced theoretically and it is possible to deduce its electronic transition moments values by comparison. Also the method has been applied to compare the synthetized bands with the experimental spectra of the B O u + -- x 1 Σ g + system of Au 2 and the A 2 Σ--- x 2 π system of OH. From these comparison band intensities and electronic moments can be deduced. The branching ratio method to measure the relative spectral response in the 1100-1560 A o =wavelength range of a vacuum uv monochromator has been used. Relative intensity of rotational lines with origine in a common upper vibrational-rotational level of Warner and Lyman systems of H 2 , have been measured. Also in this work, the deexcitation of the B 3 π + (0 + u ), v'=14 level of I 2 after pulsed laser excitation has been studied. The quenching cross sections by collisions with I 2 , H 2 , CO 2 and CH 4 have been determin-ed. (Author)

  10. Nonlinear theory of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chian, A.C.-L.; Padua Brito Serbeto, A. de.

    1984-01-01

    A theory of Raman free-electron laser using a circularly polarized electromagnetic pump is investigated. Coupled wave equations that describe both linear and nonlinear evolution of stimulated Raman scattering are derived. The dispersion relation and the growth rate for the parametric instability are obtained. Nonlinear processes that may lead to saturation of the free-electron laser are discussed. (Author) [pt

  11. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  12. CERN's web application updates for electron and laser beam technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sigas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the modifications at CERN's web application for electron and laser beam technologies. There are updates at both the front and the back end of the application. New electron and laser machines were added and also old machines were updated. There is also a new feature for printing needed information.

  13. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza, E-mail: r-massudi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983969411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  14. Understanding electron magnetic circular dichroism in a transition potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, J.; Mayer, J.; Rusz, J.; Ho, P.-L.; Zhong, X. Y.; Lentzen, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Urban, K. W.; Brown, H. G.; Findlay, S. D.; Allen, L. J.

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduces an approach based on transition potentials for inelastic scattering to understand the underlying physics of electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). The transition potentials are sufficiently localized to permit atomic-scale EMCD. Two-beam and three-beam systematic row cases are discussed in detail in terms of transition potentials for conventional transmission electron microscopy, and the basic symmetries which arise in the three-beam case are confirmed experimentally. Atomic-scale EMCD in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), using both a standard STEM probe and vortex beams, is discussed.

  15. Chaotic behaviour and controlling chaos in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjie; Chen Shigang; Du Xiangwan; Wang Guangrui

    1995-01-01

    Chaos in free electron lasers (FEL) is reviewed. Special attention has been paid to the chaotic behaviour of the electrons and the laser field. The problem of controlling and utilizing chaotic motion of the electrons and the laser field has also been discussed. In order to find out the rules of instability and chaos in FEL, some typical methods of the chaotic theory are used. These methods include making the Poincare surface of section, drawing the phase space diagrams of the electron orbits, calculating the Liapunov exponents, and computing the power spectrum, etc. Finally, some problems in FEL research are discussed (103 refs., 54 figs.)

  16. Electronic properties of asymmetrical quantum dots dressed by laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibis, O.V. [Department of Applied and Theoretical Physics, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marx Avenue 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Slepyan, G.Ya.; Maksimenko, S.A. [Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruyskaya St. 11, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Hoffmann, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    In the present paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the strong non-resonant interaction between asymmetrical quantum dots (QDs) and a laser field results in harmonic oscillations of their band gap. It is shown that such oscillations change the spectrum of elementary electron excitations in QDs: in the absence of the laser pumping there is only one resonant electron frequency, but QDs dressed by the laser field have a set of electron resonant frequencies. One expects that this modification of elementary electron excitations in QDs can be observable in optical experiments. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Quantum phase transitions of strongly correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Masatoshi

    1998-01-01

    Interacting electrons in solids undergo various quantum phase transitions driven by quantum fluctuations. The quantum transitions take place at zero temperature by changing a parameter to control quantum fluctuations rather than thermal fluctuations. In contrast to classical phase transitions driven by thermal fluctuations, the quantum transitions have many different features where quantum dynamics introduces a source of intrinsic fluctuations tightly connected with spatial correlations and they have been a subject of recent intensive studies as we see below. Interacting electron systems cannot be fully understood without deep analyses of the quantum phase transitions themselves, because they are widely seen and play essential roles in many phenomena. Typical and important examples of the quantum phase transitions include metal-insulator transitions, (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) metal-superconductor transitions, superconductor-insulator transitions, magnetic transitions to antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic phases in metals as well as in Mott insulators, and charge ordering transitions. Here, we focus on three different types of transitions

  18. Suppression of the Transit -Time Instability in Large-Area Electron Beam Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew C.; Friedman, Moshe; Swanekamp, Stephen B.; Chan, Lop-Yung; Ludeking, Larry; Sethian, John D.

    2002-12-01

    Experiment, theory, and simulation have shown that large-area electron-beam diodes are susceptible to the transit-time instability. The instability modulates the electron beam spatially and temporally, producing a wide spread in electron energy and momentum distributions. The result is gross inefficiency in beam generation and propagation. Simulations indicate that a periodic, slotted cathode structure that is loaded with resistive elements may be used to eliminate the instability. Such a cathode has been fielded on one of the two opposing 60 cm × 200 cm diodes on the NIKE KrF laser at the Naval Research Laboratory. These diodes typically deliver 600 kV, 500 kA, 250 ns electron beams to the laser cell in an external magnetic field of 0.2 T. We conclude that the slotted cathode suppressed the transit-time instability such that the RF power was reduced by a factor of 9 and that electron transmission efficiency into the laser gas was improved by more than 50%.

  19. Suppression of the transit-time instability in large-area electron beam diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Matthew C.; Friedman, Moshe; Sethian, John D.; Swanekamp, Stephen B.; Chan, L.-Y.; Ludeking, Larry

    2002-01-01

    Experiment, theory, and simulation have shown that large-area electron-beam diodes are susceptible to the transit-time instability. The instability modulates the electron beam spatially and temporally, producing a wide spread in electron energy and momentum distributions. The result is gross inefficiency in beam generation and propagation. Simulations indicate that a periodic, slotted cathode structure that is loaded with resistive elements may be used to eliminate the instability. Such a cathode has been fielded on one of the two opposing 60 cm x 200 cm diodes on the NIKE KrF laser at the Naval Research Laboratory. These diodes typically deliver 600 kV, 500 kA, 250 ns electron beams to the laser cell in an external magnetic field of 0.2 T. We conclude that the slotted cathode suppressed the transit-time instability such that the RF power was reduced by a factor of 9 and that electron transmission efficiency into the laser gas was improved by more than 50%

  20. Electron beam pumped KrF lasers for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Friedman, M.; Giuliani, J.L. Jr.; Lehmberg, R.H.; Obenschain, S.P.; Kepple, P.; Wolford, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S.B.; Weidenheimer, D.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.V.; Searles, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of electron beam pumped KrF lasers for inertial fusion energy. KrF lasers are an attractive driver for fusion, on account of their demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets; their short wavelength (248 nm), which mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities; and their modular architecture, which reduces development costs. In this paper we present a basic overview of KrF laser technology as well as current research and development in three key areas: electron beam stability and transport; KrF kinetics and laser propagation; and pulsed power. The work will be cast in context of the two KrF lasers at the Naval Research Laboratory, The Nike Laser (5 kJ, single shot), and The Electra Laser (400-700 J repetitively pulsed)

  1. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  2. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10 -5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  3. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  4. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation resonant with vibrational transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachatrian, Ani; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of polymers, both in bulk form and spin coated on Si wafers, with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared spectral region is presented. Of particular interest is whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is resonant with a fundamental vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant increases in the LIBS signals were observed for irradiation on hydride stretch fundamental transitions, and the magnitude of the enhancement showed a strong dependence on the mode excited. The role of the substrate was investigated by comparison of results for bulk and spin-coated samples. The polymers investigated were Nylon 12 and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene).

  6. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    and Berns. Mi. W. User pitotora- 26. Kestel. D.. And Chou. T. C. Tumer -localizing components of the ptirph% rin diation therapy of cancer following... cancer , (2) laser tissue interactions for the study of atherosclerosis, (3) pulsed laser effects on the eye, (4) laser application in genetic...these studies. Please refer to the appropriate article/abstract for further detail. 1. Dye plus laser photosensitization of cancer . Significant

  7. Strongly Coupled Magnetic and Electronic Transitions in Multivalent Strontium Cobaltites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Choi, Woo Seok; Jeen, H; Lee, H-J; Seo, J H; Nam, J; Yeom, M S; Lee, H N

    2017-11-22

    The topotactic phase transition in SrCoO x (x = 2.5-3.0) makes it possible to reversibly transit between the two distinct phases, i.e. the brownmillerite SrCoO 2.5 that is a room-temperature antiferromagnetic insulator (AFM-I) and the perovskite SrCoO 3 that is a ferromagnetic metal (FM-M), owing to their multiple valence states. For the intermediate x values, the two distinct phases are expected to strongly compete with each other. With oxidation of SrCoO 2.5 , however, it has been conjectured that the magnetic transition is decoupled to the electronic phase transition, i.e., the AFM-to-FM transition occurs before the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT), which is still controversial. Here, we bridge the gap between the two-phase transitions by density-functional theory calculations combined with optical spectroscopy. We confirm that the IMT actually occurs concomitantly with the FM transition near the oxygen content x = 2.75. Strong charge-spin coupling drives the concurrent IMT and AFM-to-FM transition, which fosters the near room-T magnetic transition characteristic. Ultimately, our study demonstrates that SrCoO x is an intriguingly rare candidate for inducing coupled magnetic and electronic transition via fast and reversible redox reactions.

  8. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed

  9. Longitudinal Electron Bunch Diagnostics Using Coherent Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Happek, Uwe; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The longitudinal charge distribution of electron bunches in the Fermilab A0 photo-injector was determined by using the coherent transition radiation produced by electrons passing through a thin metallic foil. The auto-correlation of the transition radiation signal was measured with a Michelson type interferometer. The response function of the interferometer was determined from measured and simulated power spectra for low electron bunch charge and maximum longitudinal compression. Kramers-Kroning technique was used to determine longitudinal charge distribution. Measurements were performed for electron bunch lengths in the range from 0.3 to 2 ps (rms).

  10. First-principles calculations of heat capacities of ultrafast laser-excited electrons in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J.P.; Recoules, V.; Stoian, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser excitation can induce fast increases of the electronic subsystem temperature. The subsequent electronic evolutions in terms of band structure and energy distribution can determine the change of several thermodynamic properties, including one essential for energy deposition; the electronic heat capacity. Using density functional calculations performed at finite electronic temperatures, the electronic heat capacities dependent on electronic temperatures are obtained for a series of metals, including free electron like, transition and noble metals. The effect of exchange and correlation functionals and the presence of semicore electrons on electronic heat capacities are first evaluated and found to be negligible in most cases. Then, we tested the validity of the free electron approaches, varying the number of free electrons per atom. This shows that only simple metals can be correctly fitted with these approaches. For transition metals, the presence of localized d electrons produces a strong deviation toward high energies of the electronic heat capacities, implying that more energy is needed to thermally excite them, compared to free sp electrons. This is attributed to collective excitation effects strengthened by a change of the electronic screening at high temperature

  11. High-power fiber lasers for photocathode electron injectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many new applications for electron accelerators require high-brightness, high-average power beams, and most rely on photocathode-based electron injectors as a source of electrons. To achieve such a photoinjector, one requires both a high-power laser system to produce the high average current beam, and also a system at reduced repetition rate for electron beam diagnostics to verify high beam brightness. Here we report on two fiber laser systems designed to meet these specific needs, at 50 MHz and 1.3 GHz repetition rate, together with pulse pickers, second harmonic generation, spatiotemporal beam shaping, intensity feedback, and laser beam transport. The performance and flexibility of these laser systems have allowed us to demonstrate electron beam with both low emittance and high average current for the Cornell energy recovery linac.

  12. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  13. Laser vacuum acceleration of a relativistic electron bunch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazyrin, I V; Karpeev, A V; Kotova, O G; Nazarov, K S [E.I. Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific-Research Institute of Technical Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region (Russian Federation); Bychenkov, V Yu [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    With regard to the problem of laser acceleration of a relativistic electron bunch we present a scheme of its vacuum acceleration directly by a relativistic intensity laser pulse. The energy of the electron bunch injected into the laser pulse leading edge increases during its coaxial movement to a thin, pulse-reflecting target. The laser-accelerated electrons continue to move free forward, passing through the target. The study of this acceleration scheme in the three-dimensional geometry is verified in a numerical simulation by the particle-in-cell method, which showed that the energy of a part of the electrons can increase significantly compared to the initial one. Restrictions are discussed, which impose limiting values of energy and total charge of accelerated electrons. (superstrong light fields)

  14. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.

    2017-01-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μm. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  15. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  16. Commissioning of the JAERI free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.J.; Nagai, R.; Sawamura, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed, and constructed a prototype for a quasi-cw, and high-average power free electron laser driven by a 15MeV superconducting rf linac at Tokai, JAERI. In designing a high power FEL, there are many available design options to generate the required power output. By applying the superconducting rf linac driver, some of the options relating to the FEL itself may be relaxed by transferring design difficulties to the driver. Because wall losses become minimal in the superconducting accelerator cavity, very long pulse or quasi-cw, and resultant high average power may be readily attained at the JAERI superconducting rf linac FEL. In 1992 Japanese fiscal year, we have successfully demonstrated better cryogenic (stand-by loss<3.5W at 4.5K) and accelerating fields' performances (Eacc=7-9.4MV/m and Q=1-2x10+9) of four JAERI superconducting accelerator modules, and installed them in the FEL accelerator vault. In 1993, Optical resonators and beam transport systems, which have been already assembled, are now under commissioning. A description and the latest results of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac FEL will be discussed in comparison with a normal-conducting one, and reported in the symposium. (author)

  17. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated

  18. The suppression of radiation reaction and laser field depletion in laser-electron beam interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, J. F.; Moritaka, T.; Takabe, H.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of radiation reaction (RR) have been studied extensively by using the interaction of ultraintense lasers with a counter-propagating relativistic electron. At the laser intensity at the order of 1023 W/cm2, the effects of RR are significant in a few laser periods for a relativistic electron. However, a laser at such intensity is tightly focused and the laser energy is usually assumed to be fixed. Then, the signal of RR and energy conservation cannot be guaranteed. To assess the effects of RR in a tightly focused laser pulse and the evolution of the laser energy, we simulated this interaction with a beam of 109 electrons by means of a Particle-In-Cell method. We observe that the effects of RR are suppressed due to the ponderomotive force and accompanied by a non-negligible amount of laser field energy reduction. This is because the ponderomotive force prevents the electrons from approaching the center of the laser pulse and leads to an interaction at the weaker field region. At the same time, the laser energy is absorbed through ponderomotive acceleration. Thus, the kinetic energy of the electron beam has to be carefully selected such that the effects of RR become obvious.

  19. Electron acceleration via high contrast laser interacting with submicron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lu; Chen Liming; Wang Weiming; Yan Wenchao; Yuan Dawei; Mao Jingyi; Wang Zhaohua; Liu Cheng; Shen Zhongwei; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Lu Xin; Ma Jinglong; Wei Zhiyi; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Li Dazhang; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigated electron acceleration from submicron size argon clusters-gas target irradiated by a 100 fs, 10 TW laser pulses having a high-contrast. Electron beams are observed in the longitudinal and transverse directions to the laser propagation. The measured energy of the longitudinal electron reaches 600 MeV and the charge of the electron beam in the transverse direction is more than 3 nC. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of the interaction has been performed and it shows an enhancement of electron charge by using the cluster-gas target.

  20. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO 2 lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider

  1. Two-pulse laser control of nuclear and electronic motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We discuss an explicitly time-dependent two-pulse laser scheme for controlling where nuclei and electrons are going in unimolecular reactions. We focus on electronic motion and show, with HD+ as an example, that one can find non-stationary states where the electron (with some probability...

  2. Peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Q.; Wu, X. Y.; Wang, J. X.; Kawata, S.; Wang, P. X.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we qualitatively analyzed peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse. We unveiled the relationship between the changes in the orientation of the electron trajectory and the cusps in magnitude of the phase velocity of the optical field along the electron trajectory in a chirped laser pulse. We also explained how the chirp effect induced the singular point of the phase velocity. Finally, we discussed the phase velocity and phase witnessed by the electron in the particle's moving instantaneous frame

  3. Novel aspects of direct laser acceleration of relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefiev, Alexey

    2015-11-01

    Production of energetic electrons is a keystone aspect of ultraintense laser-plasma interactions that underpins a variety of topics and applications, including fast ignition inertial confinement fusion and compact particle and radiation sources. There is a wide range of electron acceleration regimes that depend on the duration of the laser pulse and the plasma density. This talk focuses on the regime in which the plasma is significantly underdense and the laser pulse duration is longer than the electron response time, so that, in contrast to the wakefield acceleration regime, the pulse creates a quasi-static channel in the electron density. Such a regime is of particular interest, since it can naturally arise in experiments with solid density targets where the pre-pulse of an ultraintense laser produces an extended sub-critical pre-plasma. This talk examines the impact of several key factors on electron acceleration by the laser pulse and the resulting electron energy gain. A detailed consideration is given to the role played by: (1) the static longitudinal electric field, (2) the static transverse electric field, (3) the electron injection into the laser pulse, (4) the electromagnetic dispersion, and (5) the static longitudinal magnetic field. It is shown that all of these factors lead, under conditions outlined in the talk, to a considerable electron energy gain that greatly exceeds the ponderomotive limit. The static fields do not directly transfer substantial energy to electrons. Instead, they alter the longitudinal dephasing between the electrons and the laser pulse, which then allows the electrons to gain extra energy from the pulse. The talk will also outline a time-resolution criterion that must be satisfied in order to correctly reproduce these effects in particle-in-cell simulations. Supported by AFOSR Contract No. FA9550-14-1-0045, National Nuclear Security Administration Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512, and US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FG02

  4. Development of laser heated high current DC electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Srutarshi; Bhattacharjee, Dhruva; Kandaswamy, E.; Ghodke, S.R.; Tiwari, Rajnish; Bakhtsingh, R.I.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of a Laser heated cathode for Electron Accelerator. The electron gun is meant for Megawatt-class DC Accelerator for Electron Beam Flue Gas Treatment applications. Conventionally, LaB 6 cathode is indirectly heated by tungsten filaments whereas in the newly proposed gun, Laser is utilized for heating. A Nd:YAG Laser is used to heat the LaB 6 cathode to emission temperatures. The characterization of cathode heating at various Laser powers has been carried out. In initial trials, it has been observed that with 125 W of Laser power, the LaB 6 pellet was heated to 1315 ° C. Based on these experimental results, an electron gun rated for 30 kV, 350 mA CW has been designed. The optimization of gun electrode geometry has been done using CST Particle Studio in order to tune the various electron gun parameters. The beam diameter obtained in simulation is 8 mm at 100 mm from the LaB 6 cathode. The perveance obtained is 7.1 x 10 -8 A/V 3/2 . The Laser heated cathode has the advantages of eliminating the magnetic field effects of filament on the electron beam, electrical isolation needed for gun filament power supplies and better electron beam emittances. (author)

  5. Scaling electron acceleration in the bubble regime for upcoming lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, O.; Tueckmantel, T.; Pukhov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Electron acceleration in the laser-plasma bubble appeared to be the most successful regime of laser wake field acceleration in the last decade. The laser technology became mature enough to generate short and relativistically intense pulses required to reach the bubble regime naturally delivering quasi-monoenergetic bunches of relativistic electrons. The upcoming laser technology projects are promising short pulses with many times more energy than the existing ones. The natural question is how will the bubble regime scale with the available laser energy. We present here a parametric study of laser-plasma acceleration in the bubble regime using full three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and compare numerical results with the analytical scalings from the relativistic laser-plasma similarity theory. Our simulations and the theory match almost perfectly for spot sizes above R = 2λ and laser amplitudes above a 0 = 4. We also studied the emission of synchrotron radiation by the accelerated electrons. Both classical and a QED model were applied. We found borders, at which theory and simulations stopped matching. With small spot radii (R < 2λ) we almost never observed the formation of a bubble structure or any form of mono-energetic acceleration. Low laser amplitudes lead to higher energies than predicted by the theory

  6. The quantum mechanical analysis of the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A.

    1985-01-01

    A quantum analysis of the Free Electron Laser is presented. The theory is developed both in single and longitudinal multimode regimes. Finally a self-consistent procedure to study the growth of the laser signal from the vacuum to the macroscopic level is presented

  7. Electron acceleration by a self-diverging intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Gupta, D.N.; Tripathi, V.K.; Gupta, V.L.

    2004-01-01

    Electron acceleration by a laser pulse having a Gaussian radial and temporal profile of intensity has been studied. The interaction region is vacuum followed by a gas. The starting point of the gas region has been chosen around the point at which the peak of the pulse interacts with the electron. The tunnel ionization of the gas causes a defocusing of the laser pulse and the electron experiences the action of a ponderomotive deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse with a lower intensity rather than an acceleration at the rising part of the laser pulse with a high intensity, and thus gains net energy. The initial density of the neutral gas atoms should be high enough to properly defocus the pulse; otherwise the electron experiences some deceleration during the trailing part of the pulse and the net energy gain is reduced. The rate of tunnel ionization increases with the increase in the laser intensity and the initial density of neutral gas atoms, and with the decreases in the laser spot size, which causes more defocusing of the laser pulse. The required initial density of neutral gas atoms decreases with the increase in the laser intensity and also with the decrease in the laser spot size

  8. Free electron laser experiments using a long pulse induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasour, J.A.; Lucey, R.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL Long Pulse Induction Linac is being employed in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. The authors present results of beam transport and focusing experiments as well as measurements of the output radiation generated by various magnetic wigglers. The electron gun of the accelerator presently has a 17-cmdiam. cold cathode which is located in a nearly zero magnetic field (B /SUB z/ less than or equal to 5 G). The gun voltage is flat to within approx. = + or - 5% for 1.5 μsec with this graphite brush cathode. The beam is focused by a series of solenoidal coils as it propagates through the 4-m-long accelerator. 2 A solenoidal field which can be varied from 1-10 kG confines the beam in the FEL interaction region. Previous experiments were limited by poor beam transport, focusing, and matching into the relatively large solenoidal field in the FEL region. By smoothing the axial magnetic field profile in the accelerator and making a more adiabatic transition from the low field in the accelerator to the high field in the FEL, beam transport into the wiggler has been substantially improved. Currently, a 700 kV beam with I > 500 A and r /SUB b/ < 0.75 cm is transported through the FEL region. Beam transport is in qualitative agreement with envelope code calculations

  9. Transition to H-mode by energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae.

    1992-07-01

    Effect of the electron loss due to the toroidal ripple on an H-mode transition is studied. When energetic electrons exist in tokamaks, e.g., in the case of the current drive by lower hybrid (LH) waves, the edge electric field can show the bifurcation to the more positive value. In this state, both the electron loss and ion loss (such as loss cone loss) are reduced. The criterion for the transition is derived. Comparison with H-mode in JT-60 LH plasma shows a qualitative agreement. (author)

  10. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  11. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  12. Electron-beam pumping of visible and ultraviolet gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques for using direct electron-pumping of gas lasers are reviewed. The primary objective is to categorize pump geometries and to give guidelines for gun selection and pulser design. Examples and application of pump technology are given

  13. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbajo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London 431, 535 (2004; T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006; S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: “Making the molecular movie,”, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010; F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010; Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006; C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006; A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and

  14. Laser plasma physics in shock ignition – transition from collisional to collisionless absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimo O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock Ignition is considered as a relatively robust and efficient approach to inertial confinement fusion. A strong converging shock, which is used to ignite the fuel, is launched by a high power laser pulse with intensity in the range of 1015 − 1016 W/cm2 (at the wavelength of 351 nm. In the lower end of this intensity range the interaction is dominated by collisions while the parametric instabilities are playing a secondary role. This is manifested in a relatively weak reflectivity and efficient electron heating. The interaction is dominated by collective effects at the upper edge of the intensity range. The stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering (SBS and SRS respectively take place in a less dense plasma and cavitation provides an efficient collisionless absorption mechanism. The transition from collisional to collisionless absorption in laser plasma interactions at higher intensities is studied here with the help of large scale one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC simulations. The relation between the collisional and collisionless processes is manifested in the energy spectrum of electrons transporting the absorbed laser energy and in the spectrum of the reflected laser light.

  15. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  16. Laser wakefield electron acceleration. A novel approach employing supersonic microjets and few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. This process, known as laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), relies on strongly driven plasma waves for the generation of accelerating gradients in the vicinity of several 100 GV/m, a value four orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by conventional accelerators. This thesis demonstrates that laser pulses with an ultrashort duration of 8 fs and a peak power of 6 TW allow the production of electron energies up to 50 MeV via LWFA. The special properties of laser accelerated electron pulses, namely the ultrashort pulse duration, the high brilliance, and the high charge density, open up new possibilities in many applications of these electron beams. (orig.)

  17. Free-electron lasers with magnetized ion-wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, H.; Jafari, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made using laser ionized channels to guide electron beams in the ion focus regime in a free-electron laser. Propagation of an electron beam in the ion focusing regime (IFR) allows the beam to propagate without expanding from space-charge repulsion. The ninth-degree polynomial dispersion relation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived analytically by solving the electron momentum transfer and wave equations. The variation of resonant frequencies and peak growth rates with axial magnetic field strength has been demonstrated. Substantial enhancement in peak growth rate is obtained as the axial field frequency approaches the gyroresonance frequency.

  18. High energy electron acceleration with PW-class laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Suzuki, S.; Asaka, T.; Yanagida, K.; Hanaki, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    We performed electron acceleration experiment with PW-class laser and a plasma tube, which was created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder. In this experiment, electron energies in excess of 600 MeV have been observed. Moreover, the spectra of a comparatively high-density plasma ∼10 19 cm -3 had a bump around 10 MeV. Additionally, we performed the absolute sensitivity calibration of imaging plate for 1 GeV electrons from the injector Linac of Spring-8 in order to evaluate absolute number of GeV-class electrons in the laser acceleration experiment

  19. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukhov, I.; Zelinsky, A. E-mail: zelinsky@kipt.kharkov.ua; Telegin, Yu

    2001-09-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  20. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, I; Telegin, Yu P

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  1. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I V; Steenbergen, A van; Gallardo, J C [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  2. Structural defects in laser- and electron-beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laser and electron beam pulses provide almost an ideal source of heat by which thin layers of semiconductors can be rapidly melted and solidified with heating and cooling rates exceeding 10 80 C/sec. Microstructural modifications obtained as a function of laser parameters are examined and it is shown that both laser and electron beam pulses can be used to remove displacement damage, dislocations, dislocation loops and precipitates. Annealing of defects underneath the oxide layers in silicon is possible within a narrow energy window. The formation of cellular structure provides a rather clear evidence of melting which leads to segregation and supercooling, and subsequent cell formation

  3. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukov, I.Yu.; Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made

  4. Laser-Compton Scattering as a Potential Electron Beam Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Lancaster, G.; Jones, J.

    2002-01-01

    LCS experiments were carried out at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC); sharp monochromatic x-ray lines were observed. These are produced using the so-called inverse Compton effect, whereby optical laser photons are collided with a relativistic electron beam. The back-scattered photons are then kinematically boosted to keV x-ray energies. We have first demonstrated these beams using a 20 MeV electron beam collided with a 100 MW, 7 ns Nd; YAG laser. We observed narrow LCS x-ray spectral peaks resulting from the interaction of the electron beam with the Nd; YAG laser second harmonic (532 nm). The LCS x-ray energy lines and energy deviations were measured as a function of the electron beam energy and energy-spread respectively. The results showed good agreement with the predicted valves. LCS could provide an excellent probe of electron beam energy, energy spread, transverse and longitudinal distribution and direction

  5. Communication: Electronic flux induced by crossing the transition state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongming; Manz, Jörn; Yang, Yonggang

    2018-01-01

    We present a new effect of chemical reactions, e.g., isomerizations, that occurs when the reactants pass along the transition state, on the way to products. It is based on the well-known fact that at the transition state, the electronic structure of one isomer changes to the other. We discover that this switch of electronic structure causes a strong electronic flux that is well distinguishable from the usual flux of electrons that travel with the nuclei. As a simple but clear example, the effect is demonstrated here for bond length isomerization of Na2 (21Σu+), with adiabatic crossing the barrier between the inner and outer wells of the double minimum potential that support different "Rydberg" and "ionic" type electronic structures, respectively.

  6. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, D. Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  7. First Observation of Laser-Driven Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in a Semi-Infinite Vacuum Space

    CERN Document Server

    Plettner, Tomas; Colby, Eric R; Cowan, Benjamin; Sears, Chris M S; Siemann, Robert; Smith, Todd I; Spencer, James

    2005-01-01

    We have observed acceleration of relativistic electrons in vacuum driven by a linearly polarized laser beam incident on a thin gold-coated reflective boundary. The observed energy modulation effect follows all the characteristics expected for linear acceleration caused by a longitudinal electric field. As predicted by the Lawson-Woodward theorem the laser driven modulation only appears in the presence of the boundary. It shows a linear dependence with the strength of the electric field of the laser beam and also it is critically dependent on the laser polarization. Finally, it appears to follow the expected angular dependence of the inverse transition radiation process.

  8. Pauli blocking and laser manipulation of the electron dynamics in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The dynamics of ion-atom collisions are governed primarily by the Coulomb interactions between the active electrons and the projectile and target nuclei. This contribution is devoted to the question whether and how other phenomena can modify the outcome of atomic scattering experiments. Firstly, the role of the Pauli exclusion principle on electronic transitions will be considered. Supported by experimental data it will be argued that Pauli blocking may have an important influence on electron transfer processes if collision systems with electrons on target and projectile in the initial channel are addressed [1]. Secondly, it will be discussed to which extent the electron dynamics can be modified and manipulated by an external interaction, namely by a suitable laser field [2]. The prototype scattering system He 2+ -H will be considered in the framework of the semiclassical approximation, i.e., projectile and laser interactions are described in terms of time-dependent external potentials which govern the quantum dynamics of the electron. The focus will be on slow collisions, in which electron transfer dominates, and on relatively short wavelengths such that both time dependent potentials vary on comparable time scales. A strong enhancement of laser-assisted electron transfer is found at collision energies below 1 keV/amu [3]. Its origin and its disappearance at higher energies as well as implications for planned experiments will be discussed

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of gas-phase clusters using a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijnsbergen, D. van; Helden, G. von; Meijer, G.

    2002-01-01

    Most clusters produced in the gas phase, especially those containing metals, remain largely uncharaterized, among these are transition metal - carbide, -oxide and -nitride clusters. A method for recording IR spectra of strongly bound gas-phase clusters is presented. It is based on a free-electron laser called Felix, characterized by wide wavelength tuning range, covering almost the full 'molecular finger print' region, high power and fluence which make it suited to excite gas-phase species i.e. gas -phase clusters. Neutral clusters were generated by laser vaporization technique, ions that were created after the interaction with the free-electron laser were analyzed in a flight mass spectrometer. Experiments were run with titanium carbide clusters and their IR spectra given. It was shown that this method is suited to strongly bound clusters with low ionization energies, a condition met for many pure metal clusters and metal compound clusters. (nevyjel)

  10. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  11. Development of broadband free electron laser technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Jeong, Y. W.; Joe, S. O.; Park, S. H.; Ryu, J. K.; Kazakevich, G.; Cha, H. J.; Sohn, S. C.; Han, S. J.

    2003-02-01

    Layer cladding technology was developed to mitigate the fretting wear damages occurred at fuel spacers in Hanaro reactor. The detailed experimental procedures are as follows. 1) Analyses of fretting wear damages and fabrication process of fuel spacers 2) Development and analysis of spherical Al 6061 T-6 alloy powders for the laser cladding 3) Analysis of parameter effects on laser cladding process for clad bids, and optimization of laser cladding process 4) Analysis on the changes of cladding layers due to overlapping factor change 5) Microstructural observation and phase analysis 6) Characterization of materials properties (hardness wear tests) 7) Development of a vision system and revision of its related software 8) Manufacture of prototype fuel spacers. As a result, it was confirmed that the laser cladding technology could increased considerably the wear resistance of Al 6061 alloy which is the raw material of fuel spacers.

  12. Compact electron accelerator for pumping gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.V.; Bradley, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of the design and application of a simple e-beam generator for the repetitive pulse pumping of gas lasers. The circuit uses a low inductance Marx and series tuned pulse forming elements

  13. Escaping Electrons from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions as a Function of Laser Spot Size

    OpenAIRE

    Rusby, Dean; Gray, Ross; Butler, Nick; Dance, Rachel; Scott, Graeme; Bagnoud, Vincent; Zielbauer, Bernhard; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of a high-intensity laser with a solid target produces an energetic distribution of electrons that pass into the target. These electrons reach the rear surface of the target creating strong electric potentials that act to restrict the further escape of additional electrons. The measurement of the angle, flux and spectra of the electrons that do escape gives insights to the initial interaction. Here, the escaping electrons have been measured using a differentially filtered imag...

  14. The chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser: A high-gradient vacuum laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, F.V.; Landahl, E.C.; Troha, A.L.; Van Meter, J.R.; Baldis, H.A.; Freeman, R.R.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Song, L.; Kerman, A.K.; Yu, D.U.

    1999-01-01

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied theoretically and computationally in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. The IFEL concept has been demonstrated as a viable vacuum laser acceleration process; it is shown here that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. The theoretical study of the optical klystron free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhenhua

    2001-01-01

    The work of the theoretical study and numerical simulation of optical klystron free electron laser is supported by National 863 Research Development Program and National Science Foundation of China. The object of studying UV band free electron laser (FEL) is to understand the physical law of optical klystron FEL and to gain experience for design. A three-dimensional code OPFEL are made and it is approved that the code is correct completely. The magnetic field of the optical klystron, the energy modulation of the electron beam, the density modulation of the electron beam, spontaneous emission of the electron beam in optical klystron, the harmonic super-radiation of the electron beam, and the effects of the undulator magnetic field error on modulation of the electron beam energy are simulated. These results are useful for the future experiments

  16. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear

  17. Electronic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeglund, J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of band-structure calculations for studying thermodynamic properties of solids. We discuss 3d-, 4d- and 5d-transition metal carbides and nitrides. Through a detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results, we draw conclusions on the character of the atomic bonds in these materials. We show how electronic structure calculations can be used to give accurate predictions for bonding energies. Part of the thesis is devoted to the application of the generalized gradient approximation in electronic structure calculations on transition metals. For structures with vibrational disorder, we present a method for calculating averaged phonon frequencies without using empirical information. For magnetic excitations, we show how a combined use of theoretical results and experimental data can yield information on magnetic fluctuations at high temperatures. The main results in the thesis are: Apart for an almost constant shift, theoretically calculated bonding energies for transition metal carbides and nitrides agree with experimental data or with values from analysis of thermochemical information. The electronic spectrum of transition metal carbides and nitrides can be separated into bonding, antibonding and nonbonding electronic states. The lowest enthalpy of formation for substoichiometric vanadium carbide VC 1-X at zero temperature and pressure occurs for a structure containing vacancies (x not equal to 0). The generalized gradient approximation improves theoretical calculated cohesive energies for 3d-transition metals. Magnetic phase transitions are sensitive to the description of exchange-correlation effects in electronic structure calculations. Trends in Debye temperatures can be successfully analysed in electronic structure calculations on disordered lattices. For the elements, there is a clear dependence on the crystal structure (e.g., bcc, fcc or hcp). Chromium has fluctuating local magnetic moments at temperatures well above

  18. Correlated electron pseudopotentials for 3d-transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trail, J. R.; Needs, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    A recently published correlated electron pseudopotentials (CEPPs) method has been adapted for application to the 3d-transition metals, and to include relativistic effects. New CEPPs are reported for the atoms Sc − Fe, constructed from atomic quantum chemical calculations that include an accurate description of correlated electrons. Dissociation energies, molecular geometries, and zero-point vibrational energies of small molecules are compared with all electron results, with all quantities evaluated using coupled cluster singles doubles and triples calculations. The CEPPs give better results in the correlated-electron calculations than Hartree-Fock-based pseudopotentials available in the literature

  19. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  20. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  1. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  2. Electron acceleration by CO/sub 2/ laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Daido, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on electron acceleration have been performed by LEKKO VIII CO/sub 2/ laser system. The laser light was focused by an off-axis parabolic mirror with the F-number of 1.5 and irradiated to thin foil and pipe targets in order to obtain uniform underdense plasmas. Energy spectrum of electrons was measured by an electron spectrometer in the range of 0.3-1.1 MeV. In the single frequency case, electrons up to 1 MeV were observed in the direction of the laser axis for the laser intensity above 1.6 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ which was equal to the estimated threshold for forward Raman scattering. Amount of high energy electrons depended on the interaction length and the background hot electron temperature. More electrons could resonate with the plasma wave for the higher hot electron temperature. This was confirmed by particle simulation. In most experiments, the plasma density was estimated of about 0.1 n/sub c/. When the plasma density was reduced to 0.01 n/sub c/ using pre-pulse, high energy electrons were not observed because of the low background hot electron temperature and the higher instability threshold. In the two frequency case, energetic electron beam injection is planned for efficient coupling with fast plasma wave. Pipe target seems to be hopeful because 1) the laser light is confined by the plasma fiber and 2) the phase velocity of the plasma wave is controlled by the transverse mode

  3. High-efficiency free-electron-laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Hohla, K.L.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser have demonstrated extraction of about 3% of the energy from the electron beam and measured the corresponding optical emission. These results are in excellent agreement with theory and represent an order-of-magnitude improvement over all previous results

  4. Coherent Startup of an Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaroszynski, D. A.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent enhancement of the spontaneous undulator radiation by several orders of magnitude has been observed in a free-electron laser at wavelengths from 40 to 100 mum. The coherent emission can be explained by details of the electron-beam micropulse structure. Furthermore, it has been found that

  5. Linac-driven XUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.; Goldstein, J.C.; Fraser, J.S.; Cooper, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Use of an rf linear accelerator as the electron source for a free-electron laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range from 100 nm to at least as low as 50 nm appears feasible. Peak and average power outputs of greater than 100 kW and 50W, respectively, are predicted

  6. Free electron laser amplifier driven by an induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free-electron laser amplifier as a means of converting the kinetic energy of an electron beam into coherent radiation. In particular, the use of an induction linear accelerator is discussed. The motion of the elections in the tapered and untapered wiggler magnets is discussed as well as the beam emittance, and the radiation fields involved

  7. XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; Cooper, R.K.; Comly, J.C. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown, from computations based on a detailed theoretical model, that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will enable a free-electron laser, driven by an rf linear accelerator, to operate in the 50 to 200-nm range of optical wavelengths. 10 references

  8. Resonant third-harmonic generation of a short-pulse laser from electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Niti [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab 144 402 (India); Nandan Gupta, Devki [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Suk, Hyyong [Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI) and Graduate Program of Photonics and Applied Physics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500 712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    In semiconductors, free carriers are created in pairs in inter-band transitions and consist of an electron and its corresponding hole. At very high carrier densities, carrier-carrier collisions dominate over carrier-lattice collisions and carriers begin to behave collectively to form plasma. Here, we apply a short-pulse laser to generate third-harmonic radiation from a semiconductor plasma (electron-hole plasma) in the presence of a transverse wiggler magnetic-field. The process of third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser is resonantly enhanced by the magnetic wiggler, i.e., wiggler magnetic field provides the necessary momentum to third-harmonic photons. In addition, a high-power laser radiation, propagating through a semiconductor imparts an oscillatory velocity to the electrons and exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons at the third-harmonic frequency of the laser. This oscillatory velocity produces a third-harmonic longitudinal current. And due to the beating of the longitudinal electron velocity and the wiggler magnetic field, a transverse third-harmonic current is produced that drives third-harmonic electromagnetic radiation. It is finally observed that for a specific wiggler wave number value, the phase-matching conditions for the process are satisfied, leading to resonant enhancement in the energy conversion efficiency.

  9. Resonant third-harmonic generation of a short-pulse laser from electron-hole plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Niti; Nandan Gupta, Devki; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-01-01

    In semiconductors, free carriers are created in pairs in inter-band transitions and consist of an electron and its corresponding hole. At very high carrier densities, carrier-carrier collisions dominate over carrier-lattice collisions and carriers begin to behave collectively to form plasma. Here, we apply a short-pulse laser to generate third-harmonic radiation from a semiconductor plasma (electron-hole plasma) in the presence of a transverse wiggler magnetic-field. The process of third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser is resonantly enhanced by the magnetic wiggler, i.e., wiggler magnetic field provides the necessary momentum to third-harmonic photons. In addition, a high-power laser radiation, propagating through a semiconductor imparts an oscillatory velocity to the electrons and exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons at the third-harmonic frequency of the laser. This oscillatory velocity produces a third-harmonic longitudinal current. And due to the beating of the longitudinal electron velocity and the wiggler magnetic field, a transverse third-harmonic current is produced that drives third-harmonic electromagnetic radiation. It is finally observed that for a specific wiggler wave number value, the phase-matching conditions for the process are satisfied, leading to resonant enhancement in the energy conversion efficiency.

  10. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chodash, Perry Adam [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated con icting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of 235U. If NEET of 235U were to occur, 235mU would be created. 235mU decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of 235mU and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of 235U was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. In addition, explanations for the con icting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of 235U, it is likely that NEET of 235U has never been observed.

  11. Photonuclear fission with quasimonoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S. A.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Vane, C. R.; Beene, J. R.; Stracener, D.; Schultz, D. R.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser wakefield accelerators have resulted in the generation of low divergence, hundred MeV, quasimonoenergetic electron beams. The bremsstrahlung produced by these highly energetic electrons in heavy converters includes a large number of MeV γ rays that have been utilized to induce photofission in natural uranium. Analysis of the measured delayed γ emission demonstrates production of greater than 3x10 5 fission events per joule of laser energy, which is more than an order of magnitude greater than that previously achieved. Monte Carlo simulations model the generated bremsstrahlung spectrum and compare photofission yields as a function of target depth and incident electron energy

  12. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  13. Effect of electron-electron collisions on the phase transition and kinetics of nonequilibrium superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V.F.; Kashurnikov, V.A.; Kondrashov, V.E.; Shamraev, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    An explicit expression is obtained for the distribution function of excess quasiparticles, taking into account electron-electron collisions in nonequilibrium superconductors. It is shown that the character of the phase transition may change at a definite ratio of the electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction constants: the dependence of the order parameter on the power of the source becomes single-valued. In addition, diffusion instability and paramagnetism of the superconductors arise. The multiplication factor of the excess quasiparticles due to electron-electron collisions and to reabsorption of phonons is calculated

  14. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Jyan-Min.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 μm CO 2 laser have been carried out at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % (ΔE/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator

  15. 77 FR 47692 - Notice of Transportation Services' Transition From Paper to Electronic Fare Media Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... and effective electronic fare media transition to its participating transit benefit agencies... New Program Distribution Methodology for Transit Benefits This section presents a summary of the..., 2012 on TRANServe's adoption of a new program distribution methodology for transit benefits and...

  16. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM 10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs

  17. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  18. Guiding-center equations for electrons in ultraintense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The guiding-center equations are derived for electrons in arbitrarily intense laser fields also subject to external fields and ponderomotive forces. Exhibiting the relativistic mass increase of the oscillating electrons, a simple frame-invariant equation is shown to govern the behavior of the electrons for sufficiently weak background fields and ponderomotive forces. The parameter regime for which such a formulation is valid is made precise, and some predictions of the equation are checked by numerical simulation

  19. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  20. Spin delocalization phase transition in a correlated electrons model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, L.

    1990-11-01

    In a simplified one-site model for correlated electrons systems we show the existence of a phase transition corresponding to spin delocalization. The system becomes a solvable model and zero-dimensional functional techniques are used. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs

  1. Ultrafast Hot Electron Induced Phase Transitions in Vanadium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Au/Cr/VO2/Si system was investigated in pump–probe experiments. Hot-electrons generated in the Au were found to penetrate into the underlying VO2 and couple with its lattice inducing a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in ~2 picoseconds.

  2. Electron in the ultrashort laser pulse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2003), s. 99-110 ISSN 0020-7748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : laser pulse, Volkov solution, compton effect Subject RIV: BE - The oretical Physics Impact factor: 0.476, year: 2003

  3. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Andrew [Yorktown, VA

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  4. Intense pulsed sources of ions and electrons produced by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrabier, G.; Consoli, T.; Slama, L.

    1966-11-01

    We describe a device for the acceleration of the plasma burst produced by focusing a laser beam into a metal target. We extract the electrons and the ions from the plasma. The maximum current is around 2000 amperes during few microseconds. The study of the effect of the kind of the target on the characteristics of the current shows the great importance of the initial conditions that is the ionisation potential of the target and the energy laser. (authors) [fr

  5. Pulse propagation in tapered wiggler free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Colson, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The one-dimensional theory of short pulse propagation in free electron lasers is extended to tapered wiggler devices and is used to study the behavior of an oscillator with parameter values close to those expected in forthcoming experiments. It is found that stable laser output is possible only over a small range of optical cavity lengths. Optical pulse characteristcs are presented and are found to change considerably over this range

  6. The dynamics of the laser-induced metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, Tino

    2009-01-01

    The present thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of the metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS): Temperature- and time-resolved experiments on the characterization of the phase transition of mixed-valence SmS samples (M-SmS) are presented. The measurement of the dynamics of the laser-induced phase transition pursues via time-resolved ultrashort-time microscopy and by X-ray diffraction with sub-picosecond time resolution. The electronic and structural processes, which follow an excitation of M-SmS with infrared femtosecond laser pulses, are physically interpreted on the base of the results obtained in this thesis and model imaginations. [de

  7. Electronic Structure Evolution across the Peierls Metal-Insulator Transition in a Correlated Ferromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bhobe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal compounds often undergo spin-charge-orbital ordering due to strong electron-electron correlations. In contrast, low-dimensional materials can exhibit a Peierls transition arising from low-energy electron-phonon-coupling-induced structural instabilities. We study the electronic structure of the tunnel framework compound K_{2}Cr_{8}O_{16}, which exhibits a temperature-dependent (T-dependent paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic-metal transition at T_{C}=180  K and transforms into a ferromagnetic insulator below T_{MI}=95  K. We observe clear T-dependent dynamic valence (charge fluctuations from above T_{C} to T_{MI}, which effectively get pinned to an average nominal valence of Cr^{+3.75} (Cr^{4+}∶Cr^{3+} states in a 3∶1 ratio in the ferromagnetic-insulating phase. High-resolution laser photoemission shows a T-dependent BCS-type energy gap, with 2G(0∼3.5(k_{B}T_{MI}∼35  meV. First-principles band-structure calculations, using the experimentally estimated on-site Coulomb energy of U∼4  eV, establish the necessity of strong correlations and finite structural distortions for driving the metal-insulator transition. In spite of the strong correlations, the nonintegral occupancy (2.25 d-electrons/Cr and the half-metallic ferromagnetism in the t_{2g} up-spin band favor a low-energy Peierls metal-insulator transition.

  8. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  9. Solid state lasers: a major direction in quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the report is to analyze development of solid-state lasers (SSL) as one of the most important avenues of the quantum electronics. The obtained intensity of a laser radiation at the focus equal to 5x10 1 0 W/cm 2 (the field intensity equal to about 5x10 1 0 V/cm 2 ) is noted to enable to observe nonlinear quantum- electrodynamic effects. Besides, one managed to increase the SSL efficiency conventionally equal to maximum 3% up to 48-50%. Paper describes new types of SSLs, namely, the crystalline fiber lasers with the lateral gradient of the index of refraction [ru

  10. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  11. Diode laser spectroscopy of oxygen electronic band at 760 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesini, A.; De Rosa, M.; Gozzini, S.

    1998-01-01

    Collisional broadening and shift coefficients have been obtained by analyzing the line shapes of oxygen absorptions in the 760 nm electronic band. By using a diode laser spectrometer with commercially available etherostructure Al x Ga 1-x As diode lasers operating in 'free-running mode', line shape parameters have been collected at room temperature by varying the gas pressure. A systematic study has been carried on seven absorption lines by scanning the diode laser emission wavelength around the gas resonances. The weak absorption lines have been detected by using the wavelength modulation (WM) spectroscopy technique with second-harmonic detection

  12. Tuning by means of laser annealing of electronic and structural properties of nc-Si/a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliani, E.; Somaschini, C.; Sanguinetti, S.; Grilli, E.; Guzzi, M.; Le Donne, A.; Binetti, S.; Pizzini, S.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report the effect of laser annealing on the structural and electronic properties of nc-Si/a-Si:H samples grown close to the amorphous to nanocrystalline transition. The nc-Si/a-Si:H thin films were produced by low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition through a gas discharge containing SiH 4 . The samples were subjected to different laser fluencies and were characterized for changes in their structural and electronic properties via Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements. The laser annealing effects are twofold: i) the nanocrystalline phase grows, during the laser treatment, respect to the amorphous phase; ii) the photoluminescence spectra show the suppression, after laser annealing, of the frequencies above the crystalline Si band-gap.

  13. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriyash, I.A.; Lehe, R.; Malka, V.

    2015-01-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes

  14. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-01-01

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (∼10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10 13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  15. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the design and current status of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUV pulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current ( and 10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered

  16. Multi-GeV electron-positron beam generation from laser-electron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Klimo, Ondrej; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2018-03-16

    The new generation of laser facilities is expected to deliver short (10 fs-100 fs) laser pulses with 10-100 PW of peak power. This opens an opportunity to study matter at extreme intensities in the laboratory and provides access to new physics. Here we propose to scatter GeV-class electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators with a multi-PW laser at normal incidence. In this configuration, one can both create and accelerate electron-positron pairs. The new particles are generated in the laser focus and gain relativistic momentum in the direction of laser propagation. Short focal length is an advantage, as it allows the particles to be ejected from the focal region with a net energy gain in vacuum. Electron-positron beams obtained in this setup have a low divergence, are quasi-neutral and spatially separated from the initial electron beam. The pairs attain multi-GeV energies which are not limited by the maximum energy of the initial electron beam. We present an analytical model for the expected energy cutoff, supported by 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The experimental implications, such as the sensitivity to temporal synchronisation and laser duration is assessed to provide guidance for the future experiments.

  17. Optimization and application of electron acceleration in relativistic laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigstein, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments and simulations of the acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies (toward γ e ∼ 10 3 ) by structures in plasmas which are generated by ultrashort (pulse length < 10 -14 s) laser pulses. The first part of this work discusses experiments in a parameter space where quasimonoenergetic electron bunches are generated in subcritical (gaseous) plasmas and compares them to analytical scalings. A primary concern in this work is to optimize the stability of the energy and the pointing of the electrons. The second part deals with acceleration of electrons along the surface of solid substrates by laser-plasma interaction. The measurements show good agreement with existing analytical scalings and dedicated numerical simulations. In the third part, two new concepts for multi-stage acceleration will be presented and parameterised by analytical considerations and numerical simulations. The first method uses electron pairs, as produced in the first part, to transfer energy from the first bunch to the second by means of a plasma wave. The second method utilizes a low intensity laser pulse in order to inject electrons from a neutral gas into the accelerating phase of a plasma wave. The final chapter proposes and demonstrates a first application that has been developed in collaboration with ESA. The use of electron beams with exponential energy distribution, as in the second part of this work, offers the potential to investigate the resistance of electronic components against space radiation exposure.

  18. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  19. Electron acceleration using laser produced plasmas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Low density plasmas have long been of interest as a potential medium for particle acceleration since relativistic plasma waves are capable of supporting electric fields greater than 100 GeV/m. The physics of particle acceleration using plasmas will be reviewed, and new results will be discussed which have demonstrated that relatively narrow energy spread (<3%) beams having energies greater than 100 MeV can be produced from femtosecond laser plasma interactions. Future experiments and potential applications will also be discussed.

  20. Observation of second harmonics in laser-electron scattering using low energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iinuma, Masataka [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)]. E-mail: iinuma@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Matsukado, Koji [Venture Business Laboratory, Hiroshima University, 1-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Endo, Ichita [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Hashida, Masaki [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, Kenji [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Kohara, Akitsugu [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumihiko [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoshitaka [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Sakabe, Shuji [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Shimizu, Seiji [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tauchi, Toshiaki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ken [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Takahashi, Tohru [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2005-10-17

    We observed photon generation in the second harmonic region in collisions of 10 keV free electrons and the intense laser beam with the peak intensity of 4.0x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Observed photon yield was 3 orders of magnitude higher than expectation from the nonlinear Compton scattering. The observation indicates necessity of further investigation for the interaction between the intense laser field and the low energy electron beam.

  1. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures

  2. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, W.; Yang, J., E-mail: jyang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Liu, Y.; Lau, W. [Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R& D Center, 355 Tengfei Road, 620107 Chengdu (China); Wang, X. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-03-07

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  3. Free electron laser on the ACO storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-06-01

    This dissertation presents the design and characteristics of a Free Electron Laser built on the electron storage ring ACO at Orsay. The weak optical gain available (approximately 0.1% per pass) necessitated the use of an optical klystron instead of an undulator and the use of mirror with extremely high reflectivity. The laser characteristics: spectra, micro and macro-temporal structures, transverse structure and power are presented. They are in very good agreement with a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations [fr

  4. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, W.; Yang, J.; Liu, Y.; Lau, W.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  5. Beamline for X-ray Free Electron Laser of SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tono, K; Togashi, T; Ohashi, H; Kimura, H; Takahashi, S; Takeshita, K; Tomizawa, H; Goto, S; Inubushi, Y; Sato, T; Yabashi, M

    2013-01-01

    A beamline for X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has been developed at SACLA, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser. The beamline delivers and diagnoses an XFEL beam without degrading the beam quality. The transport optics are applicable in the range of 4–30 keV with a double-crystal monochromator or 4–15 keV with either of two double-mirror systems. A photon diagnostic system of the beamline monitors intensity, photon energy, center-of-mass position, and spatial profile in shot-by-shot and non-destructive manners.

  6. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida, A.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable highstrength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO2 laser. This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloys, over the last years.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia la aleación superficial mediante láser de aluminio con metales de transición. El cromo y el molibdeno son particularmente interesantes porque producen aleaciones de alta resistencia y por el bajo coeficiente de difusión y solución sólida en aluminio. Para producir estas aleaciones se ha seguido un procedimiento desarrollado en dos partes. En primer lugar, el material se alea usando una baja velocidad de procesado y en segundo lugar la estructura se modifica mediante un refinamiento posterior. Este procedimiento se ha empleado en la producción de aleaciones Al-Cr, Al-Mo y Al-Nb mediante aleación con láser de CO2 de polvos de Cr, Mo o Nb en aluminio y la aleación 7175. Este trabajo es una revisión del desarrollado en el Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa en los últimos años.

  7. Electron scattering by nuclei and transition charge densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul'karov, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Transition charge densities for states of electric type, for nuclei with A≤40--50 as obtained from data on inelastic electron scattering, are studied. The formalism of electroexcitation of nuclei is considered, together with various models (macroscopic and microscopic) used to calculate form factors, transition charge densities, and the moments of these densities: B(Eλ) and R/sub λ/ . The macroscopic models are derived microscopically, and it is shown that the model-independent sum rules lead to the same transition densities as calculations based on various hydrodynamic models. The sum rules with and without allowance for the Skyrme exchange interaction are discussed. The results of the calculations are compared with the experimental form factors of electron scattering by nuclei from 12 C to 48 Ca with excitation in them of normal-parity states with I/sup π/ = 0 + , 1 - , 2 + , 3 - , 4 + , 5 - and T = 0. The model-independent transition charge densities for the weakly collectivized excitations differ strongly from the model-dependent densities. The influence of neutrons on the transition charge densities of the nuclear isotopes 16 /sup ,/ 18 O, 32 /sup ,/ 34 S, and 40 /sup ,/ 48 Ca is considered

  8. Electronic properties and phase transitions in low-dimensional semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M

    2008-01-01

    We present the first review of the current state of the literature on electronic properties and phase transitions in TlX and TlMX 2 (M = Ga, In; X = Se, S, Te) compounds. These chalcogenides belong to a family of the low-dimensional semiconductors possessing chain or layered structure. They are of significant interest because of their highly anisotropic properties, semi- and photoconductivity, nonlinear effects in their I-V characteristics (including a region of negative differential resistance), switching and memory effects, second harmonic optical generation, relaxor behavior and potential applications for optoelectronic devices. We review the crystal structure of TlX and TlMX 2 compounds, their transport properties under ambient conditions, experimental and theoretical studies of the electronic structure, transport properties and semiconductor-metal phase transitions under high pressure, and sequences of temperature-induced structural phase transitions with intermediate incommensurate states. The electronic nature of the ferroelectric phase transitions in the above-mentioned compounds, as well as relaxor behavior, nanodomains and possible occurrence of quantum dots in doped and irradiated crystals is discussed. (topical review)

  9. Mechanical and electronic properties of Janus monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenwu; Wang, Zhiguo

    2018-05-01

    The mechanical and electronic properties of Janus monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides MXY (M  =  Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W; X/Y  =  S, Se, Te) were investigated using density functional theory. Results show that breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry can be used to tune the electronic and mechanical behavior of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. The band gaps of monolayer WXY and MoXY are in the ranges of 0.16–1.91 and 0.94–1.69 eV, respectively. A semiconductor to metallic phase transition occurred in Janus monolayer MXY (M  =  Ti, Zr and Hf). The monolayers MXY (M  =  V, Nb, Ta and Cr) show metallic characteristics, which show no dependence on the structural symmetry breaking. The mechanical properties of MXY depended on the composition. Monolayer MXY (M  =  Mo, Ti, Zr, Hf and W) showed brittle characteristic, whereas monolayer CrXY and VXY are with ductile characteristic. The in-plane stiffness of pristine and Janus monolayer MXY are in the range between 22 and 158 N m‑1. The tunable electronic and mechanical properties of these 2D materials would advance the development of ultra-sensitive detectors, nanogenerators, low-power electronics, and energy harvesting and electromechanical systems.

  10. Plural three-wave resonances of space charge wave harmonics in transit section of klystron-type two-stream FEL with helical electron beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Alexander; Volk, Iurii; Serozhko, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out the research of plural three-wave resonances of space charge wave (SCW) harmonics in the transit section of the klystron type two-stream superheterodyne free-electron laser (TSFEL) with helical electron beam in cubic non-linear approximation. We have found out that two...

  11. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Tomin, Sergey [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-07

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  12. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor; Geloni, Gianluca; Tomin, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  13. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofang; Saleh, Ned; Krishnan, Mohan; Wang Haiwen; Backus, Sterling; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Umstadter, Donald; Wang Quandong; Shen Baifei

    2003-01-01

    Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electron emission from the interaction of an ultrafast (τ∼29 fs), intense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulse with underdense plasmas has been studied. A beam of MeV electrons with a divergence angle as small as 1 deg. is observed in the forward direction, which is correlated with relativistic filamentation of the laser pulse in plasmas. A novel net-energy-gain mechanism is proposed for electron acceleration resulting from the relativistic filamentation and beam breakup. These results suggest an approach for generating a beam of femtosecond, MeV electrons at a kilohertz repetition rate with a compact ultrafast intense laser system

  14. Rapid solidification growth mode transitions in Al-Si alloys by dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehling, John D.; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Gibbs, John W.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Mertens, James C.E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Clarke, Amy J.; McKeown, Joseph T.

    2017-01-01

    In situ dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) imaging of Al-Si thin-film alloys was performed to investigate rapid solidification behavior. Solidification of alloys with compositions from 1 to 15 atomic percent Si was imaged during pulsed laser melting and subsequent solidification. Solely α-Al solidification was observed in Al-1Si and Al-3Si alloys, and solely kinetically modified eutectic growth was observed in Al-6Si and Al-9Si alloys. A transition in the solidification mode in eutectic and hypereutectic alloys (Al-12Si and Al-15Si) from nucleated α-Al dendrites at lower solidification velocities to planar eutectic growth at higher solidification velocities was observed, departing from trends previously seen in laser-track melting experiments. Comparisons of the growth modes and corresponding velocities are compared with previous solidification models, and implications regarding the models are discussed.

  15. Experimental Evidence of Radiation Reaction in the Collision of a High-Intensity Laser Pulse with a Laser-Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. M.; Behm, K. T.; Gerstmayr, E.; Blackburn, T. G.; Wood, J. C.; Baird, C. D.; Duff, M. J.; Harvey, C.; Ilderton, A.; Joglekar, A. S.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Marklund, M.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.; Poder, K.; Ridgers, C. P.; Samarin, G. M.; Sarri, G.; Symes, D. R.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Warwick, J.; Zepf, M.; Najmudin, Z.; Mangles, S. P. D.

    2018-02-01

    The dynamics of energetic particles in strong electromagnetic fields can be heavily influenced by the energy loss arising from the emission of radiation during acceleration, known as radiation reaction. When interacting with a high-energy electron beam, today's lasers are sufficiently intense to explore the transition between the classical and quantum radiation reaction regimes. We present evidence of radiation reaction in the collision of an ultrarelativistic electron beam generated by laser-wakefield acceleration (ɛ >500 MeV ) with an intense laser pulse (a0>10 ). We measure an energy loss in the postcollision electron spectrum that is correlated with the detected signal of hard photons (γ rays), consistent with a quantum description of radiation reaction. The generated γ rays have the highest energies yet reported from an all-optical inverse Compton scattering scheme, with critical energy ɛcrit>30 MeV .

  16. Experimental Evidence of Radiation Reaction in the Collision of a High-Intensity Laser Pulse with a Laser-Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Cole

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of energetic particles in strong electromagnetic fields can be heavily influenced by the energy loss arising from the emission of radiation during acceleration, known as radiation reaction. When interacting with a high-energy electron beam, today’s lasers are sufficiently intense to explore the transition between the classical and quantum radiation reaction regimes. We present evidence of radiation reaction in the collision of an ultrarelativistic electron beam generated by laser-wakefield acceleration (ϵ>500  MeV with an intense laser pulse (a_{0}>10. We measure an energy loss in the postcollision electron spectrum that is correlated with the detected signal of hard photons (γ rays, consistent with a quantum description of radiation reaction. The generated γ rays have the highest energies yet reported from an all-optical inverse Compton scattering scheme, with critical energy ϵ_{crit}>30  MeV.

  17. Electron acceleration by laser produced wake field: Pulse shape effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Sandeep; Nishida, Yasushi

    2007-12-01

    Analytical expressions are obtained for the longitudinal field (wake field: Ex), density perturbations ( ne') and the potential ( ϕ) behind a laser pulse propagating in a plasma with the pulse duration of the electron plasma period. A feasibility study on the wake field is carried out with Gaussian-like (GL) pulse, rectangular-triangular (RT) pulse and rectangular-Gaussian (RG) pulse considering one-dimensional weakly nonlinear theory ( ne'/n0≪1), and the maximum energy gain acquired by an electron is calculated for all these three types of the laser pulse shapes. A comparative study infers that the RT pulse yields the best results: In its case maximum electron energy gain is 33.5 MeV for a 30 fs pulse duration whereas in case of GL (RG) pulse of the same duration the gain is 28.6 (28.8)MeV at the laser frequency of 1.6 PHz and the intensity of 3.0 × 10 18 W/m 2. The field of the wake and hence the energy gain get enhanced for the higher laser frequency, larger pulse duration and higher laser intensity for all types of the pulses.

  18. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  19. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  20. Time-Resolved Studies of Laser-Induced Phase Transitions in Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Yakir

    This thesis describes a series of time-resolved experiments of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs during laser-induced phase transitions. The first set of experiments consists of a direct determination of the behavior of the linear dielectric constant at photon energies of 2.2 eV and 4.4 eV following excitation of the sample with 1.9-eV, 70-fs laser pulses spanning a fluence range from 0 to 2.5 kJ/m^2. The results from this set of experiments were used to extract the behavior of the second-order optical susceptibility from second-harmonic generation measurements made under identical excitation conditions. These experiments are unique because they provide explicit information on the behavior of intrinsic material properties--the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities--during laser-induced phase transitions in semiconductors without the ambiguities in interpretation that are generally inherent in reflectivity and second-harmonic generation measurements. The dielectric constant data indicate a drop in the average bonding-antibonding splitting of GaAs following the laser pulse excitation. This behavior leads to a collapse of the band-gap on a picosecond time scale for excitation at fluences near the damage threshold of 1.0 kJ/m ^2 and even faster at higher excitation fluences. The changes in the electronic band structure result from a combination of electronic screening by the excited free carriers and structural deformation of the lattice caused by the destabilization of the covalent bonds. The behavior of the second-order susceptibility shows that the material loses long-range order before the average bonding-antibonding splitting, which is more sensitive to short-range structure, changes significantly. Loss of long-range order and a drop of more than 2 eV in the average bonding-antibonding splitting are seen even at fluences below the damage threshold, a regime in which the laser-induced changes are reversible.

  1. Inhomogeneous effects in the quantum free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, N.; Bonifacio, R.

    2006-01-01

    We include inhomogeneous effects in the quantum model of a free electron laser taking into account the initial energy spread of the electron beam. From a linear analysis, we obtain a generalized dispersion relation, from which the exponential gain can be explicitly calculated. We determine the maximum allowed initial energy spread in the quantum exponential regime and we discuss the limit of large energy spread

  2. Vibrational analysis of a shipboard free electron laser beam path

    OpenAIRE

    Gallant, Bryan M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the deployment of a free electron laser (FEL) weapon system in a shipboard vibration environment. A concept solid model of a shipboard FEL is developed and used as a basis for a finite element model which is subjected to vibration simulation in MATLAB. Vibration input is obtained from ship shock trials data and wave excited motion data from ship motion simulation software. Emphasis is placed on the motion of electron beam path components of the FEL and the feasibility of ...

  3. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  4. Electron-doping by hydrogen in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sehoon; Im, Seongil; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the atomic and electronic structures of 2H-phase transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC), 2H-MX2, with and without defects, where M is Mo or W and X is S, Se or Te. We find that doping of atomic hydrogen on 2H-MX2 induces electron doping in the conduction band. To understand the mechanism of this electron doping, we analyze the electronic structures with and without impurities. We also calculate the diffusion energy barrier to discuss the spatial stability of the doping. Based on these results, we suggest a possible way to fabricate elaborately-patterned circuits by modulating the carrier type of 2H-MoTe2. We also discuss possible applications of this doping in designing nano-devices. This work was supported by NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2011-0018306) and KISTI supercomputing center (Project No. KSC-2016-C3-0052).

  5. Channeling of electrons in a crossed laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Dabagov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article a new analytical description of the effective interaction potential for a charged particle with the field of two interfering laser beams is presented. The potential dependence on the lasers intensities, orientation and parameters of the particle entering the considered system is analyzed. For the first time the phenomenon of effective potential inversion (or “relativistic reversal” is described for arbitrary lasers crossing angle. Threshold electron velocity values for the phenomenon are introduced and its extended illustration based on numerical simulations for two laser beams polarizations is presented. In addition the projectile radiation spectral distribution is given and general estimations on the expected beam radiation yield are outlined.

  6. Microlens Array Laser Transverse Shaping Technique for Photoemission Electron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ha, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (POSTECH) (Korea, Republic of); Qiang, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Gai, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wisniewski, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Edstrom, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Santucci, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-09-06

    A common issue encountered in photoemission electron sources used in electron accelerators is distortion of the laser spot due to non ideal conditions at all stages of the amplification. Such a laser spot at the cathode may produce asymmetric charged beams that will result in degradation of the beam quality due to space charge at early stages of acceleration and fail to optimally utilize the cathode surface. In this note we study the possibility of using microlens arrays to dramatically improve the transverse uniformity of the drive laser pulse on UV photocathodes at both Fermilab Accelerator Science \\& Technology (FAST) facility and Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). In particular, we discuss the experimental characterization of the homogeneity and periodic patterned formation at the photocathode. Finally, we compare the experimental results with the paraxial analysis, ray tracing and wavefront propagation software.

  7. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  8. Electronic dynamics induced by laser in (D)KDP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, G.; Geoffroy, G.; Dyan, A.; Piombini, H.; Geoffroy, G.; Guizard, S.

    2011-01-01

    DKDP (KD 2 PO 4 ) and KDP (KH 2 PO 4 ) crystals that are used in frequency conversion systems have a damage threshold that limits the development of power lasers. It is assumed that laser-induced damage (LID) stems for a precursor defect present in the crystal or quickly generated by the laser-radiation. The Socrate bench has been useful for studying the evolution of LID but the understanding of the very beginning of the LID requires a new method. We have performed femtosecond interferometric measures to study the behaviour of charge carriers. We show that the valence electrons are excited through multi-photon absorption and their relaxation time depends on the isotope (hydrogen or deuterium). The various electron populations are computed through an adequate simulation and the comparison with experimental data has allowed us to get values for multi-photon absorption cross-sections and relaxation times

  9. Quantum radiation reaction in head-on laser-electron beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the energy spread and the divergence of electron beams while they interact with different laser pulses at intensities where quantum effects and radiation reaction are of relevance. The interaction is modelled with a quantum electrodynamic (QED)-PIC code and the results are compared with those obtained using a standard PIC code with a classical radiation reaction module. In addition, an analytical model is presented that estimates the value of the final electron energy spread after the interaction with the laser has finished. While classical radiation reaction is a continuous process, in QED, radiation emission is stochastic. The two pictures reconcile in the limit when the emitted photons energy is small compared to the energy of the emitting electrons. The energy spread of the electron distribution function always tends to decrease with classical radiation reaction, whereas the stochastic QED emission can also enlarge it. These two tendencies compete in the QED-dominated regime. Our analysis, supported by the QED module, reveals an upper limit to the maximal attainable energy spread due to stochasticity that depends on laser intensity and the electron beam average energy. Beyond this limit, the energy spread decreases. These findings are verified for different laser pulse lengths ranging from short ∼30 fs pulses presently available to the long ∼150 fs pulses expected in the near-future laser facilities, and compared with a theoretical model. Our results also show that near future experiments will be able to probe this transition and to demonstrate the competition between enhanced QED induced energy spread and energy spectrum narrowing from classical radiation reaction. (paper)

  10. Transition and Electron Impact Excitation Collision Rates for O III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2017-12-01

    Transition probabilities, electron excitation collision strengths, and rate coefficients for a large number of O III lines over a broad wavelength range, from the infrared to ultraviolet, have been reported. The collision strengths have been calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method in combination with B-spline expansions is employed for an accurate representation of the target wave functions. The close-coupling expansion contains 202 O2+ fine-structure levels of the 2{s}22{p}2,2s2{p}3, 2{p}4,2{s}22p3s,3p,3d, 4s,4p,4d,4f,5s, and 2s2{p}33s,3p,3d configurations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging electron excitation collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities at electron temperatures ranging from 100 to 100,000 K. The calculated effective collision strengths have been reported for the 20,302 transitions between all 202 fine-structure levels. There is an overall good agreement with the recent R-matrix calculations by Storey et al. for the transitions between all levels of the ground 2{s}22{p}2 configuration, but significant discrepancies have been found with Palay et al. for transitions to the 2{s}22{p}2 1 S 0 level. Line intensity ratios between the optical lines arising from the 2{s}22{p}2{}3{P}{0,1,2} - 1 D 2 transitions have been compared with other calculations and observations from the photoionized gaseous nebulae, and good agreement is found. The present calculations provide the most complete and accurate data sets, which should allow a more detailed treatment of the available measured spectra from different ground and space observatories.

  11. Triggering of 178Hfm2 by photoinduced electron transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ya. Dzyublik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We considered the NEET (nuclear excitation by electron transition as a possible triggering mechanism of the isomer 178Hfm2 during ionization of the L3 atomic shell by x-rays. This isomer is assumed to be excited into an intermediate state by E1 electronic transition between M5 and L3 shells. Simple nonrelativistic formulas are derived for the NEET probability. The estimations show the probability to be less than the experimental data of [1] by one order of magnitude. The intermediate level is found to decay bypassing the isomeric level 16+, if the nucleus attributes a triaxial shape in the state and, besides, there exists a level 13- shifted with respect to 15- by 400 keV. We have shown also that the NEET cross section as a function of the energy of x-ray photons , has to accept constant value above the L photoionization threshold in contrast to narrow peak observed by [1].

  12. Matrix elements of the relativistic electron-transition operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudzikas, Z.B.; Slepcov, A.A.; Kickin, I.S.

    1976-01-01

    The formulas, which enable us to calculate the electric and magnetic multipole transition probabilities in relativistic approximation under various gauge conditions of the electromagnetic potential, are presented. The numerical values of the coefficients of the one-electron reduced matrix elements of the relativistic operators of the electric and magnetic dipole transitions between the configurations K 0 n 2 l 2 j 2 α 0 J 0 j 2 J--K 0 n 1 l 1 j 1 α 0 'J 0 'j 1 J', where K 0 represents any electronic configuration, having the quantum number of the total angular momentum 0 less than or equal to J 0 less than or equal to 8 (the step is 1 / 2 ), and 1 / 2 less than or equal to j 2 , j 1 less than or equal to 7 / 2 , are given

  13. Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA

  14. Transition and synchrotron radiation produced by electrons and particle discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, B.; Repellin, J.-P.; Sauvage, G.; Chollet, J.C.; Dialinas, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hrisoho, A.; Jean, P.

    1976-01-01

    Transition radiation from a radiator of 650 lithium foils has been studied in a multiwire proportional chamber filled with a Xenon-CO 2 mixture for two experimental configurations. With the chamber immediately after the radiator, particle discrimination comparable to those reported in the litterature (90% efficiency for electrons, 10% for hadrons) have been observed. With magnetic bending between the radiator and the xenon chamber typical efficiencies of 87% for electrons and less than 0.4% for hadrons have been measured. The discrimination obtained is at least a factor 20 better than for the more conventional configuration. In the latter case, synchrotron radiation has also been observed

  15. Synchrotron radiation and free electron laser activities in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, V.N.; Kulipanov, G.N.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Oreshkov, A.D.; Panchenko, V.E.; Pindyurin, V.F.; Skrinskij, A.N.; Sheromov, M.A.; Vinokurov, N.A.; Zolotarev, K.V.

    1994-01-01

    The results of studies realized in the Siberian synchrotron radiation centre within the frameworks of wide program of synchrotron radiation and free electron laser research are summarized. The technical information on the VEPP-2M, VEPP-3 and VEPP-4M storage rings used as synchrotron radiation sources is given. 10 refs.; 8 figs.; 12 tabs

  16. Emittance growth in laser-driven RF electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analysis for the evolution of the electron-beam phase space distribution in laser-driven rf guns is presented. In particular, formulas are derived for the transverse and longitudinal emittances at the exit of the gun. The results are compared and found to agree well with those from simulation. (Author). 9 refs.; 4 figs

  17. Three-dimensional simulations of free-electron laser physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, B.D.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate three-dimensional free-electron laser physics. A mathematical formulation of the FEL equations is presented, and the numerical solution of the problem is described. Sample results from the computer code are discussed. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  19. Mechanisms for the production of harmonics in free electron lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgin, J.N.; Penman, C.

    1991-01-01

    Harmonics in the radiation of a free electron laser are useful for extending the range of tuning, may originate in spontaneous or parametric processes, and can take part in stimulated emission or amplification. These mechanisms exhibit interesting analogies with those of nonlinear optics. Apart from

  20. Electron laser acceleration in vacuum by a quadratically chirped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamin, Yousef I; Jisrawi, Najeh M

    2014-01-01

    Single MeV electrons in vacuum subjected to single high-intensity quadratically chirped laser pulses are shown to gain multi-GeV energies. The laser pulses are modelled by finite-duration trapezoidal and cos  2 pulse-shapes and the equations of motion are solved numerically. It is found that, typically, the maximum energy gain from interaction with a quadratic chirp is about half of what would be gained from a linear chirp. (paper)

  1. Electron beam requirements for soft x-ray/XUV free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the electron beam quality (peak current, energy spread, and transverse emittance) required to drive short wavelength free-electron lasers in the XUV (10-100 nm) and soft x-ray (<10 nm) optical wavelength ranges is presented

  2. Electron transfer by excited benzoquinone anions: slow rates for two-electron transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamadar, Matibur; Cook, Andrew R; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Holroyd, Richard; Jiang, Yan; Bikalis, Jin; Miller, John R

    2013-09-05

    Electron transfer (ET) rate constants from the lowest excited state of the radical anion of benzoquinone, BQ(-•)*, were measured in THF solution. Rate constants for bimolecular electron transfer reactions typically reach the diffusion-controlled limit when the free-energy change, ΔG°, reaches -0.3 eV. The rate constants for ET from BQ(-•)* are one-to-two decades smaller at this energy and do not reach the diffusion-controlled limit until -ΔG° is 1.5-2.0 eV. The rates are so slow probably because a second electron must also undergo a transition to make use of the energy of the excited state. Similarly, ET, from solvated electrons to neutral BQ to form the lowest excited state, is slow, while fast ET is observed at a higher excited state, which can be populated in a transition involving only one electron. A simple picture based on perturbation theory can roughly account for the control of electron transfer by the need for transition of a second electron. The picture also explains how extra driving force (-ΔG°) can restore fast rates of electron transfer.

  3. Intensity dependence of electron gas kinetics in a laser corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In various experimental situations relevant to the laser fusion, such as plasma near the light entrance holes of hohlraum in the indirect drive experiments or more recently in the shock ignition direct drive a relatively long underdense plasma of corona type is encountered, which is subject to an intense nanosecond laser beam. The plasma is only weakly collisional and thus in the electron phase space a complicated kinetic evolution is going on, which is taking the electron gas fairly far from the thermal equilibrium and contributes to its unstable behaviour. These phenomena impede the absorption and thermalization of the incoming laser energy, create groups of fast electrons and also may lead to a non-linear reflection of the heating laser beam. One of the key processes leading to the electron acceleration is the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS in its non-linear phase. The SRS in the presence of electron-ion collisions requires a certain threshold intensity above which the mentioned non-dissipative phenomena can occur and develop to the stage, where they may become unpleasant for the fusion experiments. To assess this intensity limit a computational model has been developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell kinetics describing such a plasma in 1D geometry. At a relatively high intensity of 1016 W/cm2 a number of non-linear phenomena are predicted by the code such as a saturation of Landau damping, which is then translated in an unfavourable time dependence of the reflected light intensity and formation of accelerated electron groups due to the electron trapping. The purpose of the present contribution is to map the intensity dependence of this non-linear development with the aim of assessing its weight in fusion relevant situations.

  4. The free electron laser: a system capable of determining the gold standard in laser vision correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, W. Craig; Rose, John G.; Chang, Daniel H.; Proia, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction. In laser vision correction surgery, lasers are generally utilized based on their beam-tissue interactions and corneal absorption characteristics. Therefore, the free electron laser, with its ability to provide broad wavelength tunability, is a unique research tool for investigating wavelengths of possible corneal ablation. Methods. Mark III free electron laser wavelengths between 2.94 and 6.7 μm were delivered in serial 0.1 μm intervals to corneas of freshly enucleated porcine globes. Collateral damage, ablation depth, and ablation diameter were measured in histologic sections. Results. The least collateral damage (12-13 μm) was demonstrated at three wavelengths: 6.0, 6.1 (amide I), and 6.3 μm. Minimal collateral damage (15 μm) was noted at 2.94 μm (OH-stretch) and at 6.2 μm. Slightly greater collateral damage was noted at 6.45 μm (amide II), as well as at the 5.5-5.7 μm range, but this was still substantially less than the collateral damage noted at the other wavelengths tested. Conclusions. Our results suggest that select mid-infrared wavelengths have potential for keratorefractive surgery and warrant additional study. Further, the free electron laser's ability to allow parameter adjustment in the far-ultraviolet spectrum may provide unprecedented insights toward establishing the gold-standard parameters for laser vision correction surgery

  5. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  6. Improvement of the quality of laser-wakefield accelerators: towards a compact free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehe, R.

    2014-01-01

    When an intense and short laser pulse propagates through an underdense gas, it can accelerate a fraction of the electrons of the gas, and thereby generate an electron bunch with an energy of a few hundreds of MeV. This phenomenon, which is referred to as laser-wakefield acceleration, has many potential applications, including the design of ultra-bright X-ray sources known as free electron lasers (FEL). However, these applications require the electron bunch to have an excellent quality (low divergence, emittance and energy spread). In this thesis, different solutions to improve the quality of the electron bunch are developed, both analytically and through the use of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. It is first shown however that PIC simulations tend to erroneously overestimate the emittance of the bunch, due to the numerical Cherenkov effect. Thus, in order to correctly estimate the emittance, a modified PIC algorithm is proposed, which is not subject to this unphysical Cherenkov effect. Using this algorithm, we have observed and studied a new mechanism to generate the electron bunch: optical transverse injection. This mechanism can produce bunches with a high charge, a low emittance and a low energy spread. In addition, we also proposed an experimental setup - the laser-plasma lens - which can strongly reduce the final divergence of the bunch. Finally, these results are put into context by discussing the properties required for the design of a compact FEL. It is shown in particular that laser-wakefield accelerator could be advantageously combined with innovative laser-plasma undulators, in order to produce bright X-rays sources. (author)

  7. Electron impact excitation and ionization of laser-excited sodium atoms Na*(7d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienhaus, J.; Dorn, A.; Mehlhorn, W.; Zatsarinny, O.I.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the ejected-electron spectrum following impact excitation and ionization of laser-excited Na * (nl) atoms by 1.5 keV electrons. By means of two-laser excitation 3s → 3p 3/2 → 7d and subsequent cascading transitions about 8% (4%) of the target atoms were in excited states with n > 3 (7d). The experimental ejected-electron spectrum due to the decay of Auger and autoionization states of laser-excited atoms Na * (nl) with n = 4-7 has been fully interpreted by comprehensive calculations of the energies, cross sections and decay probabilities of the corresponding states. The various processes contributing to the ejected-electron spectrum are with decreasing magnitude: 2s ionization leading to 2s2p 6 nl Auger states, 2p → 3s excitation leading to 2p 5 3s( 1 P)nl autoionization states and 2s → 3l' excitation leading to 2s2p 6 3l'( 1 L)nl autoionization states. (Author)

  8. Property Investigation of Laser Cladded, Laser Melted and Electron Beam Melted Ti-Al6-V4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Figure 3: Examples of electron beam melted net shape parts; powder bed [3]. 1.4 Laser Cladding ...description, www.arcam.com. [4] K.-H. Hermann, S. Orban, S. Nowotny, Laser Cladding of Titanium Alloy Ti6242 to Restore Damaged Blades, Proceedings...Property Investigation of Laser Cladded , Laser Melted and Electron Beam Melted Ti-Al6-V4 Johannes Vlcek EADS Deutschland GmbH Corporate Research

  9. Electron-vibrational transitions under molecular ions collisions with slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    A concept of a multichannel quantum defect is considered and basic theoretic ratios of inelastic collisional processes with the participation of molecular positive ions and slow electrons playing an important role both in atmospheric and laboratory plasma, are presented. The problem of scattering channel number limitation with the provision of S-matrix unique character is considered. Different models of electron rotation-vibrational connection under collision of two-atom molecular ions with slow electrons are analysed. Taking N 2 + as an example, a high efficiency of transitions between different electron states of a molecular ion is shown. 73 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  10. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy (∼20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes

  11. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, J E; Swartz, J C; Urata, J; Kimmitt, M F

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed.

  12. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.; Brownell, J.H.; Swartz, J.C.; Urata, J.; Kimmitt, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed

  13. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.E.; Brownell, J.H.; Swartz, J.C.; Urata, J.; Kimmitt, M.F

    1999-06-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed.

  14. Transient analysis of a bunched beam free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.M.; Yu, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the bunched beam operation of a free electron laser was studied. Assuming the electron beam to be initially monoenergetic, the Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the system reduce to a third order partial differential equation for the envelope of the emitted light. The Green's function corresponding to an arbitrary shape of the electron bunch, which describes the transient behavior of the system, is obtained. The Green's function was used to discuss the start up problem as well as the power output and the power specrum of a self-amplified spontaneous emission

  15. High-energy inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Pellegrini, C.; Zakowicz, W.

    1985-01-01

    We study the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator and show that it can accelerate electrons to the few hundred GeV region with average acceleration rates of the order of 200 meV/m. Several possible accelerating structures are analyzed, and the effect of synchrotron radiation losses is studied. The longitudinal phase stability of accelerated particles is also analyzed. A Hamiltonian description, which takes into account the dissipative features of the IFEL accelerator, is introduced to study perturbations from the resonant acceleration. Adiabatic invariants are obtained and used to estimate the change of the electron phase space density during the acceleration process

  16. Electron spin transition causing structure transformations of earth's interiors under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, T.; Kyono, A.; Kharlamova, S.; Alp, E.; Bi, W.; Mao, H.

    2012-12-01

    To elucidate the correlation between structure transitions and spin state is one of the crucial problems for understanding the geophysical properties of earth interiors under high pressure. High-pressure studies of iron bearing spinels attract extensive attention in order to understand strong electronic correlation such as the charge transfer, electron hopping, electron high-low spin transition, Jahn-Teller distortion and charge disproponation in the lower mantle or subduction zone [1]. Experiment Structure transitions of Fe3-xSixO4, Fe3-xTixO4 Fe3-xCrxO4 spinel solid solution have been investigated at high pressure up to 60 GPa by single crystal and powder diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation with diamond anvil cell. X-ray emission experiment (XES) at high pressure proved the spin transition of Fe-Kβ from high spin (HS) to intermediate spin state (IS) or low spin state (LS). Mössbauer experiment and Raman spectra study have been also conducted for deformation analysis of Fe site and confirmation of the configuration change of Fe atoms. Jahn-Teller effect A cubic-to-tetragonal transition under pressure was induced by Jahn-Teller effect of IVFe2+ (3d6) in the tetrahedral site of Fe2TiO4 and FeCr2O4, providing the transformation from 43m (Td) to 42m (D2d). Tetragonal phase is formed by the degeneracy of e orbital of Fe2+ ion. Their c/a ratios are c/adisordered in the M2 site. At pressures above 53 GPa, Fe2TiO4 structure further transforms to Pmma. This structure change results in the order-disorder transition [2]. New structure of Fe2SiO4 The spin transition exerts an influence to Fe2SiO4 spinel structure and triggers two distinct curves of the lattice constant in the spinel phase. The reversible structure transition from cubic to pseudo-rhombohedral phase was observed at about 45 GPa. This transition is induced by the 20% shrinkage of ionic radius of VIFe2+at the low sin state. Laser heating experiment at 1500 K has confirmed the decomposition from the

  17. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  18. Large area electron beam pumped krypton fluoride laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gerber, K.A.; Pawley, C.J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C.A.; Webster, W.; Deniz, A.V.; Lehecka, T.; McGeoch, M.W.; Altes, R.A.; Corcoran, P.A.; Smith, I.D.; Barr, O.C.

    1997-01-01

    Nike is a recently completed multi-kilojoule krypton fluoride (KrF) laser that has been built to study the physics of direct drive inertial confinement fusion. This paper describes in detail both the pulsed power and optical performance of the largest amplifier in the Nike laser, the 60 cm amplifier. This is a double pass, double sided, electron beam-pumped system that amplifies the laser beam from an input of 50 J to an output of up to 5 kJ. It has an optical aperture of 60 cm x 60 cm and a gain length of 200 cm. The two electron beams are 60 cm high x 200 cm wide, have a voltage of 640 kV, a current of 540 kA, and a flat top power pulse duration of 250 ns. A 2 kG magnetic field is used to guide the beams and prevent self-pinching. Each electron beam is produced by its own Marx/pulse forming line system. The amplifier has been fully integrated into the Nike system and is used on a daily basis for laser-target experiments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. Laser-assisted electron emission from gated field-emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Mimura, H; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2002-01-01

    Enhancement of electron emission by illumination of gated field-emitters was studied using a 100 mW cw YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm, intensities up to 10 sup 7 W/m sup 2 and mechanically chopped with a rise time of 4 mu s. When shining an array of 640 silicon emitters, the emission current responded quickly to on-off of the laser. The increase of the emission current was proportional to the basic emission current at low gate voltages, but it was saturated at approx 3 mu A as the basic current approached 100 mu A with the increase of gate voltage. The emission increase was proportional to the square root of laser power at low gate voltages and to the laser power at elevated gate voltages. For 1- and 3-tip silicon emitters, the rise and fall of the current due to on-off of the laser showed a significant time lag. The magnitude of emission increase was independent of the position of laser spot on the emitter base and reached 2 mu A at a basic current of 5 mu A without showing signs of saturation. The mech...

  20. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  1. Phase stability and electronic structure of transition-metal aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will describe the interplay between die electronic structure and structural energetics in simple, complex, and quasicrystalline Al-transition metal (T) intermetallics. The first example is the Ll 2 -DO 22 competition in Al 3 T compounds. Ab-initio electronic total-energy calculations reveal surprisingly large structural-energy differences, and show that the phase stability of both stoichiometric and ternary-substituted compounds correlates closely with a quasigap in the electronic density of states (DOS). Secondly, ab-initio calculations for the structural stability of the icosahedrally based Al 12 W structure reveal similar quasigap effects, and provide a simple physical explanation for the stability of the complex aluminide structures. Finally, parametrized tight-binding model calculations for the Al-Mn quasicrystal reveal a large spread in the local Mn DOS behavior, and support a two-site model for the quasicrystal's magnetic behavior

  2. Nonlinear electron transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Haines, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Electron transport in a magnetized plasma heated by inverse bremsstrahlung is studied numerically using a nonlinear Fokker--Planck model with self-consistent E and B fields. The numerical scheme is described. Nonlocal transport is found to alter many of the transport coefficients derived from linear transport theory, in particular, the Nernst and Righi--Leduc effects, in addition to the perpendicular heat flux q/sub perpendicular/, are substantially reduced near critical surface. The magnetic field, however, remains strongly coupled to the nonlinear q/sub perpendicular/ and, as has been found in hydrosimulations, convective amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the overdense plasma

  3. High-current electron accelerator for gas-laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badaliants, G R; Mamikonian, V A; Nersisian, G Ts; Papanian, V O

    1978-11-26

    A high-current source of pulsed electron beams has been developed for the pumping of UV gas lasers. The parameters of the device are: energy of 0.3-0.7 MeV pulse duration of 30 ns and current density (in a high-pressure laser chamber) of 40-100 A/sq cm. The principal feature of the device is the use of a rectangular cold cathode with incomplete discharge along the surface of the high-permittivity dielectric. Cathodes made of stainless steel, copper, and graphite were investigated.

  4. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.; Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  5. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 [mu]s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  6. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  7. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  8. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  9. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvazian, A.; Haji Sharifi, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-stimulated Raman scattering and dominating initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-stimulated Raman scattering plasma waves with high phase velocities. This two-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  10. Laser pulse control of bridge mediated heterogeneous electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer from surface attached dye molecules into semiconductor band states is analyzed. The focus is on systems where the dye is separated from the surface by different bridge anchor groups. To simulate the full quantum dynamics of the transfer process a model of reduced dimensionality is used. It comprises the electronic levels of the dye, the bridge anchor group electronic levels and the continuum of semiconductor band states, all defined versus a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate. The effect of the bridge states is demonstrated, firstly, in studying the injection dynamics following an impulsive excitation of the dye. Then, by discussing different control tasks it is demonstrate in which way the charge injection process can be influenced by tailored laser pulses. To highlight the importance of electron wave function interference emphasis is put on asymmetric two-bridge molecule systems which are also characterized by different and complex valued electronic transfer matrix elements.

  11. Low-energy electron-helium scattering in a Nd–YAG laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, I.; Makhoute, A.; Khalil, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser assisted electron helium excitation is studied at low incident energies. • The inclusion of the second-order Born contributions is significant at low incident energies. • The target distortion induced by the laser field should be taken into account. • The effect of the second term of the Born series is reduced as the energy increases. - Abstract: We study the electron-impact excitation of atomic helium, in the presence of a linearly polarized Nd–YAG laser field, accompanied by the transfer of ℓ photons, for low collision energy of 25 eV and laser intensity of 5.3 × 10 11 W cm −2 . The second-order Born approximation has been used to calculate the differential cross sections. Detailed calculations of the scattering amplitudes are performed by using the Sturmian basis expansion. A detailed analysis is made of the excitation of the 1 1 S → 2 1 S and 1 1 S → 2 1 P transitions. We discuss the behavior and the variation of the cross sections corresponding to the excitation process for various geometrical configurations

  12. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  13. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loulergue, A; Labat, M; Benabderrahmane, C; Couprie, M E; Evain, C; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) are a unique source of light, particularly in the x-ray domain. After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). However, the present LWFA electron bunch properties do not permit use directly for a significant FEL amplification. It is known that longitudinal decompression of electron beams delivered by state-of-the-art LWFA eases the FEL process. We propose here a second order transverse beam manipulation turning the large inherent transverse chromatic emittances of LWFA beams into direct FEL gain advantage. Numerical simulations are presented showing that this beam manipulation can further enhance by orders of magnitude the peak power of the radiation. (paper)

  14. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 (angstrom), the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 pi mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the ...

  15. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  16. ULTRAVIOLET TRANSITIONS IN EUROPIUM STUDIED WITH A FREQUENCY-DOUBLED CW RING DYE-LASER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliel, E.R.; Hogervorst, W.; van Leeuwen, K.A.H.; Post, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    High resolution laser spectroscopy has been applied to the study of three ultraviolet transitions in Europium at λ = 294.8, 295.1 and 295.8 nm. The tunable narrowband UV has been generated by intracavity frequency doubling in a cw ring dye laser using a temperate tuned, Brewster angled ADA crystal.

  17. A Faraday laser lasing on Rb 1529 nm transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pengyuan; Peng, Huanfa; Zhang, Shengnan; Chen, Zhangyuan; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2017-08-21

    We present the design and performance characterization of a Faraday laser directly lasing on the Rb 1529 nm transition (Rb, 5P 3/2  - 4D 5/2 ) with high stability, narrow spectral linewidth and low cost. This system does not need an additional frequency-stabilized pump laser as a prerequisite to preparing Rb atom from 5S to 5P excited state. Just by using a performance-improved electrodeless discharge lamp-based excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (LESFADOF), we realized a heterogeneously Faraday laser with the frequency corresponding to atomic transition, working stably over a range of laser diode (LD) current from 85 mA to 171 mA and the LD temperature from 11 °C to 32 °C, as well as the 24-hour long-term frequency fluctuation range of no more than 600 MHz. Both the laser linewidth and relative intensity noisy (RIN) are measured. The Faraday laser lasing on Rb 1529 nm transition (telecom C-band) can be applied to further research on metrology, microwave photonics and optical communication systems. Besides, since the transitions correspongding to the populated excited-states of alkali atoms within lamp are extraordinarily rich, this scheme can increase the flexibility for choosing proper wavelengths for Faraday laser and greatly expand the coverage of wavelength corresponding to atomic transmission for laser frequency stabilization.

  18. Multiple purpose research complex on the basis of electron accelerators and terahertz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulipanov, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this report the basic positioning parameters of multiple purpose research complex are presented, the list of potential experiments and technological uses on the example of results received in the multiuser center of G.I. Budker Institut of nuclear physics Siberian department of the Russian Academy of Sciences is discussed. This research complex is directed on work in the big universities and nano technology centers. Electron accelerators is intended for development of electron-beam technologies different material modification, for production of nano powder, nano materials and solution of ecological tasks. In this work the project of multiple purpose research complex on the basis of new generation electron accelerator Il-14 and workable terahertz free electron laser is suggested. Terahertz free electron laser will be used for researches in the sphere of physics and chemistry, biology and medicine, nanotechnology engineering and different methods of nanodiagnostics.

  19. Accelerator for medical applications and electron acceleration by laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the current status of radiation therapies in Japan and updated medical accelerators are reviewed. For medical use, there is a strong demand of a compact and flexible accelerator. At present, however, we have only two choices of the S-band linac with one or two rotation axis combined with the multi leaf collimator, or the X-band linac with a rather flexible robotic arm. In addition, the laser plasma cathode that is the second generation of the laser wake-field accelerator (LWFA) is studied as a high-quality electron source for medical use though it is still at the stage of the basic research. The potential of LWFA as medical accelerator near future is discussed based on updated results of laser plasma cathode experiment in Univ. of Tokyo. (author)

  20. Critical behavior within 20 fs drives the out-of-equilibrium laser-induced magnetic phase transition in nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengdin, Phoebe; You, Wenjing; Chen, Cong; Shi, Xun; Zusin, Dmitriy; Zhang, Yingchao; Gentry, Christian; Blonsky, Adam; Keller, Mark; Oppeneer, Peter M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Tao, Zhensheng; Murnane, Margaret M

    2018-03-01

    It has long been known that ferromagnets undergo a phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic at the Curie temperature, associated with critical phenomena such as a divergence in the heat capacity. A ferromagnet can also be transiently demagnetized by heating it with an ultrafast laser pulse. However, to date, the connection between out-of-equilibrium and equilibrium phase transitions, or how fast the out-of-equilibrium phase transitions can proceed, was not known. By combining time- and angle-resolved photoemission with time-resolved transverse magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopies, we show that the same critical behavior also governs the ultrafast magnetic phase transition in nickel. This is evidenced by several observations. First, we observe a divergence of the transient heat capacity of the electron spin system preceding material demagnetization. Second, when the electron temperature is transiently driven above the Curie temperature, we observe an extremely rapid change in the material response: The spin system absorbs sufficient energy within the first 20 fs to subsequently proceed through the phase transition, whereas demagnetization and the collapse of the exchange splitting occur on much longer, fluence-independent time scales of ~176 fs. Third, we find that the transient electron temperature alone dictates the magnetic response. Our results are important because they connect the out-of-equilibrium material behavior to the strongly coupled equilibrium behavior and uncover a new time scale in the process of ultrafast demagnetization.

  1. Laser-excited Fluorescence And Electron-spin Resonance Of Er3+ In Polycrystalline Alcl3

    OpenAIRE

    Ceotto G.; Pires M.A.; Sanjurjo J.A.; Rettori C.; Barberis G.E.

    1990-01-01

    The green fluorescence transitions among the levels corresponding to the 4S3/2 and 4I15/2 configurations of Er3+ diluted in AlCl3 have been measured using laser excitation. The data allow us to determine the crystalline-field splittings of these levels and, in turn, the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. The electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectrum observed at low temperatures is in good agreement with that expected from these parameters. © 1990 The American Physical Society.

  2. Electron correlation influenced magnetic phase transitions in f-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenheim, T.; Ropke, G.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature-induced phase transition (on lowering the temperature) antiferromagnet-ferromagnet in the heavy rare earth and some of actinide compounds is qualitatively explained in the scope of a two-band Hubbard model and the more complex RKKY model as the result of electron correlation effects in the conduction bands. (orig.)

  3. 5th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Jennison, Dwight R; Stechel, Ellen B; DIET V; Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    1993-01-01

    This volume in the Springer Series on Surface Sciences presents a recent account of advances in the ever-broadening field of electron-and photon-stimulated sur­ face processes. As in previous volumes, these advances are presented as the proceedings of the International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; the fifth workshop (DIET V) was held in Taos, New Mexico, April 1-4, 1992. It will be abundantly clear to the reader that "DIET" is not restricted to desorption, but has for several years included photochemistry, non-thermal surface modification, exciton self-trapping, and many other phenomena that are induced by electron or photon bombardment. However, most stimulated surface processes do share a common physics: initial electronic excitation, localization of the excitation, and conversion of electronic energy into nuclear kinetic energy. It is the rich variation of this theme which makes the field so interesting and fruitful. We have divided the book into eleven parts in orde...

  4. Some remarks on electron scattering in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1988-01-01

    Potential scattering of electrons in a quantized radiation field is reconsidered. Some remarks are made on the validity of the Kroll-Watson scattering formula and on the close connection of this formula with the classical transition rate of scattering in a radiation field. (17 refs.)

  5. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  6. Harmonic operation of high gain harmonic generation free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Haixiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Dai Zhimin

    2008-01-01

    In high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free electron laser (FEL), with the right choice of parameters of the modulator undulator, the dispersive section and the seed laser, one may make the spatial bunching of the electron beam density distribution correspond to one of the harmonic frequencies of the radiator radiation, instead of the fundamental frequency of the radiator radiation in conventional HGHG, thus the radiator undulator is in harmonic operation (HO) mode. In this paper, we investigate HO of HGHG FEL. Theoretical analyses with universal method are derived and numerical simulations in ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet spectral regions are given. It shows that the power of the 3rd harmonic radiation in the HO of HGHG may be as high as 18.5% of the fundamental power level. Thus HO of HGHG FEL may obtain short wavelength by using lower beam energy. (authors)

  7. Laser-driven injector of electrons for IOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Aleksandr

    2017-03-01

    Fermilab is developing the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) ring for experiments on nonlinear integrable optics. The machine will operate with either electron beams of 150 MeV or proton beams of 2.5 MeV energies, respectively. The stability of integrable optics depends critically on the precision of the magnetic lattice, which demands the use of beam-based lattice measurements for optics correction. In the proton mode, the low-energy proton beam does not represent a good probe for this application; hence we consider the use of a low-intensity reverse-injected electron beam of matched momentum (70 MeV). Such an injector could be implemented with the use of laser-driven acceleration techniques. This report presents the consideration for a laser-plasma injector for IOTA and discusses the requirements determined by the ring design.

  8. Applications of Free Electron Lasers in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, J.B.; Tybor, K.R.; Nietubyc, R.; Wrochna, G.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of free electron lasers opens up new opportunities to probe the dynamics of ultrafast processes and the structure of matter with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. New methods inaccessible with other known types of radiation sources can be developed, resulting in a breakthrough in deep understanding the fundamentals of life as well as in numerous medical and biological applications. In the present work the properties of free electron laser radiation that make the sources excellent for probing biological matter at an arbitrary wavelength, in a wide range of intensities and pulse durations are briefly discussed. A number of biophysical and biomedical applications of the new sources, currently considered among the most promising in the field, are presented. (author)

  9. Charged beam dynamics, particle accelerators and free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Sabia, Elio; Artioli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Charged Beam Dynamics, Particle Accelerators and Free Electron Lasers summarises different topics in the field of accelerators and of Free Electron Laser (FEL) devices. It is intended as a reference manual for the different aspects of FEL devices, explaining how to design both a FEL device and the accelerator providing the driving beam. It covers both theoretical and experimental aspects, allowing researchers to attempt a first design of a FEL device in different operating conditions. It provides an analysis of what is already available, what is needed, and what the challenges are to determine new progress in this field. All chapters contain complements and exercises that are designed in such a way that the reader will gradually acquire self-confidence with the matter treated in the book.

  10. Electron injection by evolution of self-modulated laser wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Changbum; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Kim, Jong-Uk; Lee, Hae June; Suk, Hyyong; Ko, In Soo

    2003-01-01

    Self-injection mechanisms in the self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration (SM-LWFA) are investigated. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that a significant amount of plasma electrons can be self-injected into the acceleration phase of a laser wakefield by a dynamic increase in the wake wavelength in the longitudinal direction. In this process, it is found that the wake wavelength increases due to the relativistic effect and this leads to a large amount of electron injection into the wakefields. In this paper, the injection phenomena are studied with 2D simulations and a brief explanation of the new self-injection mechanism is presented. (author)

  11. High-brightness electron source driven by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kui; Geng Rongli; Wang Lifang

    1996-01-01

    A DC high-brightness laser driven by photo emissive electron gun is being developed at Beijing University, in order to produce 50∼100 ps electron bunches of high quality. The gun consists of a photocathode preparation chamber and a DC acceleration cavity. Different ways of fabricating photocathode, such as chemical vapor deposition, ion beam implantation and ion beam enhanced deposition, can be adopted. The acceleration gap is designed with the aid of simulation codes EGUN and POISSON. 100 kV DC high voltage is fed to the anode through a careful designed ceramic insulator. The laser system is a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator proceeded by an amplifier at 10 Hz repetition rate, which can deliver three different wavelength (1064/532/266 nm). The combination of a superconducting cavity with the photocathode preparation chamber is discussed

  12. Free-electron laser system with Raman amplifier outcoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J.

    1988-05-03

    A free-electron laser system is described comprising: a free-electron laser pump beam generator producing a high-power optical output beam in a vacuum environement; a Raman amplifier cell located in the path of the output beam from the pump beam generator; means for generating and introducing a Stokes seed beam into the Raman amplifier cell, a pair of gaseous windows through which the output beam enters and leaves the Raman amplifier cell, each window having a stream of gas moving continuously in a direction generally perpendicular to the beam; and a mirror positioned in the path of the output beam from the Raman amplifier, the mirror functioning to reflect and further direct the output beam, but not the unwanted spectral components.

  13. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  14. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  15. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  16. Development of a Laser Driven Photocathode Injector and Femtosecond Scale Laser Electron Synchronization for Next Generation Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P; Ditmire, T R; Rosenzweig, J

    2000-01-01

    A high brightness photoinjector has been developed at LLNL. This injector combined with the 100 TW FALCON laser and the LLNL 100 MeV S-Band RF linac will enable development of a high brightness, femtosecond-scale, tunable, hard x-ray probe for time-resolved material measurements, based on Thomson scattering. Short pulse x-rays enable time-resolved characterization of shock dynamics, and examination of materials under extremes of pressure and temperature. Examples include Equation of State characterization on high-density materials, Crystal disorganization and re-growth in shocked and heated materials, and measurement of short time scale phase transition phenomena. Single shot evaluation, requiring high peak flux, is important for complex experiments such as probing of laser shocked actinides. A low emittance electron beam synchronized with femtosecond accuracy to an intense laser will revolutionize x-ray dynamics studies of materials. This project will lead development of ultrafast x-ray dynamics research on ...

  17. Few femtosecond, few kilo-ampere electron bunch produced by a laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundh, O.; Lim, J.; Rechatin, C.; Ammoura, L.; Goddet, J.P.; Malka, V.; Faure, J.; Ben-Ismail, A.; Davoine, X.; Lefebvre, E.; Gallot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators driven by the interaction of ultra-intense and ultrashort laser pulses with a plasma can generate accelerating electric fields of several hundred giga-volts per meter and deliver high-quality electron beams with low energy spread, low emittance and up to 1 GeV peak energy. Moreover, it is expected they may soon be able to produce bursts of electrons shorter than those produced by conventional particle accelerators, down to femtosecond durations and less. Here we present wide-band spectral measurements of coherent transition radiation which we use for temporal characterization. Our analysis shows that the electron beam, produced using controlled optical injection, contains a temporal feature that can be identified as a 15 pC, 1.4-1.8 fs electron bunch (root mean square) leading to a peak current of 3-4 kA depending on the bunch shape. We anticipate that these results will have a strong impact on emerging applications such as short-pulse and short-wavelength radiation sources, and will benefit the realization of laboratory-scale free-electron lasers. (authors)

  18. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  19. Advanced laser technologies for high-brightness photocathode electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    A laser-excited photocathode RF gun is one of the most reliable high-brightness electron beam sources for XFELs. Several 3D laser shaping methods have been developed as ideal photocathode illumination sources at SPring-8 since 2001. To suppress the emittance growth caused by nonlinear space-charge forces, the 3D cylindrical UV-pulse was optimized spatially as a flattop and temporally as squarely stacked chirped pulses. This shaping system is a serial combination of a deformable mirror that adaptively shapes the spatial profile with a genetic algorithm and a UV-pulse stacker that consists of four birefringent α-BBO crystal rods for temporal shaping. Using this 3D-shaped pulse, a normalized emittance of 1.4 πmm mrad was obtained in 2006. Utilizing laser's Z-polarization, Schottky-effect-gated photocathode gun was proposed in 2006. The cathode work functions are reduced by a laser-induced Schottky effect. As a result of focusing a radially polarized laser pulse with a hollow lens in vacuum, the Z-field (Z-polarization) is generated at the cathode. (author)

  20. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Z. [Physics and Accelerator School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  1. Advanced Laser Technologies for High-brightness Photocathode Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    A laser-excited photocathode RF gun is one of the most reliable high-brightness electron beam sources for XFELs. Several 3D laser shaping methods have been developed as ideal photocathode illumination sources at SPring-8 since 2001. To suppress the emittance growth caused by nonlinear space-charge forces, the 3D cylindrical UV-pulse was optimized spatially as a flattop and temporally as squarely stacked chirped pulses. This shaping system is a serial combination of a deformable mirror that adaptively shapes the spatial profile with a genetic algorithm and a UV-pulse stacker that consists of four birefringent α-BBO crystal rods for temporal shaping. Using this 3D-shaped pulse, a normalized emittance of 1.4 π mm mrad was obtained in 2006. Utilizing laser's Z-polarization, Schottky-effect-gated photocathode gun was proposed in 2006. The cathode work functions are reduced by a laser-induced Schottky effect. As a result of focusing a radially polarized laser pulse with a hollow lens in vacuum, the Z-field (Z-polarization) is generated at the cathode.

  2. Heat transfer between adsorbate and laser-heated hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueba, H; Persson, B N J

    2008-01-01

    Strong short laser pulses can give rise to a strong increase in the electronic temperature at metal surfaces. Energy transfer from the hot electrons to adsorbed molecules may result in adsorbate reactions, e.g. desorption or diffusion. We point out the limitations of an often used equation to describe the heat transfer process in terms of a friction coupling. We propose a simple theory for the energy transfer between the adsorbate and hot electrons using a newly introduced heat transfer coefficient, which depends on the adsorbate temperature. We calculate the transient adsorbate temperature and the reaction yield for a Morse potential as a function of the laser fluency. The results are compared to those obtained using a conventional heat transfer equation with temperature-independent friction. It is found that our equation of energy (heat) transfer gives a significantly lower adsorbate peak temperature, which results in a large modification of the reaction yield. We also consider the heat transfer between different vibrational modes excited by hot electrons. This mode coupling provides indirect heating of the vibrational temperature in addition to the direct heating by hot electrons. The formula of heat transfer through linear mode-mode coupling of two harmonic oscillators is applied to the recent time-resolved study of carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen hopping on an ultrafast laser-heated Pt(111) surface. It is found that the maximum temperature of the frustrated translation mode can reach high temperatures for hopping, even when direct friction coupling to the hot electrons is not strong enough

  3. Help system for control of JAERI FEL (Free Electron laser)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The control system of JAERI FEL (Free Electron Laser) has a help system to provide the information necessary to operate the machine and to develop the new user interface. As the control software is constructed on the MS-Windows 3.x, the hyper-text feature of the Windows help system can be accessed. It consists of three major parts: (1) on-line help, (2) full document, and (3) tutorial system. (author)

  4. Storage ring free electron lasers and saw-tooth instability

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Migliorati, M; Palumbo, L; Renieri, A

    1999-01-01

    We show that Free Electron Lasers (FEL) operating with storage rings may counteract beam instabilities of the Saw Tooth (STI) type. We use a model based on a set of equations that couple those describing the FEL evolution to those accounting for the STI dynamics. The analysis provides a clear picture of the FEL-STI mutual feedback and clarifies the mechanisms of the instability inhibition. The reliability of the results is supported by a comparison with fully numerical codes.

  5. Unlimited electron acceleration in laser-driven plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the limitation to the energy gain of 2(ω/ω/sub p/) 2 mc 2 of an electron in the laser-plasma beat-wave accelerator can be overcome by imposing a magnetic field of appropriate strength perpendicular to the plasma wave. This accelerates particles parallel to the phase fronts of the accelerating wave which keeps them in phase with it. Arbitrarily large energy is theoretically possible

  6. Acceleration of laser-injected electron beams in an electron-beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knetsch, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Plasma wakefields deliver accelerating fields that are approximately a 100 times higher than those in conventional radiofrequency or even superconducting radiofrequency cavities. This opens a transformative path towards novel, compact and potentially ubiquitous accelerators. These prospects, and the increasing demand for electron accelerator beamtime for various applications in natural, material and life sciences, motivate the research and development on novel plasma-based accelerator concepts. However, these electron beam sources need to be understood and controlled. The focus of this thesis is on electron beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) and the controlled injection and acceleration of secondary electron bunches in the accelerating wake fields by means of a short-pulse near-infrared laser. Two laser-triggered injection methods are explored. The first one is the Trojan Horse Injection, which relies on very good alignment and timing control between electron beam and laser pulse and then promises electron bunches with hitherto unprecedented quality as regards emittance and brightness. The physics of electron injection in the Trojan Horse case is explored with a focus on the final longitudinal bunch length. Then a theoretical and numerical study is presented that examines the physics of Trojan Horse injection when performed in an expanding wake generated by a smooth density down-ramp. The benefits are radically decreased drive-electron bunch requirements and a unique bunch-length control that enables longitudinal electron-bunch shaping. The second laser-triggered injection method is the Plasma Torch Injection, which is a versatile, all-optical laser-plasma-based method capable to realize tunable density downramp injection. At the SLAC National Laboratory, the first proof-of-principle was achieved both for Trojan Horse and Plasma Torch injection. Setup details and results are reported in the experimental part of the thesis along with the commissioning

  7. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlis, N.H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  8. Investigation of metal coatings for the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.L.; Arendt, P.N.; Springer, R.W.; Cordi, R.C.; McCreary, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    We are investigating the deposition and characteristics of metal coatings for use in environments such as the Free Electron Laser where the radiation resistance of metal coatings could prove to be of great benefit. We have concentrated our initial efforts on silver laminate coatings due to the high reflectance of silver at 1 micron wavelength. Our initial laminate coatings have utilized thin layers of titanium oxide to break up the columnar structure of the silver during electron-beam deposition on fused silica substrates. Our initial results on equal coating thickness samples indicate an improvement in damage threshold that ranges from 1.07 to 1.71 at 351 nm

  9. The LLNL/UCLA high gradient inverse free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. T.; Musumeci, P.; Anderson, G.; Anderson, S.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Gibson, D.; Tremaine, A.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe the Inverse Free Electron Accelerator currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Upon completion of this accelerator, high brightness electrons generated in the photoinjector blowout regime and accelerated to 50 MeV by S-band accelerating sections will interact with > 4 TW peak power Ti:Sapphire laser in a highly tapered 50 cm undulator and experience an acceleration gradient of > 200 MeV/m. We present the final design of the accelerator as well as the results of start-to-end simulations investigating preservation of beam quality and tolerances involved with this accelerator.

  10. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  11. ETL linac facility and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Noguchi, T.; Mikado, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Yamada, K.; Chiwaki, M.; Ohgaki, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sei, N.

    1993-01-01

    An outline is presented of the recent development on the ETL (Electro-technical Laboratory) electron-linac facility and storage-ring FELs (free-electron lasers). Some modifications including the injection system have been made to the linac. Four storage rings are working very well. The TERAS FEL system has been shut down after the successful oscillation around 590 nm. The new NIJI-IV FEL system has been proven to work well, and the current tunable wavelength range is over 100 nm (488-595 nm). Preparatory experiments on the FEL at shorter wavelength are underway. (author)

  12. Solar-pumped electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.; Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using solar-pumped lasers as solar energy converters is examined. The absorbing media considered are halogens or halogen compounds, which are dissociated to yield excited atoms, which then hand over energy to a molecular lasing medium. Estimates of the temperature effects for a Br2-CO2-He system with He as the cooling gas are given. High temperatures can cause the lower energy levels of the CO2 laser transition to be filled. The inverted populations are calculated and lasing should be possible. However, the efficiency is less than 0.001. Examination of other halogen-molecular lasant combinations (where the rate coefficients are known) indicate efficiencies in all cases of less than 0.005.

  13. Research on high performance mirrors for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitatani, Fumito

    1996-01-01

    For the stable functioning of free electron laser, high performance optical elements are required because of its characteristics. In particular in short wavelength free electron laser, since its gain is low, the optical elements having very high reflectivity are required. Also in free electron laser, since high energy noise light exists, the optical elements must have high optical breaking strength. At present in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, the research for heightening the performance of dielectric multi-layer film elements for short wavelength is carried out. For manufacturing such high performance elements, it is necessary to develop the new materials for vapor deposition, new vapor deposition process, and the techniques of accurate substrate polishing and inspection. As the material that satisfies the requirements, there is diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, of which the properties are explained. As for the manufacture of the DLC films for short wavelength optics, the test equipment for forming the DLC films, the test of forming the DLC films, the change of the film quality due to gas conditions, discharge conditions and substrate materials, and the measurement of the optical breaking strength are reported. (K.I.)

  14. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10 9 at 2.5K, and 8x10 9 at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers

  15. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  16. The Livermore Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Kulke, B.; Deis, G.A.; Frye, R.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Ollis, C.W.; Tyler, G.C.; Van Maren, R.D.; Weiss, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory supports the ongoing development of the Induction Linac Free Electron Laser (IFEL) and uses magnetic field measurement systems that are useful in the testing of long periodic magnetic structures, electron-beam transport magnets, and spectrometer magnets. The major systems described include two computer-controlled, three-axis Hall probe-and-search coil transports with computer-controlled data acquisition; a unique, automated-search coil system used to detect very small inaccuracies in wiggler fields; a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based Hall probe-calibration facility; and a high-current DC ion source using heavy ions of variable momentum to model the transport of high-energy electrons. Additionally, a high-precision electron-beam-position monitor for use within long wigglers that has a positional resolution of less than 100 μm is under development in the laboratory and will be discussed briefly. Data transfer to LLNL's central computing facility and on-line graphics enable us to analyze large data sets quickly. 3 refs

  17. Search for nuclear excitation by laser-driven electron motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounds, J.A.; Dyer, P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that a nucleus may be excited by first exciting the atom's electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple to the electrons, which would then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, experiments with 235 U have been performed. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic vapor of 235 U which is then bombarded by a high-brightness UV laser beam. The resulting ions are collected. The first excited nuclear state of 235 U has a 26-min half-life and decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. These conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. An upper limit of 4.0x10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting the nucleus of a 235 U atom that is in the 248-nm UV beam for 700 fs at an irradiance in the range of 1.0x10 15 to 2.5x10 15 W/cm 2

  18. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm 2 and 0.4 pC/(ps mm 2 ), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  19. Ion transition heights from topside electron density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titheridge, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical electron density profiles are calculated for the topside ionosphere to determine the major factors controlling the profile shape. Only the mean temperature, the vertical temperature gradient and the O + /H + ion transition height are important. Vertical proton fluxes alter the ion transition height but have no other effect on the profile shape. Diffusive equilibrium profiles including only these three effects fit observed profiles, at all latitudes, to within experimental accuracy. Values of plasma temperature, temperature gradient and ion transition height hsub(T) were determined by fitting theoretical models to 60,000 experimental profiles obtained from Alouette 1 ionograms, at latitudes of 75 0 S to 85 0 N near solar minimum. Inside the plasmasphere hsub(T) varies from about 500 km on winter nights to 850 km on summer days. Diurnal variations are caused primarily by the production and loss of O + in the ionosphere. The approximately constant winter night value of hsub(T) is close to the level for chemical equilibrium. In summer hsub(T) is always above the equilibrium level, giving a continual production of protons which travel along lines of force to aid in maintaining the conjugate winter night ionosphere. Outside the plasmasphere hsub(T) is 300 to 600 km above the equilibrium level at all times. This implies a continual near-limiting upwards flux of protons which persists down to latitudes of about 60 0 at night and 50 0 during the day. (author)

  20. Structural phase transition and electronic properties in samarium chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, Y. S., E-mail: yspanwar2011@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. New Science College Dewas-455001 (India); Aynyas, Mahendra [Department of Physics, C.S.A. Govt. P.G. College, Sehore, 466001 (India); Pataiya, J.; Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal, 462026 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The electronic structure and high pressure properties of samarium monochalcogenides SmS, SmSe and SmTe have been reported by using tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The total energy as a function of volume is evaluated. It is found that these monochalcogenides are stable in NaCl-type structure under ambient pressure. We predict a structural phase transition from NaCl-type (B{sub 1}-phase) structure to CsCl-type (B{sub 2}-type) structure for these compounds. Phase transition pressures were found to be 1.7, 4.4 and 6.6 GPa, for SmS, SmSe and SmTe respectively. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed that these compounds exhibit metallic character. The calculated values of equilibrium lattice parameter and phase transition pressure are in general good agreement with available data.

  1. Commissioning of Japanese x-ray free electron laser, SACLA and achieved laser performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hitoshi; Amselem, Arnaud; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    After 8 months of beam commissioning of SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser, SACLA reached the primary target performance, i.e., a shortest laser wavelength of ∼0.6 Angstrom and a laser pulse energy value of sub-mJ at a wavelength of 1.2 Angstrom. This success was due to the following four factors; (1) performance estimation of each component of SACLA required for the target laser performance and its achievement, (2) elaboration of beam diagnostics and control systems enabling precise accelerator and undulator tuning, (3) a rational and strategic commissioning plan, (4) most adequate response to various accidental events during the beam commissioning period. This article, in order to light up the above four factors leading us to the success, starts with the features of SACLA and critical tolerance for the sub-system components, and then, explains our approach to achieve the target laser performance and how the beam commissioning of SACLA proceeded. At last, the article summarizes the present laser and operational status. (author)

  2. Generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter; Generation et transport des electrons rapides dans l'interaction laser-matiere a haut flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, H

    2005-10-15

    The general context of this study is the Inertial Confinement for thermonuclear controlled fusion and, more precisely, the Fast Igniter (FI). In this context the knowledge of the generation and transport of fast electrons is crucial. This thesis is an experimental study of the generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of a high intensity laser ({>=} 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) with a solid target. The main diagnostic used here is the transition radiation. This radiation depends on the electrons which produce it and thus it gives important information on the electrons: energy, temperature, propagation geometry, etc. The spectral, temporal and spatial analysis permitted to put in evidence the acceleration of periodic electron bunches which, in this case, emit a Coherent Transition Radiation (CTR). During this thesis we have developed some theoretical models in order to explain the experimental results. We find this way two kinds of electron bunches, emitted either at the laser frequency ({omega}{sub 0}), either at the double of this frequency (2{omega}{sub 0}), involving several acceleration mechanisms: vacuum heating / resonance absorption and Lorentz force, respectively. These bunches are also observed in the PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. The electron temperature is of about 2 MeV in our experimental conditions. The electrons are emitted starting from a point source (which is the laser focal spot) and then propagate in a ballistic way through the target. In some cases they can be re-injected in the target by the electrostatic field from the target edges. This diagnostic is only sensitive to the coherent relativistic electrons, which explains the weak total energy that they contain (about a few mJ). The CTR signal emitted by those fast electrons is largely dominating the signal emitted by the less energetic electrons, even if they contain the major part of the energy (about 1 J). (author)

  3. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  4. Electronic self-organization in layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, Tobias

    2015-10-30

    The interplay between different self-organized electronically ordered states and their relation to unconventional electronic properties like superconductivity constitutes one of the most exciting challenges of modern condensed matter physics. In the present thesis this issue is thoroughly investigated for the prototypical layered material 1T-TaS{sub 2} both experimentally and theoretically. At first the static charge density wave order in 1T-TaS{sub 2} is investigated as a function of pressure and temperature by means of X-ray diffraction. These data indeed reveal that the superconductivity in this material coexists with an inhomogeneous charge density wave on a macroscopic scale in real space. This result is fundamentally different from a previously proposed separation of superconducting and insulating regions in real space. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data uncover the important role of interlayer correlations in 1T-TaS{sub 2}. Based on the detailed insights into the charge density wave structure obtained by the X-ray diffraction experiments, density functional theory models are deduced in order to describe the electronic structure of 1T-TaS{sub 2} in the second part of this thesis. As opposed to most previous studies, these calculations take the three-dimensional character of the charge density wave into account. Indeed the electronic structure calculations uncover complex orbital textures, which are interwoven with the charge density wave order and cause dramatic differences in the electronic structure depending on the alignment of the orbitals between neighboring layers. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that these orbital-mediated effects provide a route to drive semiconductor-to-metal transitions with technologically pertinent gaps and on ultrafast timescales. These results are particularly relevant for the ongoing development of novel, miniaturized and ultrafast devices based on layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The discovery of orbital textures

  5. Electron scattering from atoms in the presence of a laser field. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittleman, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the theory of the effect of a laser on electron-atom scattering is continued by the derivation of explicit relations between the observed electron-atom scattering cross sections in the presence of a laser and exact electron-atom scattering cross sections with no laser present. No approximation concerning the scattering interaction is made. The only approximations concerning the laser are that (1) the laser-atom interaction energy is small compared to atomic energies, (2) the Rabi frequency times the collision time is small, and (3) the laser intensity in appropriate units is small

  6. Microwave free-electron laser applications for electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave power may be the ideal source of heat for the plasma, but advances in technology are needed to meet requirements of next generation fusion devices. Free electron lasers (FEL) are one candidate for such sources, and this paper reviews the progress, issues of physics and technology, and potential benefits for fusion from these devices

  7. Microwave free-electron laser applications for electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave power may be the ideal source of heat for a plasma, but advances in technology are needed to meet requirements of next generation fusion devices. Free electron lasers (FEL) are one candidate for such sources, and this paper reviews the progress, issues of physics and technology, and potential benefits for fusion from these devices. 15 refs., 13 figs

  8. A high power gain switched diode laser oscillator and amplifier for the CEBAF polarized electron injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelker, M.; Hansknecht, J.

    1996-01-01

    The photocathode in the polarized electron source at Jefferson Lab is illuminated with pulsed laser light from a gain switched diode laser and diode optical amplifier. Laser pulse repetition rates up to 2,000 MHz, optical pulsewidths between 31 and 123 ps, and average power > 100 mW are demonstrated. The laser system is highly reliable and completely remotely controlled

  9. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB{sub 6}-based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author).

  10. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB 6 -based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author)

  11. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  12. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Reitsma, A.J.W.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001); Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002)]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser

  13. Electron momentum spectroscopy of H2+ in the presence of laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulychev, A.A.; Kouzakov, K.A.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of laser-assisted electron impact ionization of a hydrogen molecular ion H 2 + at high impact energy and large momentum transfer is carried out. The laser-field effects on the incoming and outgoing electrons are taken into account using the Volkov functions. The field-dressing of the target electron is treated with a quasistatic state approach. Calculations for laser radiation with frequency ω = 1.55 eV and intensity I = 5 * 10 11 W/cm 2 exhibit strong laser influence on the molecular bond oscillation in laser-assisted electron momentum distributions. (authors)

  14. Electronic packaging: new results in singulation by Laser Microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Frank; Sibailly, Ochelio; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2004-07-01

    Cutting electronic packages that are produced in a matrix array fashion is an important process and deals with the ready-to-use devices. Thus an increase in the singulation yield is directly correlated to an increase in benefit. Due to the usage of different substrate materials, the saws encounter big problems in terms of lifetime and constancy of cut quality in these applications. Today"s equipment manufacturers are not yet in the position to propose an adequate solution for all types of packages. Compared to classical laser cutting, the water-jet guided laser technology minimizes the heat damages in any kind of sample. This new material processing method consists in guiding a laser beam inside a hair thin, lowpressure water-jet by total internal reflection, and is applied to package singulation since two years approximately. Using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser guided by a water jet, an LTCC-ceramics based package is singulated according to a scribe and break process. Speeds of 2-10 mm/s are reached in the LTTC and 40 mm/s in the mold compound. The process is wear-free and provides very good edge quality of the LTCC and the mold compound as well as reliable separation of the packages.

  15. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, M., E-mail: martin.hansson@fysik.lth.se; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma. - Highlights: • Compact colliding pulse injection set-up used to produce low energy spread e-beams. • Beam charge controlled by rotating the polarization of injection pulse. • Peak energy controlled by point of collision to vary the acceleration length.

  16. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  17. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  18. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is a report on recent progress made in our understanding of electron-atom collisions in a laser field. To some extent it is a continuation of a previous review covering a somewhat larger subject (Can. J. Phys. 63 (1985)). We shall discuss the present status of investigations in this field from the theoretical as well as experimental point of view but most of the report will be devoted to an analysis of the various approximation schemes used at present in this field to describe the different aspects of laser-assisted electron-atom interactions. As the table of contents shows, most of the work done so far is treating the atom as a spectator, described by a potential and only very little has been achieved over the years to include the atomic structure into consideration since the inclusion of these structure effects poses considerable computational problems. Since, for example, multiphoton ionization and its inverse process laser-assisted recombination may be considered as one half of a scattering process, it is quite natural that some of the theoretical techniques described here are also of interest for the treatment of other multiphoton processes not considered here since there are several other recent reviews available on these topics. (orig.)

  19. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  20. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.

  1. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  2. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L. [Department of Neurosurgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    1998-09-02

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO{sub 2} laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO{sub 2} laser. In super pulse mode, the CO{sub 2} laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO{sub 2} and

  4. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely

  5. Effects of laser-polarization and wiggler magnetic fields on electron acceleration in laser-cluster interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ghotra, Harjit; Kant, Niti

    2018-06-01

    We examine the electron dynamics during laser-cluster interaction. In addition to the electrostatic field of an individual cluster and laser field, we consider an external transverse wiggler magnetic field, which plays a pivotal role in enhancing the electron acceleration. Single-particle simulation has been presented with a short pulse linearly polarized as well as circularly polarized laser pulses for electron acceleration in a cluster. The persisting Coulomb field allows the electron to absorb energy from the laser field. The stochastically heated electron finds a weak electric field at the edge of the cluster from where it is ejected. The wiggler magnetic field connects the regions of the stochastically heated, ejected electron from the cluster and high energy gain by the electron from the laser field outside the cluster. This increases the field strength and hence supports the electron to meet the phase of the laser field for enhanced acceleration. A long duration resonance appears with an optimized magnetic wiggler field of about 3.4 kG. Hence, the relativistic energy gain by the electron is enhanced up to a few 100 MeV with an intense short pulse laser with an intensity of about 1019 W cm‑2 in the presence of a wiggler magnetic field.

  6. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  7. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  8. Non-Fourier heat conduction and phase transition in laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Li, Jian; He, Zhaofu

    2017-11-01

    The phase transition in heat conduction of polytetrafluoroethylene-like polymers was investigated and applied in many fields of science and engineering. Considering more details including internal absorption of laser radiation, reflectivity of material and non-Fourier effect etc., the combined heat conduction and phase transition in laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene were modeled and investigated numerically. The thermal and mechanic issues in laser ablation were illustrated and analyzed. Especially, the phenomenon of temperature discontinuity formed in the combined phase transition and non-Fourier heat conduction was discussed. Comparisons of target temperature profiles between Fourier and non-Fourier heat conduction in melting process were implemented. It was indicated that the effect of non-Fourier plays an important role in the temperature evolvement. The effect of laser fluence was proven to be significant and the thermal wave propagation was independent on the laser intensity for the non-Fourier heat conduction. Besides, the effect of absorption coefficients on temperature evolvements was studied. For different ranges of absorption coefficients, different temperature evolvements can be achieved. The above numerical simulation provided insight into physical processes of combined non-Fourier heat conduction and phase transition in laser ablation.

  9. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  10. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of the coplanar binary geometry where it is justified to use plane wave solutions for the study of the (e,2e) reaction and in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field, we introduce as a first step the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 1 where we take into account only the relativistic dressing of the incident and scattered electrons. Then, we introduce the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 2 where we take totally into account the relativistic dressing of the incident, scattered, and ejected electrons. We then compare the corresponding triple differential cross sections for laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact both for the nonrelativistic and the relativistic regime

  11. Two electron response to an intense x-ray free electron laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L R; Parker, J S; Meharg, K J; Armstrong, G S J; Taylor, K T

    2009-01-01

    New x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) promise an ultra-fast ultra-intense regime in which new physical phenomena, such as double core hole formation in at atom, should become directly observable. Ahead of x-ray FEL experiments, an initial key task is to theoretically explore such fundamental laser-atom interactions and processes. To study the response of a two-electron positive ion to an intense x-ray FEL pulse, our theoretical approach is a direct numerical integration, incorporating non-dipole Hamiltonian terms, of the full six-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present probabilities of double K-shell ionization in the two-electron positive ions Ne 8+ and Ar 16+ exposed to x-ray FEL pulses with frequencies in the range 50 au to 300 au and intensities in the range 10 17 to 10 22 W/cm 2 .

  12. Two electron response to an intense x-ray free electron laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L R; Parker, J S; Meharg, K J; Armstrong, G S J; Taylor, K T, E-mail: l.moore@qub.ac.u [DAMTP, David Bates Building, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    New x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) promise an ultra-fast ultra-intense regime in which new physical phenomena, such as double core hole formation in at atom, should become directly observable. Ahead of x-ray FEL experiments, an initial key task is to theoretically explore such fundamental laser-atom interactions and processes. To study the response of a two-electron positive ion to an intense x-ray FEL pulse, our theoretical approach is a direct numerical integration, incorporating non-dipole Hamiltonian terms, of the full six-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present probabilities of double K-shell ionization in the two-electron positive ions Ne{sup 8+} and Ar{sup 16+} exposed to x-ray FEL pulses with frequencies in the range 50 au to 300 au and intensities in the range 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  14. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources [it

  15. Achromatic and isochronous electron beam transport for tunable free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Kim, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    We have continued the study of a suitable electron beam transport line, which is both isochronous and achromatic, for the free electron laser being designed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A refined version of the beam transport optics is discussed that accommodates two different modes of FEL wavelength tuning. For the fine tuning involving a small change of the electron beam energy, sextupoles are added to cancel the leading nonlinear dispersion. For the main tuning involving the change of the undulator gap, a practical solution of maintaining the beam matching condition is presented. Calculation of the higher order aberrations is facilitated by a newly developed code. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas by Anthony R Valenzuela Approved for public release; distribution is...AND SUBTITLE Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas 5a...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer is a novel method to diagnose ultrashort pulse laser–produced plasmas

  17. High-pressure electron-resonance studies of electronic, magnetic, and structural phase transitions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pifer, J.H.; Croft, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Research is described in development of a high-pressure electron-resonance probe capable of operating down to 1.5 0 K temperatures. The apparatus has been used to measure the EPR of a sample of DPPH at room temperature and zero pressure. EPR has been used to measure valence field instabilities in alloy systems. Studies have been done on metal-insulator transitions at high pressure, and are briefly described

  18. User issues at the Stanford picosecond free electron laser center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.I.

    1995-01-01

    Assembling a productive user facility around a Free Electron Laser (FEL) is a complex task. Reliable operation of the FEL is a necessary, but by no means sufficient, condition to ensure that the center will be able to attract and keep the interest of first rate researchers. Some other issues which are important include: center wavelength stability and ease of tuning, bandwidth control, amplitude and position stability, ability to select arbitrary sequences of micropulses, and real time availability of information of the FEL's important parameters (spectral width, center wavelength, micropulse length and energy, etc.). In addition, at the Stanford Center we have found that providing additional systems (conventional picosecond lasers synchronized to the FEL, an FTIR spectrometer, a confocal microscopy, ...) has been important. (author)

  19. Electron acceleration by a radially polarized laser pulse during ionization of low density gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwar Pal Singh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration of electrons by a radially polarized intense laser pulse has been studied. The axial electric field of the laser is responsible for electron acceleration. The axial electric field increases with decreasing laser spot size; however, the laser pulse gets defocused sooner for smaller values and the electrons do not experience high electric field for long, reducing the energy they can reach. The electron remains confined in the electric field of the laser for longer and the electron energy peaks for the normalized laser spot size nearly equal to the normalized laser intensity parameter. Electron energy peaks for initial laser phase ϕ_{0}=π due to accelerating laser phase and decreases with transverse initial position of the electrons. The energy and angle of the emittance spectrum of the electrons generated during ionization of krypton and argon at low densities have been obtained and a right choice of laser parameters has been suggested to obtain high energy quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams. It has been found that argon is more suitable than krypton to obtain high energy electron beams due to higher ionization potential of inner shells for the former.

  20. Gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Andrews

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. The theory describes the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, and assumes that the electron beam interacts with an evanescent mode traveling along the surface of a periodic waveguide with a rectangular profile. The phase velocity of the evanescent wave is synchronous with the electron velocity, but the group velocity is actually negative. The electron beam amplifies the evanescent wave, which does not itself radiate. According to this picture, the radiation observed emanating from the grating is Smith-Purcell radiation enhanced by the bunching of the electrons due to the interaction with the evanescent mode. There will also be radiation from the part of the evanescent mode that is outcoupled from the ends of the grating. This radiation appears at a lower frequency than the Smith-Purcell radiation. The new results explain both the gain and the radiation observed in the experiments of Urata and Walsh, and the cube-root current dependence of the gain inferred by Bakhtyari, Walsh, and Brownell.

  1. A high-repetition rate LWFA for studies of laser propagation and electron generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Easter, James; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John; Thomas, Alec

    2010-11-01

    Advances in ultrafast optics today have enabled laser systems to deliver ever shorter and more intense pulses. When focused, such laser pulses can easily exceed relativistic intensities where the wakefield created by the strong laser electric field can be used to accelerate electrons. Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds promise for future compact electron accelerators or drivers of other radiation sources in many scientific, medical and engineering applications. We present experimental studies of laser wakefield acceleration using the λ-cubed laser at the University of Michigan -- a table-top high-power laser system operating at 500 Hz repetition rate. The high repetition rate allows statistical studies of laser propagation and electron acceleration which are not accessible with typical sub-0.1 Hz repetition rate systems. In addition, we compare the experiments with particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS.

  2. Assessing the quantum physics impacts on future x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-06

    A new quantum mechanical theory of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) has been successfully developed that has placed LANL at the forefront of the understanding of quantum effects in XFELs. Our quantum theory describes the interaction of relativistic electrons with x-ray radiation in the periodic magnetic field of an undulator using the same mathematical formalism as classical XFEL theory. This places classical and quantum treatments on the same footing and allows for a continuous transition from one regime to the other eliminating the disparate analytical approaches previously used. Moreover, Dr. Anisimov, the architect of this new theory, is now considered a resource in the international FEL community for assessing quantum effects in XFELs.

  3. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at ∼1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL

  4. An XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J. C.; Newnam, B. E.; Cooper, R. K.; Comly, J. C., Jr.

    Problems regarding the extension of free-electron laser technology from the visible and near infrared region, where such devices are currently operating, to the ultraviolet have recently been extensively discussed. It was found that significant technical problems must be overcome before free-electron lasers (FELs) can be operated in the VUV (100-200 nm) and the XUV (50-100). However, the present lack of other intense and tunable sources of coherent radiation at these wavelengths together with the intrinsic properties of FELs make the development of such devices potentially very rewarding. The properties of FELs include continuous tunability in wavelength and output in the form of a train of picosecond pulses. An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of an operation of a FEL in the XUV/VUV regions, taking into account a theoretical model. It is found that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will make the design of a FEL for operation in the 50-200-nm range of optical wavelength possible.

  5. Bone Ablation at 2.94 mm Using the Free-Electron Laser and Er:YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Borislav; Hakimian, Arman; Peavy, G. M.; Haglund, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Bone Ablation at 2.94 microns Using the Free-Electron Laser and Er:YAG Laser in Perfluorocarbon Compounds B. Ivanov^1, A. M. Hakimian^1, G. M. Peavy^2, R. F. Haglund, Jr.1 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, W. M. Keck Foundation Free-Electron Laser Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 2Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 We report studies on the efficiency of mid-IR laser ablation of cow cortical bone using the Vanderbilt free-electron laser (FEL), when irrigating the ablation zone with an inert and biocompatible perfluorocarbon compounds (PFC). At 2.94 microns, the bone matrix (mainly by water) absorbs the radiation while the PFCs transmit this wavelength, dissipate heat and acoustical stress, and prevent carbonization of the bone sample. The ablation rate, as a function of laser fluence, scanning speed and the type of PFC, was investigated. The laser fluence was estimated to be 5 J/cm^2 - 100 J/cm^2 with a laser focal spot diameter of 160 microns 500 microns and a scanning speed of 40 microns/s 2960 microns/s. The ablation rate was estimated from scanning electron microscopy to be 0.5 mm/s 2.4 mm/s. Comparisons of ablation rates with the FEL and a Er:YAG laser at 2.94 microns are being evaluated.

  6. Phase transitions in LiCoO2 thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rong; Hitosugi, Taro; Fisher, Craig A.J.; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Moriwake, Hiroki; Oki, Hideki; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Epitaxial LiCoO 2 thin films were formed on the Al 2 O 3 (0 0 0 1) substrate by PLD at room temperature and annealed at 600 °C in air. ► The orientation relationship between film and substrate is revealed. ► Crystalline phases in the RT deposited and annealed thin films are clearly identified. ► Atomic level interface structure indicates an interface reaction during annealing. ► A phase transition mechanism from fully disordered LiCoO 2 to fully ordered LiCoO 2 is proposed. - Abstract: Microstructures of epitaxial LiCoO 2 thin films formed on the (0 0 0 1) surface of sapphire (α-Al 2 O 3 ) substrates by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature and annealed at 600 °C in air were investigated by a combination of selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, spherical-aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. As-deposited LiCoO 2 thin films consisted of epitaxial grains of the fully cation-disordered phase (γ) with a cubic rock-salt structure. During annealing, this cubic-structured phase transformed into the fully ordered trigonal (α) phase oriented with its basal plane parallel to the surface of the sapphire substrate. Although overall the film appeared to be a single crystal, a small number of Co 3 O 4 grains were also observed in annealed thin films, indicating that some Li and O had been lost during processing. The atomically sharp interface between the film and substrate also became rougher during annealing, with step defects being formed, suggesting that a localized reaction occurred at the interface.

  7. A numerical study of the integral equations for the laser fields in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J. G.; Park, S. H.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, B. C.; Rhee, Y. J.; Cho, S. O.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of the radiation fields in free-electron lasers is investigated on the basis of the integro-differential equations in the one-dimensional formulation. For simple cases we solved the integro-differential equations analytically and numerically to test our numerical procedures developed on the basis of the Filon method. The numerical results showed good agreement with the analytical solutions. To confirm the legitimacy of the numerical package, we carried out numerical studies on the inhomogeneous broadening effects, where no analytic solutions are available, due to the energy spread and the emittance of the electron beam.

  8. Program to Research Laser-Driven Thermionic Electron Sources for Free Electron Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    by sinal I lengths of coaxial cable. With the ’. corresponding charge to the diode also reduced, a series of temporall y sho rter -Ioctron pulse-s was...e combination of approximately 1.6 eV. With the Nd:glass laser beam pulse heating the cathode " and the charge supplied by 0.5/ F capacitor, a series ...available charge stored in the h-arg ing ’apar i tor. A series of experiments was performed wilh lowetr capacitances of sevoral tens of picofarads furnished

  9. Upgrade of laser and electron beam welding database

    CERN Document Server

    Furman, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to fix existing issues and update the existing database holding parameters of laser-beam and electron-beam welding machines. Moreover, the database had to be extended to hold the data for the new machines that arrived recently at the workshop. As a solution - the database had to be migrated to Oracle framework, the new user interface (using APEX) had to be designed and implemented with the integration with the CERN web services (EDMS, Phonebook, JMT, CDD and EDH).

  10. Scaling of electron beam sources for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlitt, L.G.; Bradley, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scheme for constructing electron beam machines capable of pumping large volumes of gas, to analyze their performance within the framework of existing knowledge of the physical mechanisms involved, to use this analysis to assess the viability of the overall concept, pinpoint weaknesses in the understanding of the physics, identify the most important limiting physical processes, and hence to propose a program to prepare for the eventual construction of a large scale gas laser system. (auth)

  11. Deep saturated Free Electron Laser oscillators and frozen spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottaviani, P.L. [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Bologna, via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, IT 40129, Bologna (Italy); Pagnutti, S., E-mail: simonetta.pagnutti@enea.it [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Bologna, via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, IT 40129, Bologna (Italy); Dattoli, G., E-mail: giuseppe.dattoli@enea.it [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, IT 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sabia, E., E-mail: elio.sabia@enea.it [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, IT 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Petrillo, V., E-mail: vittoria.petrillo@mi.infn.it [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, IT 20133, Milano (Italy); INFN - Mi, via Celoria 16, IT 20133, Milano (Italy); Slot, P.J.M. van der, E-mail: p.j.m.vanderslot@utwente.nl [Mesa+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O.Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Biedron, S., E-mail: sandra.biedron@colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University (United States); Milton, S., E-mail: milton@engr.colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University (United States)

    2016-10-21

    We analyze the behavior of Free Electron Laser (FEL) oscillators operating in the deep saturated regime and point out the formation of sub-peaks of the optical pulse. These are very stable configurations and the sub-peaks are found to have a duration corresponding to the coherence length. We speculate on the physical mechanisms underlying their growth and attempt an identification with natural mode-locked structures in FEL oscillators. Their impact on the intra-cavity nonlinear harmonic generation is also discussed along with the possibility of exploiting them as cavity out-coupler.

  12. Inverse free electron laser beat-wave accelerator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, T.C.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1993-09-01

    A calculation on the stabilization of the sideband instability in the free electron laser (FEL) and inverse FEL (IFEL) was completed. The issue arises in connection with the use of a tapered (''variable-parameter'') undulator of extended length, such as might be used in an ''enhanced efficiency'' traveling-wave FEL or an IFEL accelerator. In addition, the FEL facility at Columbia was configured as a traveling wave amplifier for a 10-kW signal from a 24-GHz magnetron. The space charge field in the bunches of the FEL was measured. Completed work has been published

  13. Free-Electron Lasers Push Into New Frontiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, Stephen V.

    2003-01-01

    From the early days of the development of free-electron lasers (FELs) the promise of high power and short wavelengths has tantalized physicists and other scientists. Recent developments in accelerator technologies and some new discoveries about the physics of FELs have allowed researchers to push the performance of FELs into new frontiers of high power, short wavelength, and ultra-short pulses. Spin-offs from the FELs have also opened up new radiation sources in the THz, X-ray and gamma ray wavelength ranges

  14. Electron emission from laser irradiating target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 171, 9-10 (2016), s. 754-765 ISSN 1042-0150. [12th Workshop on European Collaboration for Higher Education and Research in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Protection. Bologna, Catania, Milan, 30.05.2016-01.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : electron emission from plasma * TNSA * TOF * SiC * plastic scintillator * Thomson parabola spectrometer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  15. Free-electron laser experiments in the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Cummings, J.C.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hooper, E.B.; Jong, R.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lasnier, C.J.; Matsuda, Y.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.; Nexsen, W.E.; Rice, B.W.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L.; Turner, W.C.; Wood, R.D.; Cook, D.R.; Makowski, M.A.; Oasa, K.; Ogawa, T.

    1990-08-01

    Microwave pulses have been injected from a free electron-laser (FEL) into the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at up to 0.2 GW at 140 GHz in short pulses (10-ns duration) with O-mode polarization. The power transmitted through the plasma was measured in a first experimental study of high power pulse propagation in the plasma; no nonlinear effects were found at this power level. Calculations indicate that nonlinear effects may be found at the higher power densities expected in future experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  16. Longitudinal space charge assisted echo seeding of a free-electron laser with laser-spoiler noise suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hacker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed lasers are employed to improve the temporal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL light. However, when these seed pulses are short relative to the particle bunch, the noisy, temporally incoherent radiation from the unseeded electrons can overwhelm the coherent, seeded radiation. In this paper, a technique to seed a particle bunch with an external laser is presented in which a new mechanism to improve the contrast between coherent and incoherent free electron laser radiation is employed together with a novel, simplified echo-seeding method. The concept relies on a combination of longitudinal space charge wakes and an echo-seeding technique to make a short, coherent pulse of FEL light together with noise background suppression. Several different simulation codes are used to illustrate the concept with conditions at the soft x-ray free-electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH.

  17. Critical temperature transitions in laser-mediated cartilage reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian J.; Milner, Thomas E.; Kim, Hong H.; Telenkov, Sergey A.; Chew, Clifford; Kuo, Timothy C.; Smithies, Derek J.; Sobol, Emil N.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    1998-07-01

    In this study, we attempted to determine the critical temperature [Tc] at which accelerated stress relaxation occurred during laser mediated cartilage reshaping. During laser irradiation, mechanically deformed cartilage tissue undergoes a temperature dependent phase transformation which results in accelerated stress relaxation. When a critical temperature is attained, cartilage becomes malleable and may be molded into complex new shapes that harden as the tissue cools. Clinically, reshaped cartilage tissue can be used to recreate the underlying cartilaginous framework of structures such as the ear, larynx, trachea, and nose. The principal advantages of using laser radiation for the generation of thermal energy in tissue are precise control of both the space-time temperature distribution and time- dependent thermal denaturation kinetics. Optimization of the reshaping process requires identification of the temperature dependence of this phase transformation and its relationship to observed changes in cartilage optical, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties. Light scattering, infrared radiometry, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) were used to measure temperature dependent changes in the biophysical properties of cartilage tissue during fast (laser mediated) and slow (conventional calorimetric) heating. Our studies using MDSC and laser probe techniques have identified changes in cartilage thermodynamic and optical properties suggestive of a phase transformation occurring near 60 degrees Celsius.

  18. A Low-Energy-Spread Rf Accelerator for a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher,

  19. Free electron laser and coherent radiation. Working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Csonka, P.; Deacon, D.

    1984-01-01

    The planned development of a new storage ring at SSRL gives hope for the exciting possibility that an x-ray laser may become available in a users facility. Such a device would certainly be a unique and revolutionary tool for scientific research and industrial applications, which may take advantage of the spatial and temporal coherence, high power and high brightness of this device in a wavelength regime where no alternative coherent radiation sources exist. The feasibility of implementing such a device in the new ring should be examined carefully by the ring designers. If conclusions are positive, the ring design should take into account the special requirements which are set by the x-ray laser design parameters. Our working group made the first step in this examination process. Most of the emphasis was put on the consideration of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XR FEL). FEL technology has developed in the last few years and was recently demonstrated to operate successfully in the visible wavelength regime in the ACO storage ring in Orsay

  20. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  1. Modeling multipulsing transition in ring cavity lasers with proper orthogonal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Edwin; Shlizerman, Eli; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2010-01-01

    A low-dimensional model is constructed via the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to characterize the multipulsing phenomenon in a ring cavity laser mode locked by a saturable absorber. The onset of the multipulsing transition is characterized by an oscillatory state (created by a Hopf bifurcation) that is then itself destabilized to a double-pulse configuration (by a fold bifurcation). A four-mode POD analysis, which uses the principal components, or singular value decomposition modes, of the mode-locked laser, provides a simple analytic framework for a complete characterization of the entire transition process and its associated bifurcations. These findings are in good agreement with the full governing equation.

  2. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Introduction to the theory of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    We present an introduction to some fundamental aspects of the theory of free electron lasers. Spontaneous radiation emitted by electrons traversing a wiggler magnet is briefly reviewed, and stimulated emission in the low-gain regime is discussed using Colson's pendulum equations and Madey's theorems. The high-gain regime is treated by an extention of the work of Bonifacio, Pellegrini, and Narducci. We introduce dynamical variables to describe the radiation field, and a Hamiltonian formulation of Maxwell's equations is employed. A canonical transformation to the interaction representation factors out the fast time variation of the radiation field, and the slow time dependence is determined by linearized equations for the appropriate collective variables. As an application of this technique we consider self-amplified spontaneous radiation, and we comment upon the relationship between our approach and the use of coupled Vlasov-Maxwell equations

  4. Introduction to free electron lasers (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  5. Introduction to free electron lasers (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  6. Introduction to free electron lasers (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  7. Laser-induced electron dynamics including photoionization: A heuristic model within time-dependent configuration interaction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann

    2009-09-21

    We report simulations of laser-pulse driven many-electron dynamics by means of a simple, heuristic extension of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TD-CIS) approach. The extension allows for the treatment of ionizing states as nonstationary states with a finite, energy-dependent lifetime to account for above-threshold ionization losses in laser-driven many-electron dynamics. The extended TD-CIS method is applied to the following specific examples: (i) state-to-state transitions in the LiCN molecule which correspond to intramolecular charge transfer, (ii) creation of electronic wave packets in LiCN including wave packet analysis by pump-probe spectroscopy, and, finally, (iii) the effect of ionization on the dynamic polarizability of H(2) when calculated nonperturbatively by TD-CIS.

  8. Semianalytical study of the propagation of an ultrastrong femtosecond laser pulse in a plasma with ultrarelativistic electron jitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanović, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.jovanovic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade, Zemun (Serbia); Fedele, Renato, E-mail: renato.fedele@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); Belić, Milivoj, E-mail: milivoj.belic@qatar.tamu.edu [Texas A and M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); De Nicola, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.denicola@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    The interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma is studied analytically and numerically in a regime with ultrarelativistic electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The study is applied to a laser wakefield acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse. These have fundamentally different dispersive properties since in the core the electrons are almost completely expelled by a very strong ponderomotive force, and the electromagnetic wave packet is imbedded in a vacuum channel, thus having (almost) linear properties. Conversely, at the pulse edges, the laser amplitude is smaller, and the wave is weakly nonlinear and dispersive. New nonlinear terms in the wave equation, introduced by the nonlinear phase, describe without the violation of imposed scaling laws a smooth transition to a nondispersive electromagnetic wave at very large intensities and a simultaneous saturation of the (initially cubic) nonlocal nonlinearity. The temporal evolution of the laser pulse is studied both analytically and by numerically solving the model equations in a two-dimensional geometry, with the spot diameter presently used in some laser acceleration experiments. The most stable initial pulse length is estimated to exceed ≳1.5–2 μm. Moderate stretching of the pulse in the direction of propagation is observed, followed by the development of a vacuum channel and of a very large

  9. High-energy coherent terahertz radiation emitted by wide-angle electron beams from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Brunetti, Enrico; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2018-04-01

    High-charge electron beams produced by laser-wakefield accelerators are potentially novel, scalable sources of high-power terahertz radiation suitable for applications requiring high-intensity fields. When an intense laser pulse propagates in underdense plasma, it can generate femtosecond duration, self-injected picocoulomb electron bunches that accelerate on-axis to energies from 10s of MeV to several GeV, depending on laser intensity and plasma density. The process leading to the formation of the accelerating structure also generates non-injected, sub-picosecond duration, 1–2 MeV nanocoulomb electron beams emitted obliquely into a hollow cone around the laser propagation axis. These wide-angle beams are stable and depend weakly on laser and plasma parameters. Here we perform simulations to characterise the coherent transition radiation emitted by these beams if passed through a thin metal foil, or directly at the plasma–vacuum interface, showing that coherent terahertz radiation with 10s μJ to mJ-level energy can be produced with an optical to terahertz conversion efficiency up to 10‑4–10‑3.

  10. Basic design considerations for free-electron lasers driven by electron beams from RF accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A.; Freund, H.; Granatstein, V. L.; McAdoo, J. H.; Tang, C.-M.

    A design procedure and design criteria are derived for free-electron lasers driven by electron beams from RF accelerators. The procedure and criteria permit an estimate of the oscillation-buildup time and the laser output power of various FEL schemes: with waveguide resonator or open resonator, with initial seed-radiation injection or with spontaneous-emission radiation source, with a linear wiggler or with a helical wiggler. Expressions are derived for computing the various FEL parameters, allowing for the design and optimization of the FEL operational characteristics under ideal conditions or with nonideal design parameters that may be limited by technological or practical constraints. The design procedure enables one to derive engineering curves and scaling laws for the FEL operating parameters. This can be done most conveniently with a computer program based on flowcharts given in the appendices.

  11. Dynamics of laterally coupled semiconductor lasers: transition to chaos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousefi, M.; Barsella, A.; Lenstra, D.; Lenstra, D.; Morthier, G.; Erneux, T.; Pessa, M.

    2004-01-01

    A method for the investigation of the dynamics of two semiconductor lasers, grown side-by-side on the same wafer to enhance the lateral optical coupling, is presented. Using steady state analysis, parameter regimes of relevant dynamics are identified. This is completed by a spectral analysis, were

  12. Escaping Electrons from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions as a Function of Laser Spot Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusby Dean

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of a high-intensity laser with a solid target produces an energetic distribution of electrons that pass into the target. These electrons reach the rear surface of the target creating strong electric potentials that act to restrict the further escape of additional electrons. The measurement of the angle, flux and spectra of the electrons that do escape gives insights to the initial interaction. Here, the escaping electrons have been measured using a differentially filtered image plate stack, from interactions with intensities from mid 1020-1017 W/cm2, where the intensity has been reduced by defocussing to increase the size of the focal spot. An increase in electron flux is initially observed as the intensity is reduced from 4x1020 to 6x1018 W/cm2. The temperature of the electron distribution is also measured and found to be relatively constant. 2D particle-in-cell modelling is used to demonstrate the importance of pre-plasma conditions in understanding these observations.

  13. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Valeo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background

  14. A polarized look at nucleons: Laser electron gamma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    As the title suggests we are going to look at reactions induced on nucleons by polarized photons. The results I am going to show today are from the Laser Electron Gamma Source, or ''LEGS'' facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At LEGS, gamma ray beams are produced by backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons. I will only summarize the main characteristics of this facility, and leave an in depth description to Dr. Schaerf who will discuss LEGS and other similar backscattering facilities on Wednesday. Reactions with polarized photons inevitably reflect interference terms that for the most part remain hidden in spin-averaged unpolarized measurements. This provides a tool for probing interactions that depend upon spin. In particular, we are going to look today at two cases where the polarization is used to probe the tensor interaction. First, we will examine the tensor force between a proton-neutron pair in deuterium. Secondly, we will examine the tensor force between quarks in a proton that produces a small E2 component that is mixed with the predominantly M1 excitation of the delta resonance.The magnitude of this E2 components provides a sensitive probe of the structure of the Nucleon

  15. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  16. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO 2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  17. Monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for large-scale electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2012-09-01

    A silicon-based monolithic laser source has long been envisioned as a key enabling component for large-scale electronic-photonic integration in future generations of high-performance computation and communication systems. In this paper we present a comprehensive review on the development of monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for this application. Starting with a historical review of light emission from the direct gap transition of Ge dating back to the 1960s, we focus on the rapid progress in band-engineered Ge-on-Si lasers in the past five years after a nearly 30-year gap in this research field. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active devices in Si photonics in the past decade due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. In 2007, we proposed combing tensile strain with n-type doping to compensate the energy difference between the direct and indirect band gap of Ge, thereby achieving net optical gain for CMOS-compatible diode lasers. Here we systematically present theoretical modeling, material growth methods, spontaneous emission, optical gain, and lasing under optical and electrical pumping from band-engineered Ge-on-Si, culminated by recently demonstrated electrically pumped Ge-on-Si lasers with >1 mW output in the communication wavelength window of 1500-1700 nm. The broad gain spectrum enables on-chip wavelength division multiplexing. A unique feature of band-engineered pseudo-direct gap Ge light emitters is that the emission intensity increases with temperature, exactly opposite to conventional direct gap semiconductor light-emitting devices. This extraordinary thermal anti-quenching behavior greatly facilitates monolithic integration on Si microchips where temperatures can reach up to 80 °C during operation. The same band-engineering approach can be extended to other pseudo-direct gap semiconductors, allowing us to achieve efficient light emission at wavelengths previously

  18. Laser-induced electron--ion recombination used to study enhanced spontaneous recombination during electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, U.; Wolf, A.; Schuess ler, T.; Habs, D.; Schwalm, D.; Uwira, O.; Linkemann, J.; Mueller, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous recombination of highly charged ions with free electrons in merged velocity matched electron and ion beams has been observed in earlier experiments to occur at rates significantly higher than predicted by theoretical estimates. To study this enhanced spontaneous recombination, laser induced recombination spectra were measured both in velocity matched beams and in beams with well defined relative velocities, corresponding to relative electron-ion detuning energies ranging from 1 meV up to 6.5 meV where the spontaneous recombination enhancement was found to be strongly reduced. Based on a comparison with simplified calculations, the development of the recombination spectra for decreasing detuning energies indicates additional contributions at matched velocities which could be related to the energy distribution of electrons causing the spontaneous recombination rate enhancement

  19. A multi-frequency approach to free electron lasers driven by short electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, Nicola

    1997-01-01

    A multi-frequency model for free electron lasers (FELs), based on the Fourier decomposition of the radiation field coupled with the beam electrons, is discussed. We show that the multi-frequency approach allows for an accurate description of the evolution of the radiation spectrum, also when the FEL is driven by short electron bunches, of arbitrary longitudinal profile. We derive from the multi-frequency model, by averaging over one radiation period, the usual FEL equations modelling the slippage between radiation and particles and describing the super-radiant regime in high-gain FELs. As an example of application of the multi-frequency model, we discuss the coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) from short electron bunches

  20. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  1. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-09-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  2. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  3. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  4. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations

  5. Electron beam charge diagnostics for laser plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakamura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs. First, a scintillating screen (Lanex was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160  pC/mm^{2} and 0.4  pC/(ps  mm^{2}, respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  6. Radial electron beam laser excitation: the REBLE report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1978-10-01

    The results of an investigation of techniques to generate high-power radially converging electron beams and the application of these beams to gas lasers is discussed. The design and performance of the REBLE accelerator that was developed for this program is presented. Reliable operation of the radial diode has been obtained at levels up to 1 MV, 200 kA, and 20 ns. It has been demonstrated that the anode current density can be made uniform to better than 15% over 1000 cm 2 areas with 100 to 250 A/cm 2 intensities. The measured total and spatially resolved energy deposition of this radial electron beam in various gases is compared with Monte Carlo calculations. In most cases, these codes give an accurate description of the beam transport and energy deposition. With the electron beam pumping xenon gas, the amplitude of xenon excimer radiation (1720 A 0 ) was radially uniform to within the experimental uncertainty. The efficiency of converting deposited electron beam energy to xenon excimer radiation was 20%

  7. Excitation and deexcitation of N2 molecular levels. Induced fluorescence by electrons and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fernandez-Mayoralas, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electron impact excitation followed by fluorescence induced by N 2 -laser absorption was used to study the lifetime of the lowest vibrational level of the B 3 π g electronic state of N 2 . The experimental result of this work is 13 + 1 μs. To measure the lifetime of B 3 π g (v=2,3,5,6,7,8) levels the delayed coincidence method by electron impact was use. The lifetime values were compared with recent experimental and theoretical results. The relative intensi-ties of 3 π g --- A 3 Σ Ω + system bands, in the range (6540-10500 A o ) was measured using a hollow cathode lamp as spectral source. The relative transition moments and its dependence versus the r-centroid was obtained. Total cross sections for electron scattering by N molecules in the range 600 - 5000 eV have been obtained from measurements of the attenuation of a linear electron beam. The results have been compared with available experimental cross sections and with theoretical calculations based on the first Born approximation. (Author)

  8. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides; Chaleur specifique electronique de carbures de metaux de transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-15

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [French] Les donnees experimentales permettant de preciser la structure de bandes des carbures de metaux de transition de structure NaCI sont encore peu.nombreuses. Nous avons mesure la chaleur specifique electronique de certains de ces carbures, de differentes concentrations electroniques (TiC stoechiometrique ou non, TaC et mixtes (Ti, Ta) - C). Nous donnons les principales caracteristiques (metallographie, resistivite, rayon X), de nos echantillons, et nous decrivons l'appareillage de chaleur specifique a basse temperature realise. Dans l'un nous utilisons l'helium comme gaz d'echange. L'autre est monte avec un contact mecanique. Les deux utilisent une sonde au germanium comme thermometre. La mesure de la resistance de cette sonde est decrite, ainsi que les differents montages de mesure. Les resultats, presentes dans un modele de bande rigide, font apparaitre que la densite des etats au niveau de Fermi presente un minimum au voisinage des carbures du groupe IV. (auteur)

  9. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons

  10. Shock-Assisted Superficial Hexagonal-to-Cubic Phase Transition in GaN/Sapphire Interface Induced by Using Ultra-violet Laser Lift-Of Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-Hua, Chen; Xiao-Dong, Hu; Xiang-Ning, Kang; Xu-Rong, Zhou; Xiao-Min, Zhang; Tong-Jun, Yu; Zhi-Jian, Yang; Ke, Xu; Guo-Yi, Zhang; Xu-Dong, Shan; Li-Ping, You

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-violet (KrF excimer laser, λ = 248 nm) laser lift-of (LLO) techniques have been operated to the GaN/sapphire structure to separate GaN from the sapphire substrate. Hexagonal to cubic phase transformation induced by the ultra-violet laser lift-of (UV-LLO) has been characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, micro-photoluminescence, along with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). HRTEM indicates that UV-LLO induced phase transition takes place above the LLO interface, without phase transition under the LLO interface. The formed cubic GaN often exists as nanocrystal grains attaching on the bulk hexagonal GaN. The half-loop-cluster-like UV-LLO interface indicates that the LLO-induced shock waves has generated and played an assistant role in the decomposition of the hexagonal GaN and in the formation of cubic GaN grains at the LLO surface

  11. Structural and electronic characterization of 355 nm laser-crystallized silicon: Interplay of film thickness and laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semler, Matthew R.; Swenson, Orven F.; Hoey, Justin M.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Gette, Cody R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the laser crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films as a function of laser fluence and film thickness. Silicon films grown through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were subjected to a Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser operating at 355 nm. The crystallinity, morphology, and optical and electronic properties of the films are characterized through transmission and reflectance spectroscopy, resistivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and optical and scanning-electron microscopy. Our results reveal a unique surface morphology that strongly couples to the electronic characteristics of the films, with a minimum laser fluence at which the film properties are optimized. A simple scaling model is used to relate film morphology to conductivity in the laser-processed films

  12. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  13. Laser induced popcornlike conformational transition of nanodiamond as a nanoknife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Chen, P.-H.; Chu, H.-L.; Lee, T.-C.; Chou, C.-C.; Chao, J.-I; Su, C.-Y.; Chen, J.S.; Tsai, J.-S.; Tsai, C.-M.; Ho, Y.-P.; Sun, K.W.; Cheng, C.-L.; Chen, F.-R.

    2008-01-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is surrounded by layers of graphite on its surface. This unique structure feature creates unusual fluorescence spectra, which can be used as an indicator to monitor its surface modification. Meanwhile, the impurity, nitroso (C-N=O) inside the ND can be photolyzed by two-photon absorption, releasing NO to facilitate the formation of a sp 3 diamond structure in the core of ND and transforming it into a sp 2 graphite structure. Such a conformational transition enlarges the size of ND from 8 to 90 nm, resulting in a popcornlike structure. This transition reaction may be useful as nanoknives in biomedical application

  14. Pressure induced phase transition behaviour in -electron based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present review on the high pressure phase transition behaviour of ... For instance, closing of energy gaps lead to metal–insulator transitions [4], shift in energy ... systematic study of the pressure induced structural sequences has become ...

  15. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  16. 3rd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Knotek, Michael

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of the third international workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions, DIET III, which took place on Shelter Island, NY, May. 20-22, 1987. The work contained in this volume is an excellent summary of the current status of the field and should be a valuable reference text for both "seasoned" researchers and newcomers in the field of DIET. Based on the success of the meeting it seems clear that interest and enthusiasm in the field is strong. It is also apparent, from the many lively discussions during the meeting, that many unanswered questions (and controversies) remain to be solved. It was particularly pleasing to see many new participants from new and rapidly advancing fields, ranging from gas phase dynamics to semiconductor processing. The resulting cross-fertilization from these separate but related fields is playing an important role in helping us understand desorption processes at solid surfaces. In general, the topics covered during the course of the worksh...

  17. Oxygen auroral transition laser system excited by collisional and photolytic energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.R.; Powell, H.T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1975-06-01

    The properties of laser media involving the auroral transition of atomic oxygen and analogous systems are examined. A discussion of the atomic properties, collisional mechanisms, excitation processes, and collisionally induced radiative phenomena is given. Crossing phenomena play a particularly important role in governing the dynamics of the medium

  18. b-dipole transitions in trans-HOCO observed by far infrared laser magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, T.J.; Radford, H.E.; Moore, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to measure components of 12 rotational transitions in the ground state of the HOCO radical. The transitions are all b-dipole in character in contrast to the a-dipole rotational spectrum previously reported [Radford, Wei, and Sears, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 3989 (1992)]. The new data determine the A rotational constant to high precision and allow the determination of several centrifugal distortion constants for the first time. The hyperfine coupling in the radical leads to observable splittings in several of the observed transitions and these are used to estimate two of the four expected nonzero hyperfine parameters in the radical

  19. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  20. First observations of acceleration of injected electrons in a laser plasma beatwave experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahim, N.A.; Martin, F.; Bordeur, P.; Heighway, E.A.; Matte, J.P.; Pepin, H.; Lavigne, P.

    1986-01-01

    The first experimental observations of acceleration of injected electrons in a laser driven plasma beatwave are presented. The plasma waves were excited in an ionized gas jet, using a short pulse high intensity CO 2 laser with two collinearly propagating beams (at λ = 9.6 μm and 10.6 μm) to excite a fast wave (v/sub p/ = c). The source of electrons was a laser plasma produced on an aluminum slab target by a third, synchronized CO 2 laser beam. A double-focusing dipole magnet was used to energy select and inject electrons into the beatwave, and a second magnetic spectrograph was used to analyze the accelerated electrons. Electron acceleration was only observed when the appropriate resonant plasma density was produced (∼ 10 17 cm -3 ), the two laser lines were incident on the plasma, and electrons were injected into this plasma from an external source

  1. Electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ding; Xie, Bai-Song; Ali Bake, Muhammad; Sang, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Hai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Some typical electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction are investigated theoretically. By considering a modification of the fields and ellipsoid bubble shape due to the presence of residual electrons in the bubble regime, we study in detail the electrons nonlinear dynamics with or without laser pulse. To examine the electron dynamical behaviors, a set of typical electrons, which locate initially at the front of the bubble, on the transverse edge and at the bottom of the bubble respectively, are chosen for study. It is found that the range of trapped electrons in the case with laser pulse is a little narrower than that without laser pulse. The partial phase portraits for electrons around the bubble are presented numerically and their characteristic behaviors are discussed theoretically. Implication of our results on the high quality electron beam generation is also discussed briefly

  2. Relativistic attosecond electron bunch emission from few-cycle laser irradiated nanoscale droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Di Lucchio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Attosecond electron bunches produced at the surface of nanometer-scale droplets illuminated by a two-cycle laser pulse are investigated for the purpose of determining their optimal emission characteristics. Significant departures from Mie theory are found for electron bunch emission from droplets whose radii satisfy the condition δ_{r}transitional regime which is neither accounted for by optical Mie theory valid for R≫δ, where δ is the usual plasma skin depth, nor with the Rayleigh regime (R<δ≪λ. Instead the angular emission of the bunches is to a good approximation described by the nonlinear ponderomotive scattering model. Subsequently, the bunches are subject to further deflection by the ponderomotive pressure of the copropagating laser field in vacuum, depending on the initial droplet parameters. Final emission angles are estimated, together with the energy spectrum of the bunches.

  3. Compact X-ray sources. Simulating the electron/strong laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartin, Anthony [DESY, CFEL, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The collision of an intense laser with an electron bunch can be used to produce X-rays via the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) mechanism. The ICS can be simulated via either a classical theory in which electrons and photons are treated in terms of classical electromagnetic waves - or a quantum theory in which charged particles interact with strong electromagnetic fields. The laser intensity used in a practical ICS collision is likely to be at such a level that quantum effects may be significant and the use of quantum theory may become a necessity. A simulation study is presented here comparing the classical and quantum approaches to the ICS. A custom particle-in-cell (PIC) software code, with photon generation by monte carlo of the exact quantum transition probability is used to simulate the quantum treatment. Peak resonant energies and the angular distribution of the X-rays are obtained and compared with those predicted by the classical theory. The conditions under which significant differences between the two theories emerges is obtained.

  4. Transition from diamagnetic to ferromagnetic state in laser ablated nitrogen doped ZnO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Jindal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Transition from room temperature diamagnetic to ferromagnetic state in N doped ZnO (ZnO:N films grown by pulsed laser deposition with tunable energy density has been identified. ZnO:N films deposited with moderate laser energy density of 2.5 J/cm2 are single phase and nearly defect free having N dopant substitution at O sites in ZnO lattice, exhibiting intrinsic ferromagnetism. When energy density reduces (<2.5 J/cm2, defects in ZnO:N film degrades ferromagnetism and exhibit diamagnetic phase when grown at energy density of 1.0 J/cm2. Growth kinetics, which in turn depends on laser energy density is playing important role in making transition from ferromagnetic to diamagnetic in ZnO:N films.

  5. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  6. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  7. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  8. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-07-08

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  9. Antiferromagnetic–paramagnetic state transition of NiO synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available respectively from Raman spectroscopy study. These particle sizes are known be affected by substrate temperature during the deposition. Electron spin resonance (ESR) results demonstrated a strange antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at a room...

  10. Laser - assisted multiphoton ionization of ground state Li{sup +} by electron and positron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deb, S Ghosh; Sinha, C, E-mail: srabanti.ghosh@gmail.co, E-mail: chand_sin@hotmail.co [Theoretical Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata - 700032 (India)

    2009-11-01

    The influence of the laser field on the dynamics of (e, 2e) process of Li{sup +} ion by electron / positron impact is studied for coplanar geometry with laser polarization parallel to the incident momentum. The laser dressed projectile wavefunctions are chosen as Coulomb Volkov (CV) while for ejected electron, modified CV is considered. The target dressing is constructed using the time dependent perturbation theory. Laser field suppresses the FF cross-sections significantly for single photon exchange while for multiple photon exchanges the cross-sections are enhanced. TDCS is quite sensitive with respect to the initial phase of the laser field.

  11. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered

  12. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  13. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B., E-mail: behrouz@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  14. Millimeter wave free electron laser amplifiers: Experiments and designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bensen, D.M.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Lantham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-01-01

    Free electron laser amplifies are investigated as sources of high- average-power (1 MW) millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation (200 GHz - 600 GHz) for application to electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. As a stepping-stone to higher frequencies and cw operation a pulsed amplifier (τ pulse ≅ 80 ns) at 98 GHz is being developed. Status is reported on this experiment which investigates linear gain amplification with use of sheet electron beam (transverse cross section = 0.1 cm x 2.0 cm, V beam = 440 keV, I beam ≅ 10 A) and short-period wiggler (ell w = 0.96 cm) and with expected output of 140 W. Predictions of gain and efficiency from a 1-D universal formulation are presented. Beam propagation results, with wiggler focusing as a means of sheet beam confinement in both transverse dimensions, through the 54 cm (56 period) pulsed electromagnet wiggler are discussed. Peak wiggler fields of 5.1 kG on-axis have been achieved

  15. Changing electronic density in sites of crystalline lattice under superconducting of phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaev, N.Yu.; Turaev, E.Yu.; Khuzhakulov, E.S.; Seregin, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    Results of electron density change calculations for sites of the one-dimensional Kronig-Penny lattice at the superconducting phase transition have been presented. The transition from normal state to super conducting one is accompanied by the rise of the electron density at the unit cell centre. It is agreement with Moessbauer spectroscopy data. (author)

  16. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  17. Electron structure of atoms in laser plasma: The Debye shielding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Tokuei; Okutsu, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure and the energy spectra of multielectron atoms in laser plasmas are examined by the Debye shielding model. The effect of the plasma environment on the electrons bound in an atom is taken into account by introducing the screened Coulomb-type potentials into the electronic Hamiltonian of an atom in place of the standard nuclear attraction and electron repulsion potentials. The capabilities of this new Hamiltonian are demonstrated for He and Li in laser plasmas. (author)

  18. The electron accelerator for FELIX [Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amersfoort, P.W. van; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Bruinsma, P.J.T.; Hoekstra, R.; Kroes, F.B.; Luyckx, G.; Noomen, J.G.; Poole, M.W.; Saxon, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the design of the electron accelerator for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), which is meant to provide the Dutch science community with a rapidly tunable source of infrared radiation. The first stage of the project will (at least) cover the wavelength range between 8 and 80 μm. The accelerator consists of a triode with a grid modulated at 1 GHz, a 3.8-MeV buncher, and two travelling-wave S-band linac structures, with which 70-A, 3-ps bunches are accelerated to an energy between 15 and 4-5 MeV. The system has been designed to minimize the energy spread in the electron beam. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Electron beam halo monitor for a compact x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Aoyagi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An electron beam halo monitor using diamond-based detectors, which are operated in the ionization mode, has been developed for the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA to protect its undulator magnets from radiation damage. Diamond-based detectors are inserted in a beam duct to measure the intensity of the beam halo directly. To suppress the degradation of the electron beam due to the installation of the beam halo monitor, rf fingers with aluminum windows are newly employed. We evaluated the effect of radiation from the Al windows on the output signal both experimentally and by simulation. The operational results of the beam halo monitor employed in SACLA are presented.

  20. Hyperfine structure of the metastable p-barHe+ atom revealed by a laser-induced (n,l) = (37,35) → (38,34) transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, E.; Eades, J.; Yamazaki, T.

    1996-11-01

    A precise scan of the previously discovered laser-induced transition (n,l) = (37,35) → (38,34) in p-barHe + revealed a doublet structure with a separation of Δν HF = 1.70 ± 0.05 GHz. This new type of 'hyperfine' splitting is ascribed to the interaction of the antiproton orbital angular momentum and the electron spin. (author)

  1. Diode laser operating on an atomic transition limited by an isotope ⁸⁷Rb Faraday filter at 780 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiming; Hong, Yelong; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an extended cavity Faraday laser system using an antireflection-coated laser diode as the gain medium and the isotope (87)Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as the frequency selective device. Using this method, the laser wavelength works stably at the highest transmission peak of the isotope (87)Rb FADOF over the laser diode current from 55 to 140 mA and the temperature from 15°C to 35°C. Neither the current nor the temperature of the laser diode has significant influence on the output frequency. Compared with previous extended cavity laser systems operating at frequencies irrelevant to spectacular atomic transition lines, the laser system realized here provides a stable laser source with the frequency operating on atomic transitions for many practical applications.

  2. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  3. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. (ed.)

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  4. Cartilage ablation studies using mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Peavy, George M.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2005-04-01

    The ablation rate of articular cartilage and fibrocartilage (meniscus), were quantified to examine wavelength and tissue-composition dependence of ablation efficiency for selected mid-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths tested were 2.9 um (water dominant absorption), 6.1 (protein and water absorption) and 6.45 um (protein dominant absorption) generated by the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Vanderbilt University. The measurement of tissue mass removal using a microbalance during laser ablation was conducted to determine the ablation rates of cartilage. The technique can be accurate over methods such as profilometer and histology sectioning where tissue surface and the crater morphology may be affected by tissue processing. The ablation efficiency was found to be dependent upon the wavelength. Both articular cartilage and meniscus (fibrocartilage) ablations at 6.1 um were more efficient than those at the other wavelengths evaluated. We observed the lowest ablation efficiency of both types of cartilage with the 6.45 um wavelength, possibly due to the reduction in water absorption at this wavelength in comparison to the other wavelengths that were evaluated.

  5. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA)

  6. Dual-axis vapor cell for simultaneous laser frequency stabilization on disparate optical transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Anupriya; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a dual-axis ytterbium (Yb) vapor cell and used it to simultaneously address the two laser cooling transitions in Yb at wavelengths 399 nm and 556 nm, featuring the disparate linewidths of 2π × 29 MHz and 2π × 182 KHz, respectively. By utilizing different optical paths for the two wavelengths, we simultaneously obtain comparable optical densities suitable for saturated absorption spectroscopy for both the transitions and keep both the lasers frequency stabilized over several hours. We demonstrate that by appropriate control of the cell temperature profile, two atomic transitions differing in relative strength across a large range of over three orders of magnitude can be simultaneously addressed, making the device adaptable to a variety of spectroscopic needs. We also show that our observations can be understood with a simple theoretical model of the Yb vapor.

  7. Dual-axis vapor cell for simultaneous laser frequency stabilization on disparate optical transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Anupriya, E-mail: anupriya@uw.edu; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep [Department of Physics, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351560, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We have developed a dual-axis ytterbium (Yb) vapor cell and used it to simultaneously address the two laser cooling transitions in Yb at wavelengths 399 nm and 556 nm, featuring the disparate linewidths of 2π × 29 MHz and 2π × 182 KHz, respectively. By utilizing different optical paths for the two wavelengths, we simultaneously obtain comparable optical densities suitable for saturated absorption spectroscopy for both the transitions and keep both the lasers frequency stabilized over several hours. We demonstrate that by appropriate control of the cell temperature profile, two atomic transitions differing in relative strength across a large range of over three orders of magnitude can be simultaneously addressed, making the device adaptable to a variety of spectroscopic needs. We also show that our observations can be understood with a simple theoretical model of the Yb vapor.

  8. Optical klystron and harmonic generation free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qika Jia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical field evolution of an optical klystron free electron laser is analytically described for both low gain and high gain cases. The harmonic optical klystron (HOK in which the second undulator is resonant on the higher harmonic of the first undulator is analyzed as a harmonic amplifier. The optical field evolution equation of the HOK is derived analytically for both the CHG mode (coherent harmonic generation, the quadratic gain regime and the HGHG mode (high gain harmonic generation, the exponential gain regime, the effects of energy spread, energy modulation, and dispersion in the whole process are taken into account. The linear theory is given and discussed for the HGHG mode. The analytical formula is given for the CHG mode.

  9. Test of models for electron transport in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombant, D.G.; Manheimer, W.M.; Busquet, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines five different models of electron thermal transport in laser produced spherical implosions. These are classical, classical with a flux limit f, delocalization, beam deposition model, and Fokker-Planck solutions. In small targets, the results are strongly dependent on f for flux limit models, with small f's generating very steep temperature gradients. Delocalization models are characterized by large preheat in the center of the target. The beam deposition model agrees reasonably well with the Fokker-Planck simulation results. For large, high gain fusion targets, the delocalization model shows the gain substantially reduced by the preheat. However, flux limitation models show gain largely independent of f, with the beam deposition model also showing the same high gain

  10. Free Electron Laser as Energy Driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, E.L.; Shnejdmiller, E.A.; Ul'yanov, Yu.N.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    A FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength λ = 0.5 μm and providing flash energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 10 22 W cm -2 sr -1 within steering pulse duration 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. Dimensions of such an ICF driver are comparable with those of heavy-ion ICF driver, while the problem of technical realization seems to be more realistic. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R and D. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Lynch, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    The FEL rf system was designed for 3.6-MW rf pulses from two klystrons to drive two linacs and one deflection cavity at 1300 MHz. Two 108.33-MHz subharmonic buncher cavities and one fundamental buncher were also built, each powered by a 5-kW amplifier. A single phase-coherent source drives the various amplifiers as well as the grid of the electron gun, which is pulsed at 21.67 MHz. The initial buncher system did not work as well as expected, and the first linac tank required more rf power than anticipated. The light output was extremely sensitive to amplitude and phase errors. More powerful klystrons were developed and installed, and a method was discovered for operating a single subharmonic buncher and allowing the first linac to complete the bunching process. This paper shows the actual configuration used to operate the laser and discusses future improvements

  12. Red Shift and Broadening of Backward Harmonic Radiation from Electron Oscillations Driven by Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Youwei; Yu Wei; Lu Peixiang; Senecha, Vinod K; Han, Xu; Deng Degang; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of backward harmonic radiation due to electron oscillations driven by a linearly polarized fs laser pulse are analysed considering a single electron model. The spectral distributions of the electron's backward harmonic radiation are investigated in detail for different parameters of the driver laser pulse. Higher order harmonic radiations are possible for a sufficiently intense driving laser pulse. We have shown that for a realistic pulsed photon beam, the spectrum of the radiation is red shifted as well as broadened because of changes in the longitudinal velocity of the electrons during the laser pulse. These effects are more pronounced at higher laser intensities giving rise to higher order harmonics that eventually leads to a continuous spectrum. Numerical simulations have further shown that by increasing the laser pulse width the broadening of the high harmonic radiations can be controlled

  13. Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement in JT-II plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ascasibar, E.; Balbin, R.; Castejon, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Petrov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement are triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in TJ-II ECH plasmas. Transitions triggered by the rational surface n=4/m=2 show an increase in the ion temperature synchronized with the increase in the electron temperature. SXR measurements demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, the rational surface positioned inside the plasma core region precedes and provides a trigger for the transition. (author)

  14. Two-photon transitions driven by a combination of diode and femtosecond lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Marco P; Nogueira, Giovana T; Felinto, Daniel; Vianna, Sandra S

    2012-10-15

    We report on the combined action of a cw diode laser and a train of ultrashort pulses when each of them drives one step of the 5S-5P-5D two-photon transition in rubidium vapor. The fluorescence from the 6P(3/2) state is detected for a fixed repetition rate of the femtosecond laser while the cw-laser frequency is scanned over the rubidium D(2) lines. This scheme allows for a velocity selective spectroscopy in a large spectral range including the 5D(3/2) and 5D(5/2) states. The results are well described in a simplified frequency domain picture, considering the interaction of each velocity group with the cw laser and a single mode of the frequency comb.

  15. High Speed Pump-Probe Apparatus for Observation of Transitional Effects in Ultrafast Laser Micromachining Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Alexeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A pump-probe experimental approach has been shown to be a very efficient tool for the observation and analysis of various laser matter interaction effects. In those setups, synchronized laser pulses are used to create an event (pump and to simultaneously observe it (probe. In general, the physical effects that can be investigated with such an apparatus are restricted by the temporal resolution of the probe pulse and the observation window. The latter can be greatly extended by adjusting the pump-probe time delay under the assumption that the interaction process remains fairly reproducible. Unfortunately, this assumption becomes invalid in the case of high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser material processing, where the irradiation history strongly affects the ongoing interaction process. In this contribution, the authors present an extension of the pump-probe setup that allows to investigate transitional and dynamic effects present during ultrafast laser machining performed at high pulse repetition frequencies.

  16. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  17. Electron accelerator with a laser ignition for investigation of beam plasma by optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanov, S.N.; Korolev, A.A.; Kul'beda, V.E.; Razumovskij, A.I.; Trukhin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Facility to conduct investigations into dense gas beam plasma is described. Facility comprises: electron accelerator (200-300 keV, 5kA, 20ns), OGM-40 ignition ruby laser LZhI-501 diagnostic laser (with 0.55-0.66 μm tunable wave length), Michelson interferometer and diagnostic equipment for optical measurements. Laser ignition of spark gap is introduced to strong synchronization (±10ns) of radiation pulse of diagnostic laser with beam current pulse

  18. Harmonic lasing in x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Schneidmiller

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Harmonic lasing in a free electron laser with a planar undulator (under the condition that the fundamental frequency is suppressed might be a cheap and efficient way of extension of wavelength ranges of existing and planned x-ray free electron laser (FEL facilities. Contrary to nonlinear harmonic generation, harmonic lasing can provide much more intense, stable, and narrow-band FEL beam which is easier to handle due to the suppressed fundamental frequency. In this paper we perform a parametrization of the solution of the eigenvalue equation for lasing at odd harmonics, and present an explicit expression for FEL gain length, taking into account all essential effects. We propose and discuss methods for suppression of the fundamental harmonic. We also suggest a combined use of harmonic lasing and lasing at the retuned fundamental wavelength in order to reduce bandwidth and to increase brilliance of x-ray beam at saturation. Considering 3rd harmonic lasing as a practical example, we come to the conclusion that it is much more robust than usually thought, and can be widely used in the existing or planned x-ray FEL (XFEL facilities. In particular, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS after a minor modification can lase to saturation at the 3rd harmonic up to the photon energy of 25–30 keV providing multigigawatt power level and narrow bandwidth. As for the European XFEL, harmonic lasing would allow one to extend operating range (ultimately up to 100 keV, to reduce FEL bandwidth and to increase brilliance, to enable two-color operation for pump-probe experiments, and to provide more flexible operation at different electron energies. Similar improvements can be realized in other x-ray FEL facilities with gap-tunable undulators like FLASH II, SACLA, LCLS II, etc. Harmonic lasing can be an attractive option for compact x-ray FELs (driven by electron beams with a relatively low energy, allowing the use of the standard undulator technology instead of

  19. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Wang Feng; Li Xin; Yuan Yanping; Xiao Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train. (paper)

  20. Electron transport phenomena and dense plasmas produced by ultra-short pulse laser interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent experiments with femtosecond lasers provide a test bed for theoretical ideas about electron processes in hot dense plasmas. We briefly review aspects of electron conduction theory likely to prove relevant to femtosecond laser absorption. We show that the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit implies a maximum inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of about 50% at temperatures near the Fermi temperature. We also propose that sheath inverse bremsstrahlung leads to a minimum absorption of 7-10% at high laser intensity