WorldWideScience

Sample records for electronic imaging applications

  1. The application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system.

  2. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411

  3. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuPing Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional online shopping platform (OSP, which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers’ experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system.

  4. Application of FPGA's in Flexible Analogue Electronic Image Generator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kulla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on usage of the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays Xilinx as a part of our more complex workdedicated to design of flexible analogue electronic images generator for application in TV measurement technique or/and TV servicetechnique or/and education process. The FPGAs performs here the role of component colour R, G, B, synchronization and blanking signals source. These signals are next processed and amplified in other parts of the generator as NTSC/PAL source encoder and RF modulator. The main aim of this paper is to show the possibilities how with suitable development software use a FPGAs in analog TV technology.

  5. Diffraction effects and inelastic electron transport in angle-resolved microscopic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, A; Nolze, G; Vespucci, S; Naresh-Kumar, G; Trager-Cowan, C; Vilalta-Clemente, A; Wilkinson, A J; Vos, M

    2017-09-01

    We analyse the signal formation process for scanning electron microscopic imaging applications on crystalline specimens. In accordance with previous investigations, we find nontrivial effects of incident beam diffraction on the backscattered electron distribution in energy and momentum. Specifically, incident beam diffraction causes angular changes of the backscattered electron distribution which we identify as the dominant mechanism underlying pseudocolour orientation imaging using multiple, angle-resolving detectors. Consequently, diffraction effects of the incident beam and their impact on the subsequent coherent and incoherent electron transport need to be taken into account for an in-depth theoretical modelling of the energy- and momentum distribution of electrons backscattered from crystalline sample regions. Our findings have implications for the level of theoretical detail that can be necessary for the interpretation of complex imaging modalities such as electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) of defects in crystals. If the solid angle of detection is limited to specific regions of the backscattered electron momentum distribution, the image contrast that is observed in ECCI and similar applications can be strongly affected by incident beam diffraction and topographic effects from the sample surface. As an application, we demonstrate characteristic changes in the resulting images if different properties of the backscattered electron distribution are used for the analysis of a GaN thin film sample containing dislocations. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Optimal imaging techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope: applications to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, M; Crewe, A V

    1980-01-01

    We show applications of the optimal imaging method to stained biological macromolecules. This optimal imaging method involves the following basic procedures: (i) for any given resolution, which is represented by the electron probe size in the scanning transmission electron microscope, a preferred magnification is used; (ii) the micrographs taken at the condition described above are then spatially filtered by using a low-pass filter (nu < 1/2d, in which d is the space between scan lines) to optically reconstruct the final optimal image. It is found that the micrographs obtained by using the optimal imaging method clearly show an improvement in contrast. Images PMID:6933454

  7. Diffraction effects and inelastic electron transport in angle-resolved microscopic imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Winkelmann, A.; Nolze, G.; Vespucci, S.; Naresh-Kumar, G; Trager-Cowan, C.; Vilalta-Clementes, A; Wilkinson, A; De Vos, M.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the signal formation process for scanning electronmicroscopic imaging applications on crystalline specimens. Inaccordance with previous investigations, we find nontrivialeffects of incident beam diffraction on the backscattered elec-tron distribution in energy and momentum. Specifically, inci-dent beam diffraction causes angular changes of the backscat-tered electron distribution which we identify as the dominantmechanism underlying pseudocolour orientation imaging us-ing multiple,...

  8. An Evaluation of Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration for Signal and Image Processing in Professional Electronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Manet

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Signal and image processing applications require a lot of computing resources. For low-volume applications like in professional electronics applications, FPGA are used in combination with DSP and GPP in order to reach the performances required by the product roadmaps. Nevertheless, FPGA designs are static, which raises a flexibility issue with new complex or software defined applications like software-defined radio (SDR. In this scope, dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR is used to bring a virtualization layer upon the static hardware of FPGA. During the last decade, DPR has been widely studied in academia. Nevertheless, there are very few real applications using it, and therefore, there is a lack of feedback providing relevant issues to address in order to improve its applicability. This paper evaluates the interest and limitations when using DPR in professional electronics applications and provides guidelines to improve its applicability. It makes a fair evaluation based on experiments made on a set of signal and image processing applications. It identifies the missing elements of the design flow to use DPR in professional electronics applications. Finally, it introduces a fast reconfiguration manager providing an 84-time improvement compared to the vendor solution.

  9. An Evaluation of Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration for Signal and Image Processing in Professional Electronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulagnier Denis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Signal and image processing applications require a lot of computing resources. For low-volume applications like in professional electronics applications, FPGA are used in combination with DSP and GPP in order to reach the performances required by the product roadmaps. Nevertheless, FPGA designs are static, which raises a flexibility issue with new complex or software defined applications like software-defined radio (SDR. In this scope, dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR is used to bring a virtualization layer upon the static hardware of FPGA. During the last decade, DPR has been widely studied in academia. Nevertheless, there are very few real applications using it, and therefore, there is a lack of feedback providing relevant issues to address in order to improve its applicability. This paper evaluates the interest and limitations when using DPR in professional electronics applications and provides guidelines to improve its applicability. It makes a fair evaluation based on experiments made on a set of signal and image processing applications. It identifies the missing elements of the design flow to use DPR in professional electronics applications. Finally, it introduces a fast reconfiguration manager providing an 84-time improvement compared to the vendor solution.

  10. Conversion electron surface imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, G M; Wehner, A

    1999-01-01

    A method of imaging the Moessbauer absorption over the surface of a sample based on counting conversion electrons emitted from the surface following resonant absorption of gamma radiation is described. This Conversion Electron Surface Imaging (CESI) method is somewhat analogous to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), particularly chemical shift imaging, and similar tomographic reconstruction techniques are involved in extracting the image. The theory behind the technique and a prototype device is described, as well as the results of proof-of-principle experiments which demonstrate the function of the device. Eventually this same prototype device will be part of a system to determine the spatial variation of the Moessbauer spectrum over the surface of a sample. Applications include imaging of variations of surface properties of steels and other iron containing alloys, as well as other surfaces over which sup 5 sup 7 Fe has been deposited.

  11. NOTE: Recording accelerator monitor units during electronic portal imaging: application to collimator position verification during IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-06-01

    The application of multiple portal image acquisition to collimator position verification during dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC) using a commercial camera-based electronic portal imaging device (EPID) (TheraviewTM, Cablon Medical BV, Leusden, The Netherlands) mounted on an Elekta SL15i accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is described. This is achieved using a custom-built dose acquisition system optically interfaced to both the camera control unit of the EPID and the monitor unit (MU) channel of the accelerator. The method uses the beam blanking camera control signal to trigger the dose acquisition system to read the cumulative accelerator MUs at the beginning and end of each period of image formation. A maximum delay of 15 ms has been estimated for recording of accelerator MUs in the current system. The camera interface was observed to have no effect on the operation of the EPID during normal clinical use and could therefore be left permanently in situ. Use of the system for collimator position verification of a test case is presented. The technique described uses a specific camera-based EPID and accelerator, although the general principle of using an EPID control signal to trigger recording of accelerator MUs may be applicable to other EPIDs/accelerators with suitable knowledge of the accelerator dosimetry system.

  12. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging. 2. Radiofrequency FT-EPR Imaging. Sankaran Subramanian and Murali C Krishna. Keywords. FT-EPR, Hahn-echo, acquisition delay, single-point imaging (SPI), gradient-echo, k-space, echo-SPI, carbogen, oxygen relaxivity, T2*. T2- and T1-based oximetry, co- registration ...

  14. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed, E-mail: samasoumia@hotmail.fr [Science and Technology Faculty, El Bachir El Ibrahimi University, BordjBouArreridj (Algeria); Messali, Zoubeida, E-mail: messalizoubeida@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Electrical Engineering(LGE), University of M' sila (Algeria); Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil, E-mail: abdeldjalil.ouahabi@univ-tours.fr [Polytechnic School, University of Tours (EPU - PolytechTours), EPU - Energy and Electronics Department (France); Trepout, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr; Messaoudi, Cedric, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr; Marco, Sergio, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr [INSERMU759, University Campus Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  16. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ˜500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  17. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  19. Development of a high-brightness electron beam system towards femtosecond microdiffraction and imaging and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kiseok

    To make a `molecular movie', an `ultrafast camera' with simultaneously very high spatial and temporal resolution to match the atomic dynamics is required. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) technique based on femtosecond laser technology can provide a basic framework for realizing such an `ultrafast camera' although this technology has not achieved its full utility as a universal imaging and spectroscopy tool, due to limitations in generation and preservation of a high-brightness electron beam in the ultrafast regime. With moderate electron pulse intensity (103-10 4 electrons per pulse), UED experiments have been successfully applied to investigate photo-induced non-thermal melting processes, structural phase transitions, and transient surface charge dynamics. Based on the previous development of ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV), we extend the UEDV with an aim to identify the different constituents of the measured transient surface voltage (TSV) and discuss their respective roles in Coulomb refraction. From applying this methodology on Si/SiO2 interface and surfaces decorated with nano-structures, we are able to elucidate localized charge injection, dielectric relaxation, carrier diffusion, and enhancements on such processes through surface plasmon resonances, with direct resolution in the charge state and possibly correlated structural dynamics at these interfaces. These new results highlight the high sensitivity of the interfacial charge transfer to the nanoscale modification, environment, and surface plasmonics enhancement and demonstrate the diffraction-based ultrafast surface voltage probe as a unique method to resolve the nanometer scale charge carrier dynamics. The future applications of the UED and UEDV techniques lie in the direct visualization and site-selected studies such as nano-structured interfaces, a single nanoparticle or domain, which can be enabled by the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron beam system for

  20. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Uytven, Eric [National Research Council Institute for Biodiagnostics, 435 Ellice Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 1Y6 (Canada); Pistorius, Stephen [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3A 1R9 (Canada); Gordon, Richard [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)], E-mail: eric.vanuytven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Stephen.Pistorius@cancercare.mb.ca, E-mail: gordonr@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2008-10-07

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p < 0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  1. A multi-purpose readout electronics for CdTe and CZT detectors for x-ray imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X. B.; Deng, Z.; Xing, Y. X.; Liu, Y. N.

    2017-09-01

    A multi-purpose readout electronics based on the DPLMS digital filter has been developed for CdTe and CZT detectors for X-ray imaging applications. Different filter coefficients can be synthesized optimized either for high energy resolution at relatively low counting rate or for high rate photon-counting with reduced energy resolution. The effects of signal width constraints, sampling rate and length were numerical studied by Mento Carlo simulation with simple CRRC shaper input signals. The signal width constraint had minor effect and the ENC was only increased by 6.5% when the signal width was shortened down to 2 τc. The sampling rate and length depended on the characteristic time constants of both input and output signals. For simple CR-RC input signals, the minimum number of the filter coefficients was 12 with 10% increase in ENC when the output time constant was close to the input shaping time. A prototype readout electronics was developed for demonstration, using a previously designed analog front ASIC and a commercial ADC card. Two different DPLMS filters were successfully synthesized and applied for high resolution and high counting rate applications respectively. The readout electronics was also tested with a linear array CdTe detector. The energy resolutions of Am-241 59.5 keV peak were measured to be 6.41% in FWHM for the high resolution filter and to be 13.58% in FWHM for the high counting rate filter with 160 ns signal width constraint.

  2. Quantitative analysis with electron energy-loss: spectroscopic imaging and its application in pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L.D. Beckers (Guus)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAfter the invention of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) in 1931 by Ruska and Knoll, it took about 20 years to develop the inslmment into a tool for ultrastructural research. In material science this led to the ability to visualize and investigate atomic arrangements through the

  3. Electronic circuits fundamentals & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Electronics explained in one volume, using both theoretical and practical applications.New chapter on Raspberry PiCompanion website contains free electronic tools to aid learning for students and a question bank for lecturersPractical investigations and questions within each chapter help reinforce learning Mike Tooley provides all the information required to get to grips with the fundamentals of electronics, detailing the underpinning knowledge necessary to appreciate the operation of a wide range of electronic circuits, including amplifiers, logic circuits, power supplies and oscillators. The

  4. Imaging Characteristics Of Electronic Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    1989-03-01

    Electronic imaging in the form of television has served the public for over 40 years. Television cameras have up to now used mostly photoconductive tubes to capture the live image. However, the last ten years have seen the advances in microelectronics, including VLSI technology, introduce newer, more flexible ways to record images via the solid state sensor. One version of the solid state sensor, the charge coupled device (CCD) has found its way into consumer electronic imaging, replacing the Super 8 movie system, and today, portable, commercial television cameras are starting to use CCD arrays instead of the more conventional photoconductive tubes. There are several electronic still cameras (ESC) on the market using solid state sensors, but due to the limited number of imaging sites or pixels on these imaging sensors, the quality is far below that of present photographic-based systems. This paper will consider imaging characteristics of photoconductive tubes (solid state imaging sensors) and how they compare to photographic film. Also, based on a system analysis, the requirements for a solid state sensor that will provide image quality equal to current photographic systems will be defined. The importance of digital image processing and digital image compression will also be discussed.

  5. Shearography deformation imaging. Power electronics applications; Imagerie de deformation par shearographie. Application a l'electronique de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorez, S.; Dilhaire, S.; Patino Lopez, L.D.; Claeys, W. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 33 (France)

    2002-06-01

    We present an optical method to study the thermomechanical behaviour of electronic devices. Non-destructive, this method is based on speckle interferometry called shearography and allows measuring the deformation at each point of the surface sample. This method is robust beside perturbations (airflow, vibration...) and is therefore adapted to industrial environment. (authors)

  6. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unlike MRI which addresses the naturally occurring abundant water protons in vivo, EPRI re- quires the administration of non-toxic paramagnetic free radicals into the living system prior to monitoring their distribution. The principle behind imaging is to generate profiles of EPR spectra in presence ...

  7. Imaging electron motion in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-02-01

    A cooled scanning probe microscope (SPM) is an ideal tool to image electronic motion in graphene: the SPM tip acts as a scanning gate, which interacts with the electron gas below. We introduce the technique using our group’s previous work on imaging electron flow from a quantum point contact in a GaAs 2DEG and tuning an InAs quantum dot in an InAs/InP nanowire. Carriers in graphene have very different characteristics: electrons and holes travel at a constant speed with no bandgap, and they pass through potential barriers via Klein tunneling. In this paper, we review the extension of SPM imaging techniques to graphene. We image the cyclotron orbits passing between two narrow contacts in a single-atomic-layer graphene device in a perpendicular magnetic field. Magnetic focusing produces a peak in transmission between the contacts when the cyclotron diameter is equal to the contact spacing. The charged SPM tip deflects electrons passing from one contact to the other, changing the transmission when it interrupts the flow. By displaying the change in transmission as the tip is raster scanned above the sample, an image of flow is obtained. In addition, we have developed a complementary technique to image electronic charge using a cooled scanning capacitance microscope (SCM) that uses a sensitive charge preamplifier near the SPM tip to achieve a charge noise level 0.13 e Hz-1/2 with high spatial resolution 100 nm. The cooled SPM and SCM can be used to probe the motion of electrons on the nanoscale in graphene devices.

  8. Dosimetric characterization and application of an imaging beam line with a carbon electron target for megavoltage cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Ryan T; Hartmann, Julia; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Nixon, Earl; Alfredo, R; Siochi, C; Pennington, Edward C; Bayouth, John E

    2009-06-01

    Imaging dose from megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) can be significantly reduced without loss of image quality by using an imaging beam line (IBL), with no flattening filter and a carbon, rather than tungsten, electron target. The IBL produces a greater keV-range x-ray fluence than the treatment beam line (TBL), which results in a more optimal detector response. The IBL imaging dose is not necessarily negligible, however. In this work an IBL was dosimetrically modeled with the Philips Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS), verified experimentally, and applied to clinical cases. The IBL acquisition dose for a 200 degrees gantry rotation was verified in a customized acrylic cylindrical phantom at multiple imaging field sizes with 196 ion chamber measurements. Agreement between the measured and calculated IBL dose was quantified with the 3D gamma index. Representative IBL and TBL imaging dose distributions were calculated for head and neck and prostate patients and included in treatment plans using the imaging dose incorporation (IDI) method. Surface dose was measured for the TBL and IBL for four head and neck cancer patients with MOSFETs. The IBL model, when compared to the percentage depth dose and profile measurements, had 97% passing gamma indices for dosimetric and distance acceptance criteria of 3%, 3 mm, and 100% passed for 5.2%, 5.2 mm. For the ion chamber measurements of phantom image acquisition dose, the IBL model had 93% passing gamma indices for acceptance criteria of 3%, 3 mm, and 100% passed for 4%, 4 mm. Differences between the IBL- and TBL-based IMRT treatment plans created with the IDI method were dosimetrically insignificant for both the prostate and head and neck cases. For IBL and TBL beams with monitor unit values that would result in the delivery of the same dose to the depth of maximum dose under standard calibration conditions, the IBL imaging surface dose was higher than the TBL imaging surface dose by an average of 18

  9. Electronic Noses and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine LUMBRERAS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic noses are customized devices employed to detect and to identify gaseous mixtures, even to give the concentration of the atmosphere components. Nowadays, the research in this domain is more and more growing, in Europe and other countries in the world, for many applications, such as environmental protection, food industries, perfumery, public safety, medicine, and pharmacy. Electronic noses allow to detect many organic volatile compounds, for which there is no specific detector. They constitute an alternative to complex, long, and too expensive existing methods, unable to ensure continuous monitoring. Their conception deals with many related areas (metrology, chemistry, physics, electronics, informatics, statistics, modelisation as well as areas related to the molecules to be detected. The system training is a primary step: during a measurement under a gaseous atmosphere, we must record the sensor time-responses in a treatment system, while specifying the name of the concerned odor. This process must be repeated many times for each studied atmosphere, and for all the chosen atmospheres. So a learning data base can be created, made from representative parameters of all the realized measures. After this training stage, clustering software will classify the data analysis in “concentration” or “nature” groups. Using the group separation rules given by this supervised classification, the system will be able to find itself the name of an odor or a concentration.

  10. Cellular imaging electron tomography and related techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book highlights important techniques for cellular imaging and covers the basics and applications of electron tomography and related techniques. In addition, it considers practical aspects and broadens the technological focus by incorporating techniques that are only now becoming accessible (e.g. block face imaging).  The first part of the book describes the electron microscopy 3D technique available to scientists around the world, allowing them to characterize organelles, cells and tissues. The major emphasis is on new technologies like scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, though the book also reviews some of the more proven technologies like electron tomography. In turn, the second part is dedicated to the reconstruction of data sets, signal improvement and interpretation.

  11. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Continuation order customers for either of the original Advances will receiveVolume 90, the first combined volume.

  12. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mulvey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theory of image and contrast formation and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal structure determination and imaging of lattice defects X-ray microanalysis and energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The second edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the areas of energy-loss spectroscopy, crystal-lattice imaging and reflection electron microscopy

  14. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  15. Wavelets filtering for classification of very noisy electron microscopic single particles images- application on structure determination of VP5-VP19C recombinant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Ali

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Images of frozen hydrated [vitrified] virus particles were taken close-to-focus in an electron microscope containing structural signals at high spatial frequencies. These images had very low contrast due to the high levels of noise present in the image. The low contrast made particle selection, classification and orientation determination very difficult. The final purpose of the classification is to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the particle representing the class, which is usually the average. In this paper, the proposed method is based on wavelet filtering and multi-resolution processing for the classification and reconstruction of this very noisy data. A multivariate statistical analysis (MSA is used for this classification. Results The MSA classification method is noise dependant. A set of 2600 projections from a 3D map of a herpes simplex virus -to which noise was added- was classified by MSA. The classification shows the power of wavelet filtering in enhancing the quality of class averages (used in 3D reconstruction compared to Fourier band pass filtering. A 3D reconstruction of a recombinant virus (VP5-VP19C is presented as an application of multi-resolution processing for classification and reconstruction. Conclusion The wavelet filtering and multi-resolution processing method proposed in this paper offers a new way for processing very noisy images obtained from electron cryo-microscopes. The multi-resolution and filtering improves the speed and accuracy of classification, which is vital for the 3D reconstruction of biological objects. The VP5-VP19C recombinant virus reconstruction presented here is an example, which demonstrates the power of this method. Without this processing, it is not possible to get the correct 3D map of this virus.

  16. Polymers for electronic & photonic application

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C P

    2013-01-01

    The most recent advances in the use of polymeric materials by the electronic industry can be found in Polymers for Electronic and Photonic Applications. This bookprovides in-depth coverage of photoresis for micro-lithography, microelectronic encapsulants and packaging, insulators, dielectrics for multichip packaging,electronic and photonic applications of polymeric materials, among many other topics. Intended for engineers and scientists who design, process, and manufacturemicroelectronic components, this book will also prove useful for hybrid and systems packaging managers who want to be info

  17. A new electron-ion coincidence 3D momentum-imaging method and its application in probing strong field dynamics of 2-phenylethyl-N, N-dimethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Tu, Yi-Jung; Mignolet, Benoît; Couch, David; Dorney, Kevin; Nguyen, Quynh; Wooldridge, Laura; Murnane, Margaret; Remacle, Françoise; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Li, Wen

    2017-07-01

    We report the development of a new three-dimensional (3D) momentum-imaging setup based on conventional velocity map imaging to achieve the coincidence measurement of photoelectrons and photo-ions. This setup uses only one imaging detector (microchannel plates (MCP)/phosphor screen) but the voltages on electrodes are pulsed to push both electrons and ions toward the same detector. The ion-electron coincidence is achieved using two cameras to capture images of ions and electrons separately. The time-of-flight of ions and electrons are read out from MCP using a digitizer. We demonstrate this new system by studying the dissociative single and double ionization of PENNA (2-phenylethyl-N,N-dimethylamine). We further show that the camera-based 3D imaging system can operate at 10 kHz repetition rate.

  18. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Domier, C.W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Brower, D.L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI

  19. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: Experimental observations and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Su, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Egerton, R.F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Konno, M. [Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Wu, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhu, Y., E-mail: zhu@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. -- Research highlights: {yields} Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in an aberration-corrected electron microscope. {yields} High-resolution secondary electron imaging mechanism. {yields} Image contrast quantification and as functions of imaging conditions. {yields} Simultaneous acquisition of atomic images from surface and bulk.

  20. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the industrial applications of electron accelerators for modifying the physical, chemical or biological properties of materials and commercial products by treatment with ionizing radiation. Many beneficial effects can be obtained with these methods, which are known as radiation processing. The earliest practical applications occurred during the 1950s, and the business of radiation processing has been expanding since that time. The most prevalent applications are the modification of many different plastic and rubber products and the sterilization of single-use medical devices. Emerging applications are the pasteurization and preservation of foods and the treatment of toxic industrial wastes. Industrial accelerators can now provide electron energies greater than 10 MeV and average beam powers as high as 700 kW. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron beams is stimulating interest in the use of X-rays (bremsstrahlung) as an alternative to gamma rays from radioactive nuclides.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  2. Application of electron accelerator worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Sueo [Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Electron accelerator is an important radiation source for radiation technology, which covers broad fields such as industry, health care, food and environmental protection. There are about 1,000 electron accelerators for radiation processing worldwide. Electron accelerator has advantage over Co-60 irradiator in term of high dose rate and power, assurance of safety, and higher economic performance at larger volume of irradiation. Accelerator generating higher energy in the range of 10 MeV and high power electron beam is now commercially available. There is a trend to use high-energy electron accelerator replacing Co-60 in case of large through-put of medical products. Irradiated foods, in particular species, are on the commercial market in 35 countries. Electron accelerator is used efficiently and economically for production of new or modified polymeric materials through radiation-induced cross-linking, grafting and polymerization reaction. Another important application of electron beam is the curing of surface coatings in the manufacture of products. Electron accelerators of large capacity are used for cleaning exhaust gases in industrial scale. Economic feasibility studies of this electron beam process have shown that this technology is more cost effective than the conventional process. It should be noted that the conventional limestone process produce gypsum as a by-product, which cannot be used in some countries. By contrast, the by-product of the electron beam process is a valuable fertilizer. (Y. Tanaka)

  3. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cretu, Ovidiu, E-mail: cretu.ovidiu@nims.go.jp; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  4. Low-energy electron reflection from Au-passivated Ir(0 0 1) for application in imaging spin-filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyev, D.; Tusche, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Giebels, F.; Gollisch, H. [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Fakultät für Physik, Campus Duisburg, Lotharstr. 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Feder, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Universität Duisburg-Essen, Fakultät für Physik, Campus Duisburg, Lotharstr. 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Kirschner, J., E-mail: sekrki@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    We describe the principle, the preparation, and the calibration of a spin-polarizing electron mirror in multichannel spin polarimetry. We show data obtained by two independent devices (a goniometer-type LEED set-up and a momentum-microscope set-up) and compare them to the results of a relativistic multiple scattering theory. We also discuss the effects of misalignment and mosaic structure of the crystal. For multi-channel detection we find a 5000-fold increase of efficiency over a single-channel spin-detector. The lifetime of the detector is more than 6 months in ultra-high vacuum.

  5. Computer Applications: Using Electronic Spreadsheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Connee; And Others

    This instructional unit is intended to assist teachers in helping students learn to use electronic spreadsheets. The 11 learning activities included, all of which are designed for use in conjunction with Multiplan Spreadsheet Software, are arranged in order of increasing difficulty. An effort has been made to include problems applicable to each of…

  6. Fundamentals of electronic image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Weeks, Arthur R

    1996-01-01

    This book is directed to practicing engineers and scientists who need to understand the fundamentals of image processing theory and algorithms to perform their technical tasks. It is intended to fill the gap between existing high-level texts dedicated to specialists in the field and the need for a more practical, fundamental text on image processing. A variety of example images are used to enhance reader understanding of how particular image processing algorithms work.

  7. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  8. Imaging Electrons in Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, P.; Hanson, M.

    2005-03-01

    Single-electron quantum dots are important candidates for quantum information processing. We have developed a new technique to image electrons inside a single-electron quantum dot in the Coulomb blockade regime, using a scanning probe microscope (SPM) at liquid He temperatures (1). A single-electron quantum dot was formed in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) inside a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure by surface gates. Spatial images of an electron inside the dot were obtained by fixing the tip voltage and recording the dot conductance while scanning the SPM tip above the quantum dot. The images show a ring of increased conductance about the center of the dot, where the dot conductance is on the Coulomb blockade conductance peak between 0 and 1 electrons. Simulations show that this technique can be used to extract the wavefunction of electrons inside the dot if the tip perturbation is narrower than the wave function (2). A charged SPM tip promised to be a useful tool for manipulating electrons in quantum dot circuits. 1) P. Fallahi, A.C. Bleszynski, et al submitted to Nanoletters. 2) P. Fallahi, et al Proc. 27 Int. Conf. on Physics and Semiconductors (ICPS27), Flagstaff, July 26-30, 2004, in press. *This work was supported at Harvard University by DARPA DAAD19-01-1-0659 and by the NSEC, NSF PHY-01-17795, and at UCSB by QUEST NSF Science and Technology Center.

  9. Imaging with the gas electron multiplier

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), introduced several years ago, is finding numerous applications thanks to its excellent performances in detecting and localizing ionizing radiation. This note summarizes recent developments of the technology, and presents some examples of applications.

  10. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers-actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments-are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell.

  11. Ferroelectric emission studies for electron emission lithography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, In K; Ryu, Sang O; Suchicital, Carlos T A; Lee, June K; Kim, Byong M; Chung, Chee W

    2003-10-01

    Ferroelectric switching emission, dielectric switching emission, and pyroelectric emission were studied by patterning images on electron resist for electron emission lithography applications. It was observed that the pyroelectric emission is most acceptable for a high throughput 1:1 electron projection lithography application. A 1:1 electron projection lithography was demonstrated by patterning images with line widths of 30 microm and using pyroelectric emission. A degradation of the pyroelectric emission property of the material was observed during repeated heating cycles below the phase-transition temperature of the ferroelectric material. Annealing excursions above the phase transition temperature prevented the degradation of the pyroelectric emitter.

  12. Front-end electronics for imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Geronimo, G D; Radeka, V; Yu, B

    2001-01-01

    Front-end electronics for imaging detectors with large numbers of pixels (10 sup 5 -10 sup 7) is reviewed. The noise limits as a function of detector capacitance and power dissipation are presented for CMOS technology. Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) are discussed and their potential noise performance is illustrated.

  13. Quantitative methods for the analysis of electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skands, Peter Ulrik Vallø

    1996-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is an general introduction to quantitative methods for the analysis of digital microscope images. The images presented are primarily been acquired from Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) and interfermeter microscopes (IFM). The topic is approached though several examples...... foundation of the thesis fall in the areas of: 1) Mathematical Morphology; 2) Distance transforms and applications; and 3) Fractal geometry. Image analysis opens in general the possibility of a quantitative and statistical well founded measurement of digital microscope images. Herein lies also the conditions...

  14. Vacuum electronics applications at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2009-01-01

    CERN operates a large number of vacuum electronics based RF power amplifiers covering a wide frequency range – over 300 sockets with 24 different grid tubes and klystrons are in use and require constant care to insure reliable operation of the accelerators. This is in particular true for the LHC and its injector chain, for which a program of improvement and stepwise upgrade has started. These include IOT’s for the SPS and klystrons and modulators for Linac4 and SPL. The CLIC study and the CTF3 facility are relevant to vacuum electronics in many ways: The CLIC primary RF power, to be provided at 1 GHz, requires highest possible efficiency and phase stability, MBK’s are likely candidates. The CLIC RF power source and CTF3 are themselves large vacuum electronics applications, consequently there are areas of common interest and concern, including fabrication techniques, pulse compression techniques, breakdown and multipactor theory and simulation, material fatigue, numerical analysis of slow-wave structures...

  15. DEVELOPING APPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Șoavă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We are in the early 3rd millennium as companies face the need to exploit technology changing computer environments, in order to improve customer satisfaction and reduce costs. Thus, the development of e-business, the efficient use of new information technologies in business, by developing an alternative sales channel with relatively low costs, it manages to establish relationships with incomparably greater number of customers, to traditional approaches. Starting from these general considerations, we conducted this work we divided it into four parts. In the first part we present general context in which companies can achieve needs using new technologies, then we reviewed the basic elements in developing e-business type applications presenting their main benefits. Next, I approached refining models for e-business software development and use of distributed architectures for electronic commerce, concluding with a set of conclusions.

  16. Quantitative X-ray Elemental Imaging in Plant Materials at the Subcellular Level with a Transmission Electron Microscope: Applications and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoliang Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX is a technique for determining the distribution of elements in various materials. Here, we report a protocol for high-spatial-resolution X-ray elemental imaging and quantification in plant tissues at subcellular levels with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM. Calibration standards were established by producing agar blocks loaded with increasing KCl or NaCl concentrations. TEM-EDX images showed that the salts were evenly distributed in the agar matrix, but tended to aggregate at high concentrations. The mean intensities of K+, Cl−, and Na+ derived from elemental images were linearly correlated to the concentrations of these elements in the agar, over the entire concentration range tested (R > 0.916. We applied this method to plant root tissues. X-ray images were acquired at an actual resolution of 50 nm ´ 50 nm to 100 nm ´ 100 nm. We found that cell walls exhibited higher elemental concentrations than vacuoles. Plants exposed to salt stress showed dramatic accumulation of Na+ and Cl− in the transport tissues, and reached levels similar to those applied in the external solution (300 mM. The advantage of TEM-EDX mapping was the high-spatial-resolution achieved for imaging elemental distributions in a particular area with simultaneous quantitative analyses of multiple target elements.

  17. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  18. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jie (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Intelligent Medical Research Center

    2013-07-01

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  19. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  20. Electronic Imaging in Astronomy Detectors and Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of Electronic Imaging in Astronomy: Detectors and Instrumentation describes the remarkable developments that have taken place in astronomical detectors and instrumentation in recent years – from the invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD) in 1970 to the current era of very large telescopes, such as the Keck 10-meter telescopes in Hawaii with their laser guide-star adaptive optics which rival the image quality of the Hubble Space Telescope. Authored by one of the world’s foremost experts on the design and development of electronic imaging systems for astronomy, this book has been written on several levels to appeal to a broad readership. Mathematical expositions are designed to encourage a wider audience, especially among the growing community of amateur astronomers with small telescopes with CCD cameras. The book can be used at the college level for an introductory course on modern astronomical detectors and instruments, and as a supplement for a practical or laboratory class.

  1. Image analyzers for bioscience applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, P

    1990-01-01

    Image analysis systems are becoming more sophosticated, less costly, and very common in research laboratories. Therefore, the bioscience researcher is faced with a bewildering array of choices in establishing an image analysis facility. Critical components and characteristics of commercial image analyzers are discussed. State-of-the-art systems feature a graphical user interface, a powerful operating system (e.g., Microsoft OS/2), 1000 line image acquisition, processing and display, true color imaging, and very flexible scanner interfaces. Such systems are best suited to technically difficult applications, such as ratio fluorescence, or to automated analysis of anatomical features, particularly in stained material. Less powerful image analyzers offer medium resolution, and typically work with monochrome data acquired from video cameras. Such systems are suitable for many bioscience applications, including quantitative autoradiography and routine morphometry.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  3. 2015 Applications in Electronics Pervading Industry, Environment and Society Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a thorough overview of cutting-edge research on electronics applications relevant to industry, the environment, and society at large. It covers a broad spectrum of application domains, from automotive to space and from health to security, while devoting special attention to the use of embedded devices and sensors for imaging, communication and control. The book is based on the 2015 ApplePies Conference, held in Rome, which brought together researchers and stakeholders to consider the most significant current trends in the field of applied electronics and to debate visions for the future. Areas addressed by the conference included information communication technology; biotechnology and biomedical imaging; space; secure, clean and efficient energy; the environment; and smart, green and integrated transport. As electronics technology continues to develop apace, constantly meeting previously unthinkable targets, further attention needs to be directed toward the electronics applications and the ...

  4. Applications in Electronics Pervading Industry, Environment and Society

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough overview of cutting-edge research on electronics applications relevant to industry, the environment, and society at large. A wide spectrum of application domains are covered, from automotive to space and from health to security, and special attention is devoted to the use of embedded devices and sensors for imaging, communication, and control. The book is based on the 2014 APPLEPIES Conference, held in Rome, which brought together researchers and stakeholders to consider the most significant current trends in the field of applied electronics and to debate visions for the future. Areas covered by the conference included information communication technology; biotechnology and biomedical imaging; space; secure, clean, and efficient energy; the environment; and smart, green, and integrated transport. As electronics technology continues to develop apace, constantly meeting previously unthinkable targets, further attention needs to be directed toward the electronics applications and th...

  5. Multispectral Imaging for Surveillance Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Riseby, Emil; Svensson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Silicon based sensors is a commonly used technology in digital cameras today. That has made such cameras relatively cheap and widely used. Unfortunately they are constructed to capture and represent image quality for humans. Several image applications work better without the restrictions of the visible spectrum. Human visual restrictions are often indirectly put on technology by using images showing only visible light. Thinking outside the box in this case is seeing beyond the visible spectrum.

  6. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manikandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The image processing is one of the leading technologies of computer applications. Image processing is a type of signal processing, the input for image processor is an image or video frame and the output will be an image or subset of image [1]. Computer graphics and computer vision process uses an image processing techniques. Image processing systems are used in various environments like medical fields, computer-aided design (CAD, research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP [2]. Loan approval process has been tedious process, the E-LAP system attempts to reduce the complexity of loan approval process. Customers have to login to fill the loan application form online with all details and submit the form. The loan department then processes the submitted form and then sends an acknowledgement mail via the E-LAP to the requested customer with the details about list of documents required for the loan approval process [3]. The approaching customer can upload the scanned copies of all required documents. All this interaction between customer and bank take place using an E-LAP system.

  7. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  8. Application of automatic image analysis in wood science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles W. McMillin

    1982-01-01

    In this paper I describe an image analysis system and illustrate with examples the application of automatic quantitative measurement to wood science. Automatic image analysis, a powerful and relatively new technology, uses optical, video, electronic, and computer components to rapidly derive information from images with minimal operator interaction. Such instruments...

  9. Imaging Electrons in Ultra-thin Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E.

    2011-12-01

    Ultra-thin semiconductor nanowires are promising systems in which to explore novel low-dimensional physics and are attractive candidates for future nanoelectronics. Ultra-thin nanowires with diameters of 20 to 30 nm are essentially one-dimensional (ID) for moderate electron number, because only one radial subband is occupied. Low-temperature scanning gate microscopy is especially well suited for improving our understanding of nanowires in order to optimize the construction of nanowire systems. We use a home-built liquid-He cooled scanning gate microscope (SGM) to probe and manipulate electrons beneath the surface of devices. The SGM's conductance images are obtained by scanning the charged SGM tip above the sample and recording the change in conductance through the device as a function of tip position. We present simulations of extracting the amplitude of the 1D electron wavefunction along the length of the quantum dot in an ultra-thin InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire (diameter = 30 nm) using a SGM. A weakly perturbing SGM tip slightly dents the electron wavefunction inside the quantum dot, and we propose measuring the change in energy of the dot due to the perturbation as a function of tip position. By measuring the change in energy of the dot and by knowing the form of the tip potential, the amplitude of the wavefunction can be found. This extraction technique could serve as a powerful tool to improve our understanding of electron behavior in quasi-1 D systems. We have used our SGM to image the conductance through an ultra-thin (diameter ˜ 30 nm) 1nAs nanowire with two InP barriers. Our imaging technique provides detailed information regarding the position and flow of electrons in the nanowire. We demonstrate that the charged SPM tip's position or voltage can be used to control the number of electrons on the quantum dots. We spatially locate three quantum dots in series along the length of the ultra-thin nanowire. Using energy level spectroscopy and the

  10. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Brenizer, J S; Gibbs, K M; Mengers, P; Stebbings, C T; Polansky, D; Rogerson, D J

    1999-01-01

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included sup 6 Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifi...

  11. Biological applications of phase-contrast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Here, I review the principles and applications of phase-contrast electron microscopy using phase plates. First, I develop the principle of phase contrast based on a minimal model of microscopy, introducing a double Fourier-transform process to mathematically formulate the image formation. Next, I explain four phase-contrast (PC) schemes, defocus PC, Zernike PC, Hilbert differential contrast, and schlieren optics, as image-filtering processes in the context of the minimal model, with particular emphases on the Zernike PC and corresponding Zernike phase plates. Finally, I review applications of Zernike PC cryo-electron microscopy to biological systems such as protein molecules, virus particles, and cells, including single-particle analysis to delineate three-dimensional (3D) structures of protein and virus particles and cryo-electron tomography to reconstruct 3D images of complex protein systems and cells.

  12. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  13. Digital imaging of stem cells by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathananthan, A Henry; Nottola, Stefania A

    2007-01-01

    This chapter deals with basic techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy applicable to stem cell imaging. It is sometimes desirable to characterize the fine structure of embryonic and adult stem cells to supplement the images obtained by phase-contrast and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy to compare with the microstructure of cells and tissues reported in the literature. This would help confirm their true identity whilst defining their surface and internal morphology. The intention is to put a face on stem cells during their differentiation.

  14. The role of electronic media in shaping the country's image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azel Zhanibek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the influence of electronic media in the country to external image of Kazakhstan. Special attention is paid to the experience of various countries in promoting the country's image by electronic media.

  15. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. - Highlights: • It is explained how and why symmetry improves the efficiency of inelastic scattering calculations in general. • This includes approximate symmetries, which are often easier to specify. • Specific examples are given for core-loss scattering in STEM. • The utilization of approximate symmetries associated with ELNES, the detector geometry, and the energy loss are also discussed.

  16. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  17. Industrial Applications of Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciora, Radu Adrian; Simion, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-11-01

    The recent advances in sensors quality and processing power provide us with excellent tools for designing more complex image processing and pattern recognition tasks. In this paper we review the existing applications of image processing and pattern recognition in industrial engineering. First we define the role of vision in an industrial. Then a dissemination of some image processing techniques, feature extraction, object recognition and industrial robotic guidance is presented. Moreover, examples of implementations of such techniques in industry are presented. Such implementations include automated visual inspection, process control, part identification, robots control. Finally, we present some conclusions regarding the investigated topics and directions for future investigation

  18. Physics for Medical Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Caner, Alesssandra; Rahal, Ghita

    2007-01-01

    The book introduces the fundamental aspects of digital imaging and covers four main themes: Ultrasound techniques and imaging applications; Magnetic resonance and MPJ in hospital; Digital imaging with X-rays; and Emission tomography (PET and SPECT). Each of these topics is developed by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, quality and safety aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Some issues specific to the individual techniques are also treated, e.g. choice of radioisotopes or contrast agents, optimisation of data acquisition and st

  19. Medical imaging technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The book has two intentions. First, it assembles the latest research in the field of medical imaging technology in one place. Detailed descriptions of current state-of-the-art medical imaging systems (comprised of x-ray CT, MRI, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine) and data processing techniques are discussed. Information is provided that will give interested engineers and scientists a solid foundation from which to build with additional resources. Secondly, it exposes the reader to myriad applications that medical imaging technology has enabled.

  20. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  1. Electrospun Polymer Fibers for Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzio, Alessandro; Canesi, Eleonora Valeria; Bertarelli, Chiara; Caironi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Nano- and micro- fibers of conjugated polymer semiconductors are particularly interesting both for applications and for fundamental research. They allow an investigation into how electronic properties are influenced by size confinement and chain orientation within microstructures that are not readily accessible within thin films. Moreover, they open the way to many applications in organic electronics, optoelectronics and sensing. Electro-spinning, the technique subject of this review, is a simple method to effectively form and control conjugated polymer fibers. We provide the basics of the technique and its recent advancements for the formation of highly conducting and high mobility polymer fibers towards their adoption in electronic applications. PMID:28788493

  2. Electrospun Polymer Fibers for Electronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Luzio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano- and micro- fibers of conjugated polymer semiconductors are particularly interesting both for applications and for fundamental research. They allow an investigation into how electronic properties are influenced by size confinement and chain orientation within microstructures that are not readily accessible within thin films. Moreover, they open the way to many applications in organic electronics, optoelectronics and sensing. Electro-spinning, the technique subject of this review, is a simple method to effectively form and control conjugated polymer fibers. We provide the basics of the technique and its recent advancements for the formation of highly conducting and high mobility polymer fibers towards their adoption in electronic applications.

  3. Image restoration in cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penczek, Pawel A

    2010-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are used to obtain, given experimental measurements, the best possible approximation of the original object within the limits imposed by instrumental conditions and noise level in the data. In molecular electron microscopy (EM), we are mainly interested in linear methods that preserve the respective relationships between mass densities within the restored map. Here, we describe the methodology of image restoration in structural EM, and more specifically, we will focus on the problem of the optimum recovery of Fourier amplitudes given electron microscope data collected under various defocus settings. We discuss in detail two classes of commonly used linear methods, the first of which consists of methods based on pseudoinverse restoration, and which is further subdivided into mean-square error, chi-square error, and constrained based restorations, where the methods in the latter two subclasses explicitly incorporates non-white distribution of noise in the data. The second class of methods is based on the Wiener filtration approach. We show that the Wiener filter-based methodology can be used to obtain a solution to the problem of amplitude correction (or "sharpening") of the EM map that makes it visually comparable to maps determined by X-ray crystallography, and thus amenable to comparative interpretation. Finally, we present a semiheuristic Wiener filter-based solution to the problem of image restoration given sets of heterogeneous solutions. We conclude the chapter with a discussion of image restoration protocols implemented in commonly used single particle software packages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetry for Electron Beam Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron bean dosimetry, on one hand developaent of thin fil« dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand developaent of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film...

  5. The application of neutron activation analysis, scanning electron microscope, and radiographic imaging for the characterization of electrochemically deposited layers of lanthanide and actinide elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebe, D.; Eberhardt, K.; Hartmann, W.; Häger, T.; Hübner, A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Thörle, P.; Schädel, M.; Steiner, J.

    2008-06-01

    Lanthanide and actinide targets are prepared at the University of Mainz by molecular plating, an electrochemical deposition from an organic solvent, for heavy-ion reaction studies at GSI. To acquire information about deposition yield, target thickness, and target homogeneity, the following analysis methods are applied. With neutron activation analysis (NAA) the deposition yield and the average thickness of the deposited material is determined. We report on the analytical procedure of NAA performed subsequent to the molecular plating process. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to determine the morphology of the target surfaces. In combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), we also could obtain qualitative information about the chemical form of the deposited material. So far, gadolinium, samarium, holmium, and uranium targets have been investigated with SEM/EDS. With radiographic imaging (RI), targets of uranium prepared by molecular plating and by vacuum vaporization are investigated. This method is suitable to obtain information about the spatial distribution, the homogeneity, and the thickness of the target layer deposition.

  6. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  7. Power electronics handbook components, circuits and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mazda, F F

    1993-01-01

    Power Electronics Handbook: Components, Circuits, and Applications is a collection of materials about power components, circuit design, and applications. Presented in a practical form, theoretical information is given as formulae. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 deals with the usual components found in power electronics such as semiconductor devices and power semiconductor control components, their electronic compatibility, and protection. Part 2 tackles parts and principles related to circuits such as switches; link frequency chargers; converters; and AC line control, and Part 3

  8. Biomedical Optical Imaging Technologies Design and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to design of biomedical optical imaging technologies and their applications. The main topics include: fluorescence imaging, confocal imaging, micro-endoscope, polarization imaging, hyperspectral imaging, OCT imaging, multimodal imaging and spectroscopic systems. Each chapter is written by the world leaders of the respective fields, and will cover: principles and limitations of optical imaging technology, system design and practical implementation for one or two specific applications, including design guidelines, system configuration, optical design, component requirements and selection, system optimization and design examples, recent advances and applications in biomedical researches and clinical imaging. This book serves as a reference for students and researchers in optics and biomedical engineering.

  9. Atomic Imaging Using Secondary Electrons in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope: Experimental Observations and Possible Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, D.; Inada, H.; Egerton, R.F.; Konno, M.; Wua, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-11-11

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondaryelectrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmissionelectron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. Apossiblemechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  10. Image wavelet decomposition and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treil, N.; Mallat, S.; Bajcsy, R.

    1989-01-01

    The general problem of computer vision has been investigated for more that 20 years and is still one of the most challenging fields in artificial intelligence. Indeed, taking a look at the human visual system can give us an idea of the complexity of any solution to the problem of visual recognition. This general task can be decomposed into a whole hierarchy of problems ranging from pixel processing to high level segmentation and complex objects recognition. Contrasting an image at different representations provides useful information such as edges. An example of low level signal and image processing using the theory of wavelets is introduced which provides the basis for multiresolution representation. Like the human brain, we use a multiorientation process which detects features independently in different orientation sectors. So, images of the same orientation but of different resolutions are contrasted to gather information about an image. An interesting image representation using energy zero crossings is developed. This representation is shown to be experimentally complete and leads to some higher level applications such as edge and corner finding, which in turn provides two basic steps to image segmentation. The possibilities of feedback between different levels of processing are also discussed.

  11. Neural Network for Nanoscience Scanning Electron Microscope Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Mohammad Hadi; Aversa, Rossella; Cozzini, Stefano; Ciancio, Regina; Leto, Angelo; Brandino, Giuseppe Piero

    2017-10-16

    In this paper we applied transfer learning techniques for image recognition, automatic categorization, and labeling of nanoscience images obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Roughly 20,000 SEM images were manually classified into 10 categories to form a labeled training set, which can be used as a reference set for future applications of deep learning enhanced algorithms in the nanoscience domain. The categories chosen spanned the range of 0-Dimensional (0D) objects such as particles, 1D nanowires and fibres, 2D films and coated surfaces, and 3D patterned surfaces such as pillars. The training set was used to retrain on the SEM dataset and to compare many convolutional neural network models (Inception-v3, Inception-v4, ResNet). We obtained compatible results by performing a feature extraction of the different models on the same dataset. We performed additional analysis of the classifier on a second test set to further investigate the results both on particular cases and from a statistical point of view. Our algorithm was able to successfully classify around 90% of a test dataset consisting of SEM images, while reduced accuracy was found in the case of images at the boundary between two categories or containing elements of multiple categories. In these cases, the image classification did not identify a predominant category with a high score. We used the statistical outcomes from testing to deploy a semi-automatic workflow able to classify and label images generated by the SEM. Finally, a separate training was performed to determine the volume fraction of coherently aligned nanowires in SEM images. The results were compared with what was obtained using the Local Gradient Orientation method. This example demonstrates the versatility and the potential of transfer learning to address specific tasks of interest in nanoscience applications.

  12. Materials and applications of bioresorbable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xian

    2018-01-01

    Bioresorbable electronics is a new type of electronics technology that can potentially lead to biodegradable and dissolvable electronic devices to replace current built-to-last circuits predominantly used in implantable devices and consumer electronics. Such devices dissolve in an aqueous environment in time periods from seconds to months, and generate biological safe products. This paper reviews materials, fabrication techniques, and applications of bioresorbable electronics, and aims to inspire more revolutionary bioresorbable systems that can generate broader social and economic impact. Existing challenges and potential solutions in developing bioresorbable electronics have also been presented to arouse more joint research efforts in this field to build systematic technology framework. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61604108) and the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin (No. 16JCYBJC40600).

  13. Electron Beam Source for Technological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, V. A.; Shchedrin, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Electron beam source with thermionic cathode and its application for technological purposes are described.Three electrode electron gun has a lanthanum hexaboride disc emitter with indirect heating. Accelerating voltage can be varied from 20 to 100 kV.Maximum d.c. current is 1-2 A for emitter diameter 4-5 mm.Magnetic focusing lens of solenoidal type ensures high beam power density on the object processed - up to 10 MW per sq.sm.This electron source was used for welding and thermoprocessing - surface hardening of ball-bearings. To ensure required complex power distribution on their surface special electronic unit for electron beam position control was designed.At the surface of ball-bearings the layer with hardness of 62-64 HRC and thickness about 1-1.5 mm was formed after electron processing that considerably increased their working period.

  14. Electronic Nose Technology and its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil MAHMOUDI

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Electronic Nose instrumentation has generated much interest internationally for its potential to solve a wide variety of problems in fragrance and cosmetics production, food and beverages manufacturing, chemical engineering, environmental monitoring and more recently medical diagnostic, bioprocesses and clinical diagnostic plant diseases. This instrument measure electrical resistance changes generated by adsorption of volatiles to the surface of electro active- polymer coated sensor- unique digital electronic fingerprint of aroma derived from multi-sensor- responses to distinct mixture of microbial volatiles. Major advances in information and gas sensor technology could enhance the diagnostic power of future bio-electronic nose and facilitate global surveillance mode of disease control and management. Several dozen companies are now designed and selling electronic nose units globally for a wide variety of expending markets. The present review includes principles of electronic nose technology, biosensor structure and applications of electronic nose in many fields.

  15. Electron beam throughput from raster to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywno, Marek

    2016-12-01

    Two architectures of electron beam tools are presented: single beam MEBES Exara designed and built by Etec Systems for mask writing, and the Reflected E-Beam Lithography tool (REBL), designed and built by KLA-Tencor under a DARPA Agreement No. HR0011-07-9-0007. Both tools have implemented technologies not used before to achieve their goals. The MEBES X, renamed Exara for marketing purposes, used an air bearing stage running in vacuum to achieve smooth continuous scanning. The REBL used 2 dimensional imaging to distribute charge to a 4k pixel swath to achieve writing times on the order of 1 wafer per hour, scalable to throughput approaching optical projection tools. Three stage architectures were designed for continuous scanning of wafers: linear maglev, rotary maglev, and dual linear maglev.

  16. Applications of scientific imaging in environmental toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Demerdash, Aref M.

    The national goals of clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems are a few of the primary forces that drive the need for better environmental monitoring. As we approach the end of the 1990s, the environmental questions at regional to global scales are being redefined and refined in the light of developments in environmental understanding and technological capability. Research in the use of scientific imaging data for the study of the environment is urgently needed in order to explore the possibilities of utilizing emerging new technologies. The objective of this research proposal is to demonstrate the usability of a wealth of new technology made available in the last decade to providing a better understanding of environmental problems. Research is focused in two imaging techniques macro and micro imaging. Several examples of applications of scientific imaging in research in the field of environmental toxicology were presented. This was achieved on two scales, micro and macro imaging. On the micro level four specific examples were covered. First, the effect of utilizing scanning electron microscopy as an imaging tool in enhancing taxa identification when studying diatoms was presented. Second, scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive x-ray analyzer were demonstrated as a valuable and effective tool for identifying and analyzing household dust samples. Third, electronic autoradiography combined with FT-IR microscopy were used to study the distribution pattern of [14C]-Malathion in rats as a result of dermal exposure. The results of the autoradiography made on skin sections of the application site revealed the presence of [ 14C]-activity in the first region of the skin. These results were evidenced by FT-IR microscopy. The obtained results suggest that the penetration of Malathion into the skin and other tissues is vehicle and dose dependent. The results also suggest the use of FT-IR microscopy imaging for monitoring the disposition of

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Polydopamine Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Coy, L Emerson; Scheibe, Błażej; Czechowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria; Jurga, Stefan; Tadyszak, Krzysztof

    2015-08-13

    A thorough investigation of biomimetic polydopamine (PDA) by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is shown. In addition, temperature dependent spectroscopic EPR data are presented in the range 3.8-300 K. Small discrepancies in magnetic susceptibility behavior are observed between previously reported melanin samples. These variations were attributed to thermally acitivated processes. More importantly, EPR spatial-spatial 2D imaging of polydopamine radicals on a phantom is presented for the first time. In consequence, a new possible application of polydopamine as EPR imagining marker is addressed.

  18. Biomedical image understanding methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Joo-Hwee; Xiong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to understanding and interpreting digital images in medical and functional applications Biomedical Image Understanding focuses on image understanding and semantic interpretation, with clear introductions to related concepts, in-depth theoretical analysis, and detailed descriptions of important biomedical applications. It covers image processing, image filtering, enhancement, de-noising, restoration, and reconstruction; image segmentation and feature extraction; registration; clustering, pattern classification, and data fusion. With contributions from ex

  19. Statistical reconstruction algorithms for continuous wave electron spin resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissos, Imry; Levit, Michael; Feuer, Arie; Blank, Aharon

    2013-06-01

    Electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI) is an important branch of ESR that deals with heterogeneous samples ranging from semiconductor materials to small live animals and even humans. ESRI can produce either spatial images (providing information about the spatially dependent radical concentration) or spectral-spatial images, where an extra dimension is added to describe the absorption spectrum of the sample (which can also be spatially dependent). The mapping of oxygen in biological samples, often referred to as oximetry, is a prime example of an ESRI application. ESRI suffers frequently from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which results in long acquisition times and poor image quality. A broader use of ESRI is hampered by this slow acquisition, which can also be an obstacle for many biological applications where conditions may change relatively quickly over time. The objective of this work is to develop an image reconstruction scheme for continuous wave (CW) ESRI that would make it possible to reduce the data acquisition time without degrading the reconstruction quality. This is achieved by adapting the so-called "statistical reconstruction" method, recently developed for other medical imaging modalities, to the specific case of CW ESRI. Our new algorithm accounts for unique ESRI aspects such as field modulation, spectral-spatial imaging, and possible limitation on the gradient magnitude (the so-called "limited angle" problem). The reconstruction method shows improved SNR and contrast recovery vs. commonly used back-projection-based methods, for a variety of simulated synthetic samples as well as in actual CW ESRI experiments.

  20. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. Manikandan; C.S. Celin; V.M. Gayathri

    2015-01-01

    ...), research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP) [2...

  1. Imaging and Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Romain; Tan, Sisareuth; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and other body fluids. EVs raise major interest for their diverse physiopathological roles and their potential biomedical applications. However, the characterization and quantification of EVs constitute major challenges, mainly due to their small size and the lack of methods adapted for their study. Electron microscopy has made significant contributions to the EV field since their initial discovery. Here, we describe the use of two transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for imaging and quantifying EVs. Cryo-TEM combined with receptor-specific gold labeling is applied to reveal the morphology, size, and phenotype of EVs, while their enumeration is achieved after high-speed sedimentation on EM grids.

  2. Vertical Silicon Nanowires for Image Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyunsung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional image sensors achieve color imaging using absorptive organic dye filters. These face considerable challenges however in the trend toward ever higher pixel densities and advanced imaging methods such as multispectral imaging and polarization-resolved imaging. In this dissertation, we investigate the optical properties of vertical silicon nanowires with the goal of image sensor applications. First, we demonstrate a multispectral imaging system that uses a novel filter that consists...

  3. Color imaging fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhard, Erik; Oguz Akyuz, Ahmet; Johnson, Garrett

    2008-01-01

    This book provides the reader with an understanding of what color is, where color comes from, and how color can be used correctly in many different applications. The authors first treat the physics of light and its interaction with matter at the atomic level, so that the origins of color can be appreciated. The intimate relationship between energy levels, orbital states, and electromagnetic waves helps to explain why diamonds shimmer, rubies are red, and the feathers of the Blue Jay are blue. Then, color theory is explained from its origin to the current state of the art, including image captu

  4. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  5. Application of electron closures in extended MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Eric; Adair, Brett; Taylor, Trevor

    2017-10-01

    Rigorous closure of the extended MHD equations in plasma fluid codes includes the effects of electron heat conduction along perturbed magnetic fields and contributions of the electron collisional friction and stress to the extended Ohms law. In this work we discuss application of a continuum numerical solution to the Chapman-Enskog-like electron drift kinetic equation using the NIMROD code. The implementation is a tightly-coupled fluid/kinetic system that carefully addresses time-centering in the advance of the fluid variables with their kinetically-computed closures. Comparisons of spatial accuracy, computational efficiency and required velocity space resolution are presented for applications involving growing magnetic islands in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. The reduction in parallel heat conduction due to particle trapping in toroidal geometry is emphasized. Work supported by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FC02-08ER54973 and DE-FG02-04ER54746.

  6. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  7. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serranti, S.; Bonifazi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging technique that combines the imaging properties of a digital camera with the spectroscopic properties of a spectrometer able to detect the spectral attributes of each pixel in an image. For these characteristics, HSI allows to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the effects of the interactions of light with organic and/or inorganic materials. The results of this interaction are usually displayed as a spectral signature characterized by a sequence of energy values, in a pre-defined wavelength interval, for each of the investigated/collected wavelength. Following this approach, it is thus possible to collect, in a fast and reliable way, spectral information that are strictly linked to chemical-physical characteristics of the investigated materials and/or products. Considering that in an hyperspectral image the spectrum of each pixel can be analyzed, HSI can be considered as one of the best nondestructive technology allowing to perform the most accurate and detailed information extraction. HSI can be applied in different wavelength fields, the most common are the visible (VIS: 400-700 nm), the near infrared (NIR: 1000-1700 nm) and the short wave infrared (SWIR: 1000-2500 nm). It can be applied for inspections from micro- to macro-scale, up to remote sensing. HSI produces a large amount of information due to the great number of continuous collected spectral bands. Such an approach, when successful, is quite challenging being usually reliable, robust and characterized by lower costs, if compared with those usually associated to commonly applied analytical off-line and/or on-line analytical approaches. More and more applications have been thus developed and tested, in these last years, especially in food inspection, with a large range of investigated products, such as fruits and vegetables, meat, fish, eggs and cereals, but also in medicine and pharmaceutical sector, in cultural heritage, in material characterization and in

  9. Low energy electron imaging using Medipix 2 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikharulidze, I.; van Gastel, Raoul; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, Bene; Tromp, R.M.; van der Molen, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) predominantly use a combination of microchannel plate (MCP), phosphor screen and optical camera to record images formed by 10–20 keV electrons. We have tested the performance of a LEEM/PEEM instrument with a Medipix2

  10. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@cnr.it [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Harris, Jérémie [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada); Gazzadi, Gian Carlo [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Balboni, Roberto [CNR-IMM Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mafakheri, Erfan [Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dennis, Mark R. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Frabboni, Stefano [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Bessel beams with different convergence, topological charge, visible fringes are demonstrated. • The relation between the Fresnel hologram and the probe shape is explained by detailed calculations and experiments. • Among the holograms here presented the highest relative efficiency is 37%, the best result ever reached for blazed holograms.

  11. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  13. Neutron imaging and applications a reference for the imaging community

    CERN Document Server

    McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production in addition to the wide scope of techniques that enhance imaging application capabilities. This title features a section that describes imaging single grains in polycrystalline materials, neutron imaging of geological materials and other materials science and engineering areas.

  14. Axial Vircator for Electronic Warfare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Drazan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a high power microwave generator with virtual cathode – vircator in axial release for electronic warfare applications. The classification of directed energy weapons microwave (DEWM is introduced together with basic block diagrams of a particular class of DEWM. In the paper, methods for designing vircator pulsed power supply, axial vircator structure, measurement methods and experimental results are presented. The vircator in electromagnetic ammunition is powered by magneto-cumulative generator and in weapons for defense of objects (WDO, it is powered by Marx generator. The possible applications of a vircator in the DEWM area are discussed.

  15. Applications of electron accelerator in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairul Zaman Hj. Mohd Dahlan [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2003-02-01

    Current status of radiation processing, as one of the core research programs of the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), is presented. Industrial applications of six electron accelerators from 150 kV up to 3 MV in Malaysia now in operation are mainly for curing of surface coatings, crosslinking of tubes, heat shrinkable tubes and packaging films, crosslinking of wire insulation. Their performances are listed. New technology now in R and D stage includes natural rubber, sago starch and chitosan for biomedical applications, and radiation curable materials from oil palm for pressure sensitive adhesive and printing ink. (S. Ohno)

  16. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzum, Duygu; Yu, Shimeng; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-09-27

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented.

  17. A Practical and Portable Solids-State Electronic Terahertz Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Smart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A practical compact solid-state terahertz imaging system is presented. Various beam guiding architectures were explored and hardware performance assessed to improve its compactness, robustness, multi-functionality and simplicity of operation. The system performance in terms of image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, the electronic signal modulation versus optical chopper, is evaluated and discussed. The system can be conveniently switched between transmission and reflection mode according to the application. A range of imaging application scenarios was explored and images of high visual quality were obtained in both transmission and reflection mode.

  18. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  19. An electron beam imaging system for quality assurance in IORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, F.; Rossi, M.; Morigi, M.P. E-mail: morigi@df.unibo.it; Brancaccio, R.; Paltrinieri, E.; Bettuzzi, M.; Romani, D.; Ciocca, M.; Tosi, G.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, M

    2004-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy is a special radiotherapy technique, which enables a high dose of radiation to be given in a single fraction during oncological surgery. The major stumbling block to the large-scale application of the technique is the transfer of the patient, with an open wound, from the operating room to the radiation therapy bunker, with the consequent organisational problems and the increased risk of infection. To overcome these limitations, in the last few years a new kind of linear accelerator, the Novac 7, conceived for direct use in the surgical room, has become available. Novac 7 can deliver electron beams of different energies (3, 5, 7 and 9 MeV), with a high dose rate (up to 20 Gy/min). The aim of this work, funded by ENEA in the framework of a research contract, is the development of an innovative system for on-line measurements of 2D dose distributions and electron beam characterisation, before radiotherapy treatment with Novac 7. The system is made up of the following components: (a) an electron-light converter; (b) a 14 bit cooled CCD camera; (c) a personal computer with an ad hoc written software for image acquisition and processing. The performances of the prototype have been characterised experimentally with different electron-light converters. Several tests have concerned the assessment of the detector response as a function of impulse number and electron beam energy. Finally, the experimental results concerning beam profiles have been compared with data acquired with other dosimetric techniques. The achieved results make it possible to say that the developed system is suitable for fast quality assurance measurements and verification of 2D dose distributions.

  20. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  1. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  2. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging: 2. Radiofrequency FT ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FT-EPR, Hahn-echo, acquisition delay, single-point imaging (SPI), gradient-echo, k-space, echo-SPI, carbogen, oxygen relaxivity, T2* T2- and T1-based oximetry, coregistration, cycling hypoxia, blood volume, angiogram, Warburg effect, metabolic imaging.

  4. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  5. Electronic structure theory: Applications and geometrical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coh, Sinisa

    This thesis contains several applications of the first-principles electronic-structure theory with special emphasis in parts of the thesis on the geometrical aspects of the theory. We start by reviewing the basics of the first-principles electronic-structure methods which are then used throughout the thesis. The first application of these methods is on the analysis of the stability and lattice dynamics of alpha- and beta-cristobalite phases of SiO2. We also map the complete low-energy landscape connecting these two structures and give implications on the phase transition in this compound. Next we study a family of Pbnm perovskites that are promising candidates for silicon-compatible high-K dielectrics. We calculate their structure and dielectric response, and compare with experimental results where available. The third application of these methods is to the large isosymmetric reorientation of oxygen octahedra rotation axes in epitaxially strained perovskites. We explain the origin of the peculiar energy landscape topology as a function of epitaxial strain. In the part of the thesis devoted to the geometrical aspects of electronic structure theory, we begin by extending the concept of electronic polarization to a Chern insulators. These insulators are characterized by a non-zero off-diagonal sigma_xy conductivity tensor component, quantized in units of e 2/h. Finally we discuss another geometrical quantity, the Chern-Simons orbital magnetoelectric coupling. We present a first-principles based calculation of this quantity in several compounds, and motivated by recent developments in the theory of topological insulators, we speculate about the existence of "large-theta materials," in which this kind of coupling could be unusually large.

  6. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  7. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Jason, E-mail: jason.holm@nist.gov; Keller, Robert R.

    2016-08-15

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. - Highlights: • A modular aperture system for STEM-in-SEM imaging is described. • A flexible cantilever sample holder that can maximize camera length is described. • The aperture system and sample holder enable complete acceptance angle control. • Most STEM imaging modes can be implemented without multi-segment detectors.

  8. Applications Of Image Processing In Criminalistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krile, Thomas F.; Walkup, John F.; Barsallo, Adonis; Olimb, Hal; Tarng, Jaw-Horng

    1987-01-01

    A review of some basic image processing techniques for enhancement and restoration of images is given. Both digital and optical approaches are discussed. Fingerprint images are used as examples to illustrate the various processing techniques and their potential applications in criminalistics.

  9. Modeling Perceived Quality for Imaging Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.

    2011-01-01

    People of all generations are making more and more use of digital imaging systems in their daily lives. The image content rendered by these digital imaging systems largely differs in perceived quality depending on the system and its applications. To be able to optimize the experience of viewers of

  10. Fuzzy image processing and applications with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to classical image analysis methods that employ ""crisp"" mathematics, fuzzy set techniques provide an elegant foundation and a set of rich methodologies for diverse image-processing tasks. However, a solid understanding of fuzzy processing requires a firm grasp of essential principles and background knowledge.Fuzzy Image Processing and Applications with MATLAB® presents the integral science and essential mathematics behind this exciting and dynamic branch of image processing, which is becoming increasingly important to applications in areas such as remote sensing, medical imaging,

  11. Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0045 Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules Martin Centurion UNIVERSITY OF NEBRSKA Final Report 01/12...Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...a gaseous target of atoms or molecules. An optical setup was designed and constructed to compensate for the blurring of the temporal resolution due

  12. Optical imaging modalities for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Atam P; D'Alessandro, Brian; Fu, Xiaolei

    2010-01-01

    Optical photographic imaging is a well known imaging method that has been successfully translated into biomedical applications such as microscopy and endoscopy. Although several advanced medical imaging modalities are used today to acquire anatomical, physiological, metabolic, and functional information from the human body, optical imaging modalities including optical coherence tomography, confocal microscopy, multiphoton microscopy, multispectral endoscopy, and diffuse reflectance imaging have recently emerged with significant potential for non-invasive, portable, and cost-effective imaging for biomedical applications spanning tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This paper reviews methods for modeling the propagation of light photons in a biological medium, as well as optical imaging from organ to cellular levels using visible and near-infrared wavelengths for biomedical and clinical applications.

  13. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R. P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S. R.; Hillyer, T. R.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. T. P. Team,

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 mu s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low

  14. Analysis of electron energy-loss spectra and images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W.J. Sorber (Lianne)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSeveral methods are proposed for the elemental analysis of biological material with the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) in a Zeiss EM902. For spectra, the Simplex-method was tested and compared to Egerton's 2- area method, the

  15. Microwave receivers with electronic warfare applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, James

    2005-01-01

    This book by the author of Digital Techniques for Wideband Receivers willbe like no other one on your book shelf as the definitive word on electronicwarfare (EW) receiver design and performance. Whether you are an EWscientist involved in the test and evaluation of EW receivers or a designerof RWR's and other EW-related receivers, Microwave Receivers withElectronic Warfare Applications is a handy reference through which you canperfect your technical art. Lucidly written, this book is a treatise on EWreceivers that is relevant to you if you are just looking for a top-levelinsight into EW receive

  16. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  17. Enhanced dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of in vivo physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage

    It is well established that low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. The importance of tumor oxygenation status has led to increased interest in the development of robust oxygen imaging modalities. One such method is electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). EPRI has provided a non-invasive, quantitative imaging modality with sensitivity deep in tissues, capable of investigating static oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo and has helped to corroborate the correlation between chronic states of hypoxia and tumor malignancy. However, when studying the complicated physiology of a living animal, the situation tends to be inherently dynamic. It has been found that in certain tumor regions there may exist steady states of hypoxia, or chronic hypoxia, whereas in other regions there may exist transient states of hypoxia, or acute hypoxia. It has been postulated that the negative prognostic implications associated with hypoxic tumors may be amplified for acutely hypoxic tumors. However, controversial data and a current lack in methods with the capability to noninvasively image tumor pO2 in vivo with sufficient spatial, temporal, and pO 2 resolution preclude definitive conclusions on the relationships between the different forms of hypoxia and the differences in their clinical implications. A particularly promising oxygen imaging modality that can help to study both chronic and acute hypoxia and elucidate important physiological and clinical differences is rapid Dynamic EPRI. The focus of this work is the development of methods enabling Dynamic EPRI of in vivo physiology as well as its potential applications. This work describes methods which enhance various aspects of EPRI in order to establish a more robust Dynamic EPRI capable of noninvasively studying and quantifying acute hypoxia in vivo. These enhancements are achieved through improvements that span from methods for the acquisition of individual

  18. Guiding the Design of Radiation Imagers with Experimentally Benchmarked Geant4 Simulations for Electron-Tracking Compton Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffer, Amy Beth

    Radiation imagers are import tools in the modern world for a wide range of applications. They span the use-cases of fundamental sciences, astrophysics, medical imaging, all the way to national security, nuclear safeguards, and non-proliferation verification. The type of radiation imagers studied in this thesis were gamma-ray imagers that detect emissions from radioactive materials. Gamma-ray imagers goal is to localize and map the distribution of radiation within their specific field-of-view despite the fact of complicating background radiation that can be terrestrial, astronomical, and temporal. Compton imaging systems are one type of gamma-ray imager that can map the radiation around the system without the use of collimation. Lack of collimation enables the imaging system to be able to detect radiation from all-directions, while at the same time, enables increased detection efficiency by not absorbing incident radiation in non-sensing materials. Each Compton-scatter events within an imaging system generated a possible cone-surface in space that the radiation could have originated from. Compton imaging is limited in its reconstructed image signal-to-background due to these source Compton-cones overlapping with background radiation Compton-cones. These overlapping cones limit Compton imaging's detection-sensitivity in image space. Electron-tracking Compton imaging (ETCI) can improve the detection-sensitivity by measuring the Compton-scattered electron's initial trajectory. With an estimate of the scattered electron's trajectory, one can reduce the Compton-back-projected cone to a cone-arc, thus enabling faster radiation source detection and localization. However, the ability to measure the Compton-scattered electron-trajectories adds another layer of complexity to an already complex methodology. For a real-world imaging applications, improvements are needed in electron-track detection efficiency and in electron-track reconstruction. One way of measuring Compton

  19. Electron accelerating unit for streak image tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The distance between the cathode and the mesh is 1.2 mm. The electric field in the cathode-to-mesh region is a self-focusing field, which can reduce the electron beam size. There are three advantages of the accelerating unit. In the pulsed mode, a pulsed voltage is applied to the accelerating electrode. First, the SIT works ...

  20. [Electronic Device for Retinal and Iris Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahanský, M; Kolář, R; Mňuk, T

    This paper describes design and construction of a new device for automatic capturing of eye retina and iris. This device has two possible ways of utilization - either for biometric purposes (persons recognition on the base of their eye characteristics) or for medical purposes as supporting diagnostic device. eye retina, eye iris, device, acquisition, image.

  1. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  2. Prospects for electron imaging with ultrafast time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Reed, Bryan W.; Torralva, Ben R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2007-03-01

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here the authors demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10km/s) without smearing. The authors outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, the authors present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution.

  3. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M R; Reed, B W; Torralva, B R; Browning, N D

    2007-01-26

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.

  4. Application of Quantum Dots in Biological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are a group of semiconducting nanomaterials with unique optical and electronic properties. They have distinct advantages over traditional fluorescent organic dyes in chemical and biological studies in terms of tunable emission spectra, signal brightness, photostability, and so forth. Currently, the major type of QDs is the heavy metal-containing II-IV, IV-VI, or III-V QDs. Silicon QDs and conjugated polymer dots have also been developed in order to lower the potential toxicity of the fluorescent probes for biological applications. Aqueous solubility is the common problem for all types of QDs when they are employed in the biological researches, such as in vitro and in vivo imaging. To circumvent this problem, ligand exchange and polymer coating are proven to be effective, besides synthesizing QDs in aqueous solutions directly. However, toxicity is another big concern especially for in vivo studies. Ligand protection and core/shell structure can partly solve this problem. With the rapid development of QDs research, new elements and new morphologies have been introduced to this area to fabricate more safe and efficient QDs for biological applications.

  5. Imaging the motion of electrons across semiconductor heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Michael K. L.; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Harada, Takaaki; Wong, E. Laine; Krishna, M. Bala Murali; Madéo, Julien; Winchester, Andrew; Lei, Sidong; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Dani, Keshav M.

    2017-01-01

    Technological progress since the late twentieth century has centred on semiconductor devices, such as transistors, diodes and solar cells. At the heart of these devices is the internal motion of electrons through semiconductor materials due to applied electric fields or by the excitation of photocarriers. Imaging the motion of these electrons would provide unprecedented insight into this important phenomenon, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Current studies of electron dynamics in semiconductors are generally limited by the spatial resolution of optical probes, or by the temporal resolution of electronic probes. Here, by combining femtosecond pump-probe techniques with spectroscopic photoemission electron microscopy, we imaged the motion of photoexcited electrons from high-energy to low-energy states in a type-II 2D InSe/GaAs heterostructure. At the instant of photoexcitation, energy-resolved photoelectron images revealed a highly non-equilibrium distribution of photocarriers in space and energy. Thereafter, in response to the out-of-equilibrium photocarriers, we observed the spatial redistribution of charges, thus forming internal electric fields, bending the semiconductor bands, and finally impeding further charge transfer. By assembling images taken at different time-delays, we produced a movie lasting a few trillionths of a second of the electron-transfer process in the photoexcited type-II heterostructure—a fundamental phenomenon in semiconductor devices such as solar cells. Quantitative analysis and theoretical modelling of spatial variations in the movie provide insight into future solar cells, 2D materials and other semiconductor devices.

  6. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R.P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S.R.; Hillyer, T.R.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, 228 Walker Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A.J. [FOM-Inst. voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Association Euratom-FOM (International organizations without location); RTP team

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 {mu}s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low cost linear mixer/receiver array. Unlike conventional ECE diagnostics, the sample volumes of the ECE imaging system are aligned vertically, and can be shifted across the plasma cross-section by varying the local oscillator frequency, making possible 2D measurements of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. The poloidal/radial wavenumber spectra and correlation lengths of T{sub e} fluctuations in the plasma core can also be obtained by properly positioning the focal plane of the imaging system. Due to these unique features, ECE imaging is an ideal tool for plasma transport study. Technical details of the system are described, together with preliminary experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Applications of Digital Image Processing 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. -C.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique, digital image velocimetry, is proposed for the measurement of instantaneous velocity fields of time dependent flows. A time sequence of single-exposure images of seed particles are captured with a high-speed camera, and a finite number of the single-exposure images are sampled within a prescribed period in time. The sampled images are then digitized on an image processor, enhanced, and superimposed to construct an image which is equivalent to a multiple exposure image used in both laser speckle velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The superimposed image and a single-exposure Image are digitally Fourier transformed for extraction of information on the velocity field. A great enhancement of the dynamic range of the velocity measurement is accomplished through the new technique by manipulating the Fourier transform of both the single-exposure image and the superimposed image. Also the direction of the velocity vector is unequivocally determined. With the use of a high-speed video camera, the whole process from image acquisition to velocity determination can be carried out electronically; thus this technique can be developed into a real-time capability.

  8. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    The development of technologies for mass spectrometry imaging is of substantial research interest. Mass spectrometry is potentially capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of compounds in tissues, with high sensitivity. The in-situ analysis needed for tissue imaging requires MS to be performed under conditions different from the traditional ones, typically with intensive sample preparation and optimized for pharmaceutical applications. In this paper we critically review the current status of MS imaging with different methods of sample ionization and discuss the 3D and quantitative imaging capabilities which need further development, the importance of the multi-modal imaging, and the balance between the pursuit of high-resolution imaging and the practical application of MS imaging in biomedicine.

  9. Contribution of Metal Layer Thickness for Quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyonchol; Takei, Hiroyuki; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    ...) imaging in field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were studied to evaluate the potential of using these particles as simultaneously distinguishable labels of target molecules in FE-SEM studies...

  10. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  11. Heat resistant polymers for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillion, B.; Verdet, L.

    This review looks at how the heat resistant polymers have become components of necessity in the building of electronic systems, starting with the fabrication of the integrated circuit, through its packaging, and concluding with its final assembly onto a circuit board. The specific material requirements for each application in terms of properties and processing and the response which has been given by the polymer chemist are discussed. An overview of the various classes of polymeric materials, which are used or considered for applications in the mentioned area, is provided. It includes linear and crosslinkable materials. Among linear thermostable polymers, some of them are offered as polyimide precursors, like conventional polyamic acids, as well as modified structures such as photoimagable polymers and alignment coatings for display tehcnologies. However, fully cyclized soluble materials such as polyimides or polyphenylquinoxalines are now considered when better dielectric properties are needed. Applications of crosslinkable resins such as maleimides, benzocyclobutenes and acetylenics are also reviewed. The respective benefits of these different materials in relationship with their structure are examined.

  12. Droplet Epitaxy Image Contrast in Mirror Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Jesson, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation methods are applied to interpret mirror electron microscopy (MEM) images obtained from a movie of GaAs droplet epitaxy. Cylindrical symmetry of structures grown by droplet epitaxy is assumed in the simulations which reproduce the main features of the experimental MEM image contrast, demonstrating that droplet epitaxy can be studied in real-time. It is therefore confirmed that an inner ring forms at the droplet contact line and an outer ring (or skirt) occurs outside the droplet periphery. We believe that MEM combined with image simulations will be increasingly used to study the formation and growth of quantum structures.

  13. Imaging gaseous detectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nappi, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Covers the detector and imaging technology and their numerous applications in nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, medicine and radiation measurements Foreword from G. Charpak, awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for this invention.

  14. Super-thermal light for imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allevi, Alessia; Cassina, Silvia; Bondani, Maria

    2017-12-01

    We report on a new classical light source useful for ghost-imaging applications. The light is obtained by frequency doubling a conventional speckle pattern having an overall multi-mode thermal distribution. The frequency-doubled light acquires a super-thermal distribution, which induces higher correlations at a beam splitter and, as a consequence, a higher visibility in ghost-imaging protocols.

  15. Ultrafast optical imaging technology: principles and applications of emerging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikami Hideharu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High-speed optical imaging is an indispensable technology for blur-free observation of fast transient dynamics in virtually all areas including science, industry, defense, energy, and medicine. High temporal resolution is particularly important for microscopy as even a slow event appears to occur “fast” in a small field of view. Unfortunately, the shutter speed and frame rate of conventional cameras based on electronic image sensors are significantly constrained by their electrical operation and limited storage. Over the recent years, several unique and unconventional approaches to high-speed optical imaging have been reported to circumvent these technical challenges and achieve a frame rate and shutter speed far beyond what can be reached with the conventional image sensors. In this article, we review the concepts and principles of such ultrafast optical imaging methods, compare their advantages and disadvantages, and discuss an entirely new class of applications that are possible using them.

  16. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  17. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Desouki, Munir; Deen, M Jamal; Fang, Qiyin; Liu, Louis; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4∼5 μm) due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps).

  18. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4~5 μm due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps.

  19. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  20. 21 CFR 1311.120 - Electronic prescription application requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prescription information to medical records. (22) If the transmission of an electronic prescription fails, the... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic prescription application requirements... REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.120...

  1. Intrinsically shunted Josephson junctions for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Lacquaniti, V.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Josephson metal-insulator-metal devices are inherently underdamped and exhibit hysteretic current-voltage response due to a very high subgap resistance compared to that in the normal state. At the same time, overdamped junctions with single-valued characteristics are needed for most superconducting digital applications. The usual way to overcome the hysteretic behavior is to place an external low-resistance normal-metal shunt in parallel with each junction. Unfortunately, such solution results in a considerable complication of the circuitry design and introduces parasitic inductance through the junction. This paper provides a concise overview of some generic approaches that have been proposed in order to realize internal shunting in Josephson heterostructures with a barrier that itself contains the desired resistive component. The main attention is paid to self-shunted devices with local weak-link transmission probabilities that are so strongly disordered in the interface plane that transmission probabilities are tiny for the main part of the transition region between two super-conducting electrodes, while a small part of the interface is well transparent. We discuss the possibility of realizing a universal bimodal distribution function and emphasize advantages of such junctions that can be considered as a new class of self-shunted Josephson devices promising for practical applications in superconducting electronics operating at 4.2 K.

  2. Low-energy electron beams through ultra-thin foils, applications for electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aken, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis has discussed two electron microscopy applications that make use of ultra-thin foils: the tunnel junction emitter and the low-energy foil corrector. Both applications have in common that the electron beam is sent through the thin foil at low energy. Part of the electrons will scatter in

  3. Imaging the motion of electrons in 2D semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Keshav

    Technological progress since the late 20th century has centered on semiconductor devices, such as transistors, diodes, and solar cells. At the heart of these devices, is the internal motion of electrons through semiconductor materials due to applied electric fields or by the excitation of photocarriers. Imaging the motion of these electrons would provide unprecedented insight into this important phenomenon, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Current studies of electron dynamics in semiconductors are generally limited by the spatial resolution of optical probes, or by the temporal resolution of electronic probes. In this talk, we combine femtosecond pump-probe techniques with spectroscopic photoemission electron microscopy to image the motion of photoexcited electrons from high-energy to low-energy states in a 2D InSe/GaAs heterostructure exhibiting a type-II band alignment. At the instant of photoexcitation, energy-resolved photoelectron images reveal a highly non-equilibrium distribution of photocarriers in space and energy. Thereafter, in response to the out-of-equilibrium photocarriers, we observe the spatial redistribution of charges, thus forming internal electric fields, bending the semiconductor bands, and finally impeding further charge transfer. By assembling images taken at different time-delays, we make a movie lasting a few tens of picoseconds of the electron transfer process in the photoexcited type-II heterostructure - a fundamental phenomenon in semiconductor devices like solar cells. Quantitative analysis and theoretical modeling of spatial variations in the video provide insight into future solar cells, electron dynamics in 2D materials, and other semiconductor devices.

  4. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Julia I.; Carnevale, Santino D.; De Graef, Marc; McComb, David W.; Grassman, Tyler J.

    2016-08-01

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  5. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitz, Julia I.; McComb, David W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carnevale, Santino D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Grassman, Tyler J., E-mail: grassman.5@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  6. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k...

  7. MATLAB-Based Applications for Image Processing and Image Quality Assessment – Part I: Software Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasula

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes several MATLAB-based applications useful for image processing and image quality assessment. The Image Processing Application helps user to easily modify images, the Image Quality Adjustment Application enables to create series of pictures with different quality. The Image Quality Assessment Application contains objective full reference quality metrics that can be used for image quality assessment. The Image Quality Evaluation Applications represent an easy way to compare subjectively the quality of distorted images with reference image. Results of these subjective tests can be processed by using the Results Processing Application. All applications provide Graphical User Interface (GUI for the intuitive usage.

  8. Power electronic converters and systems frontiers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Trzynadlowski, Andrzej M

    2016-01-01

    Power electronics is a branch of electrical engineering dealing with conversion and control of electric power using semiconductor power switches. This book provides an overview of modern power electronic converters and systems, and their applications.

  9. Developments in electronic imaging techniques; Proceedings of the Seminar-in-Depth, San Mateo, Calif., October 16, 17, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkind, R. (Editor); Nudelman, S. S.; Schnitzler, A.

    1973-01-01

    Capabilities and limitations of infrared imaging systems are discussed, and a real-time simulator for image data systems is described. Ultrahigh resolution electronic imaging and storage with the return beam vidicon is treated, and a description is given of an electron-lens for opaque photocathodes. Ground surveillance with an active low light level TV, digital processing of Mariner 9 TV data, image enhancement by holography, and application of data compression techniques to spacecraft imaging systems are given attention. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  10. Fundamentals and applications of magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgert, Jörn; Schmidt, Joachim D; Schmale, Ingo; Rahmer, Jürgen; Bontus, Claas; Gleich, Bernhard; David, Bernd; Eckart, Rainer; Woywode, Oliver; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Haegele, Julian; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technique which performs a direct measurement of magnetic nanoparticles, also known as superparamagnetic iron oxide. MPI can acquire quantitative images of the local distribution of the magnetic material with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its sensitivity is well above that of other methods used for the detection and quantification of magnetic materials, for example, magnetic resonance imaging. On the basis of an intravenous injection of magnetic particles, MPI has the potential to play an important role in medical application areas such as cardiovascular, oncology, and also in exploratory fields such as cell labeling and tracking. Here, we present an introduction to the basic function principle of MPI, together with an estimation of the spatial resolution and the detection limit. Furthermore, the above-mentioned medical applications are discussed with respect to an applicability of MPI. Copyright © 2012 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic imaging and its applications to materials

    CERN Document Server

    De Graef, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Volume 36 provides an extensive introduction to magnetic imaging,including theory and practice, utilizing a wide range of magnetic sensitive imaging methods. It also illustrates the applications of these modern experimental techniques together with imaging calculations to today's advanced magnetic materials. This book is geared towards the upper-level undergraduate students and entry-level graduate students majoring in physics or materials science who are interested in magnetic structure and magnetic imaging. Researchers involved in studying magnetic materials should alsofind the book usef

  12. Clinical applications of choroidal imaging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Chhablani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroid supplies the major blood supply to the eye, especially the outer retinal structures. Its understanding has significantly improved with the advent of advanced imaging modalities such as enhanced depth imaging technique and the newer swept source optical coherence tomography. Recent literature reports the findings of choroidal changes, quantitative as well as qualitative, in various chorioretinal disorders. This review article describes applications of choroidal imaging in the management of common diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, high myopia, central serous chorioretinopathy, chorioretinal inflammatory diseases, and tumors. This article briefly discusses future directions in choroidal imaging including angiography.

  13. Imaging attosecond electron wavepackets around the ionization threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swoboda, Marko; Remetter, Thomas; Mauritsson, Johan; L' Huillier, Anne [Dept. of Physics, Lund University (Sweden); Schafer, Kenneth J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Kelkensberg, Freek; Siu, Wing-Kiu; Johnsson, Per; Vrakking, Marc J.J. [AMOLF Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kling, Matthias F.; Znakovskaya, Irina; Uphues, Thorsten; Zherebtsov, Sergey [MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Lepine, Franck [Univ. Lyon 1, CNRS, LASIM, UMR, Villeurbanne (France); Benedetti, Enrico; Ferrari, Federico; Sansone, Giuseppe; Nisoli, Mauro [CUSBO, ULTRAS-INFM, Politecnico, Milano (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    We image the momentum distributions of attosecond electron wavepackets generated from the ionization of Helium by attosecond XUV pulses. Using an infrared probing field, the evolution of these wavepackets can be captured in time and space. Tuning the central frequency of the pulses allows us to initiate a number of processes that originate from the interplay of partially bound and continuum wavepackets or returning electrons and the atomic potential. Using this attosecond pump-probe scheme, we can track electron dynamics around the ionization barrier, performing interferometric measurements of different ionization pathways.

  14. Industrial application of electron sources with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Belyuk, S I; Rempe, N G

    2001-01-01

    Paper contains a description, operation, design and parameters of electron sources with plasma emitters. One presents examples of application of these sources as part of automated electron-beam welding lines. Paper describes application of such sources for electron-beam deposition of composite powders. Electron-beam deposition is used to rebuild worn out part and to increase strength of new parts of machines and tools. Paper presents some examples of rebuilding part and the advantages gained in this case

  15. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  16. Rotation Covariant Image Processing for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Skibbe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of novel biomedical 3D image acquisition techniques, the efficient and reliable analysis of volumetric images has become more and more important. The amount of data is enormous and demands an automated processing. The applications are manifold, ranging from image enhancement, image reconstruction, and image description to object/feature detection and high-level contextual feature extraction. In most scenarios, it is expected that geometric transformations alter the output in a mathematically well-defined manner. In this paper we emphasis on 3D translations and rotations. Many algorithms rely on intensity or low-order tensorial-like descriptions to fulfill this demand. This paper proposes a general mathematical framework based on mathematical concepts and theories transferred from mathematical physics and harmonic analysis into the domain of image analysis and pattern recognition. Based on two basic operations, spherical tensor differentiation and spherical tensor multiplication, we show how to design a variety of 3D image processing methods in an efficient way. The framework has already been applied to several biomedical applications ranging from feature and object detection tasks to image enhancement and image restoration techniques. In this paper, the proposed methods are applied on a variety of different 3D data modalities stemming from medical and biological sciences.

  17. Solid silica nanoparticles: applications in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshahi, Vahid; Soltani, Madjid

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica-based nanoparticles have been widely used for therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancer mainly through delivery of drugs, genes and contrast agents. Development of synthesis methods has provided the possibility of fabricating silica nanoparticles with different sizes in nanometer ranges as well as silica-based multimodal nanoparticles with many innovative properties and intriguing applications in biomedicine. The surface of silica particles facilitates different methods of surface modifications and allows conjugation of various biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. In this review, different methods of fabrication of silica and silica-based nanoparticles, their surface modification and the application of these nanoparticles in molecular imaging are discussed. Overall, the aim of this review is to address the development of silica and silica-based multifunctional nanoparticles that are introduced mainly for molecular imaging applications using optical, magnetic (MRI), X-ray (computed tomography) and multimodal imaging techniques. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Comparison of Electron Imaging Modes for Dimensional Measurements in the Scanning Electron Microscope†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András E.; Villarrubia, John S.; Muto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Dimensional measurements from secondary electron (SE) images were compared with those from backscattered electron (BSE) and low-loss electron (LLE) images. With the commonly used 50% threshold criterion, the lines consistently appeared larger in the SE images. As the images were acquired simultaneously by an instrument with the capability to operate detectors for both signals at the same time, the differences cannot be explained by the assumption that contamination or drift between images affected the SE, BSE, or LLE images differently. Simulations with JMONSEL, an electron microscope simulator, indicate that the nanometer-scale differences observed on this sample can be explained by the different convolution effects of a beam with finite size on signals with different symmetry (the SE signal’s characteristic peak versus the BSE or LLE signal’s characteristic step). This effect is too small to explain the > 100 nm discrepancies that were observed in earlier work on different samples. Additional modeling indicates that those discrepancies can be explained by the much larger sidewall angles of the earlier samples, coupled with the different response of SE versus BSE/LLE profiles to such wall angles. PMID:27452278

  19. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Secondary-electron-bremsstrahlung imaging for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Ando, Koki; Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1 Hirate-cho, Kita-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kataoka, Jun [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A feasibility study on an imaging technique of a therapeutic proton-beam trajectory using a gamma camera by measuring secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB) was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and a beam-irradiation experiment. From the simulation and experimental results, it was found that a significant amount of SEB yield exists between the beam-injection surface and the range position along the beam axis and the beam trajectory is clearly imaged by the SEB yield. It is concluded that the SEB imaging is a promising technique for monitoring of therapeutic proton-beam trajectories.

  1. Analysis of FIB-induced damage by electron channelling contrast imaging in the SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the Ga+ ion-damage effect induced by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in a [001] single crystal of a 316 L stainless steel by the electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) technique. The influence of FIB milling on the characteristic electron channelling contrast of surface dislocations was analysed. The ECCI approach provides sound estimation of the damage depth produced by FIB milling. For comparison purposes, we have also studied the same milled surface by a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) approach. We observe that the ECCI approach provides further insight into the Ga+ ion-damage phenomenon than the EBSD technique by direct imaging of FIB artefacts in the scanning electron microscope. We envisage that the ECCI technique may be a convenient tool to optimize the FIB milling settings in applications where the surface crystal defect content is relevant. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade.... International Trade Commission on May 23, 2012, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S...

  3. Laser-induced electron diffraction for dynamic imaging of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chii-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Electron diffraction is the well-established tool for probing the structure of gas-phase molecules near the equilibrium geometry. To study chemical dynamics ultrashort electron pulses below a few tens of femtoseconds are needed. Laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) is a method where molecules can be probed with femtosecond temporal resolution and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. In LIED, molecules are exposed to an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The electrons that have been previously removed by the laser field can be driven back later to rescatter with the parent molecular ion. Using diffraction images from large-angle backscattered events, sub-angstrom spatial resolution can be achieved with tens to hundreds eV electrons. Recent LIED experimental results showing bond breaking in molecules will be illustrated. Practical issues related to the retrieval of diffraction images from LIED on aligned molecules and possibilities of real-time imaging of dissociating molecules using LIED will be presented. US Department of Energy. This work is performed in collaboration with Anh Thu Le (Kansas State University) and the experimental group of Jens Biegert (ICFO, Barcelona).

  4. Electrospun Fibers for Energy, Electronic, & Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Nicholas M.

    applications, fibers consisting of the commonly used organic photovoltaic electron donor/acceptor pair P3HT:PCBM were made by coaxial electrospinning. The inclusion of P3HT:PCBM fibers into an active layer of a organic photovoltaic device led to a ˜ 50% increase in power conversion efficiency over a thin film device of identical chemical composition and thickness. The inclusion of biological photosynthetic moieties into electrically relevant conjugated polymers was also explored for electrical applications. Polymeric fibers consisting largely of PEDOT:PSS were doped with thylakoid vesicles from spinach, and were found to act as photo-detectors. Native PEDOT:PSS does not exhibit such properties. For environmental applications, photocatalytic degradation membranes were also created by electrospinning cellulosic fibers which could be used as platforms to efficiently bind the photocatalyst TiO2. Employing different fiber-titania binding strategies, titania nanoparticles of various sizes and band gap configurations were successfully incorporated into mats of non-woven cellulosic nanofibers. These mats were found to successfully degrade dyes and relevant fresh water toxins such as microcystin-LR.

  5. Computational estimation of the gain image of Direct Electron Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Gimenez, E.; Peredo Robinson, V.; Sorzano, C.O.S.; Vargas, J.; Oton, J.; Vilas, J.L.; Rosa-Trevin, J.L. de la; Melero, R.; Gomez-Blanco, J.; Cuenca, J.; Cano, L. del; Conesa, P.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of Direct Electron Detectors (DED) in the Electron Microscope field has boosted Single Particle Analysis to a point in which it is currently considered to be a key player technique in Structural Biology. In this article we address the issues of increasing the quality of current DED images as well as their ease of use. In this way, we introduce an algorithm to estimate the camera gain at each pixel from the movies themselves, so that the recorded movies can be compensated for differences amongst the detection capability of the camera sensors. This compensation is needed to set the recorded frames in a coherent gray level range, homogeneous over the whole image. The algorithm does not need any other input than the DED movie itself and it is able of estimating the camera gain image, identifying dead pixels and incorrectly calibrated cameras. We show the results for the three current DED camera models (DE, Falcon and K2). (Author)

  6. Molecular Imaging by Optically Detected Electron Spin Resonance of Nitrogen-Vacancies in Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2013-03-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demonstrating Optically-Detected Functional-Electron-Spin-Resonance-Imaging, OD-f-ESRI. By combining optical detection with magnetic resonance, nanodiamond imaging achieves high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. It is absent of the complications of ionizing radiation, and the cost should be similar to all-optical imaging. Because nanodiamond imaging is limited by the depth of optical penetration into tissue to depths of a few cm, nanodiamond imaging should open up new avenues of investigation for applications where high depth penetration is not required, such as in small-animal imaging, tumor margin imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping, and perhaps mammography.

  7. Application of numerical methods to elasticity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Benjamin; Ormachea, Juvenal; Rodríguez, Paul; Parker, Kevin J

    2013-03-01

    Elasticity imaging can be understood as the intersection of the study of biomechanical properties, imaging sciences, and physics. It was mainly motivated by the fact that pathological tissue presents an increased stiffness when compared to surrounding normal tissue. In the last two decades, research on elasticity imaging has been an international and interdisciplinary pursuit aiming to map the viscoelastic properties of tissue in order to provide clinically useful information. As a result, several modalities of elasticity imaging, mostly based on ultrasound but also on magnetic resonance imaging and optical coherence tomography, have been proposed and applied to a number of clinical applications: cancer diagnosis (prostate, breast, liver), hepatic cirrhosis, renal disease, thyroiditis, arterial plaque evaluation, wall stiffness in arteries, evaluation of thrombosis in veins, and many others. In this context, numerical methods are applied to solve forward and inverse problems implicit in the algorithms in order to estimate viscoelastic linear and nonlinear parameters, especially for quantitative elasticity imaging modalities. In this work, an introduction to elasticity imaging modalities is presented. The working principle of qualitative modalities (sonoelasticity, strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse) and quantitative modalities (Crawling Waves Sonoelastography, Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force (SMURF), Supersonic Imaging) will be explained. Subsequently, the areas in which numerical methods can be applied to elasticity imaging are highlighted and discussed. Finally, we present a detailed example of applying total variation and AM-FM techniques to the estimation of elasticity.

  8. Scattered Radiation Emission Imaging: Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging processes built on the Compton scattering effect have been under continuing investigation since it was first suggested in the 50s. However, despite many innovative contributions, there are still formidable theoretical and technical challenges to overcome. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art principles of the so-called scattered radiation emission imaging. Basically, it consists of using the cleverly collected scattered radiation from a radiating object to reconstruct its inner structure. Image formation is based on the mathematical concept of compounded conical projection. It entails a Radon transform defined on circular cone surfaces in order to express the scattered radiation flux density on a detecting pixel. We discuss in particular invertible cases of such conical Radon transforms which form a mathematical basis for image reconstruction methods. Numerical simulations performed in two and three space dimensions speak in favor of the viability of this imaging principle and its potential applications in various fields.

  9. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Deen, M.; Qiyin Fang; Louis Liu; Frances Tse; David Armstrong; Munir El-Desouki

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4~5 μm) due to ...

  10. Nanostructures for Electronic and Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop sensors and electronic components from metal oxide based nanotubes and nanowires. These nanostructured materials will be grown...

  11. From the physics of secondary electron emission to image contrasts in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Image formation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a combination of physical processes, electron emissions from the sample, and of a technical process related to the detection of a fraction of these electrons. For the present survey of image contrasts in SEM, simplified considerations in the physics of the secondary electron emission yield, δ, are combined with the effects of a partial collection of the emitted secondary electrons. Although some consideration is initially given to the architecture of modern SEM, the main attention is devoted to the material contrasts with the respective roles of the sub-surface and surface compositions of the sample, as well as with the roles of the field effects in the vacuum gap. The recent trends of energy filtering in normal SEM and the reduction of the incident energy to a few electron volts in very low-energy electron microscopy are also considered. For an understanding by the SEM community, the mathematical expressions are explained with simple physical arguments.

  12. Multimodal nanoparticle imaging agents: design and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Benjamin P.; Cawthorne, Christopher; Archibald, Stephen J.

    2017-10-01

    Molecular imaging, where the location of molecules or nanoscale constructs can be tracked in the body to report on disease or biochemical processes, is rapidly expanding to include combined modality or multimodal imaging. No single imaging technique can offer the optimum combination of properties (e.g. resolution, sensitivity, cost, availability). The rapid technological advances in hardware to scan patients, and software to process and fuse images, are pushing the boundaries of novel medical imaging approaches, and hand-in-hand with this is the requirement for advanced and specific multimodal imaging agents. These agents can be detected using a selection from radioisotope, magnetic resonance and optical imaging, among others. Nanoparticles offer great scope in this area as they lend themselves, via facile modification procedures, to act as multifunctional constructs. They have relevance as therapeutics and drug delivery agents that can be tracked by molecular imaging techniques with the particular development of applications in optically guided surgery and as radiosensitizers. There has been a huge amount of research work to produce nanoconstructs for imaging, and the parameters for successful clinical translation and validation of therapeutic applications are now becoming much better understood. It is an exciting time of progress for these agents as their potential is closer to being realized with translation into the clinic. The coming 5-10 years will be critical, as we will see if the predicted improvement in clinical outcomes becomes a reality. Some of the latest advances in combination modality agents are selected and the progression pathway to clinical trials analysed. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  13. Electron beam confinement and image contrast enhancement in near field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, T L; De Pietro, L G; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2009-04-01

    In conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the lateral resolution is limited by the electron beam diameter impinging on the specimen surface. Near field emission scanning electron microscopy (NFESEM) provides a simple means of overcoming this limit; however, the most suitable field emitter remains to be determined. NFESEM has been used in this work to investigate the W (110) surface with single-crystal tungsten tips of (310), (111), and (100)-orientations. The topographic images generated from both the electron intensity variations and the field emission current indicate higher resolution capabilities with decreasing tip work function than with polycrystalline tungsten tips. The confinement of the electron beam transcends the resolution limitations of the geometrical models, which are determined by the minimum beam width.

  14. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  15. Applications and advances in electronic-nose technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. D. Wilson; M. Baietto

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software...

  16. CERN's web application updates for electron and laser beam technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sigas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the modifications at CERN's web application for electron and laser beam technologies. There are updates at both the front and the back end of the application. New electron and laser machines were added and also old machines were updated. There is also a new feature for printing needed information.

  17. Advances in Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; Second International Conference on Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication (ECWAC 2012)

    2012-01-01

    ECWAC2012 is an integrated conference devoted to Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication. In the this proceedings you can find the carefully reviewed scientific outcome of the second International Conference on Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication (ECWAC 2012) held at March 17-18,2012  in Wuhan, China, bringing together researchers from all around the world in the field.

  18. Advances in Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; Second International Conference on Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication (ECWAC 2012)

    2012-01-01

    ECWAC2012 is an integrated conference devoted to Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication. In the this proceedings you can find the carefully reviewed scientific outcome of the second International Conference on Electronic Commerce, Web Application and Communication (ECWAC 2012) held at March 17-18,2012  in Wuhan, China, bringing together researchers from all around the world in the field.

  19. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  20. HuntIR thermal imagers for reconnaissance and targeting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Ihle, Tobias; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner

    2004-08-01

    A new family of light handheld military thermal imagers for reconnaissance and targeting applications was developed based on AIM's IR components like IR detection modules, command and control electronics and image processing units. Three different types of imagers provide solutions for different requirements in identification ranges of targets. The highest performance device makes use of a FPA MCT 384x288 MWIR detector with a motorized double field of view optics. An identification range up to 2400m for the NATO standard target was proven according to the FGAN-FOM TRM3 range model. The device provides a mechanical adaptation to weapon systems and provides target markers for common hand weapons of the German army. A single field of view MCT device for 1000m ranges and an uncooled device on the lower performance end complete the imager family. Electronics for intelligent power management from batteries and display electronics were developed to provide stand alone operation. The modular concept allows the use of the same image processing unit for all devices providing special features for best performance like scene-based non-uniformity correction together with an optical calibration element and dynamic reduction including automatic histogram equalization for optimized scene display and text or graphics overlay. Due to the modular concept the components like the image processing unit are already used and validated in programs like the thermal sight for the self defense gun of the reconnaissance vehicle FENNEK together with a 320x240 LWIR uncooled microbolometer detector or with the MCT 384x288 MWIR detection module in a thermal imager for the German army UAV Luna.

  1. AN APPLICATION OF ELECTRONIC AMPLIFIER STETHOSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper KAÇAR

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic stethoscopes are one of the important medical devices which affects the self-diagnostic or remote diagnostic in medical area. Rather the general stethoscopes, electronic ones increases the sound amplitude and quality. By filtering ambient noise, they can be used for advance analysis of heart or lung related diseases.

  2. Polycystalline silicon thin films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Christian Claus

    2012-01-15

    with an activation energy of E{sub A}{sup poly-Si}=1.1 eV. By long-lasting tempering or a short high-temperature step finally the stable layer configuration substrate/Al+Si islands(hillocks)/poly-Si can be reached (E{sub A}{sup hillocks}=2.4 eV). The further main topic of this thesis is the study of the applicability of the poly-silicon layers fabricated by means of the ALILE and R-ALILE process for electronic applications. First thin-film transistors were studied. Additionally thin-film solar cells with microcrystalline silicon as absorber material on polycrystalline R-ALILE seed layers were fabricated. Finally the suitedness of the fabricated poly-silicon layers for crytographic applications were studied.

  3. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

  4. Neuron Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images Using Partial Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cory; Sayedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    In connectomics, neuroscientists seek to identify the synaptic connections between neurons. Segmentation of cell membranes using supervised learning algorithms on electron microscopy images of brain tissue is often done to assist in this effort. Here we present a partial differential equation with a novel growth term to improve the results of a supervised learning algorithm. We also introduce a new method for representing the resulting image that allows for a more dynamic thresholding to further improve the result. Using these two processes we are able to close small to medium sized gaps in the cell membrane detection and improve the Rand error by as much as 9% over the initial supervised segmentation.

  5. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Imaging Near-Earth Electron Densities Using Thomson Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-15

    telescopes (left and right squares). In these simulated images, we have assumed an input aperture diameter of 23.5 cm and a pixel plate scale of 270...diameter of 23.8 cm and a pixel plate scale of 120 km. The inner field of view begins near 320 km in altitude, which Imaging Near-Earth Electron...LFM) Global MHD Magnetospheric Simulation Code,” J. Atmos. Sol. Terres . Phys. 66, 1333. Meier, R.R., 1991. “Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Remote

  7. An imaging toolbox for smart phone applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchul, Alexandr; Bhupathiraju, Deepthi; Agaian, Sos; Akopian, David

    2006-05-01

    The paper presents a Digital Image Processing toolbox for cellular phones. It is intended for users dealing with imaging algorithms and allows the processing of real images taken by the camera phones. For example, users are able to analyze the images and selected regions of interest using different transforms including Discrete Fourier, Hartley, and Cosine Transforms. One can apply different filters such as median and moving average. Simple image enhancement techniques are also included in the toolbox. A handy user interface allows a suitable browsing through the images and operators. The toolbox is designed to be expandable and more operations will be included in the future targeting military and security applications. The toolbox is implemented using Series 60 Platform SDK for Symbian tm OS, for C++. It allows developers to quickly and efficiently run and test applications for devices that are compatible with the Series 60 Platform. The algorithms are first implemented on Series 60 Platform device emulator on the PC and then installed on the cell phone.

  8. Novel hemispheric image formation: concepts and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Simon; Konen, Pierre; Roulet, Patrice; Villegas, Mathieu

    2008-04-01

    Panoramic and hemispheric lens technologies represent new and exciting opportunities in both imaging and projection systems. Such lenses offer intriguing applications for the transportation/automotive industry, in the protection of civilian and military areas, business. In this paper we describe a new optical design technique that provides a greater degree of freedom in producing a variety of hemispheric spatial light distribution areas. This innovative optical design strategy, of generating and controlling image mapping, has been successful in producing high-resolution imaging and projection systems. This success has subsequently generated increased interest in the high-resolution camera/projector and the concept of absolute measurement with high-resolution wide-angle lenses. The new technique described in this paper uses optimization techniques to improve the performance of a customized wide-angle lens optical system for a specific application. By adding a custom angle-to-pixel ratio at the optical design stage, this customized optical system provides ideal image coverage while reducing and optimizing signal processing. This novel image formation technique requires the development of new algorithms in order to view the panoramic image on a display without any residual distortion.

  9. Wavelets: Applications to Image Compression-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 3. Wavelets: Applications to Image Compression – II. Sachin P Nanavati ... National PARAM Supercomputing Facility, Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC). Pune University Campus, Ganesh Khind, Pune 411 007, India.

  10. Curve Matching with Applications in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martin; Bruveris, Martins; Harms, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, Riemannian shape analysis of curves and surfaces has found several applications in medical image analysis. In this paper we present a numerical discretization of second order Sobolev metrics on the space of regular curves in Euclidean space. This class of metrics has several...

  11. Recent applications of hyperspectral imaging in microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Aoife A; Feng, Yaoze; Gaston, Edurne; Valdramidis, Vasilis

    2015-05-01

    Hyperspectral chemical imaging (HSI) is a broad term encompassing spatially resolved spectral data obtained through a variety of modalities (e.g. Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared microscopy, fluorescence and near-infrared chemical imaging). It goes beyond the capabilities of conventional imaging and spectroscopy by obtaining spatially resolved spectra from objects at spatial resolutions varying from the level of single cells up to macroscopic objects (e.g. foods). In tandem with recent developments in instrumentation and sampling protocols, applications of HSI in microbiology have increased rapidly. This article gives a brief overview of the fundamentals of HSI and a comprehensive review of applications of HSI in microbiology over the past 10 years. Technical challenges and future perspectives for these techniques are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron microscopy imaging of proteins on gallium phosphide semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Martin; Bauer, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Stefan; Mårsell, Erik; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Karlsson, Gunnel; Sanfins, Elodie; Prinz, Christelle N.; Wallenberg, Reine; Cedervall, Tommy; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the laminin conformation on the NWs. In blood plasma, an intermediate sized corona around the NWs indicates a corona with a mixture of plasma proteins. The ability to directly visualize proteins on nanostructures in situ holds great promise for assessing the conformation and thickness of the protein corona, which is key to understanding and predicting the properties of engineered nanomaterials in a biological environment.We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the

  13. Applicability of thin film phase plates in biological electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Danev, Radostin; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2006-01-01

    Presented is an evaluation of phase contrast techniques in transmission electron microscopy. The traditional defocus phase contrast is compared to two recently developed phase plate techniques. One is the Zernike phase contrast transmission electron microscope, the other is the Hilbert differential contrast thransmission electron microscope. The imaging characteristics of each technique are discussed. Phase plate techniques provide improved contrast for ice-embedded biological samples which a...

  14. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multimodal interaction in image and video applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sappa, Angel D

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Pattern Recognition (PR) and Computer Vision (CV) technologies have mainly focused on full automation, even though full automation often proves elusive or unnatural in many applications, where the technology is expected to assist rather than replace the human agents. However, not all the problems can be automatically solved being the human interaction the only way to tackle those applications. Recently, multimodal human interaction has become an important field of increasing interest in the research community. Advanced man-machine interfaces with high cognitive capabilities are a hot research topic that aims at solving challenging problems in image and video applications. Actually, the idea of computer interactive systems was already proposed on the early stages of computer science. Nowadays, the ubiquity of image sensors together with the ever-increasing computing performance has open new and challenging opportunities for research in multimodal human interaction. This book aims to show how existi...

  16. Freeform Compliant CMOS Electronic Systems for Internet of Everything Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh, Sohail F.

    2017-01-17

    The state-of-the-art electronics technology has been an integral part of modern advances. The prevalent rise of the mobile device and computational technology in the age of information technology offers exciting applications that are attributed to sophisticated, enormously reliable, and most mature CMOS-based electronics. We are accustomed to high performance, cost-effective, multifunctional, and energy-efficient scaled electronics. However, they are rigid, bulky, and brittle. The convolution of flexibility and stretchability in electronics for emerging Internet of Everything application can unleash smart application horizon in unexplored areas, such as robotics, healthcare, smart cities, transport, and entertainment systems. While flexible and stretchable device themes are being remarkably chased, the realization of the fully compliant electronic system is unaddressed. Integration of data processing, storage, communication, and energy management devices complements a compliant system. Here, a comprehensive review is presented on necessity and design criteria for freeform (physically flexible and stretchable) compliant high-performance CMOS electronic systems.

  17. Genitourinary imaging: Current and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O′ Donoghue P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the current and emerging techniques in urinary tract imaging. Recent technical advances and novel discoveries make this an exciting but challenging time for urinary tract imaging. The first section describes the imaging of the adrenal gland which has made great strides in the last decade, the current major adrenal imaging modalities as well as new applications are discussed with particular attention to the role of imaging in the incidentally detected adrenal lesion. In the second section the role of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance (MR in evaluation of the renal tract are discussed with the new technical advances leading to earlier detection and characterization of renal lesions. Complementary to this is the emerging role of CT and MR urography in assessment of the urinary tract and bladder in contrast to the demise of plain film studies/intravenous urography. The role of CT angiography in assessment of the renal vasculature is also discussed. The third section discusses the role of prostate imaging in the diagnosis, staging and management of prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasonography, can be used to guide biopsy, CT is frequently used in staging, with bone scintigraphy and positron emission tomography having roles in advanced disease. Currently, all imaging modalities, especially MR are evolving to improve disease detection and staging. The final section discusses the recently encountered adverse reaction of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients post gadolinium-enhanced MRI and how to help prevent this adverse reaction.

  18. Quantum dots in imaging, drug delivery and sensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matea, Cristian T; Mocan, Teodora; Tabaran, Flaviu; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Puia, Cosmin; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), also known as nanoscale semiconductor crystals, are nanoparticles with unique optical and electronic properties such as bright and intensive fluorescence. Since most conventional organic label dyes do not offer the near-infrared (>650 nm) emission possibility, QDs, with their tunable optical properties, have gained a lot of interest. They possess characteristics such as good chemical and photo-stability, high quantum yield and size-tunable light emission. Different types of QDs can be excited with the same light wavelength, and their narrow emission bands can be detected simultaneously for multiple assays. There is an increasing interest in the development of nano-theranostics platforms for simultaneous sensing, imaging and therapy. QDs have great potential for such applications, with notable results already published in the fields of sensors, drug delivery and biomedical imaging. This review summarizes the latest developments available in literature regarding the use of QDs for medical applications.

  19. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications & Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field made be used for volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. Extensions to environment, Space and subterranean applications will be presented, and initial results for quantitative characterizing material properties are shown. A wearable EFI system has been developed by using fundamental EFI concepts. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, manufacturing quality control, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of

  20. Lagrange time delay estimation for scanning electron microscope image magnification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K-S; Thong, L W; Ting, H Y; Tso, C P

    2010-02-01

    Interpolation techniques that are used for image magnification to obtain more useful details of the surface such as morphology and mechanical contrast usually rely on the signal information distributed around edges and areas of sharp changes and these signal information can also be used to predict missing details from the sample image. However, many of these interpolation methods tend to smooth or blur out image details around the edges. In the present study, a Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator method is proposed and this method only requires a small filter order and has no noticeable estimation bias. Comparing results with the original scanning electron microscope magnification and results of various other interpolation methods, the Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator is found to be more efficient, more robust and easier to execute.

  1. Imaging the atomic orbitals of carbon atomic chains with field-emission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Velicodnaja, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    A recently developed high-field technique of atomic chains preparation has made it possible to attain the ultrahigh resolution of field-emission electron microscopy (FEEM), which can be used to direct imaging the intra-atomic electronic structure. By applying cryogenic FEEM, we are able to resolve the spatial configuration of atomic orbitals, which correspond to quantized states of the end atom in free-standing carbon atomic chains. Knowledge of the intra-atomic structure will make it possible to visualize generic aspects of quantum mechanics and also lead to approaches for a wide range of nanotechnological applications.

  2. Projection imaging with directional electron and proton beams emitted from an ultrashort intense laser-driven thin foil target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Choi, I. W.; Daido, H.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Yogo, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Daito, I.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Yu, T. J.; Jeong, T. M.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, C. M.; Kang, S. W.; Pae, K. H.; Oishi, Y.; Lee, J.

    2015-02-01

    Projection images of a metal mesh produced by directional MeV electron beam together with directional proton beam, emitted simultaneously from a thin foil target irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser, are recorded on an imaging plate for the electron imaging and on a CR-39 nuclear track detector for the proton imaging. The directional electron beam means the portion of the electron beam which is emitted along the same direction (i.e., target normal direction) as the proton beam. The mesh patterns are projected to each detector by the electron beam and the proton beam originated from tiny virtual sources of ~20 µm and ~10 µm diameters, respectively. Based on the observed quality and magnification of the projection images, we estimate sizes and locations of the virtual sources for both beams and characterize their directionalities. To carry out physical interpretation of the directional electron beam qualitatively, we perform 2D particle-in-cell simulation which reproduces a directional escaping electron component, together with a non-directional dragged-back electron component, the latter mainly contributes to building a sheath electric field for proton acceleration. The experimental and simulation results reveal various possible applications of the simultaneous, synchronized electron and proton sources to radiography and pump-probe measurements with temporal resolution of ~ps and spatial resolution of a few tens of µm.

  3. Uncooled LWIR imaging: applications and market analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasawa, Satomi

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of infrared (IR) imaging sensor technology for defense market has played an important role in developing commercial market, as dual use of the technology has expanded. In particular, technologies of both reduction in pixel pitch and vacuum package have drastically evolved in the area of uncooled Long-Wave IR (LWIR; 8-14 μm wavelength region) imaging sensor, increasing opportunity to create new applications. From the macroscopic point of view, the uncooled LWIR imaging market is divided into two areas. One is a high-end market where uncooled LWIR imaging sensor with sensitivity as close to that of cooled one as possible is required, while the other is a low-end market which is promoted by miniaturization and reduction in price. Especially, in the latter case, approaches towards consumer market have recently appeared, such as applications of uncooled LWIR imaging sensors to night visions for automobiles and smart phones. The appearance of such a kind of commodity surely changes existing business models. Further technological innovation is necessary for creating consumer market, and there will be a room for other companies treating components and materials such as lens materials and getter materials and so on to enter into the consumer market.

  4. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ISHIDA.Nobuyuki@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Fujita, Daisuke [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Advanced Nanocharacterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li.

  5. 76 FR 55944 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... importation of certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated... having graphics processing units (``GPUs'') supplied by NVIDIA Corporation (``NVIDIA'') infringe any...

  6. Modelling experimental image formation for likelihood-based classification of electron microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Gómez-Llorente, Yacob; Martín, Carmen San; Eggermont, Paul P. B.; Carazo, José María

    2007-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple distinct structural states often obstructs the application of three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy to large macromolecular complexes. Maximum likelihood approaches are emerging as robust tools for solving the image classification problems that are posed by such samples. Here, we propose a statistical data model that allows for a description of the experimental image formation within the formulation of 2D and 3D maximum likelihood refinement. The proposed approach comprises a formulation of the probability calculations in Fourier space, including a spatial frequency-dependent noise model and a description of defocus-dependent imaging effects. The Expectation-Maximization like algorithms presented are generally applicable to the alignment and classification of structurally heterogeneous projection data. Their effectiveness is demonstrated with various examples, including 2D classification of top views of the archaeal helicase MCM, and 3D classification of 70S E.coli ribosome and Simian Virus 40 large T-antigen projections. PMID:17937907

  7. Electron imaging with Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    McMullan, G; Chen, S; Henderson, R; Llopart, X; Summerfield, C; Tlustos, L; Faruqi, A R

    2007-01-01

    The electron imaging performance of Medipix2 is described. Medipix2 is a hybrid pixel detector composed of two layers. It has a sensor layer and a layer of readout electronics, in which each 55 μm×55 μm pixel has upper and lower energy discrimination and MHz rate counting. The sensor layer consists of a 300 μm slab of pixellated monolithic silicon and this is bonded to the readout chip. Experimental measurement of the detective quantum efficiency, DQE(0) at 120 keV shows that it can reach 85% independent of electron exposure, since the detector has zero noise, and the DQE(Nyquist) can reach 35% of that expected for a perfect detector (4/π2). Experimental measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist resolution for 120 keV electrons using a 60 keV lower energy threshold, yields a value that is 50% of that expected for a perfect detector (2/π). Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of electron tracks and energy deposited in adjacent pixels have been performed and used to calculate expected v...

  8. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, W; Berry, J; Maolinbay, M; Martelli, C; Mody, P; Nassif, S; Yeakey, M

    1999-01-01

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The sys...

  9. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  10. Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

    2000-01-01

    easily imaged and studied. The low-temperature SEM sample collecting and handling methods proved to be operable in the field; the SEM analysis is applicable to glaciological studies and reveals details unattainable by conventional light microscopic methods.Low temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae and ice worms were also collected and imaged. The SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. The SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities.

  11. Electron transfer reactions for image and image-derived states in dielectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. T.; Sanche, L.

    2008-08-01

    We have studied the cross section for electron trapping that occurs at the surfaces and interfaces of a variety of thin dielectric films (n-octane, methanol, n-butanol, and difluoromethane) that are grown on Kr buffer films. When such films are bombarded with electrons of very low incident energies (E<~300 meV), charging cross sections up to the order of 10-14 cm2 are measured for submonolayer quantities of a variety of coadsorbed molecules: CH3I, CH3Br, CH3Cl, and CO2. These huge cross sections are ascribed to the formation of image states at the dielectric film interfaces, which trap incoming electrons and, via coupling to the adsorbate electron affinity levels, dramatically enhance the capture probability. We have also shown that thin film dielectric layer structures can be created which display image-derived states, such as a ``quantum well'' in a sandwich structure with two ``electron barrier'' layers surrounding a Kr and adsorbate spacer film. These phenomena are shown to be of a general nature, occurring for a wide variety of molecular thin films, and depend on the dielectric constant and electron affinity of the selected species. We also report the absolute cross section for dissociative electron attachment of submonolayer CH3I adsorbed on Kr thin films.

  12. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software that... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices with image...

  13. Biomedical Applications of Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Zhao, Xiang; Yang, Ke; Liu, Yueping; Liu, Yu; Fu, Weiling; Luo, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Terahertz (THz=10(12)Hz) radiation has attracted wide attention for its unprecedented sensing ability and its noninvasive and nonionizing properties. Tremendous strides in THz instrumentation have prompted impressive breakthroughs in THz biomedical research. Here, we review the current state of THz spectroscopy and imaging in various biomedical applications ranging from biomolecules, including DNA/RNA, amino acids/peptides, proteins, and carbohydrates, to cells and tissues. We also address the potential biological effects of THz radiation during its biological applications and propose future prospects for this cutting-edge technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression of COTR in electron beam imaging diagnosis at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Minjie

    2012-05-15

    The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) demands electron beams with high peak current to generate high-brilliant, coherent X-ray pulses. Magnetic chicanes are used for longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to achieve the required high peak current. During bunch compression process, microstructures with a modulation length comparable to the visible light can be induced inside the bunch. This leads to coherent emission of optical transition radiation (OTR), which may impede the widely used beam diagnostic based on OTR imaging. In this thesis, two methods of using incoherent scintillation light are proposed to circumvent the problem of coherence effects in beam imaging diagnostics. The method of temporal separation has been proved experimentally to have successfully suppressed coherence effects. The longitudinal beam profiles measured using this method are in good agreement with reference measurements, verifying further the reliability of the method. The method of spatial separation has been investigated in preparation studies, from which an improved experimental setup has been designed.

  15. The CASSIOPE/e-POP Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Cameron, T. G.; Enno, G. A.; Howarth, A.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    The Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI) on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) experiment uses a microchannel-plate-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) detector to record two-dimensional, energy-angle images of electron distributions for energies up to 350 eV. Alternatively, the SEI can be biased to measure positive ions at energies that include the ambient ionospheric population (360∘×±4∘, and includes viewing of the nadir and ram directions, nominally. At high latitude the nominal orientation allows coverage of most pitch angles. The SEI is included on e-POP to address the mission's principal scientific objectives, the first being to characterize polar ion outflow and its drivers including ambipolar electric fields generated by suprathermal electron populations, and direct energization of ions by plasma waves or through frictional heating. In addition, the SEI's focus on low energies and high time resolution allows a unique view of suprathermal particle populations and their role in wave-particle interactions, in support of e-POP's second scientific objective: to study plasma waves and wave propagation in the high-latitude ionosphere. Observations taken within geophysically quiet regions indicate that the instrument can track bulk ion flow velocity with a resolution of order 25 m/s or better.

  16. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  17. Digital direct electron imaging of energy-filtered electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G.; Mingard, K. P.; Maneuski, D.; Edwards, P. R.; Day, A. P.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is a scanning electron microscopy technique used to obtain crystallographic information on materials. It allows the nondestructive mapping of crystal structure, texture, and strain with a lateral and depth resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs) are presently acquired using a detector comprising a scintillator coupled to a digital camera, and the crystallographic information obtainable is limited by the conversion of electrons to photons and then back to electrons again. In this article we will report the direct acquisition of energy-filtered EBSPs using a digital complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid pixel detector, Timepix. We show results from a range of samples with different mass and density, namely diamond, silicon, and GaN. Direct electron detection allows the acquisition of EBSPs at lower (≤5 keV) electron beam energies. This results in a reduction in the depth and lateral extension of the volume of the specimen contributing to the pattern and will lead to a significant improvement in lateral and depth resolution. Direct electron detection together with energy filtering (electrons having energy below a specific value are excluded) also leads to an improvement in spatial resolution but in addition provides an unprecedented increase in the detail in the acquired EBSPs. An increase in contrast and higher-order diffraction features are observed. In addition, excess-deficiency effects appear to be suppressed on energy filtering. This allows the fundamental physics of pattern formation to be interrogated and will enable a step change in the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for crystal phase identification and the mapping of strain. The enhancement in the contrast in high-pass energy-filtered EBSD patterns is found to be stronger for lighter, less dense materials. The improved contrast for such materials will enable the application of the EBSD

  18. Pharmaceutical applications of non-linear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Clare J; Windbergs, Maike; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2011-09-30

    Non-linear optics encompasses a range of optical phenomena, including two- and three-photon fluorescence, second harmonic generation (SHG), sum frequency generation (SFG), difference frequency generation (DFG), third harmonic generation (THG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The combined advantages of using these phenomena for imaging complex pharmaceutical systems include chemical and structural specificities, high optical spatial and temporal resolutions, no requirement for labels, and the ability to image in an aqueous environment. These features make such imaging well suited for a wide range of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical investigations, including material and dosage form characterisation, dosage form digestion and drug release, and drug and nanoparticle distribution in tissues and within live cells. In this review, non-linear optical phenomena used in imaging will be introduced, together with their advantages and disadvantages in the pharmaceutical context. Research on pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical applications is discussed, and potential future applications of the technology are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ferrite nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterisation and applications in electronic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kefeni, Kebede K., E-mail: kkefeni@gmail.com; Msagati, Titus A.M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Available synthesis methods of ferrite nanoparticles (FNPs) are briefly reviewed. • Summary of the advantage and limitation of FNPs synthesis techniques are presented. • The existing most common FNPs characterisation techniques are briefly reviewed. • Major application areas of FNPs in electronic materials are reviewed. - Abstract: Ferrite nanoparticles (FNPs) have attracted a great interest due to their wide applications in several areas such as biomedical, wastewater treatment, catalyst and electronic device. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterisation and application of FNPs in electronic device with more emphasis on the recently published works. The most commonly used synthesis techniques along with their advantages and limitations are discussed. The available characterisation techniques and their application in electronic materials such as sensors and biosensors, energy storage, microwave device, electromagnetic interference shielding and high-density recording media are briefly reviewed.

  20. Power electronic converter systems for direct drive renewable energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents power electronic conversion systems for wind and marine energy generation applications, in particular, direct drive generator energy conversion systems. Various topologies are presented and system design optimization and reliability are briefly discussed....

  1. Electronic Health Services: An Introduction to Theory and Application

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and communication technologies have made dramatic changes in our lives. Healthcare communities also made use of these technologies. Using computerized medical knowledge, electronic patients' information and telecommunications a lot of applications are now established throughout the world.

  2. Parallelism and Scalability in an Image Processing Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Sleth; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2008-01-01

    parallel programs. This paper investigates parallelism and scalability of an embedded image processing application. The major challenges faced when parallelizing the application were to extract enough parallelism from the application and to reduce load imbalance. The application has limited immediately...

  3. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  4. Efficient elastic imaging of single atoms on ultrathin supports in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Mono-atomic-layer membranes such as graphene offer new opportunities for imaging and detecting individual light atoms in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). For such applications where multiple scattering and diffraction effects are weak, we evaluate the detection efficiency and interpretability of single atom images for the most common detector geometries using quantitative quantum mechanical simulations. For well-resolved and atomically-thin specimens, the low angle annular dark field (LAADF) detector can provide a significant increase in signal-to-noise over other common detector geometries including annular bright field and incoherent bright field. This dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Simulations of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) imaged under ideal conditions indicate the minimal dose requirements for elastic imaging by STEM or conventional TEM still exceed previously reported dose limits. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene offers new opportunities for imaging individual light atoms in electron microscopes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For ultrathin materials, a low angle annular dark field detector can provide a SNR comparable to TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LAADF dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulations for atomic imaging of ATP nucleotides exceed the molecules' dose limits.

  5. Electronic Nose Technology and its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeil MAHMOUDI

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, Electronic Nose instrumentation has generated much interest internationally for its potential to solve a wide variety of problems in fragrance and cosmetics production, food and beverages manufacturing, chemical engineering, environmental monitoring and more recently medical diagnostic, bioprocesses and clinical diagnostic plant diseases. This instrument measure electrical resistance changes generated by adsorption of volatiles to the surface of electro active- polymer coa...

  6. Applications of laser wakefield accelerators for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2014-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators driven by high-intensity short-pulse lasers are a proven compact source of high-energy electron beams, with energy gains of ~GeV energy in centimetres of plasma demonstrated. One of the main proposed applications for these accelerators is to drive synchrotron light sources, in particular for x-ray applications. It has also been shown that the same plasma accelerator can also act as a wigglers, capable of the production of high brightness and spatially coherent hard x-ray beams. In this latest work, we demonstrate the application of these unique light-sources for biological and medical applications. The experiments were performed with the Astra Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Gemini produces laser pulses with energy exceeding 10 J in pulse lengths down to 40 fs. A long focal length parabola (f / 20) is used to focus the laser down to a spot of size approximately 25 μ m (fwhm) into a gas-cell of variable length. Electrons are accelerated to energies up to 1 GeV and a bright beam of x-rays is observed simultaneously with the accelerated beam. The length of the gas cell was optimised to produce high contrast x-ray images of radiographed test objects. This source was then used for imaging a number of interesting medical and biological samples. Full tomographic imaging of a human trabecular bone sample was made with resolution easily exceeding the ~100 μm level required for CT applications. Phase-contrast imaging of human prostrate and mouse neonates at the micron level was also demonstrated. These studies indicate the usefulness of these sources in research and clinical applications. They also show that full 3D imaging can be made possible with this source in a fraction of the time that it would take with a corresponding x-ray tube. The JAI is funded by STFC Grant ST/J002062/1.

  7. The multiple applications of electrons in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grard, R. J. L.

    1977-01-01

    An electron source such as a simple cathode is a cheap and light device which can serve several technological and scientific purposes in space: (1) electrostatic charging of a spacecraft can be limited by releasing electrons accumulated on the conductive elements of their surface; (2) the erosion of conductive coatings and the ability of conductive paints to withstand the space environment can be evaluated by monitoring the flow of charged particles impinging on their surface; (3) measuring the current collected by the spacecraft surface as a function of its potential with respect to an emitter is a very sensitive diagnostic technique which can yield a number of plasma parameters, such as density and temperature; (4) it is possible to convert the thermal motion of space plasmas into electrical energy by collecting energetic electrons and returning them to the medium as cold particles; (5) a wave in a plasma is characterized by a conduction current density which gives rise to fluctuations of the current flowing to the surface.

  8. Potential applications of electron emission membranes in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilevych, Yevgen [Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM), Berlin (Germany); University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brunner, Stefan E. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Chan, Hong Wah; Charbon, Edoardo [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Graaf, Harry van der, E-mail: vdgraaf@nikhef.nl [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hagen, Cornelis W. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nützel, Gert; Pinto, Serge D. [Photonis, Roden (Netherlands); Prodanović, Violeta [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Rotman, Daan [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Santagata, Fabio [State Key Lab for Solid State Lighti Changzhou base, F7 R& D HUB 1, Science and Education Town, Changzhou 213161, Jangsu Province (China); Sarro, Lina; Schaart, Dennis R. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Sinsheimer, John; Smedley, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tao, Shuxia; Theulings, Anne M.M.G. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-11

    With a miniaturised stack of transmission dynodes, a noise free amplifier is being developed for the detection of single free electrons, with excellent time- and 2D spatial resolution and efficiency. With this generic technology, a new family of detectors for individual elementary particles may become possible. Potential applications of such electron emission membranes in medicine are discussed.

  9. Imaging Systems For Application In Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothues, H.-G.; Michaelis, H.; Behnke, T.; Bresch, W.; Koldewey, E.; Lichopoj, A.; Tschentscher, M.; Alicke, P.

    Imaging systems operating in the wavelength domain between the near UV and the mid IR (about 300 nm to > 5 (m) play a crucial role in remote sensing from orbiters and in-situ lander measurements of planetary exploration space missions. Wide-angle and high-resolution cameras, IR imagers, and imaging spectrographs provide carto- graphic information on the morphology and topography of planetary surfaces, serve to characterize landing sites with their geological features like soils and rocks, de- liver data on the spectrophotometric characteristics of minerals, and contribute to at- mospheric reasearch. Moreover, imaging systems have the important task to present scientific missions to the general public. As resources during planetary missions are usually very limited imaging payloads have to be designed to have low mass and size, low power consumption, and to effectively handle the imaging data taking into ac- count the limited computing powers, mass memories and telemetry data rates (image data compression). Furthermore, the design has to cope with extremely harsh environ- ments such as, for example, high and very low temperatures, large temperature varia- tions and gradients, high mechanical loads (shocks), e.g. during landing on a planetary surface, a hostile particle radiation environment, and dusty or chemically aggressive atmospheres. The presentation discusses the requirements to be set up for planetary mission imaging systems, and gives an overview of the most important design mea- sures to be taken in order to be compliant with these requirements (e.g. miniatur- ization of electronics, light-weight materials, athermal and radiation tolerant design). The discussion comprises all subunits of imaging systems starting with the optics / the spectrograph and the detector unit, continuing with the data processing unit, and ending with peripheral equipment like e.g. drives, deployable booms, and illumina- tion devices for lander cameras. Examples are given of already

  10. Biomolecular imaging and electronic damage using X-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Quiney, Harry M

    2010-01-01

    Proposals to determine biomolecular structures from diffraction experiments using femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses involve a conflict between the incident brightness required to achieve diffraction-limited atomic resolution and the electronic and structural damage induced by the illumination. Here we show that previous estimates of the conditions under which biomolecular structures may be obtained in this manner are unduly restrictive, because they are based on a coherent diffraction model that is not appropriate to the proposed interaction conditions. A more detailed imaging model derived from optical coherence theory and quantum electrodynamics is shown to be far more tolerant of electronic damage. The nuclear density is employed as the principal descriptor of molecular structure. The foundations of the approach may also be used to characterize electrodynamical processes by performing scattering experiments on complex molecules of known structure.

  11. Optical Thermal Characterization Enables High-Performance Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    NREL developed a modeling and experimental strategy to characterize thermal performance of materials. The technique provides critical data on thermal properties with relevance for electronics packaging applications. Thermal contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity were characterized for new high-performance materials such as thermoplastics, boron-nitride nanosheets, copper nanowires, and atomically bonded layers. The technique is an important tool for developing designs and materials that enable power electronics packaging with small footprint, high power density, and low cost for numerous applications.

  12. Handbook of power systems engineering with power electronics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, Yoshihide

    2012-01-01

    Formerly known as Handbook of Power System Engineering, this second edition provides rigorous revisions to the original treatment of systems analysis together with a substantial new four-chapter section on power electronics applications. Encompassing a whole range of equipment, phenomena, and analytical approaches, this handbook offers a complete overview of power systems and their power electronics applications, and presents a thorough examination of the fundamental principles, combining theories and technologies that are usually treated in separate specialised fields, in a single u

  13. Clean electromigrated nanogaps imaged by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Douglas R; Smith, Deirdre E; Fischbein, Michael D; Johnston, Danvers E; Guiton, Beth S; Drndić, Marija; Bonnell, Dawn A; Johnson, Alan T

    2006-03-01

    Electromigrated nanogaps have shown great promise for use in molecular scale electronics. We have fabricated nanogaps on free-standing transparent SiN(x) membranes which permit the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the gaps. The electrodes are formed by extending a recently developed controlled electromigration procedure and yield a nanogap with approximately 5 nm separation clear of any apparent debris. The gaps are stable, on the order of hours as measured by TEM, but over time (months) relax to about 20 nm separation determined by the surface energy of the Au electrodes. A major benefit of electromigrated nanogaps on SiN(x) membranes is that the junction pinches in away from residual metal left from the Au deposition which could act as a parasitic conductance path. This work has implications to the design of clean metallic electrodes for use in nanoscale devices where the precise geometry of the electrode is important.

  14. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane......, connected by a horizontal flux-line in the plane, resembling a connecting Josephson vortex (JV) segment. Such structures may arise when a magnetic field is applied almost in the plane, and the line tension of the fluxon breaks down under its influence. The existence of kinked vortices was hinted in earlier...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  15. Aplanatic imaging systems for the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Heiko, E-mail: mueller@ceos-gmbh.de [Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Massmann, Ingo; Uhlemann, Stephan; Hartel, Peter; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Maximilian [Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-07-21

    During the last decade aberration correctors have become a well-accepted tool in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The available correctors compensate for the spherical aberration C{sub s} of the imaging system. Recently, for instruments with considerably improved information limit also the off-axial aberrations have attracted more attention since these aberrations limit the high-resolution field of view. We have proposed a novel hexapole-type C{sub s}/B{sub 3}-corrector which corrects for the spherical aberration and the off-axial coma of the imaging system. We discuss the assessment and correction of off-axial aberrations and report about the optical performance of the first prototype instrument.

  16. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J X; Milbourne, T; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Dominguez, A; Efthimion, P C; Hill, K W; Kramer, G J; Kung, C; Kubota, S; Kasparek, W; Lu, J; Pablant, N A; Park, H; Tobias, B

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  17. Cellulose-gold nanowire (GNW) composite for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Hyung; Lim, Byungwook; Park, Seongsoon

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, regenerated cellulose has received much attention due to its huge industrial potentials and its feasibility for many industrial applications such as sensors and actuators. However, due to its insulating property, few results used for potential electronic applications have been reported. By modification of cellulose itself, nano-sized electrical inner paths can be formed by chemical bonding of metallic or semiconducting nanowires to cellulose fibrils during regenerated process. Already our earlier result of the chemical bonding between carbon nanotubes and the regenerated cellulose has been reported as a novel electronic material for potential paper transistor. In this paper, we study the cellulose-gold nanowire (GNW) composite for electronic application due to its huge potential for paper transistor and other applications such as biosensors and strain sensors due to its electrical response sensitivity. The detailed material properties of GNW cellulose composite and its potential for electrical applications will be demonstrated.

  18. Residual Deconvolutional Networks for Brain Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Zeng, Tao; Ji, Shuiwang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate reconstruction of anatomical connections between neurons in the brain using electron microscopy (EM) images is considered to be the gold standard for circuit mapping. A key step in obtaining the reconstruction is the ability to automatically segment neurons with a precision close to human-level performance. Despite the recent technical advances in EM image segmentation, most of them rely on hand-crafted features to some extent that are specific to the data, limiting their ability to generalize. Here, we propose a simple yet powerful technique for EM image segmentation that is trained end-to-end and does not rely on prior knowledge of the data. Our proposed residual deconvolutional network consists of two information pathways that capture full-resolution features and contextual information, respectively. We showed that the proposed model is very effective in achieving the conflicting goals in dense output prediction; namely preserving full-resolution predictions and including sufficient contextual information. We applied our method to the ongoing open challenge of 3D neurite segmentation in EM images. Our method achieved one of the top results on this open challenge. We demonstrated the generality of our technique by evaluating it on the 2D neurite segmentation challenge dataset where consistently high performance was obtained. We thus expect our method to generalize well to other dense output prediction problems.

  19. Applications of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to thin oxide films and interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Luck, Julia T [ORNL; Torija, Maria [University of Minnesota; Sharma, M [University of Minnesota; Leighton, chris [University of Minnesota; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Murfitt, Matt [Nion Co; Dellby, Niklas [ORNL; Krivanek, Ondrej [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope allows spatial resolutions of the order of one ngstr m to be routinely achieved. When combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is possible to simultaneously map the structure, the chemistry and even the electronic properties of materials in one single experiment. Here we will apply these techniques to the characterization of thin films and interfaces based on complex oxides with the perovskite structure. The relatively large lattice parameter of these materials combined with the fact that most of them have absorption edges within the reach of the spectrometer optics makes these materials ideal for these experiments. We will show how it is possible to map the chemistry of interfaces atomic plane by atomic plane, including light element imaging such as O. Applications to cobaltite and titanate thin films will be described.

  20. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  1. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-03

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  2. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion.

  3. Power electronics basics operating principles, design, formulas, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rozanov, Yuriy; Chaplygin, Evgeny; Voronin, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Power Electronics Basics: Operating Principles, Design, Formulas, and Applications provides fundamental knowledge for the analysis and design of modern power electronic devices. This concise and user-friendly resource:Explains the basic concepts and most important terms of power electronicsDescribes the power assemblies, control, and passive components of semiconductor power switchesCovers the control of power electronic devices, from mathematical modeling to the analysis of the electrical processesAddresses pulse-width modulation, power quality control, and multilevel, modular, and multicell

  4. Imaging laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons using miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weingartner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of the energy spread, beam divergence, and pointing fluctuations are some of the main challenges currently facing the field of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons. We address these issues by manipulating the electron beams after their generation using miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with field gradients of ∼500  T/m. By imaging electron beams the spectral resolution of dipole magnet spectrometers can be significantly increased, resulting in measured energy spreads down to 1.0% rms at 190 MeV. The focusing of different electron energies demonstrates the tunability of the lens system and could be used to filter out off-target energies in order to reduce the energy spread even further. By collimating the beam, the shot-to-shot spatial stability of the beam is improved by a factor of 5 measured at a distance of 1 m from the source. Additionally, by deliberately transversely offsetting a quadrupole lens, the electron beam can be steered in any direction by several mrad. These methods can be implemented while still maintaining the ultrashort bunch duration and low emittance of the beam and, except for undesired electron energies in the energy filter, without any loss of charge. This reliable and compact control of laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams is independent of the accelerator itself, allowing immediate application of currently available beams.

  5. Applications of Novel X-Ray Imaging Modalities in Food Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou

    with improved contrast are needed. Two possible candidates in this regard are the novel X-ray phase-contrast and X-ray dark-eld imaging modalities. The contrast in phase-contrast imaging is based on dierences in electron density which is especially useful for soft matter materials whereas dark-eld imaging...... process. From the initial step of taking the image, the information in the image needs to be translated through image analysis before data analysis can be applied to treat the image quantitatively and answer the questions at hand. In this work, a number of studies were carried out to investigate possible...... applications of novel X-ray imaging modalities within food science. The first two studies mainly concern the image acquisition process of taking the image. Using dark-eld radiography, raw, frozen and defrosted fruit were distinguished, and structural changes in barley seeds during germination were monitored...

  6. Theory and applications of free-electron vortex states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, K. Y.; Ivanov, I. P.; Guzzinati, G.; Clark, L.; Van Boxem, R.; Béché, A.; Juchtmans, R.; Alonso, M. A.; Schattschneider, P.; Nori, F.; Verbeeck, J.

    2017-05-01

    Both classical and quantum waves can form vortices : entities with helical phase fronts and circulating current densities. These features determine the intrinsic orbital angular momentum carried by localized vortex states. In the past 25 years, optical vortex beams have become an inherent part of modern optics, with many remarkable achievements and applications. In the past decade, it has been realized and demonstrated that such vortex beams or wavepackets can also appear in free electron waves, in particular, in electron microscopy. Interest in free-electron vortex states quickly spread over different areas of physics: from basic aspects of quantum mechanics, via applications for fine probing of matter (including individual atoms), to high-energy particle collision and radiation processes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of research. We describe the main properties of electron vortex states, experimental achievements and possible applications within transmission electron microscopy, as well as the possible role of vortex electrons in relativistic and high-energy processes. We aim to provide a balanced description including a pedagogical introduction, solid theoretical basis, and a wide range of practical details. Special attention is paid to translating theoretical insights into suggestions for future experiments, in electron microscopy and beyond, in any situation where free electrons occur.

  7. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) testing, and Li-ion battery design. In summary, the authors have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). Finally, the authors are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  8. Application of UV Imaging in Formulation Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Østergaard, Jesper

    2017-05-01

    Efficient drug delivery is dependent on the drug substance dissolving in the body fluids, being released from dosage forms and transported to the site of action. A fundamental understanding of the interplay between the physicochemical properties of the active compound and pharmaceutical excipients defining formulation behavior after exposure to the aqueous environments and pharmaceutical performance is critical in pharmaceutical development, manufacturing and quality control of drugs. UV imaging has been explored as a tool for qualitative and quantitative characterization of drug dissolution and release with the characteristic feature of providing real-time visualization of the solution phase drug transport in the vicinity of the formulation. Events occurring during drug dissolution and release, such as polymer swelling, drug precipitation/recrystallization, or solvent-mediated phase transitions related to the structural properties of the drug substance or formulation can be monitored. UV imaging is a non-intrusive and simple-to-operate analytical technique which holds potential for providing a mechanistic foundation for formulation development. This review aims to cover applications of UV imaging in the early and late phase pharmaceutical development with a special focus on the relation between structural properties and performance. Potential areas of future advancement and application are also discussed.

  9. Electron tomography of whole cultured cells using novel transmission electron imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Taiga; Shoji, Minami; Hisada, Akiko; Ominami, Yusuke; Ito, Sukehiro; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Nakajima, Masato; Ohshima, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Since a three-dimensional (3D) cellular ultrastructure is significant for biological functions, it has been investigated using various electron microscopic techniques. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques are traditionally used, cells must be embedded in resin and sliced into ultrathin sections in sample preparation processes. Block-face observation using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has also been recently applied to 3D observation of cellular components, but this is a destructive inspection and does not allow re-examination. Therefore, we developed electron tomography using a transmission electron imaging technique called Plate-TEM. With Plate-TEM, the cells cultured directly on a scintillator plate are inserted into a conventional SEM equipped with a Plate-TEM observation system, and their internal structures are observed by detecting scintillation light produced by electrons passing through the cells. This technology has the following four advantages. First, the cells cultured on the plate can be observed at electron-microscopic resolution since they remain on the plate. Second, both surface and internal information can be obtained simultaneously by using electron- and photo-detectors, respectively, because a Plate-TEM detector is installed in an SEM. Third, the cells on the scintillator plate can also be inspected using light microscopy because the plate has transparent features. Finally, correlative observation with other techniques, such as conventional TEM, is possible after Plate-TEM observation because Plate-TEM is a non-destructive analysis technique. We also designed a sample stage to tilt the samples for tomography with Plate-TEM, by which 3D organization of cellular structures can be visualized as a whole cell. In the present study, Mm2T cells were investigated using our tomography system, resulting in 3D visualization of cell organelles such as mitochondria, lipid droplets, and microvilli. Correlative observations

  10. Advances in electronic-nose technologies developed for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Wilson; Manuela. Baietto

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and...

  11. Evaluating dot and Western blots using image analysis and pixel quantification of electronic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierck, J L; Bryne, K M; Dodson, M V

    2000-01-01

    Inexpensive computer imaging technology was used to assess levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on dot blots (DB) and alpha-Actinin on Western blots (WB). In the first procedure, known IGF-I samples were dotted on nitrocellulose membranes using a vacuum manifold. After the DB were developed and dried, the images were digitized using an HP Deskscan II flat bed scanner, exported into Image-Pro Plus and analyzed by taking the combined mean of 45 degrees and 135 degrees sample lines drawn through each dot. Dot blots corresponding to a linear concentration range from 10 to 300 ng IGF-I were assessed by this method. In the second procedure, WB were scanned with a ScanJet 3c flat bed scanner and their backgrounds were clarified using Image-Pro Plus. A second image analysis program, Alpha Imager 2000, was then used to define the boundaries of protein bands, assess pixel number and density, and to obtain final numerical data for quantifying alpha-Actinin on the WB. Collectively, the results of these two studies suggest that specific proteins may be evaluated by using relatively inexpensive image analysis software systems via pixel quantification of electronic images.

  12. Multifrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Sushil K

    2011-01-01

    Filling the gap for a systematic, authoritative, and up-to-date review of this cutting-edge technique, this book covers both low and high frequency EPR, emphasizing the importance of adopting the multifrequency approach to study paramagnetic systems in full detail by using the EPR method. In so doing, it discusses not only the underlying theory and applications, but also all recent advances -- with a final section devoted to future perspectives.

  13. Developing a model for application of electronic banking based on electronic trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hooshang Nazarpoori

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a model for application of electronic banking based on electronic trust among costumers of Day bank in KhoramAbad city. A sample of 150 people was selected based on stratified random sampling. Questionnaires were used for the investigation. Results indicate that technology-based factors, user-based factors, and trust had negative relationships with perceived risk types including financial, functional, personal, and private. Moreover, trust including trust in system and trust in bank had a positive relationship with tendency to use and real application of electronic banking.

  14. Physics of electronic materials principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rammer, Jorgen

    2017-01-01

    Adopting a uniquely pedagogical approach, this comprehensive textbook on the quantum mechanics of semiconductor materials and devices focuses on the materials, components and devices themselves whilst incorporating a substantial amount of fundamental physics related to condensed matter theory and quantum mechanics. Written primarily for advanced undergraduate students in physics and engineering, this book can also be used as a supporting text for introductory quantum mechanics courses, and will be of interest to anyone interested in how electronic devices function at a fundamental level. Complete with numerous exercises, and with all the necessary mathematics and physics included in appendices, this book guides the reader seamlessly through the principles of quantum mechanics and the quantum theory of metals and semiconductors, before describing in detail how devices are exploited within electric circuits and in the hardware of computers, for example as amplifiers, switches and transistors. Includes nume...

  15. Applications of electronic noses in meat analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta GÓRSKA-HORCZYCZAK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electronic noses are devices able to characterize and differentiate the aroma profiles of various food, especially meat and meat products. During recent years e-noses have been widely used in food analysis and proved to provide a fast, simple, non-expensive and non-destructive method of food assessment and quality control. The aim of this study is to summarize the most important features of this analytic tool and to present basic fields and typical areas of e-nose use as well as most commonly used sensor types and patterns for e-nose design. Prospects for the future development of this technique are presented. Methods and research results presented in this manuscript may be a guideline for practical e-nose use.

  16. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  17. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  18. Segmentation of electron microscopy images through Gabor texture descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rafael B.; Nestares, Oscar

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a robust method for image segmentation based on a local multiscale texture description. We first apply a set of 4 by 4 complex Gabor filters, plus a low-pass residual (LPR), producing a log-polar sampling of the frequency domain. Contrary to other analysis methods, our Gabor scheme produces a visually complete multipurpose representation of the image, so that it can also be applied to coding, synthesis, etc. Our sixteen texture features consist of local contrast descriptors, obtained by dividing the modulus of the response of the complex Gabor filter by that of the LPR at each location. Contrast descriptors are basically independent of slow variations in intensity, while increasing the robustness and invariance of the representation. Before applying the segmentation algorithm, we equalize the number of samples of the four layers in the resulting pyramid of local contrast descriptors. This method has been applied to segmentation of electron microscopy images, obtaining very good results in this real case, where robustness is a basic requirement, because intensity, textures and other factors are not completely homogeneous.

  19. Electronic Navigational Chart as an Equivalent to Image Produced by Hypercatadioptric Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic hyperboloidal mapping model aimed at building image of electronic navigational chart which constitutes an equivalent to that obtained from a hypercatadioptric camera system. In the 1st part, space and three reference frames located in it are defined. These are: the observer frame and horizontal topocentric frame considered secondary (both connected with water-surface platform, and the geocentric frame, primary one. The 2nd part provides description of a way of interconnection between the observer frame and horizontal topocentric one as well as of determination of their location in relation to the geocentric reference frame, depending on course and position of water-surface platform. In the final part is presented a model of panoramic image mapping in the observer reference frame and principles of generating ENC image by using dynamic hyperboloidal mapping. Finally, conclusions indicating possible applications of the developed model are presented.

  20. Femtosecond photoelectron imaging of transient electronic states and Rydberg atom emission from electronically excited he droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Bünermann, Oliver; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2011-07-14

    Ultrafast relaxation of electronically excited pure He droplets is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Droplets are excited by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses with photon energies below 24 eV. Excited states and relaxation products are probed by ionization with an infrared (IR) pulse with 1.6 eV photon energy. An initially excited droplet state decays on a time scale of 220 fs, leading predominantly to the emission of unaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms. In a second relaxation channel, electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are emitted from the droplet within less than 120 fs. The experimental results are described within a model that approximates electronically excited droplet states by localized, atomic Rydberg states perturbed by the local droplet environment in which the atom is embedded. The model suggests that, below 24 eV, EUV excitation preferentially leads to states that are localized in the surface region of the droplet. Electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are expected to originate from excitations in the outermost surface regions, while nonaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms emerge from a deeper surface region with higher local densities. The model is used to simulate the He droplet EUV absorption spectrum in good agreement with previously reported fluorescence excitation measurements.

  1. Toward Environmentally Robust Organic Electronics: Approaches and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kwang; Lee, Moo Yeol; Park, Cheol Hee; Lee, Hae Rang; Oh, Joon Hak

    2017-11-01

    Recent interest in flexible electronics has led to a paradigm shift in consumer electronics, and the emergent development of stretchable and wearable electronics is opening a new spectrum of ubiquitous applications for electronics. Organic electronic materials, such as π-conjugated small molecules and polymers, are highly suitable for use in low-cost wearable electronic devices, and their charge-carrier mobilities have now exceeded that of amorphous silicon. However, their commercialization is minimal, mainly because of weaknesses in terms of operational stability, long-term stability under ambient conditions, and chemical stability related to fabrication processes. Recently, however, many attempts have been made to overcome such instabilities of organic electronic materials. Here, an overview is provided of the strategies developed for environmentally robust organic electronics to overcome the detrimental effects of various critical factors such as oxygen, water, chemicals, heat, and light. Additionally, molecular design approaches to π-conjugated small molecules and polymers that are highly stable under ambient and harsh conditions are explored; such materials will circumvent the need for encapsulation and provide a greater degree of freedom using simple solution-based device-fabrication techniques. Applications that are made possible through these strategies are highlighted. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Liquid phase exfoliated graphene for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sheena S.; Jinesh, K. B.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2017-09-01

    Graphene dispersions were prepared using the liquid phase exfoliation method with three different surfactants. One surfactant was used from each of the surfactant types, anionic, cationic, and non-ionic; those used, were sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), respectively. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the number of layers and the nature of any defects present in the exfoliated graphene. The yield of graphene was found to be less with the non-ionic surfactant, PVP. The deconvolution of 2D peaks at ~2700 cm-1 indicated that graphene prepared using these surfactants resulted in sheets consisting of few-layer graphene. The ratio of intensity of the D and G bands in the Raman spectra showed that edge defect density is high for samples prepared with SDBS compared to the other two, and is attributed to the smaller size of the graphene sheets, as shown in the electron micrographs. In the case of the dispersion in PVP, it is found that the sizes of the graphene sheets are highly sensitive to the concentration of the surfactant used. Here, we have made an attempt to investigate the local density of states in the graphene sheets by measuring the tunnelling current-voltage characteristics. Graphene layers have shown consistent p-type behaviour when exfoliated with SDBS and n-type behaviour when exfoliated with CTAB, with a larger band gap for graphene exfoliated using CTAB. Hence, in addition to the known advantages of liquid phase exfoliation, we found that by selecting suitable surfactants, to a certain extent it is possible to tune the band gap and determine the type of majority carriers.

  3. Chalcogenide based materials and devices for flexible electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Villasenor, Ana Lizeth

    The scaling of large-area electronics for applications in flat-panel displays, digital X-ray images, and flexible electronics is pushing the technological and cost limits of conventional materials and device processing. Chemical bath deposited chalcogenide films are attractive for thin film transistors (TFTs) for large area electronics given its simple fabrication, low temperature and compatibility with most substrates. In this dissertation, we describe the development of a high performance chalcogenide based TFTs using chemical bath deposition (CBD) methods. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and lead sulfide (PbS) are used as the TFT channel layer. The influence of several CBD parameters is studied. CBD pH and CdS film thickness have a profound influence on the TFT electrical characteristics. These parameters impact film cluster size and impurity concentration. With the optimized CdS deposition conditions TFTs with excellent electrical properties are demonstrated. With a novel photolithography approach demonstrated here, TFTs with mobilities as high as 18 cm2 /V s, Ion/Ioff of 109 and V T shift of less than 0.1 eV were fabricated. To achieve these TFTs characteristics, a variety of contact materials, gate dielectrics, annealing conditions and device structures were studied. The factors affecting VT instability for CdS based TFTs are also presented and correlated to electrode materials, gate dielectrics, and post-annealing. In summary, TFT instability is correlated to traps and impurities at the dielectric/semiconductor and/or in the semiconductor film. In addition, this dissertation demonstrates CdS TFTs integration in hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. In particular, logic gates and ferroelectric random access (FRAM) memory cells are demonstrated. Finally, CdS based TFTs on flexible and transparent substrates with excellent stability and mobility of 10-18 cm2/V-s, threshold voltage of 1.6-4.8 V, and Ion/Ioff ratios of 107 are demonstrated. This

  4. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  5. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2016-01-01

    The technology and techniques for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for (illuminating) volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology, electric field sensor (e-sensor), and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasistatic generator), and current e-sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-sensor) are discussed. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. This new EFI capability is demonstrated to reveal characterization of electric charge distribution, creating a new field of study that embraces areas of interest including electrostatic discharge mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, dielectric morphology of structures, inspection of containers, inspection for hidden objects, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  6. Optical Imaging of the Breast: Basic Principles and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Trimboli, Rubina Manuela; Sella, Tamar; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the physical principles, technology features, and first clinical applications of optical imaging techniques to the breast. Light-breast tissue interaction is expressed as absorption and scattering coefficients, allowing image reconstruction based on endogenous or exogenous contrast. Diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging, fluorescence molecular tomography, photoacoustic imaging, and multiparametric infrared imaging show potential for clinical application, especially for lesion characterization, estimation of cancer probability, and monitoring the effect of neoadjuvant therapy.

  7. Molecular modeling and multiscaling issues for electronic material applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamoto, Nancy; Yuen, Matthew; Fan, Haibo

    Volume 1 : Molecular Modeling and Multiscaling Issues for Electronic Material Applications provides a snapshot on the progression of molecular modeling in the electronics industry and how molecular modeling is currently being used to understand material performance to solve relevant issues in this field. This book is intended to introduce the reader to the evolving role of molecular modeling, especially seen through the eyes of the IEEE community involved in material modeling for electronic applications.  Part I presents  the role that quantum mechanics can play in performance prediction, such as properties dependent upon electronic structure, but also shows examples how molecular models may be used in performance diagnostics, especially when chemistry is part of the performance issue.  Part II gives examples of large-scale atomistic methods in material failure and shows several examples of transitioning between grain boundary simulations (on the atomistic level)and large-scale models including an example ...

  8. Electron beam irradiation processing for industrial and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Zehra Nur

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, electron beam processing has been widely used for medical and industrial applications. Electron beam accelerators are reliable and durable equipments that can produce ionizing radiation when it is needed for a particular commercial use. On the industrial scale, accelerators are used to generate electrons in between 0.1-100 MeV energy range. These accelerators are used mainly in plastics, automotive, wire and electric cables, semiconductors, health care, aerospace and environmental industries, as well as numerous researches. This study presents the current applications of electron beam processing in medicine and industry. Also planned study of a design for such a system in the energy range of 200-300 keV is introduced.

  9. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  10. A streaming multi-GPU implementation of image simulation algorithms for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Alan; Ophus, Colin; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Simulation of atomic-resolution image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy can require significant computation times using traditional methods. A recently developed method, termed plane-wave reciprocal-space interpolated scattering matrix (PRISM), demonstrates potential for significant acceleration of such simulations with negligible loss of accuracy. Here, we present a software package called Prismatic for parallelized simulation of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using both the PRISM and multislice methods. By distributing the workload between multiple CUDA-enabled GPUs and multicore processors, accelerations as high as 1000 × for PRISM and 15 × for multislice are achieved relative to traditional multislice implementations using a single 4-GPU machine. We demonstrate a potentially important application of Prismatic, using it to compute images for atomic electron tomography at sufficient speeds to include in the reconstruction pipeline. Prismatic is freely available both as an open-source CUDA/C++ package with a graphical user interface and as a Python package, PyPrismatic.

  11. Industrial applications of electron beam; Przemyslowe zastosowamia wiazki elektronow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    The review of industrial applications with use of electron beams has been done. Especially the radiation technologies being developed in Poland have been shown. Industrial installations with electron accelerators as radiation source have been applied for: modification of polymers; modification of thyristors; sterilization of health care materials; radiopreservation of food and other consumer products; purification of combustion flue gases in heat and power plants. 14 refs, 6 tabs, 7 figs.

  12. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...... information is achieved when the results of OIM and these various techniques are combined. Examples hereof are given to illustrate the potentials of OIM techniques. Finally, limitations of TEM and SEM based OIM for specific applications are discussed....

  13. Diverse protocols for correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of chemically fixed samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G.; Paez-Segala, Maria G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Sochacki, Kem A.; Sun, Mei G.; Wang, Yalin; Xu, C. Shan; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Taraska, Justin W.; Looger, Loren L.; Hess, Harald F.

    2017-01-01

    Our groups have recently developed related approaches for sample preparation for super-resolution imaging within endogenous cellular environments using correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). Four distinct techniques for preparing and acquiring super-resolution CLEM datasets on aldehyde-fixed specimens are provided, including Tokuyasu cryosectioning, whole-cell mount, cell unroofing and platinum replication, and resin embedding and sectioning. Choice of the best protocol for a given application depends on a number of criteria that are discussed in detail. Tokuyasu cryosectioning is relatively rapid but is limited to small, delicate specimens. Whole-cell mount has the simplest sample preparation but is restricted to surface structures. Cell unroofing and platinum replica creates high-contrast, 3-dimensional images of the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, but is more challenging than whole-cell mount. Resin embedding permits serial sectioning of large samples, but is limited to osmium-resistant probes, and is technically difficult. Expected results from these protocols include super-resolution localization (~10–50 nm) of fluorescent targets within the context of electron microscopy ultrastructure, which can help address cell biological questions. These protocols can be completed in 2–7 days, are compatible with a number of super-resolution imaging protocols, and are broadly applicable across biology. PMID:28384138

  14. The Role of Gas in Determining Image Quality and Resolution During In Situ Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Browning, Nigel D. [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-08-02

    As gas-solid heterogeneous catalytic reactions are molecular in nature, a full mechanistic understanding of the process requires atomic scale characterization under realistic operating conditions. While atomic resolution imaging has become a routine in modern high-vacuum (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM), both image quality and resolution nominally degrade when reaction gases are introduced. In this work, we systematically assess the effects of different gases at various pressures on the quality and resolution of images obtained at room temperature in the annular dark field STEM imaging mode using a differentially pumped (DP) gas cell. This imaging mode is largely free from inelastic scattering effects induced by the presence of gases and retains good imaging properties over a wide range of gas mass/pressures. We demonstrate the application of the ESTEM with atomic resolution images of a complex oxide alkane oxidation catalyst MoVNbTeOx (M1) immersed in light and heavy gas environments.

  15. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  16. Adhesives technology for electronic applications materials, processing, reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture and assembly of electronic circuits and products. Generally, electronics design engineers and manufacturing engineers are not well versed in adhesives, while adhesion chemists have a limited knowledge of electronics. This book bridges these knowledge gaps and is useful to both groups. The book includes chapters covering types of adhesive, the chemistry on which they are based, and their properties, applications, processes, specifications, and reliability. Coverage of toxicity, environmental impacts and the regulatory framework make this book par

  17. Handbook of polymer coatings for electronics chemistry, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    1990-01-01

    This completely revised edition remains the only comprehensive treatise on polymer coatings for electronics. Since the original edition, the applications of coatings for the environmental protection of electronic systems have greatly increased, largely driven by the competitive need to reduce costs, weight and volume. The demands for high-speed circuits for the rapid processing of signals and data, high-density circuits for the storage and retrieval of megabits of memory, and the improved reliability required of electronics for guiding and controlling weapons and space vehicles have triggered

  18. Electronically Tunable Multi-Terminal Floating Nullor and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tangsrirat

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A realization scheme of an electronically tun- able multi-terminal floating nullor (ET-MTFN is de- scribed in this paper. The proposed circuit mainly employs a transconductance amplifier, an improved translinear cell, two complementary current mirrors with variable current gain and improved Wilson current mirrors, which provide an electronic tuning of the current gain. The va- lidity of the performance of the scheme is verified through PSPICE simulation results. Example applications employing the proposed ET-MTFN as an active element demonstrate that the circuit properties can be varied by electronic means.

  19. Applications and Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Baietto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software innovations and progress in microcircuitry design and systems integration. The invention of many new e-nose sensor types and arrays, based on different detection principles and mechanisms, is closely correlated with the expansion of new applications. Electronic noses have provided a plethora of benefits to a variety of commercial industries, including the agricultural, biomedical, cosmetics, environmental, food, manufacturing, military, pharmaceutical, regulatory, and various scientific research fields. Advances have improved product attributes, uniformity, and consistency as a result of increases in quality control capabilities afforded by electronic-nose monitoring of all phases of industrial manufacturing processes. This paper is a review of the major electronic-nose technologies, developed since this specialized field was born and became prominent in the mid 1980s, and a summarization of some of the more important and useful applications that have been of greatest benefit to man.

  20. Computer Archiving and Image Enhancement of Diagnostic Electron Micrographs Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope as Real-Time Digitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagaki, T.; Jones, M.H.; Clark, B.A.; Pan, T.; Ferro, J.M.; Hsing, R.; Tzou, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Diagnostic electron micrographs were digitized in real time using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) controlled by a devoted front end processor at a resolution of 1K × 1K × 8. Various methods of image enhancement produced satisfactory results. From our experience, a faster front end processor with a larger memory size and 2K × 2K or 4K × 4K spatial resolution of an image are desirable. In order to facilitate storage and retrieval of an image archive, efficient data compression is necessary. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  1. Electronic readout system for the Belle II imaging Time-Of-Propagation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-07-01

    The imaging Time-Of-Propagation (iTOP) detector, constructed for the Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB e+e- collider, is an 8192-channel high precision Cherenkov particle identification detector with timing resolution below 50 ps. To acquire data from the iTOP, a novel front-end electronic readout system was designed, built, and integrated. Switched-capacitor array application-specific integrated circuits are used to sample analog signals. Triggering, digitization, readout, and data transfer are controlled by Xilinx Zynq-7000 system on a chip devices.

  2. Analysis of virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Loris; Paci, Michelangelo; Caetano Dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Brahnam, Sheryl; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ensemble of texture descriptors for analyzing virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images. Specifically, we present several novel multi-quinary (MQ) codings of local binary pattern (LBP) variants: the MQ version of the dense LBP, the MQ version of the rotation invariant co-occurrence among adjacent LBPs, and the MQ version of the LBP histogram Fourier. To reduce computation time as well as to improve performance, a feature selection approach is utilized to select the thresholds used in the MQ approaches. In addition, we propose new variants of descriptors where two histograms, instead of the standard one histogram, are produced for each descriptor. The two histograms (one for edge pixels and the other for non-edge pixels) are calculated for training two different SVMs, whose results are then combined by sum rule. We show that a bag of features approach works well with this problem. Our experiments, using a publicly available dataset of 1500 images with 15 classes and same protocol as in previous works, demonstrate the superiority of our new proposed ensemble of texture descriptors. The MATLAB code of our approach is available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357.

  3. Computational Phase Imaging for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tan Huu

    laser comes at the expense of speckles, which degrades image quality. Therefore, solutions purely based on physical modeling and computations to remove these artifacts, using white-light illumination, are highly desirable. Here, using physical optics, we develop a theoretical model that accurately explains the effects of partial coherence on image information and phase information. The model is further combined with numerical processing to suppress the artifacts, and recover the correct phase information. The third topic is devoted to applying QPI to clinical applications. Traditionally, stained tissues are used in prostate cancer diagnosis instead. The reason is that tissue samples used in diagnosis are nearly transparent under bright field inspection if unstained. Contrast-enhanced microscopy techniques, e.g., phase contrast microscopy (PC) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC), can render visibility of the untagged samples with high throughput. However, since these methods are intensity-based, the contrast of acquired images varies significantly from one imaging facility to another, preventing them from being used in diagnosis. Inheriting the merits of PC, SLIM produces phase maps, which measure the refractive index of label-free samples. However, the maps measured by SLIM are not affected by variation in imaging conditions, e.g., illumination, magnification, etc., allowing consistent imaging results when using SLIM across different clinical institutions. Here, we combine SLIM images with machine learning for automatic diagnosis results for prostate cancer. We focus on two diagnosis problems of automatic Gleason grading and cancer vs. non-cancer diagnosis. Finally, we introduce a new imaging modality, named Gradient Light Interference Microscopy (GLIM), which is able to image through optically thick samples using low spatial coherence illumination. The key benefit of GLIM comes from a large numerical aperture of the condenser, which is 0.55 NA

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  5. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  6. Pixel readout electronics for LHC and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanquart, L; Comes, G; Delpierre, P A; Fischer, P; Hausmann, J C; Keil, M; Lindner, Manfred; Meuser, S; Wermes, N

    2000-01-01

    The demanding requirements for pixel readout electronics for high- energy physics experiments and biomedical applications are reviewed. Some examples of the measured analog performance of prototype chips are given. The readout architectures of the PIxel readout for the ATlas experiment (PIRATE) chip suited for LHC experiments and of the multi-picture element counter (MPEC) counting chip targeted for biomedical applications are presented. First results with complete chip-sensor assemblies are also shown. (12 refs).

  7. Computer assisted assembly of connectomes from electron micrographs: application to Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xu

    Full Text Available A rate-limiting step in determining a connectome, the set of all synaptic connections in a nervous system, is extraction of the relevant information from serial electron micrographs. Here we introduce a software application, Elegance, that speeds acquisition of the minimal dataset necessary, allowing the discovery of new connectomes. We have used Elegance to obtain new connectivity data in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. We analyze the accuracy that can be obtained, which is limited by unresolvable ambiguities at some locations in electron microscopic images. Elegance is useful for reconstructing connectivity in any region of neuropil of sufficiently small size.

  8. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Z., E-mail: zhongbo.lee@uni-ulm.de; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-10-15

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions.

  9. Electronic recording of holograms with applications to holographic displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claspy, P. C.; Merat, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes an electronic heterodyne recording which uses electrooptic modulation to introduce a sinusoidal phase shift between the object and reference wave. The resulting temporally modulated holographic interference pattern is scanned by a commercial image dissector camera, and the rejection of the self-interference terms is accomplished by heterodyne detection at the camera output. The electrical signal representing this processed hologram can then be used to modify the properties of a liquid crystal light valve or a similar device. Such display devices transform the displayed interference pattern into a phase modulated wave front rendering a three-dimensional image.

  10. Image sharpness measurement in the scanning electron-microscope--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N F; Postek, M T; Larrabee, R D; Vladár, A E; Keery, W J; Jones, S N

    1999-01-01

    Fully automated or semi-automated scanning electron microscopes (SEM) are now commonly used in semiconductor production and other forms of manufacturing. Testing and proving that the instrument is performing at a satisfactory level of sharpness is an important aspect of quality control. The application of Fourier analysis techniques to the analysis of SEM images is a useful methodology for sharpness measurement. In this paper, a statistical measure known as the multivariate kurtosis is proposed as an additional useful measure of the sharpness of SEM images. Kurtosis is designed to be a measure of the degree of departure of a probability distribution. For selected SEM images, the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms were computed. Then the bivariate kurtosis of this Fourier transform was calculated as though it were a probability distribution. Kurtosis has the distinct advantage that it is a parametric (i.e., a dimensionless) measure and is sensitive to the presence of the high spatial frequencies necessary for acceptable levels of image sharpness. The applications of this method to SEM metrology will be discussed.

  11. Application of Image Analysis in Optical Microscopy of Ordinary Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E. V.; Petrov, M. S.; Grokhovsky, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Application of image analysis systems give additional possibilities for estimation, calculation and comparison of optical microscopic images. Different parameters of the texture (phase distribution, porosity, grains shape parameters) can be obtained.

  12. Streamlined embedding of cell monolayers on gridded glass-bottom imaging dishes for correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Hugo H; Reilly, James E; Lee, Rebecca; Janssen, William G; Phillips, Greg R

    2010-12-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has facilitated study of intracellular trafficking. Routine application of CLEM would be advantageous for many laboratories but previously described techniques are particularly demanding, even for those with access to laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe streamlined methods for TEM of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled organelles after imaging by LSCM using gridded glass bottom imaging dishes. GFP-MAP 1A/1B LC3 (GFP-LC3) transfected cells were treated with rapamycin, fixed and imaged by LSCM. Confocal image stacks were acquired enabling full visualization of each GFP-LC3 labeled organelle. After LSCM, cells were embedded for TEM using a simplified two step method that stabilizes the glass bottom such that the block can be separated from the glass by mild heating. All imaging and TEM processing are performed in the same dish. The LSCM imaged cells were relocated on the block and serial sectioned. Correlation of LSCM, DIC, and TEM images was facilitated by cellular landmarks. All GFP labeled structures were successfully reidentified and imaged by serial section TEM. This method could make CLEM more accessible to nonspecialized laboratories with basic electron microscopy expertise and could be used routinely to confirm organelle localization of fluorescent puncta.

  13. Novel Metal Clusters for Imaging Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2014-05-01

    During the past few years, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have received considerable attention in many fields due to their optical properties, photothermal effect and biocompatibility. AuNPs, particularly AuNCs and AuNRs, exhibit great potential in diagnostics and imaging. In the present study, AuNCs were used to selectively image and quantify intracellular antioxidants. It was reported by Chen et al. that the strong fluorescence of AuNCs is quenched by highly reactive oxygen species (hROS). Most of applications depend on fluorescence quenching, however, for our project we designed turn-on fluorescent sensors using AuNCs that sense antioxidants. In the presence of antioxidants, AuNCs fluorescence switch on, while in the absence of antioxidants their fluorescence immediately turn off due to hROS effect. AuNRs were also used for cellular imaging in which AuNRs were conjugated to Cy3-labelled molecular beacon (MB) DNA. Next, the previous complex was loaded in two different strains of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). MTB were used as a targeted delivery vehicle in which magnetosomes direct the movement of bacteria. The DNA sequence was specific to a certain sequence in mitochondria. The exposure of MTB to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) leads to the increase of temperature inside the bacteria, which destruct the cell wall, and hence, bacterial payload is released. When MD-DNA hybrid with the target sequence, AuNR and Cy3 separate from each other, the fluorescence of the Cy3 is restored.

  14. Single-particle imaging for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Isil, Cagatay; Seymour, Elif; Yurdakul, Celalettin; Solmaz, Berkan; Koc, Aykut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art technology for in-vitro diagnostics employ laboratory tests such as ELISA that consists of a multi-step test procedure and give results in analog format. Results of these tests are interpreted by the color change in a set of diluted samples in a multi-well plate. However, detection of the minute changes in the color poses challenges and can lead to false interpretations. Instead, a technique that allows individual counting of specific binding events would be useful to overcome such challenges. Digital imaging has been applied recently for diagnostics applications. SPR is one of the techniques allowing quantitative measurements. However, the limit of detection in this technique is on the order of nM. The current required detection limit, which is already achieved with the analog techniques, is around pM. Optical techniques that are simple to implement and can offer better sensitivities have great potential to be used in medical diagnostics. Interference Microscopy is one of the tools that have been investigated over years in optics field. More of the studies have been performed in confocal geometry and each individual nanoparticle was observed separately. Here, we achieve wide-field imaging of individual nanoparticles in a large field-of-view ( 166 μm × 250 μm) on a micro-array based sensor chip in fraction of a second. We tested the sensitivity of our technique on dielectric nanoparticles because they exhibit optical properties similar to viruses and cells. We can detect non-resonant dielectric polystyrene nanoparticles of 100 nm. Moreover, we perform post-processing applications to further enhance visibility.

  15. 20 CFR 321.1 - Filing applications electronically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 321.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT... under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act may be filed electronically through the Board's Internet Web site, http://www.rrb.gov, utilizing a User ID and a PIN/Password. (b) Adjudication of applications...

  16. Application of maximum entropy method for the study of electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Application of maximum entropy method for the study of electron density distribution in ... the sulphide has been divided into 64 × 64 × 64 pixels), a supercomputing system is needed in most cases involving lower ..... predicting metallurgical behaviour of the elements in binary alloy systems, LA-2345. (Los Alamos Scientific ...

  17. Development and applications of gas electron multiplier detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the recent developments in the field of gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors was presented. Cascading of several GEM foils permits the sustaining of large gains and thereby allows the detection of minimum ionizing particles. The application of GEM included, fast and position sensitive detection in particle physics, medicine, neutron spectrometry, and astrophysics. (Edited abstract) 19 Refs.

  18. Review on usefulness of EPID (Electronic Portal Imaging Device)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Won; Park, Do Keun; Choi, A Hyun; Ahn, Jong Ho; Song, Ki Weon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Replacing the film which used to be used for checking the set-up of the patient and dosimetry during radiation therapy, more and more EPID equipped devices are in use at present. Accordingly, this article tried to evaluated the accuracy of the position check-up and the usefulness of dosimetry during the use of an electronic portal imaging device. On 50 materials acquired with the search of Korea Society Radiotherapeutic Technology, The Korean Society for Radiation Oncology, and Pubmed using 'EPID', 'Portal dosimetry', 'Portal image', 'Dose verification', 'Quality control', 'Cine mode', 'Quality - assurance', and 'In vivo dosimetry' as indexes, the usefulness of EPID was analyzed by classifying them as history of EPID and dosimetry, set-up verification and characteristics of EPID. EPID is developed from the first generation of Liquid-filled ionization chamber, through the second generation of Camera-based fluoroscopy, and to the third generation of Amorphous-silicon EPID imaging modes can be divided into EPID mode, Cine mode and Integrated mode. When evaluating absolute dose accuracy of films and EPID, it was found that EPID showed within 1% and EDR2 film showed within 3% errors. It was confirmed that EPID is better in error measurement accuracy than film. When gamma analyzing the dose distribution of the base exposure plane which was calculated from therapy planning system, and planes calculated by EDR2 film and EPID, both film and EPID showed less than 2% of pixels which exceeded 1 at gamma values (r%>1) with in the thresholds such as 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm respectively. For the time needed for full course QA in IMRT to compare loads, EDR2 film recorded approximately 110 minutes, and EPID recorded approximately 55 minutes. EPID could easily replace conventional complicated and troublesome film and ionization chamber which used to be used for dosimetry and set-up verification, and it was

  19. Application of Diffraction Enhanced Imaging to Medical Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chapman, Leroy

    2001-01-01

    This renewal report is for an academic award for Prof. Leroy Chapman to pursue a program of study to apply Diffraction Enhanced X-ray Imaging applied to mammography and other areas of medical imaging. Prof...

  20. Development of a gaseous photon detector for Cherenkov imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Elena; Dalla Torre, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the R&D activity aiming at a novel micro pattern gaseous photon detector based on the THick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM). The goal application of the novel photon detector is the detection of single photon in Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) counters. The THGEM principle is derived from the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) one, even if the material, the production technology and the size scale are different: a THGEM is a Circuit Printed Board (PCB) coated with thin copper layers on both faces, with holes obtained by drilling. Part of the THGEM features are similar to those of the GEMs, but a number of characteristics aspects result substantially different: in fact, if the geometrical parameters can be scaled from the GEM ones, the parameters related to the electrons multiplication, which is a microscopic physical phenomenon, do not. This is why, before starting the photon detector development, we have performed a systematic study of the THGEM multiplier. A photon detector is forme...

  1. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging principles, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen , Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging: Principles, Algorithms and Applications is based on the latest research on ISAR imaging of moving targets and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR). With a focus on the advances and applications, this book will provide readers with a working knowledge on various algorithms of ISAR imaging of targets and implementation with MATLAB. These MATLAB algorithms will prove useful in order to visualize and manipulate some simulated ISAR images.

  2. The Application of Fractal Theory in Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, technicians are constantly exploring how to do effective managements and convenient and efficient queries on the large number of images in database. This article puts forward a new idea that doing the image retrieval with the similarity characteristics of fractal theory. It makes image similarity verification with the method of Opency image histogram and makes explanations by using the application of fractal theory in image pattern recognition. Fractal theory has provided a new method for the methods of image pattern recognition, the recognition research on related images and the classification of huge image database.

  3. Application of image editing software for forensic detection of image ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The image editing software's available today is apt for creating visually compelling and sophisticated fake images, which causes major issues to the reliability of digital contents as a right representation of reality. Authenticity is the main problem in most digital image communication. Various forensic techniques have been ...

  4. Many-body approach to electronic excitations concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The many-body-theoretical basis and applications of theoretical spectroscopy of condensed matter, e.g. crystals, nanosystems, and molecules are unified in one advanced text for readers from graduate students to active researchers in the field. The theory is developed from first principles including fully the electron-electron interaction and spin interactions. It is based on the many-body perturbation theory, a quantum-field-theoretical description, and Green's functions. The important expressions for ground states as well as electronic single-particle and pair excitations are explained. Based on single-particle and two-particle Green's functions, the Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations are derived. They are applied to calculate spectral and response functions. Important spectra are those which can be measured using photoemission/inverse photoemission, optical spectroscopy, and electron energy loss/inelastic X-ray spectroscopy. Important approximations are derived and discussed in the light of selected computa...

  5. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, J.D.; Langford, D.S.; Williams, D.W. [General Imaging Corp., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  6. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct-sensing CCD array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John D.; Langford, D. S.; Williams, Donald W.

    1993-12-01

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package, and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  7. Imaging Magnetic Vortices Dynamics Using Lorentz Electron Microscopy with GHz Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimei

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic vortices in thin films are naturally formed spiral spin configurations with a core polarization pointing out of the film plane. They typically represent ground states with high structural and thermal stability as well as four different chirality-polarity combinations, offering great promise in the development of spin-based devices. For applications to spin oscillators, non-volatile memory and logic devices, the fundamental understanding and precise control of vortex excitations and dynamic switching behavior are essential. The compact dimensionality and fast spin dynamics set grand challenges for direct imaging technologies. Recently, we have developed a unique method to directly visualize the dynamic magnetic vortex motion using advanced Lorentz electron microscopy combined with GHz electronic excitations. It enables us to map the orbit of a magnetic vortex core in a permalloy square with Material Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  8. An image-intensive ePR for image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery applications including real-time intra-operative image acquisition, archival, and display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Le, Anh; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.; Chiu, John

    2009-02-01

    Recent developments in medical imaging informatics have improved clinical workflow in Radiology enterprise but gaps remain in the clinical workflow from diagnosis to surgical treatment through post-operative follow-up. One solution to bridge this gap is the development of an electronic patient record (ePR) that integrates key imaging and informatics data during the pre, intra, and post-operative phases of clinical workflow. We present an ePR system based on standards and tailored to the clinical application for image-guided minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS). The ePR system has been implemented in a clinical environment for a half-year.

  9. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. New amorphous-silicon image sensor for x-ray diagnostic medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisfield, Richard L.; Hartney, Mark A.; Street, Robert A.; Apte, Raj B.

    1998-07-01

    This paper introduces new high-resolution amorphous Silicon (a-Si) image sensors specifically configured for demonstrating film-quality medical x-ray imaging capabilities. The devices utilizes an x-ray phosphor screen coupled to an array of a-Si photodiodes for detecting visible light, and a-Si thin-film transistors (TFTs) for connecting the photodiodes to external readout electronics. We have developed imagers based on a pixel size of 127 micrometer X 127 micrometer with an approximately page-size imaging area of 244 mm X 195 mm, and array size of 1,536 data lines by 1,920 gate lines, for a total of 2.95 million pixels. More recently, we have developed a much larger imager based on the same pixel pattern, which covers an area of approximately 406 mm X 293 mm, with 2,304 data lines by 3,200 gate lines, for a total of nearly 7.4 million pixels. This is very likely to be the largest image sensor array and highest pixel count detector fabricated on a single substrate. Both imagers connect to a standard PC and are capable of taking an image in a few seconds. Through design rule optimization we have achieved a light sensitive area of 57% and optimized quantum efficiency for x-ray phosphor output in the green part of the spectrum, yielding an average quantum efficiency between 500 and 600 nm of approximately 70%. At the same time, we have managed to reduce extraneous leakage currents on these devices to a few fA per pixel, which allows for very high dynamic range to be achieved. We have characterized leakage currents as a function of photodiode bias, time and temperature to demonstrate high stability over these large sized arrays. At the electronics level, we have adopted a new generation of low noise, charge- sensitive amplifiers coupled to 12-bit A/D converters. Considerable attention was given to reducing electronic noise in order to demonstrate a large dynamic range (over 4,000:1) for medical imaging applications. Through a combination of low data lines capacitance

  11. High efficiency digital cooler electronics for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkconnell, C. S.; Luong, T. T.; Shaw, L. S.; Murphy, J. B.; Moody, E. A.; Lisiecki, A. L.; Ellis, M. J.

    2014-06-01

    Closed-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, or cryocoolers, are an enabling technology for a wide range of aerospace applications, mostly related to infrared (IR) sensors. While the industry focus has tended to be on the mechanical cryocooler thermo mechanical unit (TMU) alone, implementation on a platform necessarily consists of the combination of the TMU and a mating set of command and control electronics. For some applications the cryocooler electronics (CCE) are technologically simple and low cost relative to the TMU, but this is not always the case. The relative cost and complexity of the CCE for a space-borne application can easily exceed that of the TMU, primarily due to the technical constraints and cost impacts introduced by the typical space radiation hardness and reliability requirements. High end tactical IR sensor applications also challenge the state of the art in cryocooler electronics, such as those for which temperature setpoint and frequency must be adjustable, or those where an informative telemetry set must be supported, etc. Generally speaking for both space and tactical applications, it is often the CCE that limits the rated lifetime and reliability of the cryocooler system. A family of high end digital cryocooler electronics has been developed to address these needs. These electronics are readily scalable from 10W to 500W output capacity; experimental performance data for nominally 25W and 100W variants are presented. The combination of a FPGA-based controller and dual H-bridge motor drive architectures yields high efficiency (>92% typical) and precision temperature control (+/- 30 mK typical) for a wide range of Stirling-class mechanical cryocooler types and vendors. This paper focuses on recent testing with the AIM INFRAROT-MODULE GmbH (AIM) SX030 and AIM SF100 cryocoolers.

  12. Application of Concentrated Electron Beams in Extra-Vacuum Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, Oleg; Iliin, A. A.; Lovtsov, A. S.; Rizakhanov, R. N.

    2001-10-01

    At present time the rise in development of the technology with using the concentrated electron beams in gas with atmospheric pressure is observed. Besides the technologies, which are usually carried out in vacuum and connected with surface modification by the concentrated energy flows (welding, cutting, metal surface hardening), at present time the plasma chemical processes become of greater interest. These are processes with using the beam of fast electrons to initiate the plasma chemical reactions. One of such technologies is gas cleaning of the toxic impurities (nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides and etc.) The electron-beam gas cleaning of the toxic impurities (for example Ebara-process) is based on radiation-enhanced combining of toxic impurities. The disadvantage of this method are high level of consumed power during the gas cleaning and difficulties in devices development for the output of electron beam with megawatt unit power with foil outlet, as the facilities of this very power are necessary for the real industrial application. These problems can be solved by using the devices with concentrated electron beam output into the atmosphere. In this case the beam is transported into the dense gas through the system of lock chambers, independently pumped. But unlike the beam, output through the foil window, the concentrated electron beam is characterized by the noticeable spatial irregularity in distribution of temperature, plasma concentration and area of radiation. This paper is devoted to consideration of using the concentrated electron beams in extra-vacuum technologies.

  13. VR interaction techniques for medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapichler, C; Haubner, M; Engelbrecht, R; Englmeier, K H

    1998-04-01

    Methods of virtual reality (VR) offer new ways of human-computer interaction. Medicine is predestined to benefit from this new technology in many ways. Virtual environments can support physicians in their work, alleviate communication between specialists from different fields or be established in educational and training applications. For the field of visualization and analysis of three-dimensional anatomical images (e.g. CT or MRI scans), an application is introduced which expedites recognition of spatial coherencies and the exploration and manipulation of the 3D data. To avoid long periods of learning and accustoming and to facilitate work in such an environment, a powerful human-oriented interface is required allowing interactions similar to the real world and utilization of our natural experiences. This paper shows the use of eye tracking parameters for a level-of-detail algorithm and the integration of a glove-based hand gesture recognition into the virtual environment as an essential component of the human-machine interface. Furthermore, virtual bronchoscopy and virtual angioscopy are presented as examples for the use of the virtual environment.

  14. Counterfeit Electronics Detection Using Image Processing and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadizanjani, Navid; Tehranipoor, Mark; Forte, Domenic

    2017-01-01

    Counterfeiting is an increasing concern for businesses and governments as greater numbers of counterfeit integrated circuits (IC) infiltrate the global market. There is an ongoing effort in experimental and national labs inside the United States to detect and prevent such counterfeits in the most efficient time period. However, there is still a missing piece to automatically detect and properly keep record of detected counterfeit ICs. Here, we introduce a web application database that allows users to share previous examples of counterfeits through an online database and to obtain statistics regarding the prevalence of known defects. We also investigate automated techniques based on image processing and machine learning to detect different physical defects and to determine whether or not an IC is counterfeit.

  15. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    . Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... rate-controlled large-scale simultaneous hypothesis testing is used as a statistical framework for interpretation of results. The first sample yields, as expected, a homogeneous distribution of carbon–carbon (C–C) bond lengths. The second sample exhibits regions of shorter C–C bond lengths...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  16. Development of image mappers for hyperspectral biomedical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Robert T; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2010-04-01

    A new design and fabrication method is presented for creating large-format (>100 mirror facets) image mappers for a snapshot hyperspectral biomedical imaging system called an image mapping spectrometer (IMS). To verify this approach a 250 facet image mapper with 25 multiple-tilt angles is designed for a compact IMS that groups the 25 subpupils in a 5 x 5 matrix residing within a single collecting objective's pupil. The image mapper is fabricated by precision diamond raster fly cutting using surface-shaped tools. The individual mirror facets have minimal edge eating, tilt errors of <1 mrad, and an average roughness of 5.4 nm.

  17. Synergy between transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction: application to modulated structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure solution of modulated compounds is often very challenging, even using the well established methodology of single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This task becomes even more difficult for materials that cannot be prepared in a single-crystal form, so that only polycrystalline powders are available. This paper illustrates that the combined application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder diffraction is a possible solution to the problem. Using examples of anion-deficient perovskites modulated by periodic crystallographic shear planes, it is demonstrated what kind of local structural information can be obtained using various TEM techniques and how this information can be implemented in the crystal structure refinement against the powder diffraction data. The following TEM methods are discussed: electron diffraction (selected area electron diffraction, precession electron diffraction), imaging (conventional high-resolution TEM imaging, high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy) and state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques (atomic resolution mapping using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy).

  18. Integrated graphene/nanoparticle hybrids for biological and electronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim Truc; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-06-21

    The development of novel graphene/nanoparticle hybrid materials is currently the subject of tremendous research interest. The intrinsic exceptional assets of both graphene (including graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and nanoparticles render their hybrid materials synergic properties that can be useful in various applications. In this feature review, we highlight recent developments in graphene/nanoparticle hybrids and their promising potential in electronic and biological applications. First, the latest advances in synthetic methods for the preparation of the graphene/nanoparticle hybrids are introduced, with the emphasis on approaches to (1) decorate nanoparticles onto two-dimensional graphene and (2) wrap nanoparticles with graphene sheets. The pros and cons of large-scale synthesis are also discussed. Then, the state-of-the-art of graphene/nanoparticle hybrids in electronic and biological applications is reviewed. For electronic applications, we focus on the advantages of using these hybrids in transparent conducting films, as well as energy harvesting and storage. Biological applications, electrochemical biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery using the hybrids are showcased. Finally, the future research prospects and challenges in this rapidly developing area are discussed.

  19. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  20. Infrared imaging technology and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastberger, Gerald; Stachl, Reinhold

    2003-08-01

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity, second only to time. Infrared (IR) technology has been utilized successfully in astronomy (for a summary,see Hermans-Killam, 2002b) and in industrial and research settings (Gruner, 2002; Madding, 1982, 1989; Wolfe & Zissis, 1993) for decades. However, fairly recent innovations have reduced costs, increased reliability, and resulted in noncontact IR sensors offering mobile, smaller units of measurement (EOI, 2002; Flir, 2000, 2001,2002). The advantages of using IR imaging are (1) rapidity in the millisecond range, facilitating measurement of moving targets, (2) noncontact procedures, allowing measurements of hazardous or physically inaccessible objects, (3) no interference and no energy lost from the target, (4) no risk of contamination, and (5) no mechanical effect on the surface of the object. All these factors have led to IR technology's becoming an area of interest for new kinds of applications and users. In both manufacturing and quality control, temperature plays an important role as an indicator of the condition of a product or a piece of machinery (EOI, 2002; Flir, 2000, 2001, 2002; Raytek, 2002). In medical and veterinary applications, IR thermometry is increasingly used in organ diagnostics, in the evaluation of sports injuries and the progression of therapy, in disease evaluation (e.g, breast cancer, arthritis, and SARS; Flir, 2003), and in injury and inflammation examinations in horses, livestock (Tivey & Banhazi, 2002), and zoo animals (Hermans-Killam, 2002a; Thiesbrummel, 2002). Lastly, physiological expressions of life processes in animals (Kastberger, Winder, & Steindl, 2001; Stabentheiner, Kovac, & Hagmüller, 1995; Stabentheiner, Kovac, & Schmaranzer, 2002; Stabentheiner & Schmarnzer, 1987) and plants (Bermadinger-Stabentheiner & Stabentheiner, 1995) can be monitored. The most recent field in which IR technology has been applied is animal behavior. This article focuses on the practical

  1. Imaging surface acoustic wave dynamics in semiconducting polymers by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Ebrahim; Liao, Bolin; Scarborough, Timothy; Zewail, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors is essential to their electronic and photovoltaic applications. Despite a large volume of research directed toward elucidating the chemical, physical and electronic properties of these materials, little attention has been directed toward understanding their thermo-mechanical behavior. Here, we report the ultrafast imaging of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on the surface of the Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) thin film at the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. We then use these images to measure the propagation velocity of SAWs, which we then employ to determine the Young's modulus of P3HT. We further validate our experimental observation by performing a semi-empirical transient thermoelastic finite element analysis. Our findings demonstrate the potential of ultrafast electron microscopy to not only probe charge carrier dynamics in materials as previously reported, but also to measure their mechanical properties with great accuracy. This is particularly important when in situ characterization of stiffness for thin devices and nanomaterials is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of reinforcement learning for segmentation of transrectal ultrasound images

    OpenAIRE

    Sahba, Farhang; Tizhoosh, Hamid R; Salama, Magdy MA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Among different medical image modalities, ultrasound imaging has a very widespread clinical use. But, due to some factors, such as poor image contrast, noise and missing or diffuse boundaries, the ultrasound images are inherently difficult to segment. An important application is estimation of the location and volume of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. For this purpose, manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming procedure. Methods We introduce ...

  3. Momentum-resolved electron dynamics of image-potential states on Cu and Ag surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, K.; Damm, A.; Eremeev, S. V.; Marks, M.; Shibuta, M.; Berthold, W.; Güdde, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Tsirkin, S. S.; Chulkov, E. V.; Höfer, U.

    2012-05-01

    The dependence of the inelastic lifetime of electrons in the first n=1 image-potential state of clean and rare-gas covered Ag(111), Cu(111), and Cu(100) surfaces on their momentum parallel to the surface has been studied experimentally by means of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE) and theoretically by calculations based on the many-body theory within the self-energy formalism. Similar to the previously studied clean Cu(100) surface, the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experiment findings for Cu(111). For Ag(111), the theory overestimates the decay rate and its momentum dependence, which is attributed to the neglect of surface plasmon excitations. With increasing parallel momentum, the n=1 state shifts out of the projected bulk band gap on both surfaces and turns into an image-potential resonance. This opens an additional decay channel by resonant electron transfer into the bulk, which is theoretically treated by the application of the wave packet propagation approach. The expected stronger increase of the decay rate upon crossing the edge of the band gap, however, is not observed in the experiment. The decoupling of the image-potential states from the metal surface upon adsorption of rare-gas layers results in a decrease of the decay rate as well as of its momentum dependence by a similar factor, which can be successfully explained by the change of interband and intraband contributions to the total decay rate.

  4. Organic structures design applications in optical and electronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Tahsin J

    2014-01-01

    ""Presenting an overview of the syntheses and properties of organic molecules and their applications in optical and electronic devices, this book covers aspects concerning theoretical modeling for electron transfer, solution-processed micro- and nanomaterials, donor-acceptor cyclophanes, molecular motors, organogels, polyazaacenes, fluorogenic sensors based on calix[4]arenes, and organic light-emitting diodes. The publication of this book is timely because these topics have become very popular nowadays. The book is definitely an excellent reference for scientists working in these a

  5. Advances in Clinical and Biomedical Applications of Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jimmy L; Wang, Bo; Wilson, Katheryne E; Bayer, Carolyn L; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly A; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2010-11-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Photoacoustic imaging is an imaging modality that derives image contrast from the optical absorption coefficient of the tissue being imaged. The imaging technique is able to differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue with either deeper penetration or higher resolution than other functional imaging modalities currently available. From a clinical standpoint, photoacoustic imaging has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in diagnosing diseased tissue regions using either endogenous tissue contrast or exogenous contrast agents. Furthermore, the potential of photoacoustic imaging has been demonstrated in various therapeutic interventions ranging from drug delivery and release to image-guided therapy and monitoring. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: This article reviews the current state of photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine from a technological perspective, highlights various biomedical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, and gives insights on future directions. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: Readers will learn about the various applications of photoacoustic imaging, as well as the various contrast agents that can be used to assist photoacoustic imaging. This review will highlight both pre-clinical and clinical uses for photoacoustic imaging, as well as discuss some of the challenges that must be addressed to move photoacoustic imaging into the clinical realm. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Photoacoustic imaging offers unique advantages over existing imaging modalities. The imaging field is broad with many exciting applications for detecting and diagnosing diseased tissue or processes. Photoacoustics is also used in therapeutic applications to identify and characterize the pathology and then to monitor the treatment. Although the technology is still in its infancy, much work has been done in the pre-clinical arena, and photoacoustic imaging is fast approaching the clinical setting.

  6. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  7. Cardiac Applications of PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jeffrey M C; Laforest, Richard; Nensa, Felix; Zheng, Jie; Gropler, Robert J; Woodard, Pamela K

    2017-05-01

    Simultaneous acquisition PET/MR imaging combines the anatomic capabilities of cardiac MR imaging with quantitative capabilities of both PET and MR imaging. Cardiac PET/MR imaging has the potential not only to assess cardiac tumors but also to provide thorough assessment of myocardial ischemia, infarction, and function and specific characterization of cardiomyopathies, such as cardiac sarcoid. In this article, the authors start with a discussion of the technical challenges specific to cardiovascular PET/MR imaging followed by a discussion of the use of PET/MR imaging in various cardiovascular conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Practical Example of GaN-LED Failure Cause Analysis by Application of Combined Electron Microscopy Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Elke; Haeckel, Maral; Friedrich, Jochen

    2017-10-19

    In this paper, we report a failure case of blue LEDs returned from a field application, and propose a practical way to identify the physical and structural reasons for the observed malfunction by a combination of different electron microscope techniques. Cathodoluminescence imaging and electron beam induced current (EBIC) imaging are employed in order to visualize conductive paths through the device in conjunction with subsequent energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS), revealing a metal deposition along cracks in the semiconductor layer which short-circuit the device. We demonstrate that the electron beam induced current imaging, in conjunction with other microscopic and analytical techniques at µm scale, is a powerful combination for clearly resolving and visualizing the cause of failure in the GaN LED chip. However, this represents a case study of a real application, which may not have been generally observed in laboratory testing environment.

  9. A Practical Example of GaN-LED Failure Cause Analysis by Application of Combined Electron Microscopy Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Meissner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a failure case of blue LEDs returned from a field application, and propose a practical way to identify the physical and structural reasons for the observed malfunction by a combination of different electron microscope techniques. Cathodoluminescence imaging and electron beam induced current (EBIC imaging are employed in order to visualize conductive paths through the device in conjunction with subsequent energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS, revealing a metal deposition along cracks in the semiconductor layer which short-circuit the device. We demonstrate that the electron beam induced current imaging, in conjunction with other microscopic and analytical techniques at µm scale, is a powerful combination for clearly resolving and visualizing the cause of failure in the GaN LED chip. However, this represents a case study of a real application, which may not have been generally observed in laboratory testing environment.

  10. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2017-07-01

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical and electronic structure imaging of graphene on Cu: a NanoARPES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-05-01

    Electronic structure, which describes the distribution of electronic states in reciprocal space, is one of the most fundamental concepts in condensed matter physics, since it determines the electrical, optical and magnetic behaviours of materials. Graphene has great promise for both fundamental physics and future applications. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is currently the dominant technology for its scaled growth on metal foils. The polycrystalline nature of metal foil makes NanoARPES, one energy-momentum dispersion probe with spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers, a unique tool to study the intrinsic electronic structure of polycrystalline graphene films. In this topical review, we present the latest NanoARPES studies on graphene grains and films grown on copper foil by CVD. The comprehensive chemical and electronic images probed by NanoARPES provide deep insight about graphene and point out potential ways to functionalize graphene properties. This knowledge may stimulate us to look into the future of this field from both the material synthesis and the instrumental characterisation.

  12. Relativistic Shear Flow between Electron-Ion and Electron-Positron Plasmas and Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Böttcher, Markus

    2017-10-01

    We present particle-in-cell simulation results of relativistic shear boundary layers between electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas and discuss their potential applications to astrophysics. Specifically, we find that in the case of a fast electron-positron spine surrounded by a slow-moving or stationary electron-ion sheath, lepton acceleration proceeds in a highly anisotropic manner due to electromagnetic fields created at the shear interface. While the highest-energy leptons still produce a beaming pattern (as seen in the quasi-stationary frame of the sheath) of order 1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the spine, for lower-energy particles, the beaming is much less pronounced. This is in stark contrast to the case of pure electron-ion shear layers, in which anisotropic particle acceleration leads to significantly narrower beaming patterns than 1/Γ for the highest-energy particles. In either case, shear-layer acceleration is expected to produce strongly angle-dependent lepton (hence, emanating radiation) spectra, with a significantly harder spectrum in the forward direction than viewed from larger off-axis angles, much beyond the regular Doppler boosting effect from a co-moving isotropic lepton distribution. This may solve the problem of the need for high (and apparently arbitrarily chosen) minimum Lorentz factors of radiating electrons, often plaguing current blazar and GRB jet modeling efforts.

  13. Reliability Oriented Circuit Design For Power Electronics Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sintamarean, Nicolae Cristian

    for improving the reliability is by active thermal control of the power electronic devices. The work developed during the Ph.D. studies the above mentioned topics, and is divided into two main parts: the first part develops a reliability-oriented design tool which is using a long term real-field mission....... The temperature variation of the semiconductor devices plays a key role in the robustness design and reliability of power electronics converters. This factor has a major impact on the power converters used in renewable energy systems, like solar and wind energy applications, due to the fluctuating nature......-profile as input and the second part propose an advanced gatedriver concept for enhancing the reliability of the power electronics devices. Chapter 1 introduce the emerging challenges of a design tool for reliability and which are the main methods for achieving active thermal control of the devices. To overcome...

  14. Electronic noses and their applications in environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks for real-time data analysis of a sensor array. Analyzing the sensor data in parallel may allow for rapid identification of contaminants in the field without requiring highly selective component sensors. A sensor array combined with a data analysis module is referred to as an electronic nose. In this paper, we investigate the trade off between sensor sensitivity and selectivity relating to the applications of neural network based-electronic noses in environmental monitoring. We use a prototype electronic nose which consists of nine tin-oxide Taguchi-type sensors, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. We illustrate that by using neural network based analysis of a sensor data, the selectivity of a sensor array may be significantly improved, especially when some (or all) sensors are not highly selective.

  15. Electron microscopy by specimen design: application to strain measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashin, Nikolay; Denneulin, Thibaud; Hÿtch, Martin J

    2017-09-29

    A bewildering number of techniques have been developed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), involving the use of ever more complex combinations of lens configurations, apertures and detector geometries. In parallel, the developments in the field of ion beam instruments have modernized sample preparation and enabled the preparation of various types of materials. However, the desired final specimen geometry is always almost the same: a thin foil of uniform thickness. Here we will show that judicious design of specimen geometry can make all the difference and that experiments can be carried out on the most basic electron microscope and in the usual imaging modes. We propose two sample preparation methods that allow the formation of controlled moiré patterns for general monocrystalline structures in cross-section and at specific sites. We developed moiré image treatment algorithms using an absolute correction of projection lens distortions of a TEM that allows strain measurements and mapping with a nanometer resolution and 10-4 precision. Imaging and diffraction techniques in other fields may in turn benefit from this technique in perspective.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  17. Electron beam induced chemical dry etching and imaging in gaseous NH3 environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Charlene J; Martin, Aiden; Phillips, Matthew R; Toth, Milos

    2012-09-21

    We report the use of ammonia (NH(3)) vapor as a new precursor for nanoscale electron beam induced etching (EBIE) of carbon, and an efficient imaging medium for environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Etching is demonstrated using amorphous carbonaceous nanowires grown by electron beam induced deposition (EBID). It is ascribed to carbon volatilization by hydrogen radicals generated by electron dissociation of NH(3) adsorbates. The volatilization process is also effective at preventing the buildup of residual hydrocarbon impurities that often compromise EBIE, EBID and electron imaging. We also show that ammonia is a more efficient electron imaging medium than H(2)O, which up to now has been the most commonly used ESEM imaging gas.

  18. Application of Nanoparticles in Diagnostic Imaging via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). These imaging modalities differ not only in resolution, but also in the instrumentation and the type of nanoparticle that can be employed as its assistant. Of these imaging techniques, ultrasound is one of ...

  19. Tomographic imaging in CWI: Algorithms and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. Der Sarkissian (Henri)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractTomography is a widely used imaging tool to explore the 3D inner structure of object without having to cut it open using penetrating beams. In this talk, I will present the different aspects of tomographic imaging handled and developed at the Computational Imaging group in CWI,

  20. Transformers and inductors for power electronics theory, design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, WG

    2013-01-01

    Based on the fundamentals of electromagnetics, this clear and concise text explains basic and applied principles of transformer and inductor design for power electronic applications. It details both the theory and practice of inductors and transformers employed to filter currents, store electromagnetic energy, provide physical isolation between circuits, and perform stepping up and down of DC and AC voltages. The authors present a broad range of applications from modern power conversion systems. They provide rigorous design guidelines based on a robust methodology for inductor and transform

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance image reconstruction with total variation and curvelets regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Sylvain; Frapart, Yves-Michel; Kerebel, Maud

    2017-11-01

    Spatial electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a recent method to localize and characterize free radicals in vivo or in vitro, leading to applications in material and biomedical sciences. To improve the quality of the reconstruction obtained by EPRI, a variational method is proposed to inverse the image formation model. It is based on a least-square data-fidelity term and the total variation and Besov seminorm for the regularization term. To fully comprehend the Besov seminorm, an implementation using the curvelet transform and the L 1 norm enforcing the sparsity is proposed. It allows our model to reconstruct both image where acquisition information are missing and image with details in textured areas, thus opening possibilities to reduce acquisition times. To implement the minimization problem using the algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock, a thorough analysis of the direct model is undertaken and the latter is inverted while avoiding the use of filtered backprojection (FBP) and of non-uniform Fourier transform. Numerical experiments are carried out on simulated data, where the proposed model outperforms both visually and quantitatively the classical model using deconvolution and FBP. Improved reconstructions on real data, acquired on an irradiated distal phalanx, were successfully obtained.

  2. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ~10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  3. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursley, Randall H; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C; Pohida, Thomas J

    2006-02-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (L(f)) of 300MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency L(f), in conjunction with our approximately 10MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented.

  4. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  5. A flexible inkjet printed antenna for wearable electronics applications

    KAUST Repository

    Karimi, Muhammad Akram

    2016-11-02

    Wearable electronics has gained enormous attention since past few years because it is a promising technology to enhance the human experience. This paper shows a modified inverted-F antenna (IFA), inkjet printed directly on the fabric. A flexible and UV curable interface layer has been used to reduce the surface roughness of the fabric to realize the antenna on top of fabric with fine features. Flexibility tests of the prototype confirm the viability of the design for the wearable applications.

  6. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  7. Electrically and Thermally Conducting Nanocomposites for Electronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl Santos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites made up of polymer matrices and carbon nanotubes are a class of advanced materials with great application potential in electronics packaging. Nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes as fillers have been designed with the aim of exploiting the high thermal, electrical and mechanical properties characteristic of carbon nanotubes. Heat dissipation in electronic devices requires interface materials with high thermal conductivity. Here, current developments and challenges in the application of nanotubes as fillers in polymer matrices are explored. The blending together of nanotubes and polymers result in what are known as nanocomposites. Among the most pressing current issues related to nanocomposite fabrication are (i dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the polymer host, (ii carbon nanotube-polymer interaction and the nature of the interface, and (iii alignment of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. These issues are believed to be directly related to the electrical and thermal performance of nanocomposites. The recent progress in the fabrication of nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes as fillers and their potential application in electronics packaging as thermal interface materials is also reported.

  8. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  9. A simple image based method for obtaining electron density and atomic number in dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The extraction of electron density and atomic number information in computed tomography is possible when image values can be sampled using two different effective energies. The foundation for this extraction lies in the ability to express the linear attenuation coefficient using two basis functions that are dependent on electron density and atomic number over the diagnostic energy range used in CT. Material basis functions separate images into clinically familiar quantities such as 'bone' images and 'soft tissue' images. Physically, all basis function choices represent the expression of the linear attenuation coefficient in terms of a photoelectric and a Compton scattering term. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple dual energy decomposition method that requires no a priori knowledge about the energy characteristics of the imaging system. It is shown that the weighted sum of two basis images yields an electron density image where the weights for each basis image are the electron density of that basis image's basis material. Using the electron density image, effective atomic number information can also be obtained. These methods are performed solely in the image domain and require no spectrum or detector energy response information as required by some other dual energy decomposition methods.

  10. Applications of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Lyngbye, J. : Ph.D.

    1992-01-01

    The present thesis "Application of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics" has been prepared as a part of Janus Lyngbyes Ph.D. study during the period December 1988 to June 1992 at the Department of Building technology and Structural Engineering, University of Aalborg, Denmark. In this thesis attention will be focused on optimal use and analysis of the information of digital images. This is realized during investigation and application of parametric methods in digital image analysis...

  11. [Special applications in health telematics: electronic prescription/electronic patient file/digital archiving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, G

    2001-10-01

    Our challenge for the upcoming years is the development and the implementation of telematic applications that allow the exchange of data between different sectors of the health care system by a network system. Although most of the techniques already exist today, our highly administrated health care system makes further developments difficult. The communication process is subject to conventional procedures that have to be agreed upon between the contracting parties. The aim is to implement a common electronic communication platform for the health care system which can be accessed by all users. For this purpose, the implementation of electronic prescriptions (digital transmission of data that are up to now communicated from the physicians' office to the pharmacy in paper form) and of electronic patient files (structured documentations of findings according to standards agreed upon between the contracting parties) are of fundamental importance.

  12. 78 FR 69440 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY... Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov , and will be available for inspection during... public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http...

  13. 78 FR 16531 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof...,084; 7,453,605; 7,936,391; and 6,292,218 by certain electronic devices for capturing and transmitting....usitc.gov . The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket...

  14. New Efficient Detector for Radiation Therapy Imaging using Gas Electron Multipliers

    OpenAIRE

    Östling, Janina

    2006-01-01

    Currently film is being replaced by electronic detectors for portal imaging in radiation therapy. This development offers obvious advantages such as on-line quality assurance and digital images that can easily be accessed, processed and communicated. In spite of the improvements, the image quality has not been significantly enhanced, partly since the quantum efficiency compared to film is essentially the same, and the new electronic devices also suffer from sensitivity to the harsh radiation ...

  15. Calculations of secondary electron yield of graphene coated copper for vacuum electronic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. A. Nguyen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The suppression of secondary electron yield (SEY which can possibly lead to multipactor is an important goal for several applications. Though some techniques have focused on geometric modifications to lower the SEY, the use of graphene coatings as thin as a few monolayers is a promising new development that deserves attention either as a standalone technique or in concert with geometric alterations. Here we report on Monte Carlo based numerical studies of SEY on graphene coated copper with comparisons to recent experimental data. Our predicted values are generally in good agreement with reported measurements. Suppression of the secondary electron yield by as much as 50 percent (over copper with graphene coating is predicted at energies below 125 eV, and bodes well for multipactor suppression in radio frequency applications.

  16. Calculations of secondary electron yield of graphene coated copper for vacuum electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. K. A.; Mankowski, J.; Dickens, J. C.; Neuber, A. A.; Joshi, R. P.

    2018-01-01

    The suppression of secondary electron yield (SEY) which can possibly lead to multipactor is an important goal for several applications. Though some techniques have focused on geometric modifications to lower the SEY, the use of graphene coatings as thin as a few monolayers is a promising new development that deserves attention either as a standalone technique or in concert with geometric alterations. Here we report on Monte Carlo based numerical studies of SEY on graphene coated copper with comparisons to recent experimental data. Our predicted values are generally in good agreement with reported measurements. Suppression of the secondary electron yield by as much as 50 percent (over copper) with graphene coating is predicted at energies below 125 eV, and bodes well for multipactor suppression in radio frequency applications.

  17. Electronic Referrals and Digital Imaging Systems in Ophthalmology: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeganathan, V Swetha E; Hall, H Nikki; Sanders, Roshini

    2017-01-01

    Ophthalmology departments face intensifying pressure to expedite sight-saving treatments and reduce the global burden of disease. The use of electronic communication systems, digital imaging, and redesigned service care models is imperative for addressing such demands. The recently developed Scottish Eyecare Integration Project involves an electronic referral system from community optometry to the hospital ophthalmology department using National Health Service (NHS) email with digital ophthalmic images attached, via a virtual private network connection. The benefits over the previous system include reduced waiting times, improved triage, e-diagnosis in 20% without the need for hospital attendance, and rapid electronic feedback to referrers. We draw on the experience of the Scottish Eyecare Integration Project and discuss the global applications of this and other advances in teleophthalmology. We focus particularly on the implications for management and screening of chronic disease, such as glaucoma and diabetic eye disease, and ophthalmic disease, such as retinopathy of prematurity where diagnosis is almost entirely and critically dependent on fundus appearance. Currently in Scotland, approximately 75% of all referrals are electronic from community to hospital. The Scottish Eyecare Integration Project is globally the first of its kind and unique in a national health service. Such speedy, safe, and efficient models of communication are geographically sensitive to service provision, especially in remote and rural regions. Along with advances in teleophthalmology, such systems promote the earlier detection of sight-threatening disease and safe follow-up of non-sight-threatening disease in the community. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  18. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  19. Review of diffusion tensor imaging and its application in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorona, Gregory A. [Children' s Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Radiology, Richmond, VA (United States); Berman, Jeffrey I. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Diffusion MRI is an imaging technique that uses the random motion of water to probe tissue microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can quantitatively depict the organization and connectivity of white matter. Given the non-invasiveness of the technique, DTI has become a widely used tool for researchers and clinicians to examine the white matter of children. This review covers the basics of diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging and discusses examples of their clinical application in children. (orig.)

  20. Colour application on mammography image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, R.; Aziz, N. M. Nik Ab.; Karim, A. H. Abd; Ibrahim, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    The segmentation process is one of the most important steps in image processing and computer vision since it is vital in the initial stage of image analysis. Segmentation of medical images involves complex structures and it requires precise segmentation result which is necessary for clinical diagnosis such as the detection of tumour, oedema, and necrotic tissues. Since mammography images are grayscale, researchers are looking at the effect of colour in the segmentation process of medical images. Colour is known to play a significant role in the perception of object boundaries in non-medical colour images. Processing colour images require handling more data, hence providing a richer description of objects in the scene. Colour images contain ten percent (10%) additional edge information as compared to their grayscale counterparts. Nevertheless, edge detection in colour image is more challenging than grayscale image as colour space is considered as a vector space. In this study, we implemented red, green, yellow, and blue colour maps to grayscale mammography images with the purpose of testing the effect of colours on the segmentation of abnormality regions in the mammography images. We applied the segmentation process using the Fuzzy C-means algorithm and evaluated the percentage of average relative error of area for each colour type. The results showed that all segmentation with the colour map can be done successfully even for blurred and noisy images. Also the size of the area of the abnormality region is reduced when compare to the segmentation area without the colour map. The green colour map segmentation produced the smallest percentage of average relative error (10.009%) while yellow colour map segmentation gave the largest percentage of relative error (11.367%).

  1. Practical Applications of Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging has been a focus of research for almost 3 decades. The research carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging has demonstrated that synthetic aperture focusing not only can be used in-vivo, but that it also yields superior B-mode and blood flow images. In the last...... years synthetic aperture focusing has moved from the lab to commercial products. The implementations vary in their scope and purpose. Some scanners use synthetic aperture imaging to improve the detail and contrast resolution of the system. Others to increase the image uniformity. Yet others use......, and multiple angle flash imaging are just a few of the names used to describe the commercial implementations of synthetic aperture focusing. Although they sound like different algorithms, they are the same in their core, as revealed in this paper....

  2. Digital Imaging Research for Meteorological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-19

    from (RDAOO - RDA07) ADVISAR image or enhancement table memory . Timing pulse DCDC initiates data transfer and, subsequently, DCFLAG signal transfer...systems have evolved because of inexpensive solid-state memory . However, the total systems aspects of meteorological image processing still needs...three images (infrared, visible, difference) utilized the complete dynamic range of the ADVISAR video refresh memories . Clouds that were cold and

  3. Signal and image processing in medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Amit; Rahim, B Abdul; Kumar, D Sravan

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights recent findings on and analyses conducted on signals and images in the area of medicine. The experimental investigations involve a variety of signals and images and their methodologies range from very basic to sophisticated methods. The book explains how signal and image processing methods can be used to detect and forecast abnormalities in an easy-to-follow manner, offering a valuable resource for researchers, engineers, physicians and bioinformatics researchers alike.

  4. Perceptual digital imaging methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lukac, Rastislav

    2012-01-01

    Visual perception is a complex process requiring interaction between the receptors in the eye that sense the stimulus and the neural system and the brain that are responsible for communicating and interpreting the sensed visual information. This process involves several physical, neural, and cognitive phenomena whose understanding is essential to design effective and computationally efficient imaging solutions. Building on advances in computer vision, image and video processing, neuroscience, and information engineering, perceptual digital imaging greatly enhances the capabilities of tradition

  5. Photo-excited hot carrier dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon imaged by 4D electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bolin; Najafi, Ebrahim; Li, Heng; Minnich, Austin J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier dynamics in amorphous semiconductors has been a topic of intense research that has been propelled by modern applications in thin-film solar cells, transistors and optical sensors. Charge transport in these materials differs fundamentally from that in crystalline semiconductors owing to the lack of long-range order and high defect density. Despite the existence of well-established experimental techniques such as photoconductivity time-of-flight and ultrafast optical measurements, many aspects of the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers in amorphous semiconductors remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate direct imaging of carrier dynamics in space and time after photo-excitation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (SUEM). We observe an unexpected regime of fast diffusion immediately after photoexcitation, together with spontaneous electron-hole separation and charge trapping induced by the atomic disorder. Our findings demonstrate the rich dynamics of hot carrier transport in amorphous semiconductors that can be revealed by direct imaging based on SUEM.

  6. Dynamics and control of gold-encapped gallium arsenide nanowires imaged by 4D electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Fu, Xuewen; Tang, Jau; Lysevych, Mykhaylo; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2017-11-20

    Eutectic-related reaction is a special chemical/physical reaction involving multiple phases, solid and liquid. Visualization of a phase reaction of composite nanomaterials with high spatial and temporal resolution provides a key understanding of alloy growth with important industrial applications. However, it has been a rather challenging task. Here, we report the direct imaging and control of the phase reaction dynamics of a single, as-grown free-standing gallium arsenide nanowire encapped with a gold nanoparticle, free from environmental confinement or disturbance, using four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy. The nondestructive preparation of as-grown free-standing nanowires without supporting films allows us to study their anisotropic properties in their native environment with better statistical character. A laser heating pulse initiates the eutectic-related reaction at a temperature much lower than the melting points of the composite materials, followed by a precisely time-delayed electron pulse to visualize the irreversible transient states of nucleation, growth, and solidification of the complex. Combined with theoretical modeling, useful thermodynamic parameters of the newly formed alloy phases and their crystal structures could be determined. This technique of dynamical control aided by 4D imaging of phase reaction processes on the nanometer-ultrafast time scale opens new venues for engineering various reactions in a wide variety of other systems. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. An Algorithm for Data Hiding in Radiographic Images and ePHI/R Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqsa Rashid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine is the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT for clinical health care from a distance. The exchange of radiographic images and electronic patient health information/records (ePHI/R for diagnostic purposes has the risk of confidentiality, ownership identity, and authenticity. In this paper, a data hiding technique for ePHI/R is proposed. The color information in the cover image is used for key generation, and stego-images are produced with ideal case. As a result, the whole stego-system is perfectly secure. This method includes the features of watermarking and steganography techniques. The method is applied to radiographic images. For the radiographic images, this method resembles watermarking, which is an ePHI/R data system. Experiments show promising results for the application of this method to radiographic images in ePHI/R for both transmission and storage purpose.

  8. Fundamental and experimental aspects of diffraction for characterizing dislocations by electron channeling contrast imaging in scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kriaa, H.; Guitton, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopes provide detailed crystallographic information with high spatial and angular resolutions, and allow direct observation of crystalline defects, such as dislocations, through an attractive technique called Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI). Dislocations play a crucial role in the properties of materials and ECCI has naturally emerged as an adapted tool for characterizing defects in bulk specimen. Nevertheless, fine control of th...

  9. Collaborative Research and Development. Delivery Order 0006: Transmission Electron Microscope Image Modeling and Semiconductor Heterointerface Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    .... Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization studies were performed on a variety of novel III-V semiconductor heterostructures being developed for advanced optoelectronic device applications...

  10. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, Gorazd

    2011-09-01

    Ten years ago, a book with a title like this would be interesting only to a narrow circle of specialists. Thanks to rapid advances in technology, the price of thermal imaging devices has dropped sharply, so they have, almost overnight, become accessible to a wide range of users. As the authors point out in the preface, the growth of this area has led to a paradoxical situation: now there are probably more infrared (IR) cameras sold worldwide than there are people who understand the basic physics behind them and know how to correctly interpret the colourful images that are obtained with these devices. My experience confirms this. When I started using the IR camera during lectures on the didactics of physics, I soon realized that I needed more knowledge, which I later found in this book. A wide range of potential readers and topical areas provides a good motive for writing a book such as this one, but it also represents a major challenge for authors, as compromises in the style of writing and choice of topics are required. The authors of this book have successfully achieved this, and indeed done an excellent job. This book addresses a wide range of readers, from engineers, technicians, and physics and science teachers in schools and universities, to researchers and specialists who are professionally active in the field. As technology in this area has made great progress in recent times, this book is also a valuable guide for those who opt to purchase an infrared camera. Chapters in this book could be divided into three areas: the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging and related physics (two chapters); IR imaging systems and methods (two chapters) and applications, including six chapters on pedagogical applications; IR imaging of buildings and infrastructure, industrial applications, microsystems, selected topics in research and industry, and selected applications from other fields. All chapters contain numerous colour pictures and diagrams, and a rich list of relevant

  12. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    the non-adiabatic photodissociation of carbon disulphide demonstrate how the purely electronic rearrangements of the valence electrons can be projected from inherently coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics. Combined with ongoing efforts in molecular frame alignment(20) and orientation(21,22), TRMFPADs...... offer the promise of directly imaging valence-electron dynamics during molecular processes without involving the use of strong, highly perturbing laser fields(23)....

  13. The use and potential application of electron accelerator in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danu, Sugiarto [National Nuclear Energy Agency, Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2003-02-01

    The use of electron accelerator in Indonesia for research and development, radiation services, commercial purposes and potential application in the future is described. A pilot plant for radiation curing technology particularly for wood surface coating using low energy electron accelerator (300 keV, 50 mA; installed in 1984) and a EBM GJ 2 (2 MeV, 10 mA, installed in 1994) for R and D of crosslinking process such as wire and cable and heat shrinkable tube and sheets in Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, Jakarta, and also a low energy electron accelerator (installed in 1998) in a private company, PT Gajah Tunggai, are being mainly used. Their performances are presented with activities achieved in the fields of wood surface coating, vulcanization of natural rubber latex, grafting of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), radiation sterilization, degradation of cellulose and, as promising applications, radiation curing for composite production and uses for environmental preservation are introduced. (S. Ohno)

  14. Application of a Heat Flux Sensor in Wind Power Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Baygildina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and investigates the application of the gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS for measuring the local heat flux in power electronics. Thanks to its thinness, the sensor can be placed between the semiconductor module and the heat sink. The GHFS has high sensitivity and yields direct measurements without an interruption to the normal power device operation, which makes it attractive for power electronics applications. The development of systems for monitoring thermal loading and methods for online detection of degradation and failure of power electronic devices is a topical and crucial task. However, online condition monitoring (CM methods, which include heat flux sensors, have received little research attention so far. In the current research, an insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT module-based test setup with the GHFS implemented on the base plate of one of the IGBTs is introduced. The heat flux experiments and the IGBT power losses obtained by simulations show similar results. The findings give clear evidence that the GHFS can provide an attractive condition monitoring method for the thermal loading of power devices.

  15. Electron Beam Irradiated Intercalated CNT Yarns For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Deborah L.; Gaier, James R.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Lopez Calero, Johnny E.; Ramirez, Christopher; Meador, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled CNT yarns have been experimentally and commercially created to yield lightweight, high conductivity fibers with good tensile properties for application as electrical wiring and multifunctional tendons. Multifunctional tendons are needed as the cable structures in tensegrity robots for use in planetary exploration. These lightweight robust tendons can provide mechanical strength for movement of the robot in addition to power distribution and data transmission. In aerospace vehicles, such as Orion, electrical wiring and harnessing mass can approach half of the avionics mass. Use of CNT yarns as electrical power and data cables could reduce mass of the wiring by thirty to seventy percent. These fibers have been intercalated with mixed halogens to increase their specific electrical conductivity to that near copper. This conductivity, combined with the superior strength and fatigue resistance makes it an attractive alternative to copper for wiring and multifunctional tendon applications. Electron beam irradiation has been shown to increase mechanical strength in pristine CNT fibers through increased cross-linking. Both pristine and intercalated CNT yarns have been irradiated using a 5-megavolt electron beam for various durations and the conductivities and tensile properties will be discussed. Structural information obtained using a field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy will correlate microstructural details with bulk properties.

  16. Ten years of biophotonics single-photon SPAD imager applications: retrospective and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschini, Claudio; Homulle, Harald; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-02-01

    SPAD (single-photon avalanche diode) arrays are single-photon imagers that can provide unparalleled timeresolved sensing performance. Since their inception in standard CMOS technologies (2003), a host of architectures and target applications have been explored, ranging from simple pixel arrays, with off-chip data processing electronics, to fully integrated "smart" imagers with in-pixel time-stamping electronics and/or on-chip data processing fabric. Applications include (endoscopic) FLIM, (multi-beam multiphoton) FLIM-FRET, SPIMFCS, time-resolved Raman, NIROT, super-resolution microscopy, and PET, to name a few. We will review some representative sensors and applications, the corresponding challenges, and provide an outlook on the future of this fascinating technology

  17. Fundamentals and Applications of Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgert, J.; Schmidt, J.D.; Schmale, I.; Rahmer, J.; Bontus, C.; Gleich, B.; David, B.; Eckart, R.; Woywode, O.; Juergen Weizenecker; Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Haegele, J.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technique that performs a direct measurement of the magnetization of ferromagnetic nanoparticles to quantify their local concentration. These particles are usually called SPIOs, i.e. superparamagnetic iron oxides. Specific formulations of

  18. Imaging-Genetics Applications in Child Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To place imaging-genetics research in the context of child psychiatry. Method: A conceptual overview is provided, followed by discussion of specific research examples. Results: Imaging-genetics research is described linking brain function to two specific genes, for the serotonin-reuptake-transporter protein and a monoamine oxidase…

  19. Novel biomedical applications of Cerenkov radiation and radioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Boschi, Federico

    2015-03-01

    The main goals of this review is to provide an up-to-date account of the different uses of Cerenkov radiation (CR) and radioluminescence imaging for pre-clinical small animal imaging. We will focus on new emerging applications such as the use of Cerenkov imaging for monitoring radionuclide and external radiotherapy in humans. Another novel application that will be described is the monitoring of radiochemical synthesis using microfluidic chips. Several pre-clinical aspects of CR will be discussed such as the development of 3D reconstruction methods for Cerenkov images and the use of CR as excitation source for nanoparticles or for endoscopic imaging. We will also include a discussion on radioluminescence imaging that is a more general method than Cerenkov imaging for the detection using optical methods of alpha and gamma emitters. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  1. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.T., E-mail: chenytao@ynu.edu.cn [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Yunnan University, 650091 Kunming (China); La Taille, C. de [OMEGA (UMS 3605) - IN2P3/CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Suomijärvi, T. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Cao, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, 100049 Beijing (China); Deligny, O. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Dulucq, F. [OMEGA (UMS 3605) - IN2P3/CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Ge, M.M. [Yunnan University, 650091 Kunming (China); Lhenry-Yvon, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Martin-Chassard, G. [OMEGA (UMS 3605) - IN2P3/CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Nguyen Trung, T.; Wanlin, E. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Xiao, G.; Yin, L.Q. [Institute of High Energy Physics, 100049 Beijing (China); Yun Ky, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Zhang, L. [Yunnan University, 650091 Kunming (China); Zhang, H.Y. [Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Zhang, S.S.; Zhu, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, a front-end electronics based on an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented for the future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). To achieve this purpose, a 16-channel ASIC chip, PARISROC 2 (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is used in the analog signal processing and digitization. The digitized results are sent to the server by a user-defined User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) hardcore engine through Ethernet that is managed by a FPGA. A prototype electronics fulfilling the requirements of the Wide Field of View Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA) of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project has been designed, fabricated and tested to prove the concept of the design. A detailed description of the development with the results of the test measurements are presented. By using a new input structure and a new configuration of the ASIC, the dynamic range of the circuit is extended. A highly precise-time calibrating algorithm is also proposed, verified and optimized for the mass production. The test results suggest that the proposed electronics design fulfills the general specification of the future IACTs.

  2. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  3. From Relativistic Electrons to X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Garson, A. B. [Washington U., St. Louis; Anastasio, M. A. [Washington U., St. Louis

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial demonstrations of the use of single crystals in indirect x-ray imaging for x-ray phase contrast imaging at the Washington University in St. Louis Computational Bioimaging Laboratory (CBL). Based on single Gaussian peak fits to the x-ray images, we observed a four times smaller system point spread function (21 μm (FWHM)) with the 25-mm diameter single crystals than the reference polycrystalline phosphor’s 80-μm value. Potential fiber-optic plate depth-of-focus aspects and 33-μm diameter carbon fiber imaging are also addressed.

  4. Growth, characterisation and electronic applications of amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    temperature on GaAs, has been studied and concluded to be satisfactory on the basis of good adherence and low leakage currents. Such a structure was motivated by the applicability in Metal Insulator Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MISFET). My thesis proposes solutions to a number of riddles associated with the material, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, (a-C:H). This material has lately generated interest in the electronic engineering community, owing to some remarkable properties. The characterisation of amorphous carbon films, grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The coexistence of multiple phases in the same a-C:H film manifests itself in the inconsistent electrical behaviour of different parts of the film, thus rendering it difficult to predict the nature of films. For the first time, in this thesis, a reliable prediction of Schottky contact formation on a-C:H films is reported. A novel and simple development on a Scanning Electron Microscope, configu...

  5. Applications of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbye, J. : Ph.D.

    The present thesis "Application of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics" has been prepared as a part of Janus Lyngbyes Ph.D. study during the period December 1988 to June 1992 at the Department of Building technology and Structural Engineering, University of Aalborg, Denmark....... In this thesis attention will be focused on optimal use and analysis of the information of digital images. This is realized during investigation and application of parametric methods in digital image analysis. The parametric methods will be implemented in applications representative for the area of experimental...

  6. Efficient Image Blur in Web-Based Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Scripting languages require the use of high-level library functions to implement efficient image processing; thus, real-time image blur in web-based applications is a challenging task unless specific library functions are available for this purpose. We present a pyramid blur algorithm, which can...... be implemented using a subimage copy function, and evaluate its performance with various web browsers in comparison to an infinite impulse response filter. While this pyramid algorithm was first proposed for GPU-based image processing, its applicability to web-based applications indicates that some GPU...

  7. Image Processor Electronics (IPE): The High-Performance Computing System for NASA SWIFT Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang H.; Settles, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are believed to be the most powerful explosions that have occurred in the Universe since the Big Bang and are a mystery to the scientific community. Swift, a NASA mission that includes international participation, was designed and built in preparation for a 2003 launch to help to determine the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts. Locating the position in the sky where a burst originates requires intensive computing, because the duration of a GRB can range between a few milliseconds up to approximately a minute. The instrument data system must constantly accept multiple images representing large regions of the sky that are generated by sixteen gamma ray detectors operating in parallel. It then must process the received images very quickly in order to determine the existence of possible gamma ray bursts and their locations. The high-performance instrument data computing system that accomplishes this is called the Image Processor Electronics (IPE). The IPE was designed, built and tested by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in order to meet these challenging requirements. The IPE is a small size, low power and high performing computing system for space applications. This paper addresses the system implementation and the system hardware architecture of the IPE. The paper concludes with the IPE system performance that was measured during end-to-end system testing.

  8. Performance assessment of methods for estimation of fractal dimension from scanning electron microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risović, Dubravko; Pavlović, Zivko

    2013-01-01

    Processing of gray scale images in order to determine the corresponding fractal dimension is very important due to widespread use of imaging technologies and application of fractal analysis in many areas of science, technology, and medicine. To this end, many methods for estimation of fractal dimension from gray scale images have been developed and routinely used. Unfortunately different methods (dimension estimators) often yield significantly different results in a manner that makes interpretation difficult. Here, we report results of comparative assessment of performance of several most frequently used algorithms/methods for estimation of fractal dimension. To that purpose, we have used scanning electron microscope images of aluminum oxide surfaces with different fractal dimensions. The performance of algorithms/methods was evaluated using the statistical Z-score approach. The differences between performances of six various methods are discussed and further compared with results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on the same samples. The analysis of results shows that the performance of investigated algorithms varies considerably and that systematically erroneous fractal dimensions could be estimated using certain methods. The differential cube counting, triangulation, and box counting algorithms showed satisfactory performance in the whole investigated range of fractal dimensions. Difference statistic is proved to be less reliable generating 4% of unsatisfactory results. The performances of the Power spectrum, Partitioning and EIS were unsatisfactory in 29%, 38%, and 75% of estimations, respectively. The results of this study should be useful and provide guidelines to researchers using/attempting fractal analysis of images obtained by scanning microscopy or atomic force microscopy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel compact photoacoustic imaging system to explore the applications in the medical imaging field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Hayakawa, Toshiro; Ishihara, Miya

    2017-04-01

    PhotoAcoustic (PA) imaging is a promising imaging method using the pulsed-laser light source and ultrasound detector. PA image shows the features of optical contrast in biological tissue with ultrasound-like depth and resolution. In the human body, Hemoglobin of the blood is strong optical absorber, so the high-contrast blood distribution (vascular) image is obtained by PA imaging. Recently, FUJIFILM has developed the PA imaging system to explore its application in medical imaging field. In this system, the fusion of PA and conventional ultrasound image is realized, for example, ultrasound Doppler image is superposed to the PA and B-mode image. The system features and some results of clinical studies will be introduced.

  10. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Dǎdârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a "sensor" or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  11. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudoran, Cristian D., E-mail: cristian.tudoran@itim-cj.ro; Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat, PO 5 Box 700, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  12. Advanced electrical and electronics materials processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, K M

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and unique book is intended to cover the vast and fast-growing field of electrical and electronic materials and their engineering in accordance with modern developments.   Basic and pre-requisite information has been included for easy transition to more complex topics. Latest developments in various fields of materials and their sciences/engineering, processing and applications have been included. Latest topics like PLZT, vacuum as insulator, fiber-optics, high temperature superconductors, smart materials, ferromagnetic semiconductors etc. are covered. Illustrations and exa

  13. The analysis of web application quality for electronic banking

    OpenAIRE

    Jankovič, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate a systematic analysis of web applications quality for electronic banking. In the theoretical part we focused on the ISO/IEC 25000 standard, which deals with quality of the product. With help of SQuaRE set of standards we have reviewed the contents of some standards from ISO/IEC 25000 family. At the and we used ISO/IEC 25010 quality model and ISO/IEC 25040 which contains procedure for assessing the product quality. For the assessment of user in...

  14. An infrared high rate video imager for various space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Hâkan; Koschny, Detlef

    2010-05-01

    Modern spacecraft with high data transmission capabilities have opened up the possibility to fly video rate imagers in space. Several fields concerned with observations of transient phenomena can benefit significantly from imaging at video frame rate. Some applications are observations and characterization of bolides/meteors, sprites, lightning, volcanic eruptions, and impacts on airless bodies. Applications can be found both on low and high Earth orbiting spacecraft as well as on planetary and lunar orbiters. The optimum wavelength range varies depending on the application but we will focus here on the near infrared, partly since it allows exploration of a new field and partly because it, in many cases, allows operation both during day and night. Such an instrument has to our knowledge never flown in space so far. The only sensors of a similar kind fly on US defense satellites for monitoring launches of ballistic missiles. The data from these sensors, however, is largely inaccessible to scientists. We have developed a bread-board version of such an instrument, the SPOSH-IR. The instrument is based on an earlier technology development - SPOSH - a Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head, for operation in the visible range, but with the sensor replace by a cooled IR detector and new optics. The instrument is using a Sofradir 320x256 pixel HgCdTe detector array with 30µm pixel size, mounted directly on top of a four stage thermoelectric Peltier cooler. The detector-cooler combination is integrated into an evacuated closed package with a glass window on its front side. The detector has a sensitive range between 0.8 and 2.5 µm. The optical part is a seven lens design with a focal length of 6 mm and a FOV 90deg by 72 deg optimized for use at SWIR. The detector operates at 200K while the optics operates at ambient temperature. The optics and electronics for the bread-board has been designed and built by Jena-Optronik, Jena, Germany. This talk will present the design and the

  15. Laser-assisted electron diffraction for femtosecond molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    We report the observation of laser-assisted electron diffraction (LAED) through the collision of 1 keV electrons with gas-phase CCl{sub 4} molecules in a femtosecond near-infrared laser field. In the angular distribution of the scattered electrons with the energy shifts of ±ℏω, we observed clear diffraction patterns which reflect the geometrical structure of the molecules at the moment of laser irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast nuclear dynamics of molecules can be probed by LAED with the high temporal (<10 fs) and spatial (∼0.01 Å) resolutions.

  16. Multi-sensor image fusion and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Rick S

    2005-01-01

    Taking another lesson from nature, the latest advances in image processing technology seek to combine image data from several diverse types of sensors in order to obtain a more accurate view of the scene: very much the same as we rely on our five senses. Multi-Sensor Image Fusion and Its Applications is the first text dedicated to the theory and practice of the registration and fusion of image data, covering such approaches as statistical methods, color-related techniques, model-based methods, and visual information display strategies.After a review of state-of-the-art image fusion techniques,

  17. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging: understanding the technology and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Teyhen, Deydre S; Elliott, James M; Cook, Katy; Langevin, Helene M; Dahl, Haldis H; Stokes, Maria

    2007-08-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging by physical therapists is growing in popularity. This commentary has 2 aims. The first is to introduce the concept of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI), provide a definition of the scope of this emerging tool in regard to the physical therapy profession, and describe how this relates to the larger field of medical ultrasound imaging. The second aim is to provide an overview of basic ultrasound imaging and instrumentation principles, including an understanding of the various modes and applications of the technology with respect to neuromusculoskeletal rehabilitation and in relation to other common imaging modalities.

  18. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  19. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine, E-mail: naj@mail.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States); Kruecker, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.kruecker@philips.com [Philips Research North America (United States); Kadoury, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.kadoury@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada); Kobeiter, Hicham, E-mail: hicham.kobeiter@gmail.com [CHU Henri Mondor, UPEC, Departments of Radiology and d' imagrie medicale (France); Venkatesan, Aradhana M., E-mail: VenkatesanA@cc.nih.gov; Levy, Elliot, E-mail: levyeb@cc.nih.gov; Wood, Bradford J., E-mail: bwood@cc.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  20. Theory and Application of Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such...for collecting RGB data and displaying image 11205 beadbits - 0: updown m 0 11210 rowx - 3: columnx m 22: vidthlx - 58: depthx - 6: forex - 15: backx...1 11220 VIEW PRINT 2 TO 24 11230 CALL box(rowx, columnx, widthlx, depthx, forex , backx) 11240 LOCATE rowx + 1, columnx + 1: INPUT ’Type Image

  1. Using stereoscopic imaging for visualization applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelson, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of scientific visualization is to simplify the analysis of numerical data by rendering the information as an image. Even when the image is familiar, as in the case of terrain data, preconceptions about what the image should look like and deceptive image artifacts can create misconceptions about what information is actually contained in the scene. One way of aiding the development of unambiguous visualizations is to add stereoscopic depth to the image. Despite the recent proliferation of affordable stereoscopic viewing equipment, few researchers are at this time taking advantage of stereo in their visualizations. It is generally perceived that the rendering time will have to be doubled in order to generate the pair, and so stereoscopic viewing is sacrificed in the name of expedient rendering. We show that this perception is often invalid. The second half of a stereoscopic image can be generated from the first half for a fraction of the computational cost of complete rendering, usually no more than 50% of the cost and in many cases as little as 5%. Using the techniques presented here, the benefits of stereoscopy can be added to existing visualization systems for only a small cost over current single-frame rendering methods.

  2. Mineral mapping and applications of imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Boardman, J.; Mustard, J.; Kruse, F.; Ong, C.; Pieters, C.; Swayze, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Spectroscopy is a tool that has been used for decades to identify, understand, and quantify solid, liquid, or gaseous materials, especially in the laboratory. In disciplines ranging from astronomy to chemistry, spectroscopic measurements are used to detect absorption and emission features due to specific chemical bonds, and detailed analyses are used to determine the abundance and physical state of the detected absorbing/emitting species. Spectroscopic measurements have a long history in the study of the Earth and planets. Up to the 1990s remote spectroscopic measurements of Earth and planets were dominated by multispectral imaging experiments that collect high-quality images in a few, usually broad, spectral bands or with point spectrometers that obtained good spectral resolution but at only a few spatial positions. However, a new generation of sensors is now available that combines imaging with spectroscopy to create the new discipline of imaging spectroscopy. Imaging spectrometers acquire data with enough spectral range, resolution, and sampling at every pixel in a raster image so that individual absorption features can be identified and spatially mapped (Goetz et al., 1985).

  3. [Digital TV tomosynthesis--system development, digital image processing and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, S

    1990-12-25

    We have designed and developed two types of high-resolution digital X-ray TV tomosynthesis systems which incorporate an X-ray TV fluororadiographic unit with tomographic function and a digital image processor, which handles image data from the image intensifier-TV camera chain. We have studied methods of improving image quality of the tomosynthesis images and their clinical applicability. As a result of clinical application of this method, a number of advantages have already become apparent, as listed below: 1) Low patient radiation dose per examination, short examination time, and early display of the image on the CRT. 2) Reconstruction of the tomograms at any desired depth and oblique tomograms. 3) Spatial frequency filtering to improve the image quality, particularly one-dimensional spatial filtering process to reduce linear tomographic blur. 4) Digital angiotomosynthesis with and without subtraction. 5) Dual energy subtraction digital tomosynthesis. 6) Electronic storage and transmission of image data. Clinical effectiveness of this method was shown in such areas as imaging of the ear, spine and lung, angiography of the brain and abdominal organs, and arthrography.

  4. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-08-08

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  5. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  6. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E.; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  7. Magnetic particle imaging: from proof of principle to preclinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, T.; Gdaniec, N.; Möddel, M.

    2017-07-01

    Tomographic imaging has become a mandatory tool for the diagnosis of a majority of diseases in clinical routine. Since each method has its pros and cons, a variety of them is regularly used in clinics to satisfy all application needs. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a relatively new tomographic imaging technique that images magnetic nanoparticles with a high spatiotemporal resolution in a quantitative way, and in turn is highly suited for vascular and targeted imaging. MPI was introduced in 2005 and now enters the preclinical research phase, where medical researchers get access to this new technology and exploit its potential under physiological conditions. Within this paper, we review the development of MPI since its introduction in 2005. Besides an in-depth description of the basic principles, we provide detailed discussions on imaging sequences, reconstruction algorithms, scanner instrumentation and potential medical applications.

  8. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Lozano, J G; Pennycook, T J; Jones, L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2015-06-04

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures.

  10. Infrared hyperspectral imaging miniaturized for UAV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford; McCutchen, Earl

    2017-02-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera, both MWIR and LWIR, small enough to serve as a payload on a miniature unmanned aerial vehicles. The optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of the sensor. This new and innovative approach to infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics and will be explained in this paper. The micro-optics are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a mini-UAV or commercial quadcopter. Also, an example of how this technology can easily be used to quantify a hydrocarbon gas leak's volume and mass flowrates. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the spatial resolution. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image four different spectral images of the scene each frame and when coupled with a 512 x 512 focal plane array will give spatial resolution of 256 x 256 pixel each spectral image. Another system that we developed uses a 4 x 4

  11. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  12. Fluorinated graphene films with graphene quantum dots for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, I. V., E-mail: antonova@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Nebogatikova, N. A.; Prinz, V. Ya. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-14

    This work analyzes carrier transport, the relaxation of non-equilibrium charge, and the electronic structure of fluorinated graphene (FG) films with graphene quantum dots (GQDs). The FG films with GQDs were fabricated by means of chemical functionalization in an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid. High fluctuations of potential relief inside the FG barriers have been detected in the range of up to 200 mV. A phenomenological expression that describes the dependence of the time of non-equilibrium charge emission from GQDs on quantum confinement levels and film thickness (potential barrier parameters between GQDs) is suggested. An increase in the degree of functionalization leads to a decrease in GQD size, the removal of the GQD effect on carrier transport, and the relaxation of non-equilibrium charge. The study of the electronic properties of FG films with GQDs has revealed a unipolar resistive switching effect in the films with a relatively high degree of fluorination and a high current modulation (up to ON/OFF ∼ 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5}) in transistor-like structures with a lower degree of fluorination. 2D films with GQDs are believed to have considerable potential for various electronic applications (nonvolatile memory, 2D connections with optical control and logic elements).

  13. Multimodal imaging of bone metastases: From preclinical to clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Ellmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the skeletal system are commonly observed in cancer patients, highly affecting the patients' quality of life. Imaging plays a major role in detection, follow-up, and molecular characterisation of metastatic disease. Thus, imaging techniques have been optimised and combined in a multimodal and multiparametric manner for assessment of complementary aspects in osseous metastases. This review summarises both application of the most relevant imaging techniques for bone metastasis in preclinical models and the clinical setting.

  14. Application of image processing technology in yarn hairiness detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guohong; Binjie XIN

    2016-01-01

    Digital image processing technology is one of the new methods for yarn detection, which can realize the digital characterization and objective evaluation of yarn appearance. This paper overviews the current status of development and application of digital image processing technology used for yarn hairiness evaluation, and analyzes and compares the traditional detection methods and this new developed method. Compared with the traditional methods, the image processing technology based method is...

  15. Trace metal imaging with high spatial resolution: Applications in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Z.; Caruso, J A; B. Lai; Matusch, A.; Becker, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    New generations of analytical techniques for imaging of metals are pushing hitherto boundaries of spatial resolution and quantitative analysis in biology. Because of this, the application of these imaging techniques described herein to the study of the organization and dynamics of metal cations and metal-containing biomolecules in biological cell and tissue is becoming an important issue in biomedical research. In the current review, three common metal imaging techniques in biomedical researc...

  16. Image binarization algorithm using GPU for woodworking industry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A.; Pelevin, V.

    2017-09-01

    Application of GPU for improving performance of image preprocessing is considered. The task was to measure radius of a log's moving on conveyor for further processing planning. Input data were the images received from three cameras, which supposed to be processed at a moderately high framerate. The paper describes how GPU may be utilized to increase performance of image preprocessing. Obtained results show preferred method of processing.

  17. Optimizing signal and image processing applications using Intel libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landré, Jérôme; Truchetet, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents optimized signal and image processing libraries from Intel Corporation. Intel Performance Primitives (IPP) is a low-level signal and image processing library developed by Intel Corporation to optimize code on Intel processors. Open Computer Vision library (OpenCV) is a high-level library dedicated to computer vision tasks. This article describes the use of both libraries to build flexible and efficient signal and image processing applications.

  18. Medical Image Registration Guided by Application-Specific Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, F.F.

    2015-01-01

    Image registration is an important task in medical image processing. Among its applications are inter-patient registration to perform segmentation of organs, registration of follow-up scans to propagate the in tissue accumulated radiation dose of a radiotherapy, and registration to perform

  19. VIS/NIR imaging application for honey floral origin determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minaei, Saeid; Shafiee, Sahameh; Polder, Gerrit; Moghadam-Charkari, Nasrolah; Ruth, van Saskia; Barzegar, Mohsen; Zahiri, Javad; Alewijn, Martin; Kuś, Piotr M.

    2017-01-01

    Nondestructive methods are of utmost importance for honey characterization. This study investigates the potential application of VIS-NIR hyperspectral imaging for detection of honey flower origin using machine learning techniques. Hyperspectral images of 52 honey samples were taken in

  20. In vivo preclinical cancer and tissue engineering applications of absolute oxygen imaging using pulse EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Kotecha, Mrignayani; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-07-01

    The value of any measurement and a fortiori any measurement technology is defined by the reproducibility and the accuracy of the measurements. This implies a relative freedom of the measurement from factors confounding its accuracy. In the past, one of the reasons for the loss of focus on the importance of imaging oxygen in vivo was the difficulty in obtaining reproducible oxygen or pO2 images free from confounding variation. This review will briefly consider principles of electron paramagnetic oxygen imaging and describe how it achieves absolute oxygen measurements. We will provide a summary review of the progress in biomedical EPR imaging, predominantly in cancer biology research, discuss EPR oxygen imaging for cancer treatment and tissue graft assessment for regenerative medicine applications.

  1. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn-internal electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Rajon, Didier [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Jokisch, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC (United States)], E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu

    2010-04-07

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  2. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn—internal electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  3. Hospital electronic medical record enterprise application strategies: do they matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Naleef; Ozcan, Yasar A; DeShazo, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Successful implementations and the ability to reap the benefits of electronic medical record (EMR) systems may be correlated with the type of enterprise application strategy that an administrator chooses when acquiring an EMR system. Moreover, identifying the most optimal enterprise application strategy is a task that may have important linkages with hospital performance. This study explored whether hospitals that have adopted differential EMR enterprise application strategies concomitantly differ in their overall efficiency. Specifically, the study examined whether hospitals with a single-vendor strategy had a higher likelihood of being efficient than those with a best-of-breed strategy and whether hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy had a higher probability of being efficient than those with best-of-breed or single-vendor strategies. A conceptual framework was used to formulate testable hypotheses. A retrospective cross-sectional approach using data envelopment analysis was used to obtain efficiency scores of hospitals by EMR enterprise application strategy. A Tobit regression analysis was then used to determine the probability of a hospital being inefficient as related to its EMR enterprise application strategy, while moderating for the hospital's EMR "implementation status" and controlling for hospital and market characteristics. The data envelopment analysis of hospitals suggested that only 32 hospitals were efficient in the study's sample of 2,171 hospitals. The results from the post hoc analysis showed partial support for the hypothesis that hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy were more likely to be efficient than those with a single-vendor strategy. This study underscores the importance of understanding the differences between the three strategies discussed in this article. On the basis of the findings, hospital administrators should consider the efficiency associations that a specific strategy may have compared with another prior to moving toward

  4. Neural networks: Application to medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laurence P.

    1994-01-01

    The research mission is the development of computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) methods for improved diagnosis of medical images including digital x-ray sensors and tomographic imaging modalities. The CAD algorithms include advanced methods for adaptive nonlinear filters for image noise suppression, hybrid wavelet methods for feature segmentation and enhancement, and high convergence neural networks for feature detection and VLSI implementation of neural networks for real time analysis. Other missions include (1) implementation of CAD methods on hospital based picture archiving computer systems (PACS) and information networks for central and remote diagnosis and (2) collaboration with defense and medical industry, NASA, and federal laboratories in the area of dual use technology conversion from defense or aerospace to medicine.

  5. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. High-frame-rate intensified fast optically shuttered TV cameras with selected imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.

    1994-08-01

    This invited paper focuses on high speed electronic/electro-optic camera development by the Applied Physics Experiments and Imaging Measurements Group (P-15) of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Physics Division over the last two decades. The evolution of TV and image intensifier sensors and fast readout fast shuttered cameras are discussed. Their use in nuclear, military, and medical imaging applications are presented. Several salient characteristics and anomalies associated with single-pulse and high repetition rate performance of the cameras/sensors are included from earlier studies to emphasize their effects on radiometric accuracy of electronic framing cameras. The Group`s test and evaluation capabilities for characterization of imaging type electro-optic sensors and sensor components including Focal Plane Arrays, gated Image Intensifiers, microchannel plates, and phosphors are discussed. Two new unique facilities, the High Speed Solid State Imager Test Station (HSTS) and the Electron Gun Vacuum Test Chamber (EGTC) arc described. A summary of the Group`s current and developmental camera designs and R&D initiatives are included.

  7. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography.

  8. MEM application to IRAS CPC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    A method for applying the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to Chopped Photometric Channel (CPC) IRAS additional observations is illustrated. The original CPC data suffered from problems with repeatability which MEM is able to cope with by use of a noise image, produced from the results of separate data scans of objects. The process produces images of small areas of sky with circular Gaussian beams of approximately 30 in. full width half maximum resolution at 50 and 100 microns. Comparison is made to previous reconstructions made in the far-infrared as well as morphologies of objects at other wavelengths. Some projects with this dataset are discussed.

  9. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  10. 2D hybrid analysis: Approach for building three-dimensional atomic model by electron microscopy image matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Takagi, Junichi; Iwasaki, Kenji

    2017-03-23

    In this study, we develop an approach termed "2D hybrid analysis" for building atomic models by image matching from electron microscopy (EM) images of biological molecules. The key advantage is that it is applicable to flexible molecules, which are difficult to analyze by 3DEM approach. In the proposed approach, first, a lot of atomic models with different conformations are built by computer simulation. Then, simulated EM images are built from each atomic model. Finally, they are compared with the experimental EM image. Two kinds of models are used as simulated EM images: the negative stain model and the simple projection model. Although the former is more realistic, the latter is adopted to perform faster computations. The use of the negative stain model enables decomposition of the averaged EM images into multiple projection images, each of which originated from a different conformation or orientation. We apply this approach to the EM images of integrin to obtain the distribution of the conformations, from which the pathway of the conformational change of the protein is deduced.

  11. Research to Develop Biomedical Applications of Free Electron Laser Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrish, John

    2004-01-01

    .... The specimens were opened and imaged at normal body temperature (37-C) in saline. To ensure proper registration of OCT images with histolog the image location was marked with ink viewable on the OCT image and in the histology section...

  12. Electronic Image Readout Devices Used In Conjunction With Picosecond Streak Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailler, C.; Genoud, M.; Fleurot, N.; Launspach, J.; Mazataud, D.; Mens, A.

    1985-02-01

    Understanding the laser-matter interaction experiments require a dynamic recording of the phenomena as well as a good knowledge of the laser pulse occuring during the irradiation of the target ; those measurements are made with streak cameras the increasing number of which leads to processing problems when the results are recorded on films. Furthermore, since physicists wish to have those temporal information immediatly, we unfolded automatic image readout devices fitted specially to streak cameras. The first one used an ISOCON tube operating with a slow sweep (0.5 s frame)1-2. The sensitivity of the tube was very good but its dynamic range was too limited when seeing pulsed images at low light level. So we developped two electronic readout chains with solid state devices which behave better for that kind of light. The first one was designed to get the most information along the temporal axis of the camera sweep (1024 points) in one or two spatial channels ; this device operates a linear 1024 photodiodes array the signal of which is digitized on 12 bits. We have obtained a temporal resolution better than 15 ps and a dynamic range over 500 ; this system is mainly useful to study laser pulses (rise time, temporal profile...)3. For applications requiring two dimension images, we studied and realized a device operating a CCD array and a fiber optics reducer (40-18 mm) adapting the image of the streak camera screen to the dimensions of the input fiber optics of the CCD. A comparison has been made on different CCD cameras on a test setup which simulates the experimental conditions, in order to choose the CCD which would fit the best for that purpose ; we present these results here, as well as those of the associated readout chains.

  13. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  14. On the Image Watermarking Techniques Applications, Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract:With the coming and the expansion of the World Wide Web an increased amount of digital information, such as documents, images audio and video ... for copyright protection and a considerable interest in methods for inserting in a multimedia document a visible, or preferably invisible, mark to identify the owner.

  15. Wavelets: Applications to Image Compression-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    discussions on non-unifornl quantizers, interested read- ers can refer [3]. Entropy Encoder. This is the last component in the compression model. Till now, we have devised models for an alternate repre- sentation of the image, in which its interpixel redundan- cies were reduced. This last model, which is a loss less technique ...

  16. Infrared scanning images: an archeological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G G; Gumerman, G J

    1969-05-09

    Aerial infrared scanner images of an area near the Little Colorado River in north-central Arizona disclosed the existence of scattered clusters of parallel linear features in the ashfall area of Sunset Crater. The features are not obvious in conventional aerial photographs, and only one cluster could be recognized on the ground. Soil and pollen analyses reveal that they are prehistoric agricultural plots.

  17. Quantum Imaging: New Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    higher-nonlinearity, periodically- poled 2nd-order nonlinear crystals (lithium niobate and potassium titanyl phosphate) together with off-the-shelf high...imaging for multi- layered and scattering media. Dispersion cancellation has been demonstrated experimentally. In conjunction with this, a method for

  18. Advances in navigation and intraoperative imaging for intraoperative electron radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    García Vázquez, Verónica

    2017-01-01

    Mención Internacional en el título de doctor Esta tesis se enmarca dentro del campo de la radioterapia y trata específicamente sobre la radioterapia intraoperatoria (RIO) con electrones. Esta técnica combina la resección quirúrgica de un tumor y la radiación terapéutica directamente aplicada sobre el lecho tumoral post-resección o sobre el tumor no resecado. El haz de electrones de alta energía es colimado y conducido por un aplicador específico acoplado a un acelerador line...

  19. 76 FR 73677 - Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings: Certain Electronic Devices With Image...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... COMMISSION Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings: Certain Electronic Devices With Image... this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov... entirety. On September 15, 2011, non-parties Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (``AMD'') and its subsidiaries...

  20. Fully relativistic treatment of electron-optical image formation based on the Dirac equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, H.A.; Hoenders, B.J.; Slump, C.H.

    The theory of image formation for an electron microscope is based on the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation, whereas present-day electron microscopes operate with acceleration voltages of the order of one hundred to several hundreds of kilovolts, in which case relativistic effects become

  1. Application of reinforcement learning for segmentation of transrectal ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahba, Farhang; Tizhoosh, Hamid R; Salama, Magdy M A

    2008-04-22

    Among different medical image modalities, ultrasound imaging has a very widespread clinical use. But, due to some factors, such as poor image contrast, noise and missing or diffuse boundaries, the ultrasound images are inherently difficult to segment. An important application is estimation of the location and volume of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. For this purpose, manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming procedure. We introduce a new method for the segmentation of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound images, using a reinforcement learning scheme. This algorithm is used to find the appropriate local values for sub-images and to extract the prostate. It contains an offline stage, where the reinforcement learning agent uses some images and manually segmented versions of these images to learn from. The reinforcement agent is provided with reward/punishment, determined objectively to explore/exploit the solution space. After this stage, the agent has acquired knowledge stored in the Q-matrix. The agent can then use this knowledge for new input images to extract a coarse version of the prostate. We have carried out experiments to segment TRUS images. The results demonstrate the potential of this approach in the field of medical image segmentation. By using the proposed method, we can find the appropriate local values and segment the prostate. This approach can be used for segmentation tasks containing one object of interest. To improve this prototype, more investigations are needed.

  2. Application of reinforcement learning for segmentation of transrectal ultrasound images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tizhoosh Hamid R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among different medical image modalities, ultrasound imaging has a very widespread clinical use. But, due to some factors, such as poor image contrast, noise and missing or diffuse boundaries, the ultrasound images are inherently difficult to segment. An important application is estimation of the location and volume of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS images. For this purpose, manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming procedure. Methods We introduce a new method for the segmentation of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound images, using a reinforcement learning scheme. This algorithm is used to find the appropriate local values for sub-images and to extract the prostate. It contains an offline stage, where the reinforcement learning agent uses some images and manually segmented versions of these images to learn from. The reinforcement agent is provided with reward/punishment, determined objectively to explore/exploit the solution space. After this stage, the agent has acquired knowledge stored in the Q-matrix. The agent can then use this knowledge for new input images to extract a coarse version of the prostate. Results We have carried out experiments to segment TRUS images. The results demonstrate the potential of this approach in the field of medical image segmentation. Conclusion By using the proposed method, we can find the appropriate local values and segment the prostate. This approach can be used for segmentation tasks containing one object of interest. To improve this prototype, more investigations are needed.

  3. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R; Armstrong, Linda S; Ponce, Arturo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2), TiO(2) and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO(2) and TiO(2), whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution.

  4. Applications and research on nano power electronics: an adventure beyond quantum electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Emadi, Ali

    2005-06-01

    This paper is a roadmap to the exhaustive role of the newly emerging field of nanotechnology in various application and research areas. Some of the today's important topics are plasma, dielectric layer semiconductor, and carbon nanoparticle based technologies. Carbon nanotubes are very useful for the purpose of fabricating nano opto power devices. The basic concept behind tunneling of electrons has been utilized to define another scope of this technology, and thus came many quantum scale tunneling devices and elements. Fabrication of crystal semiconductors of high quality along with oxides of nano aspect would give rise to superior device performance and find applications such as LEDs, LASER, VLSI technology and also in highly efficient solar cells. Many nano-research based organizations are fully devoted to develop nano power cells, which would give birth to new battery cells, tunneling devises, with high power quality, longer lives, and higher activation rates. Different electronics industries as well as the military organizations would be largely benefited due to this major component and system design ideas of 'Smart Power' technologies. The contribution of nano scale power electronics would be realized in various fields like switching devices, electromechanical systems and quantum science. Such a sophisticated technology will have great impact on the modernization of robotics; space systems, automotive systems and many other fields. The highly emerging field of nanomedicine according to specialists would bring a dramatic revolution in the present century. However nanomedicine is nothing but an integration of biology, medicine and technology. Thermoelectric materials as been referred earlier also are used in case of implantable medical equipments for generation of electric power sufficient for those equipments.

  5. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope : All-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device

  6. Machine Learning in Radiology: Applications Beyond Image Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Paras; Prater, Adam B; Hutson, R Kent; Andriole, Kathy P; Dreyer, Keith J; Morey, Jose; Prevedello, Luciano M; Clark, Toshi J; Geis, J Raymond; Itri, Jason N; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2018-02-01

    Much attention has been given to machine learning and its perceived impact in radiology, particularly in light of recent success with image classification in international competitions. However, machine learning is likely to impact radiology outside of image interpretation long before a fully functional "machine radiologist" is implemented in practice. Here, we describe an overview of machine learning, its application to radiology and other domains, and many cases of use that do not involve image interpretation. We hope that better understanding of these potential applications will help radiology practices prepare for the future and realize performance improvement and efficiency gains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Real Time Fast Ultrasound Imaging Technology and Possible Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruza, J. F.; Perez, M.; Moreno, J. M.; Fritsch, C.

    In this work, a novel hardware architecture for fast ultrasound imaging based on FPGA devices is proposed. A key difference over other approaches is the unlimited scalability in terms of active channels without performance losses. Acquisition and processing tasks share the same hardware, eliminating communication bottlenecks with smaller size and power losses. These features make this system suitable to implement the most demanding imaging applications, like 3D Phased Array, Total Focusing Method, Vector Doppler, Image Compounding, High Speed Part Scanning and advanced elastographic techniques. A single medium sized FPGA allows beamforming up to 200 scan lines simultaneously, which is enough to perform most of the above mentioned applications in strict real time.

  8. Mineral element analysis of carious and sound rat dentin by electron probe microanalyzer combined with back-scattered electron image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjäderhane, L; Hietala, E L; Larmas, M

    1995-11-01

    We recently demonstrated the advantages of back-scattered electron images (COMPO) in the visualization of dentinal caries, and the relationship of the change in the dentin fluorescence pattern in caries lesions. However, the exact nature of these changes is not known. In this paper, the nature of the changes in the areas with reduced mineral content in COMPO images was investigated. We examined the relation of changes in mineral elements and the appearance of soft carious and sound dentin in COMPO images using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). Rat molars with small dentinal caries lesions just under the DEJ were chosen for the study. The Ca, P, Na, Mg, Zn, F, and total contents were determined by EPMA from five different dentin sites, and the Ca/P and Mg/Ca ratios were calculated. Generally, the lowest contents were found in caries lesions and highest in mantle dentin, with the exceptions of Mg and Zn. The Ca/P ratio was lowest in mantle dentin and highest in carious dentin. The results confirm that the change in fluorescence in the dentinal caries lesion is correlated with the very initial changes in mineral content, and that EPMA used in combination with COMPO images is a useful tool for determining small changes in mineral elements in the carious and adjacent areas of dentin.

  9. Longwave Imaging for Astronomical Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact portable longwave camera for astronomical applications. In Phase 1, we will develop and deliver the focal plane array (FPA) - a...

  10. Longwave Imaging for Astronomical Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact portable longwave camera for astronomical applications. In Phase 1, we successfully developed the eye of the camera, i.e. the focal...

  11. Integrating Web Services into Map Image Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tu, Shengru

    2003-01-01

    Web services have been opening a wide avenue for software integration. In this paper, we have reported our experiments with three applications that are built by utilizing and providing web services for Geographic Information Systems (GIS...

  12. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  13. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  14. Magnetic imaging with a Zernike-type phase plate in a transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Shawn; Malac, Marek; Beleggia, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a hole-free phase plate (HFPP) for magnetic imaging in transmission electron microscopy by mapping the domain structure in PrDyFeB samples. The HFPP, a Zernike-like imaging method, allows for detecting magnetic signals in-focus to correlate the sample crystal structure a...

  15. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  16. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vesseur, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide

  17. Modeling of Image Formation in Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of biological specimens is crucial for understanding life. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) permits structural studies of biological specimen at their near-native state. The research performed in this thesis represents one of two subprojects of the FOM industrial

  18. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; den Dekker, A.J.; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown

  19. A Simple Metric for Determining Resolution in Optical, Ion, and Electron Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alexandra E; Skinner, Ryan; Sanders, Aric W

    2015-06-01

    A resolution metric intended for resolution analysis of arbitrary spatially calibrated images is presented. By fitting a simple sigmoidal function to pixel intensities across slices of an image taken perpendicular to light-dark edges, the mean distance over which the light-dark transition occurs can be determined. A fixed multiple of this characteristic distance is then reported as the image resolution. The prefactor is determined by analysis of scanning transmission electron microscope high-angle annular dark field images of Si. This metric has been applied to optical, scanning electron microscope, and helium ion microscope images. This method provides quantitative feedback about image resolution, independent of the tool on which the data were collected. In addition, our analysis provides a nonarbitrary and self-consistent framework that any end user can utilize to evaluate the resolution of multiple microscopes from any vendor using the same metric.

  20. Semantic sparse recoding of visual content for image applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwu; Han, Peng; Wang, Liwei; Wen, Ji-Rong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new semantic sparse recoding method to generate more descriptive and robust representation of visual content for image applications. Although the visual bag-of-words (BOW) representation has been reported to achieve promising results in different image applications, its visual codebook is completely learnt from low-level visual features using quantization techniques and thus the so-called semantic gap remains unbridgeable. To handle such challenging issue, we utilize the annotations (predicted by algorithms or shared by users) of all the images to improve the original visual BOW representation. This is further formulated as a sparse coding problem so that the noise issue induced by the inaccurate quantization of visual features can also be handled to some extent. By developing an efficient sparse coding algorithm, we successfully generate a new visual BOW representation for image applications. Since such sparse coding has actually incorporated the high-level semantic information into the original visual codebook, we thus consider it as semantic sparse recoding of the visual content. Finally, we apply our semantic sparse recoding method to automatic image annotation and social image classification. The experimental results on several benchmark datasets show the promising performance of our semantic sparse recoding method in these two image applications.

  1. Performance evaluation of a new gamma imager for small animal SPECT applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Eduardo; Vaquero, Juan José; Villena, José L.; Carlos, Álvaro de; Tapias, Gustavo; Sisniega, Alejandro; Desco, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '07), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, Oct. 27 - Nov. 3, 2007 Abstract–In this work we characterized a recently developed gamma imager for small animal SPECT applications. The Hamamatsu C9177 is a mini-gamma camera that integrates the detector and all the electronics, including the acquisition system, in a compact and portable housing. The detector is based on a high resolution parallel hole collimator, a CsI(NaI) crystal a...

  2. Image feature detectors and descriptors foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hassaballah, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with a selection of high-quality chapters that cover both theoretical concepts and practical applications of image feature detectors and descriptors. It serves as reference for researchers and practitioners by featuring survey chapters and research contributions on image feature detectors and descriptors. Additionally, it emphasizes several keywords in both theoretical and practical aspects of image feature extraction. The keywords include acceleration of feature detection and extraction, hardware implantations, image segmentation, evolutionary algorithm, ordinal measures, as well as visual speech recognition. .

  3. Image and video compression fundamentals, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Madhuri A; Dandawate, Yogesh H; Joshi, Kalyani R; Metkar, Shilpa P

    2014-01-01

    Image and video signals require large transmission bandwidth and storage, leading to high costs. The data must be compressed without a loss or with a small loss of quality. Thus, efficient image and video compression algorithms play a significant role in the storage and transmission of data.Image and Video Compression: Fundamentals, Techniques, and Applications explains the major techniques for image and video compression and demonstrates their practical implementation using MATLAB® programs. Designed for students, researchers, and practicing engineers, the book presents both basic principles

  4. Digital signal processing techniques and applications in radar image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bu-Chin

    2008-01-01

    A self-contained approach to DSP techniques and applications in radar imagingThe processing of radar images, in general, consists of three major fields: Digital Signal Processing (DSP); antenna and radar operation; and algorithms used to process the radar images. This book brings together material from these different areas to allow readers to gain a thorough understanding of how radar images are processed.The book is divided into three main parts and covers:* DSP principles and signal characteristics in both analog and digital domains, advanced signal sampling, and

  5. Applications of magnetic resonance image segmentation in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Laarne, Paeivi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Laasonen, Erkki; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    1999-05-01

    After the introduction of digital imagin devices in medicine computerized tissue recognition and classification have become important in research and clinical applications. Segmented data can be applied among numerous research fields including volumetric analysis of particular tissues and structures, construction of anatomical modes, 3D visualization, and multimodal visualization, hence making segmentation essential in modern image analysis. In this research project several PC based software were developed in order to segment medical images, to visualize raw and segmented images in 3D, and to produce EEG brain maps in which MR images and EEG signals were integrated. The software package was tested and validated in numerous clinical research projects in hospital environment.

  6. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Uncooled thermal imaging sensor for UAV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Derick M.; Manning, Paul A.; Wyllie, Tim A.

    2001-10-01

    Research by DERA aimed at unmanned air vehicle (UAV) size reduction and control automation has led to a unique solution for a short range reconnaissance UAV system. Known as OBSERVER, the UAV conventionally carries a lightweight visible band sensor payload producing imagery with a large 40°x90° field of regard (FOR) to maximize spatial awareness and target detection ranges. Images taken from three CCD camera units set at elevations from plan view and up to the near horizon and are 'stitched' together to produce the large contiguous sensor footprint. This paper describes the design of a thermal imaging (TI) sensor which has been developed to be compatible with the OBSERVER UAV system. The sensor is based on UK uncooled thermal imaging technology research and offers a compact and lightweight solution operating in the 8-12 μm waveband without the need for cryogenic cooling. Infra-red radiation is gathered using two lead scandium tantalate (PST) hybrid thermal detectors each with a 384 X 288 pixel resolution, known as the Very Large Array (VLA). The TI system is designed to maintain the imaging format with that of the visible band sensor. In order to practically achieve this with adequate resolution performance, a dual field of view (FOV) optical system is used within a pitchable gimbal. This combines the advantages of a wide angle 40°x30° FOV for target detection and a narrow angle 13°x10° FOV 'foveal patch' to improve target recognition ranges. The gimbal system can be steered in elevation to give the full 90° coverage as with the visible band sensor footprint. The concept of operation is that targets can be detected over the large FOV and then the air vehicle is maneuvered so as to bring the target into the foveal patch view for recognition at an acceptable stand-off range.

  8. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Tanderup, Kari; Bergstrand, Eva Stabell

    2007-01-01

    in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method...... applicator set and six lead pellets representing dose points, was used. The phantom was CT scanned with the ring applicator at four different angles related to the image plane. In each scan the applicator was reconstructed by three methods: (1) direct reconstruction in each image (DR), (2) reconstruction...

  9. Aliphatic polyesters for medical imaging and theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottelet, Benjamin; Darcos, Vincent; Coudane, Jean

    2015-11-01

    Medical imaging is a cornerstone of modern medicine. In that context the development of innovative imaging systems combining biomaterials and contrast agents (CAs)/imaging probes (IPs) for improved diagnostic and theranostic applications focuses intense research efforts. In particular, the classical aliphatic (co)polyesters poly(lactide) (PLA), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), attract much attention due to their long track record in the medical field. This review aims therefore at providing a state-of-the-art of polyester-based imaging systems. In a first section a rapid description of the various imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) and radionuclide imaging (SPECT, PET) will be given. Then, the two main strategies used to combine the CAs/IPs and the polyesters will be discussed. In more detail we will first present the strategies relying on CAs/IPs encapsulation in nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers or capsules. We will then present chemical modifications of polyesters backbones and/or polyester surfaces to yield macromolecular imaging agents. Finally, opportunities offered by these innovative systems will be illustrated with some recent examples in the fields of cell labeling, diagnostic or theranostic applications and medical devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in computer imaging/applications in facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papel, I D; Jiannetto, D F

    1999-01-01

    Rapidly progressing computer technology, ever-increasing expectations of patients, and a confusing medicolegal environment requires a clarification of the role of computer imaging/applications. Advances in computer technology and its applications are reviewed. A brief historical discussion is included for perspective. Improvements in both hardware and software with the advent of digital imaging have allowed great increases in speed and accuracy in patient imaging. This facilitates doctor-patient communication and possibly realistic patient expectations. Patients seeking cosmetic surgery now often expect preoperative imaging. Although society in general has become more litigious, a literature search up to 1998 reveals no lawsuits directly involving computer imaging. It appears that conservative utilization of computer imaging by the facial plastic surgeon may actually reduce liability and promote communication. Recent advances have significantly enhanced the value of computer imaging in the practice of facial plastic surgery. These technological advances in computer imaging appear to contribute a useful technique for the practice of facial plastic surgery. Inclusion of computer imaging should be given serious consideration as an adjunct to clinical practice.

  11. Visualization of oxidative stress in ex vivo biopsies using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Håkan; Hallbeck, Martin; Lindgren, Mikael; Kolbun, Natallia; Jonson, Maria; Engström, Maria; de Muinck, Ebo; Zachrisson, Helene

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an X-Band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol for visualization of oxidative stress in biopsies. The developed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol was based on spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. Computer software was developed for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR image. A phantom containing radicals of known spatial characteristic was used for evaluation of the developed protocol. As a demonstration of the technique electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of oxidative stress was performed in six sections of atherosclerotic plaques. Histopathological analyses were performed on adjoining sections. The developed computer software for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR images could accurately reproduce the shape of a phantom of known spatial distribution of radicals. The developed protocol could successfully be used to image oxidative stress in six sections of the three ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques. We have shown that oxidative stress can be imaged using a combination of spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. A thorough and systematic evaluation on different types of biopsies must be performed in the future to validate the proposed technique. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book clearly demonstrates the progression of nanoparticle therapeutics from basic research to applications. Unlike other books covering nanoparticles used in medical applications, Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications presents the medical challenges that can be reduced or even overcome by recent advances in nanoscale drug delivery. Each chapter highlights recent progress in the design and engineering of select multifunctional nanoparticles with topics covering targeting, imaging, delivery, diagnostics, and therapy.

  13. Electron beam immobilization of hydrolytic ferments having polyfunctional application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonchar, A.M.; Auslender, V.L

    1998-06-01

    We have acquired the experience in the use of the linear electron accelerators type ILU in two main technological directions. The first one is the radiation-induced immobilization of various biologically active substances on polymer matrix. The second one is the radiation-induced linkage of low molecular polyethilenoxides in water solutions at the stage of formation of gels which are used as the basic component in the production of creams, gel-like toothpastes, contact media for ultrasonic diagnostics, absorption pastes. The report describes the production of cellulase complex stabilized on polymer carrier. The immobilization improved the quality of preparation: the pH range is widened with simultaneous increase of activity in more wide working temperature range (up to 70 centigrades). As a result the possibilities of their application for hydrolytic decomposition of cellulose containing materials are increased.

  14. Current and future industrial application of electron accelerators in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri-Upathum, Chyagrit [Chulalongkorn Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2003-02-01

    Industrial applications of electron accelerators in Thailand, first introduced in 1997 for radiation sterilized products such as doctor gown, pampas, feminine napkin etc followed by installation of accelerators, one with energies at 20 MV and the other at 5 MV to produce new value added products like gem stones, topaz, tourmaline and zircon. The machines operate in pulse mode and is also used for irradiation services for food and sterilized products treatment. The need for low and medium energy accelerators in radiation technology is stressed. They are to be used for crosslinking of electrical wire and cable, heat shrinkable materials, low protein concentrated rubber latex, rubber wood furniture and parts, and silk protein degradation. The role of governmental organizations like Nuclear Research Institute (OAEP) and universities in stimulating the utilization of radiation processing in Thailand is strengthened. (S. Ohno)

  15. A High-Speed CMOS Image Sensor with Global Electronic Shutter Pixels Using Pinned Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Tamura, Toshihiro; Furuta, Masanori; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    This paper describes a high-speed CMOS image sensor with a new type of global electronic shutter pixel. A global electronic shutter is necessary for imaging fast-moving objects without motion blur or distortion. The proposed pixel has two potential wells with pinned diode structure for two-stage charge transfer that enables a global electronic shuttering and reset noise canceling. A prototype high-speed image sensor fabricated in 0.18μm standard CMOS image sensor process consists of the proposed pixel array, 12-bit column-parallel cyclic ADC arrays and 192-channel digital outputs. The sensor achieves a good linearity at low-light intensity, demonstrating the perfect charge transfer between two pinned diodes. The input referred noise of the proposed pixel is measured to be 6.3 e-.

  16. Virtual screening of electron acceptor materials for organic photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Djurovich, Peter J.; Giesen, David J.; Goldberg, Alexander; Sommer, Jonathan; McAnally, Eric; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual screening involves the generation of structure libraries, automated analysis to predict properties related to application performance and subsequent screening to identify lead systems and estimate critical structure-property limits across a targeted chemical design space. This approach holds great promise for informing experimental discovery and development efforts for next-generation materials, such as organic semiconductors. In this work, the virtual screening approach is illustrated for nitrogen-substituted pentacene molecules to identify systems for development as electron acceptor materials for use in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A structure library of tetra-azapentacenes (TAPs) was generated by substituting four nitrogens for CH at 12 sites on the pentacene molecular framework. Molecular properties (e.g. ELUMO, Eg and μ) were computed for each candidate structure using hybrid DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The resulting TAPs library was then analyzed with respect to intrinsic properties associated with OPV acceptor performance. Marcus reorganization energies for charge transport for the most favorable TAP candidates were then calculated to further determine suitability as OPV electron acceptors. The synthesis, characterization and OPV device testing of TAP materials is underway, guided by these results.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Aryasomayajula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nanotubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nanotubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nanotube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The methods of fabrication of these composites, their properties and possible applications restricted to the field of electronic packaging have been discussed in this paper. Experimental and theoretical calculations have shown improved mechanical and physical properties like tensile stress, toughness, and improved electrical and thermal properties. They have also demonstrated the ease of production of the composites and their adaptability as one can tailor their properties as per the requirement. This paper reviews work reported on fabricating and characterizing carbon- nanotube-based metal matrix and polymer composites. The focus of this paper is mainly to review the importance of these composites in the field of electronics packaging.

  18. MATLAB-based Applications for Image Processing and Image Quality Assessment – Part II: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasula

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an overview of some possible usage of the software described in the Part I. It contains the real examples of image quality improvement, distortion simulations, objective and subjective quality assessment and other ways of image processing that can be obtained by the individual applications.

  19. Time-Encoded Neutron Imaging for Applications in Nuclear Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James; Gerling, Mark; Marleau, Peter; Monterial, Mateusz; Nowack, Aaron; Schuster, Patricia; Sturm, Ben; Sweany, Melinda

    2017-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging (TEI) refers to a class of techniques that extract directional information from a radiation field by inducing a time modulation in a detected particle flux. These approaches are in many ways analogous to pinhole and coded aperture imaging, in which a spatial modulation rather than a time modulation is induced. TEI is particularly useful for imaging energetic particle radiation such as gamma rays and fission-energy neutrons, which cannot be easily lensed. We developed TEI-based neutron imaging systems for two classes of nuclear security applications. First, high-resolution neutron emission imaging of distributed neutron sources was demonstrated with a single-pixel TEI imager. Second, long standoff source detection via a neutron signature was accomplished using a large-area, self-modulating TEI system. We demonstrate the ability to detect a 1 mCi Cf-252 source at 100 m standoff in 12 minutes.

  20. Advances and applications of optimised algorithms in image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva, Diego

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a study of the use of optimization algorithms in complex image processing problems. The problems selected explore areas ranging from the theory of image segmentation to the detection of complex objects in medical images. Furthermore, the concepts of machine learning and optimization are analyzed to provide an overview of the application of these tools in image processing. The material has been compiled from a teaching perspective. Accordingly, the book is primarily intended for undergraduate and postgraduate students of Science, Engineering, and Computational Mathematics, and can be used for courses on Artificial Intelligence, Advanced Image Processing, Computational Intelligence, etc. Likewise, the material can be useful for research from the evolutionary computation, artificial intelligence and image processing co.