WorldWideScience

Sample records for electronic excitation transfer

  1. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  2. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  3. Population of highly excited intermediate resonance states by electron transfer and excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R. (Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, S-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden (SE)); Justiniano, E. (Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (USA)); Schulz, M.; Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Giese, J.P.; Krause, H.F.; Schoene, H.; Vane, R. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6377 (USA)); Shafroth, S. (Department of Physics, North Carolina University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Coincidences between two sulfur {ital K} x rays were detected from collisions of hydrogenlike S ions with H{sub 2} gas in the projectile energy range between 150 and 225 MeV. These {ital K} x rays are emitted in the decay of doubly excited states formed in the collisions via transfer and excitation. The excitation function for two coincident {ital K}{beta} transitions peaks at about 175 MeV, slightly above the expected {ital KMM} resonance energy for resonant transfer and excitation (RTE). This demonstrates the occurrence of {Delta}{ital N}{ge}2 transitions (i.e., {ital KMM} and higher resonances) in the RTE process. The cross sections for the population of the very highly excited states are higher than those predicted by theoretical calculations that use dielectronic recombination rates folded with the Compton profile for the bound electrons.

  4. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  5. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  6. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  7. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    2000-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfersbetween globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions forits use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange couplingdue to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependenceof the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globularproteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling andsolvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis forunderstanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment.The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-rangeelectron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experimentsare made.

  8. [Long-range electron transfer in globular proteins by polaron excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V L; Chuev, G N

    1997-01-01

    Considering polaron model, we have calculated an electron state localized in the protein heme. Using these calculations: the electron density and electron energy, we estimated the self-exchange rate constant for cyt c (horse heart), its reorganization energy, matrix element, and dependence of this rate on the distance between hemes. The results are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical estimations. We discuss the role of polaron excitations in the long-range electron transfer in globular proteins.

  9. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M.

    2016-03-01

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm-1 oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  10. Quenching of the excited state of hydrated Europium(III) ions by electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.

    1993-08-01

    This thesis explores the oxidation-reduction chemistry of the excited state of Eu(III) ions, *Eu{sub aq}{sup 3+}, in aqueous solutions. Evidence is presented for the quenching of *Eu{sup 3+} by reductive electron transfer. It is concluded that *Eu{sup 3+} is not a strong energy transfer reagent. The reactivity of *Eu{sub aq}{sup 3+} is compared with that of *UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}.

  11. Characterizing the Locality of Diabatic States for Electronic Excitation Transfer by Decomposing the Diabatic Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vura-Weis, Josh; Newton, M. D.; Wasielewski, Michael R; Subotnik, J.E.

    2010-12-09

    A common strategy to calculate electronic coupling matrix elements for charge or energy transfer is to take the adiabatic states generated by electronic structure computations and rotate them to form localized diabatic states. In this paper, we show that, for intermolecular transfer of singlet electronic excitation, usually we cannot fully localize the electronic excitations in this way. Instead, we calculate putative initial and final states with small excitation tails caused by weak interactions with high energy excited states in the electronic manifold. These tails do not lead to substantial changes in the total diabatic coupling between states, but they do lead to a different partitioning of the total coupling between Coulomb (Förster), exchange (Dexter), and one-electron components. The tails may be reduced by using a multistate diabatic model or eliminated entirely by truncation (denoted as “chopping”). Without more information, we are unable to conclude with certainty whether the observed diabatic tails are a physical reality or a computational artifact. This research suggests that decomposition of the diabatic coupling between chromophores into Coulomb, exchange, and one-electron components may depend strongly on the number of states considered, and such results should be treated with caution.

  12. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  13. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. [Pennsylvania State Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He[sup +] collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  14. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion.

  15. Quantum chemical calculations of tryptophan → heme electron and excitation energy transfer rates in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Christian J; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2017-04-01

    The development of optical multidimensional spectroscopic techniques has opened up new possibilities for the study of biological processes. Recently, ultrafast two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments have determined the rates of tryptophan → heme electron transfer and excitation energy transfer for the two tryptophan residues in myoglobin (Consani et al., Science, 2013, 339, 1586). Here, we show that accurate prediction of these rates can be achieved using Marcus theory in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory. Key intermediate residues between the donor and acceptor are identified, and in particular the residues Val68 and Ile75 play a critical role in calculations of the electron coupling matrix elements. Our calculations demonstrate how small changes in structure can have a large effect on the rates, and show that the different rates of electron transfer are dictated by the distance between the heme and tryptophan residues, while for excitation energy transfer the orientation of the tryptophan residues relative to the heme is important. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Excited state electron transfer from aminopyrene to graphene: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Himadri; Bramhaiah, Kommula; John, Neena Susan; Pal, Suman Kalyan

    2013-12-01

    The quenching of the fluorescence of 1-aminopyrene (1-Ap) by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been investigated using spectroscopic techniques. In spite of the upward curvature in the Stern-Volmer plot, the unchanged spectral signature of the absorption of 1-Ap in the presence of rGO and the decrease in fluorescence lifetime with increasing rGO concentration point toward the dynamic nature of the quenching. Detailed analysis of steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic data has shown that the quenching arises due to the photoinduced electron transfer from 1-Ap to rGO. This is again supported by estimating the Gibb's free energy change for the ground as well as excited state electron transfer. Ab initio calculations under the density functional theory (DFT) formalism reveal that the possibility of π-π stacking is very slim in the 1-Ap-rGO system and the electron density resides completely on 1-Ap in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and on graphene in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), supporting the experimental findings of the intermolecular electron transfer between 1-Ap and rGO in the excited state.

  17. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  18. Evaluating Electronic Couplings for Excited State Charge Transfer Based on Maximum Occupation Method ΔSCF Quasi-Adiabatic States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzi; Zhang, Yong; Bao, Peng; Yi, Yuanping

    2017-02-14

    Electronic couplings of charge-transfer states with the ground state and localized excited states at the donor/acceptor interface are crucial parameters for controlling the dynamics of exciton dissociation and charge recombination processes in organic solar cells. Here we propose a quasi-adiabatic state approach to evaluate electronic couplings through combining maximum occupation method (mom)-ΔSCF and state diabatization schemes. Compared with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using global hybrid functional, mom-ΔSCF is superior to estimate the excitation energies of charge-transfer states; moreover it can also provide good excited electronic state for property calculation. Our approach is hence reliable to evaluate electronic couplings for excited state electron transfer processes, which is demonstrated by calculations on a typical organic photovoltaic system, oligothiophene/perylenediimide complex.

  19. Excited states in electron-transfer reaction products: ultrafast relaxation dynamics of an isolated acceptor radical anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horke, Daniel A; Roberts, Gareth M; Verlet, Jan R R

    2011-08-04

    The spectroscopy and ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excited states of the radical anion of a representative charge-transfer acceptor molecule, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, have been studied in the gas phase using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectra reveal that at least two anion excited states are bound. Time-resolved studies show that both excited states are very short-lived and internally convert to the anion ground state, with the lower energy state relaxing within 200 fs and a near-threshold valence-excited state relaxing on a 60 fs time scale. These excited states, and in particular the valence-excited state, present efficient pathways for electron-transfer reactions in the highly exergonic inverted region which commonly displays rates exceeding predictions from electron-transfer theory.

  20. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1989--June 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-08-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  1. Intermolecular electron transfer from naphthalene derivatives in the higher triplet excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Masanori; Cai, Xichen; Hara, Michihiro; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2004-08-11

    Intermolecular electron transfer (ELT) from a series of naphthalene derivatives (NpD) in the higher triplet excited states (T(n)) to carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) in Ar-saturated acetonitrile was observed using the two-color two-laser flash photolysis method. The ELT efficiency depended on the driving force of ELT. Since the ELT from the T(n) state occurred competitively with the internal conversion (IC, T(n) --> T(1)) and the triplet energy transfer (ENT), the ELT became apparent only when sufficient free energy change of ELT was attained. On the other hand, ELT from the T(1) state was not observed, although ELT from the T(1) state with sufficiently long lifetime has a slightly exothermic driving force. The fast ELT from the T(n) state and lack of the reactivity of the T(1) state were explained well by the "sticky" dissociative electron-transfer model based on one-electron reductive attachment to CCl(4) leading to the C-Cl bond cleavage.

  2. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what exten

  3. Characterizing the Locality of Diabatic States forElectronic Excitation Transfer By Decomposing theDiabatic Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, M.D.; Vura-Weis, J.; Wasielewski, M.R.; Subotnik, J.E.

    2010-10-19

    A common strategy to calculate electronic coupling matrix elements for charge or energy transfer is to take the adiabatic states generated by electronic structure computations and rotate them to form localized diabatic states. In this paper, we show that, for intermolecular transfer of singlet electronic excitation, usually we cannot fully localize the electronic excitations in this way. Instead, we calculate putative initial and final states with small excitation tails caused by weak interactions with high energy excited states in the electronic manifold. These tails do not lead to substantial changes in the total diabatic coupling between states, but they do lead to a different partitioning of the total coupling between Coulomb (Forster), exchange (Dexter), and one-electron components. The tails may be reduced by using a multistate diabatic model or eliminated entirely by truncation (denoted as 'chopping'). Without more information, we are unable to conclude with certainty whether the observed diabatic tails are a physical reality or a computational artifact. This research suggests that decomposition of the diabatic coupling between chromophores into Coulomb, exchange, and one-electron components may depend strongly on the number of states considered, and such results should be treated with caution.

  4. Hydrophobic Acceleration of Electron-Transfer Fluorescence Quenching Processes between Excited 1-Alkanoylperylenes and Ferrocene Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI, Ji-Liang

    2001-01-01

    Coaggregation-facilitated Electron-transfer (ET) fluorescence quenching processes between an excited 1-alkanoylperylene (Pe-n, n=4, 8, 12) as an acceptor and an 1-alkanoylferrocene (Fc-m, m=4, 8, 12, 16 ) or a 1,1-dialkanoyiferrocene (Fc-m-2, m=4, 8, 12, 16) as a donor have been investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy in dioxane (DX)H2O binary solvents of different φ values, where φ is the volume fraction of the organic component of an aquiorgano mixture. This is a first observation of an ET processes facilitated by hydrophobic-lipophilic interaction (HLI) with organometallic compounds as donors. Tne extent of HLI-driven coaggregation between the acceptor and the donor may be assessed from the efficiency of fluorescence quenching, i.e.,the slope B of Eq. ( 2 ). The chain-foldability effect and the intramolecular “self-satisfation” of HLI for Fc-m-2 have been observed. The experimental results show that the behavior of Fc-m as a quencher for fluorescence quenching of Pen* is rather similar to that of N-alkylsubstituend phenothiazine.

  5. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-03-21

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  6. A TDDFT study on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT): excited-state equilibrium induced by electron density swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Yang, Dapeng; Ren, Baiping; Wang, Dandan

    2013-07-01

    One important issue of current interest is the excited-state equilibrium for some ESITP dyes. However, so far, the information about the driving forces for excited-state equilibrium is very limited. In this work, the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method was employed to investigate the nature of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The geometric structures, vibrational frequencies, frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and the potential-energy curves for 1-hydroxy-11H-benzo[b]fluoren-11-one (HHBF) in the ground and the first singlet excited state were calculated. Analysis of the results shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond of HHBF is strengthened from E to E*. Moreover, it is found that electron density swing between the proton acceptor and donor provides the driving forces for the forward and backward ESIPT, enabling the excited-state equilibrium to be established. Furthermore, we proposed that the photoexcitation and the interchange of position for electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups are the main reasons for the electron density swing. The potential-energy curves suggest that the forward ESIPT and backward ESIPT may happen on the similar timescale, which is faster than the fluorescence decay of both E* and K* forms.

  7. Excited state electron transfer in systems with a well-defined geometry. [cyclophane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, K.J.

    1980-12-01

    The effect of temperature, dielectric strength and ligand on the structure of the mesopyropheophorbide cyclophanes will be studied. ESR, NMR, emission and absorption spectroscopy, as well as circular dichroism will be used. The changes in structure will be correlated with changes in the photochemical activity. Electron acceptors such as benzoquinone will be utilized to stabilize the charge separation. Charge separation in porphyrin quinone dimers will also be studied. It was found that electron transfer in the cyclophane system is relatively slow. This is presumably due to an orientation requirement for fast electron transfer. Solvent dielectric also is important in producing a charge separation. Decreasing the temperature effects the yield of charge transfer, but not the kinetics.

  8. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  9. Solvent electronic polarization effects on a charge transfer excitation studied by the mean-field QM/MM method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Hiroshi [Department of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto Daigaku Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8245 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Electronic polarization effects of a medium can have a significant impact on a chemical reaction in condensed phases. We discuss the effects on the charge transfer excitation of a chromophore, N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline, in various solvents using the mean-field QM/MM method with a polarizable force field. The results show that the explicit consideration of the solvent electronic polarization effects is important especially for a solvent with a low dielectric constant when we study the solvatochromism of the chromophore.

  10. Evidence for resonance electron transfer in photon excited X-ray satellite spectra of fluorine compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ram Narayana; B Seetharami Reddy; S S Raju; T Seshi Reddy; S Lakshmi Narayana; K Premachand; B M Rao; M V R Murti; L S Mombasawala

    2005-08-01

    The KL1/KL0 intensity ratio of fluorine is measured in five fluorine compounds with a crystal spectrometer. An anomalous reduction of this intensity ratio was observed in KF and SrF2, which is attributed to resonance electron transfer from the metal ion to the spectator vacancy in the fluorine ion. KL2/KL0 intensity ratio of fluorine is also measured. The measured relative intensities are compared with the theoretical estimates of Aberg.

  11. Chemical Physics Electrons and Excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Sven

    2012-01-01

    A full understanding of modern chemistry is impossible without quantum theory. Since the advent of quantum mechanics in 1925, a number of chemical phenomena have been explained, such as electron transfer, excitation energy transfer, and other phenomena in photochemistry and photo-physics. Chemical bonds can now be accurately calculated with the help of a personal computer. Addressing students of theoretical and quantum chemistry and their counterparts in physics, Chemical Physics: Electrons and Excitations introduces chemical physics as a gateway to fields such as photo physics, solid-state ph

  12. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. Final technical report, June 15, 1986--June 14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The research on theoretical atomic collisions that was funded at The Pennsylvania State University`s Wilkes-Barre Campus by DOE from 1986 to 1998 was carried out by Winger from 1986 to 1989 and by Winter and Alston from 1989 to 1998. The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-ion, ion-atom, and, more recently, ion-molecule collisions were addressed. These collision processes were treated in the context of simple one-electron, quasi-one-electron, or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. Winter`s work generally focused on the intermediate projectile-energy range corresponding to proton energies from about ten to a few hundred keV. In this velocity-matching energy range, the electron-transfer cross section reaches a peak, and many states, including electron-transfer and ionization states, contribute to the overall electron-cloud distribution and transition probabilities; a large number of states are coupled, and therefore perturbative approaches are generally inappropriate. These coupled-state calculations were sometimes also extended to higher energies to join with perturbative results. Alston concentrated on intermediate-energy asymmetric collision systems, for which coupling with the projectile is weaker, but many target states are included, and on high energies (MeV energies). Thus, while perturbation theory for electron transfer is valid, it is not adequate to first order. The studies by Winter and Alston described were often done in parallel. Alston also developed formal perturbative approaches not tied to any particular system. Materials studied included He{sup +}, Li{sup 2+}, Be{sup 3+}, B{sup 4+}, C{sup 5+}, and the H{sup +} + Na system.

  13. Electron transfer between excited states of some sulfonated phtha-locyanines and tyrosine as well as trptophan in homogeneous aqueous solution and aqueous micellar media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张先付; 许慧君; 沈涛

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants for electron transfer between excited states of several tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (MTSPC, M = H2, Zn, ClAl, ClGa) and tyrosine or trptophan have been measured in homogeneous aqueous and aqueous micellar media. Cationic micelles formed by surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) promote the electron transfer reaction, whereas neutral micelles formed by Triton X-100 depress this process. The calculated free energy change shows that phthalocyanines act as electron donors in the electron transfer reaction of its excited singlet states with tyrosine or trptophan (Type Is), whereas they act as electron acceptors in the reaction of its excited triplet states with tyrosine or trptophan (type IT). The two different electron transfer processes involving singlet and triplet of sensitizer respectively compete with each other and form different intermediates which may induce the formation of different products. Factors that govern the importance of Type Is in the whole reaction includ

  14. Role of thermal excitation in ultrafast energy transfer in chlorosomes revealed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sunhong; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Tae Wu; Isaji, Megumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-07-21

    Chlorosomes are the largest light harvesting complexes in nature and consist of many bacteriochlorophyll pigments forming self-assembled J-aggregates. In this work, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) to investigate ultrafast dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in chlorosomes and their temperature dependence. From time evolution of the measured 2D electronic spectra of chlorosomes, we directly map out the distribution of the EET rate among the manifold of exciton states in a 2D energy space. In particular, it is found that the EET rate varies gradually depending on the energies of energy-donor and energy-acceptor states. In addition, from comparative 2D-ES measurements at 77 K and room temperature, we show that the EET rate exhibits subtle dependence on both the exciton energy and temperature, demonstrating the effect of thermal excitation on the EET rate. This observation suggests that active thermal excitation at room temperature prevents the excitation trapping at low-energy states and thus promotes efficient exciton diffusion in chlorosomes at ambient temperature.

  15. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2015-06-25

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  16. Radiative electronic energy transfer-time studies of naphthalene-biacetyl system by one and two-photon excitation, and optical antenna mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakceken, Fuat

    2005-04-01

    In principle, the optical energy absorbed by a complex molecule raises that molecule to one of its excited states, and afterwards this excitation energy decays through the relaxation channels. Initially, electronically excited naphthalene emits photons and these emitted photons are absorbed by the acceptor molecule biacetyl, then excited biacetyl fluoresces. In this investigation radiative energy transfer-time is measured in cyclohexane by one and two-photon excitations. The UV-vis spectrum of biacetyl vapor at room temperature conditions was broad and structureless.

  17. Excited states in electron-transfer reaction products : ultrafast relaxation dynamics of an isolated acceptor radical anion.

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Horke; Roberts, G.M.; Verlet, J. R. R.

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopy and ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excited states of the radical anion of a representative charge-transfer acceptor molecule, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, have been studied in the gas phase using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectra reveal that at least two anion excited states are bound. Time-resolved studies show that both excited states are very short-lived and internally convert to the anion ground state, with the ...

  18. Cationic dye-sensitized degradation of sodium hyaluronate through photoinduced electron transfer in the upper excited state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, M; Takahashi, K; Nakamura, K

    2001-09-01

    The formation of ground-state complexes of methylene blue (MB) and thionine (TN) with sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) was clearly observed by means of absorption spectra in aqueous solution. Irradiation of the complexes using 313 nm light caused significant degradation of NaHA under oxygen and argon. However, the use of visible light over 400 nm, which gives the lowest excited singlet state of the cationic dyes, caused no degradation. MB and TN were more efficient sensitizers for the degradation of NaHA than rose bengal (RB), although RB is a more efficient singlet oxygen (1O2) sensitizer than the cationic dyes. Under similar conditions the polysaccharides with carboxyl groups, such as alginic acid and polygalacturonic acid, also photodecomposed. However, the polysaccharides without carboxyl groups, such as pullulan and methyl cellulose, did not. The irradiation of the polysaccharides in the presence of powdered titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst to generate the hydroxyl radical (.OH) in aerated aqueous solution caused the fragmentation of all the polymers. It was confirmed that methyl viologen, an electron-accepting sensitizer, formed a charge-transfer complex with NaHA, the irradiation of which caused the efficient degradation of NaHA. In the presence of beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins the MB- and TN-sensitized photodegradation of NaHA was markedly suppressed. This was probably due to the formation of the inclusion complexes comprising the cationic dyes and the cyclodextrins. On the basis of the results obtained we propose that the cationic dye-sensitized degradation of NaHA involves a photoinduced electron-transfer process between the upper excited dyes and the ground-state NaHA and that .OH and 1O2 do not participate in the degradation.

  19. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  20. Electron-transfer fluorescence quenching processes in coaggregates between excited N-alkylcarbazoles as electron donors and 2, 4-dinitrophenyl carboxylates or pentafiuorophenyl carboxylates as acceptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI, Ji-Liang; YI, Hu-Nan; XU, Jia-Yi; JIANG, Xi-Kui

    2000-01-01

    Electron-transfer processes facilitated by hydrophobiclipophilic interaction (HLI) between excited N-alkylcarbazoles (1-n, n=4, 8, 12, 16) as electron donors and 2,4dinnrophenyl carboxylates (2-n, n = 4, 8, 12, 16) or pentafluorophenyl carboxylates (3-n, n = 4, 8, 12, 16) as electron acceptors have been investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy in aqueous or aquiorgano binary mixtures.The fluorescence quenching of-n* by2-n or-n indicates that preassociation precedes the electron transfer. The extent of HLI-drtven coaggregation of the acceptor and the donor may be assessed from the B value of the equation I0/I = A + B [Q]. The chain-length effect and possibly also a chain-foldability effect, as well as the solvent aggregating power (SAgP)effect have been observed. Comparison of the quenching constants ( B ) for 1-n* /2-n combinations and 1-n* / 3-n combinations shows that the order of increasing B values for the quenching processes is 3-n < 2-n.

  1. A combined IR/IR and IR/UV spectroscopy study on the proton transfer coordinate of isolated 3-hydroxychromone in the electronic ground and excited state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, A; Weiler, M; Brächer, A; Schwing, K; Gerhards, M

    2014-10-21

    In this paper the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of isolated 3-hydroxychromone (3-HC), the prototype of the flavonols, is investigated for the first time by combined IR/UV spectroscopy in molecular beam experiments. The IR/UV investigations are performed both for the electronically excited and electronic ground state indicating a spectral overlap of transitions of the 3-HC monomer and clusters with water in the electronic ground state, whereas in the excited state only the IR frequencies of the proton-transferred monomer structure are observed. Due to the loss of isomer and species selectivity with respect to the UV excitations IR/IR techniques are applied in order to figure out the assignment of the vibrational transitions in the S0 state. In this context the quadruple resonance IR/UV/IR/UV technique (originally developed to distinguish different isomers in the electronically excited state) could be applied to identify the OH stretching vibration of the monomer in the electronic ground state. In agreement with calculations the OH stretching frequency differs significantly from the corresponding values of substituted hydroxychromones.

  2. Efficiency of intramolecular electron transfer from the second excited state of the donor in molecular triads D-A1-A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskov, S. V.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    It is found that intramolecular and intermolecular electron transfer from the second singlet excited state of the donor in all molecular dyads studied up to now is accompanied by ultrafast recombination into the first excited state, resulting in a low quantum yield of the thermalized state with separated charges. The ultrafast photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer in donor‒acceptor 1‒acceptor 2 molecular triads is studied to ascertain the possibilities of increasing the quantum yield of ionic state. It is demonstrated that nonthermal (hot) electron transfer from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor can, in parallel with relaxation of a polar solvent, efficiently suppress the ultrafast recombination of charges into the first excited state of the donor and increase the yield of the ionic state. It is established that the angle between the directions of reaction coordinates corresponding to the electron transfer from the donor to the primary acceptor and from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor play the most important role in describing these processes. It is concluded that the value of this angle is governed by the ratio between the reorganization energies of the three possible electron transfers in the triad and can vary within wide limits. The parametric regions with maximum quantum yield of the thermalized ionic state are revealed. The strong effect the geometry of a studied triad has on charge separation efficiency is observed.

  3. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Calculations of Nonlinear Wave-Packet Interferometry Signals in the Pump-Probe Limit as Tests for Vibrational Control over Electronic Excitation Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Biggs, Jason D

    2009-01-01

    The preceding paper describes a strategy for externally influencing the course of short-time electronic excitation transfer (EET) in molecular dimers and observing the process by nonlinear wave-packet interferometry (nl-WPI). Within a sample of isotropically oriented dimers having a specified internal geometry, a vibrational mode internal to the acceptor chromophore can be preferentially driven by electronically nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman (or resonant infrared) excitation with a short polarized control pulse. A subsequent electronically resonant polarized pump then preferentially excites the donor, and EET ensues. Here we test both the control strategy and its spectroscopic investigation-with some sacrifice of amplitude-level detail-by calculating the pump-probe difference signal. That signal is the limiting case of the control-influenced nl-WPI signal in which the two pulses in the pump pulse-pair coincide, as do the two pulses in the probe pulse-pair. We present calculated pump-probe difference ...

  5. The effect of thermal motion on the electron localization in metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations in [Fe(bpy)3](2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Alex; Sousa, Carmen; de Graaf, Coen

    2014-12-21

    Accurate electronic structure calculations of the lowest excited states have been performed on twenty snapshots of a molecular dynamics simulation of [Fe(bpy)3](2+) dissolved in water. The thermal motion distorts the structure of the complex from its average D3 symmetry, causing the localization on one bipyridine ligand of the excited electron in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) state. The excitation energy is about 0.25 eV lower than that for the delocalized description of the MLCT state and is in good agreement with experiments. The composition of the MLCT band is carefully analyzed and the effect of thermal motion on the mechanism of light-induced spin crossover is discussed.

  6. Exogenous quinones inhibit photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus by specific quenching of the excited bacteriochlorophyll c antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, N-U; Tokita, S; Matsuura, K

    1999-01-01

    In the photosynthetic green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, excitation energy is transferred from a large bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c antenna via smaller BChl a antennas to the reaction center. The effects of substituted 1,4-naphthoquinones on BChl c and BChl a fluorescence and o...... antenna. Our results provide a model system for studying the redox-dependent antenna quenching in green sulfur bacteria because the antennas in these bacteria inherently exhibit a sensitivity to O(2) similar to the quinone-supplemented cells of Cfx. aurantiacus....

  7. Solvent evaporation versus proton transfer in nucleobase-Pt(CN)(4,6)²⁻ dianion clusters: a collisional excitation and electronic laser photodissociation spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ananya; Luxford, Thomas F M; Yoshikawa, Naruo; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2014-08-07

    Isolated molecular clusters of adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil with Pt(CN)6(2-) and Pt(CN)4(2-) were studied for the first time to characterize the binding and reactivity of isolated transition metal complex ions with nucleobases. These clusters represent model systems for understanding metal complex-DNA adducts, as a function of individual nucleobases. Collisional excitation revealed that the clusters decay on the ground electronic surface by either solvent evaporation (i.e. loss of a nucleobase unit from the cluster) or via proton transfer from the nucleobase to the dianion. The Pt(CN)6(2-)-nucleobase clusters decay only by solvent evaporation, while the Pt(CN)4(2-) clusters fragment by both pathways. The enhanced proton-transfer reactivity of Pt(CN)4(2-) is attributed to the higher charge-density of the ligands in this transition metal anion. % fragmentation curves of the clusters reveal that the adenine clusters display distinctively higher fragmentation onsets, which are traced to the propensity of adenine to form the shortest intercluster H-bond. We also present laser electronic photodissociation measurements for the Pt(CN)6(2-)·Ur, Pt(CN)4(2-)·Ur and Pt(CN)4(2-)·Ur2 clusters to illustrate the potential of exploring metal complex DNA photophysics as a function of nucleobase within well-defined gaseous clusters. The spectra reported herein represent the first such measurements. We find that the electronic excited states decay with production of the same fragments (associated with solvent evaporation and proton transfer) observed upon collisional excitation of the electronic ground state, indicating ultrafast deactivation of the excited-state uracil-localized chromophore followed by vibrational predissociation.

  8. Charge-Transfer Versus Charge-Transfer-Like Excitations Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Barry; Sun, Haitao; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-07-14

    Criteria to assess charge-transfer (CT) and `CT-like' character of electronic excitations are examined. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with non-hybrid, hybrid, and tuned long-range corrected (LC) functionals is compared with with coupled-cluster (CC) benchmarks. The test set includes an organic CT complex, two `push-pull' donor-acceptor chromophores, a cyanine dye, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Proper CT is easily identified. Excitations with significant density changes upon excitation within regions of close spatial proximity can also be diagnosed. For such excitations, the use of LC functionals in TDDFT sometimes leads to dramatic improvements of the singlet energies, similar to proper CT, which has led to the concept of `CT-like' excitations. However, `CT-like' excitations are not like charge transfer, and the improvements are not obtained for the right reasons. The triplet excitation energies are underestimated for all systems, often severely. For the `CT-like' candidates, when going from a non-hybrid to an LC functional the error in the singlet-triplet (S/T) separation changes from negative to positive, providing error compensation. For the cyanine, the S/T separation is too large with all functionals, leading to the best error compensation for non-hybrid functionals.

  9. Electron spin polarization transfer to the charge-separated state from locally excited triplet configuration: theory and its application to characterization of geometry and electronic coupling in the electron donor-acceptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobori, Yasuhiro; Fuki, Masaaki; Murai, Hisao

    2010-11-18

    We present a theoretical model of analysis of the time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) spectrum of the charge-separated (CS) state generated by the photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reaction via the locally excited triplet state in an electron donor-acceptor (D-A) system with a fixed molecular orientation. We show, by the stochastic-Liouville equation, that chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) of the triplet mechanism is explained by lack of transfer of quantum coherence terms in the primary triplet spin state, resulting in net emissive or absorptive electron spin polarization (ESP) which is dependent on anisotropy of the singlet-triplet intersystem crossing in the precursor excited state. This disappearance of the coherence is clearly shown to occur when the photoinduced ET rate is smaller than the angular frequency of the Zeeman splitting: the transferred coherence terms are averaged to be zero due to effective quantum oscillations during the time that the chemical reaction proceeds. The above theory has been applied to elucidate the molecular geometries and spin-spin exchange interactions (2J) of the CS states for both folded and extended conformers by computer simulations of TREPR spectra of the zinc porphyrin-fullerene dyad (ZnP-C(60)) bridged by diphenyldisilane. On the extended conformation, the electronic coupling is estimated from the 2J value. It has been revealed that the coupling term is smaller than the reported electronic interactions of the porphyrin-C(60) systems bridged by diphenylamide spacers. The difference in the electronic couplings has been explained by the difference in the LUMO levels of the bridge moieties that mediate the superexchange coupling for the long-range ET reaction.

  10. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  11. Excited-state proton coupled electron transfer between photolyase and the damaged DNA through water wire: a photo-repair mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai

    2014-12-14

    The photolyase enzyme absorbs blue light to repair damaged DNA through a cyclic electron transfer reaction. A description of the underlying mechanism has proven to be a challenging issue for both experimental and theoretical studies. In the present work, combined CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER (QM/MM) calculations have been performed for damaged DNA in photolyase. A proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism has been determined for restoring cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) to two normal thymine bases by irradiation of photolyase. A well-defined water wire between FADH(-) and CPD was determined as a bridge to assist the PCET process within FADH(-) and thereby trigger the forward electron transfer to CPD. The subsequent CPD splitting and the alternation of the H-bond pattern proceed in a concerted way, which makes the productive backward electron transfer occur on an ultrafast timescale. A local minimum of SCT((1)ππ*)-LMin was identified on the pathway of the futile backward electron transfer (BET), which is stabilized by the strong H-bond interaction between the water wire and CPD. As a result, the futile BET process is endothermic by ∼18.0 kcal mol(-1), which is responsible for a 2.4 ns timescale inferred experimentally for the futile BET process. Besides the unbiased interpretation for the majority of the experimental findings, the present study provides a new excited-state PCET mechanism, which leads to a significant step toward a deeper understanding of the photo-repair process of damaged-DNA by the photolyase enzyme.

  12. Modulation of the excited state intramolecular electron transfer reaction and dual fluorescence of crystal violet lactone in room temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2010-07-22

    The influence of polarity, viscosity, and hydrogen bond donating ability of the medium on the fluorescence behavior of crystal violet lactone (CVL), which undergoes excited state electron transfer reaction and exhibits dual fluorescence from two different electronic states, termed as CT(A) and CT(B), has been studied in six different room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) using steady state and time-resolved emission techniques. It is shown that the excited state CT(A) --> CT(B) transformation and dual fluorescence of CVL can be controlled by appropriate choice of the ILs. While dual fluorescence of CVL is clearly observed in pyrrolidinium IL, the molecule exhibits a single fluorescence band in ammonium IL. While the second emission from the CT(B) state can barely be seen in 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ILs, dual fluorescence is quite prominent in 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium IL, [bmMim][Tf(2)N]. These contrasting results have been explained taking into account the hydrogen bonding interactions of the 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ions (mediated through the C(2)-hydrogen) with CVL and the viscosity of the ILs. The excited state CT(A) --> CT(B) reaction kinetics has been studied in IL by monitoring the time-evolution of the CT(B) emission in [bmMim][Tf(2)N]. The solvation dynamics in this IL has been studied by following the dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift of C153, which is used as a probe molecule. A comparison of the excited state reaction time and solvation time suggests that the rate of the CT(A) --> CT(B) reaction in moderately viscous ILs is primarily dictated by the rate of solvation. Very little or negligible excitation wavelength dependence of the emission behavior of CVL can be observed in these ILs.

  13. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  14. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  15. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R-2 rather than as R-6, suggested by the Förster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Förster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Förster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Förster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  16. Stepwise Two-Photon-Induced Fast Photoswitching via Electron Transfer in Higher Excited States of Photochromic Imidazole Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Katayama, Tetsuro; Yamane, Takuya; Setoura, Kenji; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Abe, Jiro

    2016-05-11

    Stepwise two-photon excitations have been attracting much interest because of their much lower power thresholds compared with simultaneous two-photon processes and because some stepwise two-photon processes can be initiated by a weak incoherent excitation light source. Here we apply stepwise two-photon optical processes to the photochromic bridged imidazole dimer, whose solution instantly changes color upon UV irradiation and quickly reverts to the initial color thermally at room temperature. We synthesized a zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP)-substituted bridged imidazole dimer, and wide ranges of time-resolved spectroscopic studies revealed that a ZnTPP-linked bridged imidazole dimer shows efficient visible stepwise two-photon-induced photochromic reactions upon excitation at the porphyrin moiety. The fast photoswitching property combined with stepwise two-photon processes is important not only for the potential for novel photochromic materials that are sensitive to the incident light intensity but also for fundamental photochemistry using higher excited states.

  17. Excitation energy transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albinsson, Bo; Mårtensson, Jerker

    2010-07-21

    This perspective will focus on the mechanistic aspects of singlet and triplet excitation energy transfer. Well defined donor-bridge-acceptor systems specifically designed for investigating the distance and energy gap dependencies of the energy transfer reactions are discussed along with some recent developments in computational modeling of the electronic coupling.

  18. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points.

  19. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  20. Electron transfer in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  1. Calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements for ground and excited state electron transfer reactions: Comparison of the generalized Mulliken-Hush and block diagonalization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1997-06-01

    Two independent methods are presented for the nonperturbative calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) for electron transfer reactions using ab initio electronic structure theory. The first is based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) model, a multistate generalization of the Mulliken Hush formalism for the electronic coupling. The second is based on the block diagonalization (BD) approach of Cederbaum, Domcke, and co-workers. Detailed quantitative comparisons of the two methods are carried out based on results for (a) several states of the system Zn2OH2+ and (b) the low-lying states of the benzene-Cl atom complex and its contact ion pair. Generally good agreement between the two methods is obtained over a range of geometries. Either method can be applied at an arbitrary nuclear geometry and, as a result, may be used to test the validity of the Condon approximation. Examples of nonmonotonic behavior of the electronic coupling as a function of nuclear coordinates are observed for Zn2OH2+. Both methods also yield a natural definition of the effective distance (rDA) between donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites, in contrast to earlier approaches which required independent estimates of rDA, generally based on molecular structure data.

  2. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H–Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Svenja M.; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Kandratsenka, Alexander, E-mail: akandra@mpibpc.mpg.de [Institute for Physical Chemistry, Göttingen University, Tammannstr. 6, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Faßberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Wodtke, Alec M. [Institute for Physical Chemistry, Göttingen University, Tammannstr. 6, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Faßberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); International Center for Advanced Studies of Energy Conversion, Göttingen University, Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H–Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  3. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.

  4. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; LingKang

    2001-01-01

    Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.  ……

  5. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-21

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  6. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  7. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  8. Photoselected electron transfer pathways in DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytkova, Tatiana R; Beratan, David N; Skourtis, Spiros S

    2007-01-16

    Cyclobutane dimer photolyases are proteins that bind to UV-damaged DNA containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions. They repair these lesions by photo-induced electron transfer. The electron donor cofactor of a photolyase is a two-electron-reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH(-)). When FADH(-) is photo-excited, it transfers an electron from an excited pi --> pi* singlet state to the pyrimidine dimer lesion of DNA. We compute the lowest excited singlet states of FADH(-) using ab initio (time-dependent density functional theory and time-dependent Hartree-Fock), and semiempirical (INDO/S configuration interaction) methods. The calculations show that the two lowest pi --> pi* singlet states of FADH(-) are localized on the side of the flavin ring that is proximal to the dimer lesion of DNA. For the lowest-energy donor excited state of FADH(-), we compute the conformationally averaged electronic coupling to acceptor states of the thymine dimer. The coupling calculations are performed at the INDO/S level, on donor-acceptor cofactor conformations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. These calculations demonstrate that the localization of the (1)FADH(-)* donor state on the flavin ring enhances the electronic coupling between the flavin and the dimer by permitting shorter electron-transfer pathways to the dimer that have single through-space jumps. Therefore, in photolyase, the photo-excitation itself enhances the electron transfer rate by moving the electron towards the dimer.

  9. Charge-transfer (CT) orbitals for the one-electron description of CT excitations in a wide range of donor-acceptor separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    A transformation of the virtual Kohn-Sham orbitals is proposed to a set of charge-transfer orbitals (CTOs) adapted to description of CT excitations. The CTO scheme offers a simple estimate of the CT excitation energy with an orbital energy difference. This estimate reproduces well the reference values of the configuration interaction (CI) method in a wide range of donor-acceptor separations in the paradigmatic He -Be complex. CTO-based orbital energy and shape indices are proposed to assess the suitability of the CT description with virtual orbitals of a given basis set. Both indices yield correct trends for the Kohn-Sham and Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  10. Electron impact excitations of S2 molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Motomichi

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy electron impact excitations of S_2 molecules are studied using the fixed-bond R-matrix method based on state-averaged complete active space SCF orbitals. Integral cross sections are calculated for elastic electron collision as well as impact excitation of the 7 lowest excited electronic states. Also, differential cross sections are obtained for elastic collision and excitation of the a^1 Delta_g, b^1 Sigma_g^+ and B^3 Sigma_u^- states. The integrated cross section of optically allowed excitation of the B^3 Sigma_u^- state agrees reasonably well with the available theoretical result.

  11. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH−-containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH−, upon photo-excitation of FADH− with 350–450 nm light...

  12. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH−-containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH−, upon photo-excitation of FADH− with 350–450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH− in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH− that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron- acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH− - thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green’s function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH− causes a π → π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH− - to - dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer. PMID:23226907

  13. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  14. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  15. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have reported theoretical studies on the rate of energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to graphene. It was found that graphene is a very efficient quencher of the electronically excited states and that the rate -4. The process was found to be effective up to 30 which is well beyond the traditional FRET limit. In this report, we study the transfer of an amount of energy $\\hbar$ from a dye molecule to doped graphene. We find a crossover of the distance dependence of the rate from -4 to exponential as the Fermi level is increasingly shifted into the conduction band, with the crossover occurring at a shift of the Fermi level by an amount $\\hbar$ /2.

  16. Modulating unimolecular charge transfer by exciting bridge vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiwei; Lawrence, Candace M; Xiao, Dequan; Kireev, Victor V; Skourtis, Spiros S; Sessler, Jonathan L; Beratan, David N; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2009-12-23

    Ultrafast UV-vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate how vibrational excitation of the bridge changes photoinduced electron transfer between donor (dimethylaniline) and acceptor (anthracene) moieties bridged by a guanosine-cytidine base pair (GC). The charge-separated (CS) state yield is found to be lowered by high-frequency bridge mode excitation. The effect is linked to a dynamic modulation of the donor-acceptor coupling interaction by weakening of H-bonding and/or by disruption of the bridging base-pair planarity.

  17. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  18. What determines the rate of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile in room temperature ionic liquids? A study in [bmim][PF6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2012-05-14

    The kinetics of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction and dynamics of solvation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) was studied in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazloium hexafluorophosphate, [bmim][PF(6)], by monitoring the dual fluorescence of the system. The picosecond time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) of DMABN exhibit decay of the locally excited (LE) emission intensity and shift of the ICT emission peak position with time, thus capturing the kinetics of evolution of the ICT state from the LE state and solvent relaxation of the ICT state. These results show that the LE→ICT transformation rate is determined not by the slow dynamics of solvation in ionic liquid, but is controlled mainly by the rate of structural reorganization of the molecule, which accompanies the electron-transfer process in this polar viscous medium. Even though both solvent reorganization around photo-excited DMABN and structural rearrangement of the molecule are dependent on the viscosity of the medium, it is the latter process that contributes to the viscosity dependence of the LE→ICT transformation.

  19. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schober H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external periodic potential while phonons exemplify a decoupled system of interacting particles. The way we develop the argument gives as by-product a short account of molecular orbitals and molecular vibrations.

  20. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  1. Stimulated excitation electron microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howie, A.

    2015-04-15

    Recent advances in instrumentation for electron optics and spectroscopy have prompted exploration of ultra-low excitations such as phonons, bond vibrations and Johnson noise. These can be excited not just with fast electrons but also thermally or by other external sources of radiation. The near-field theory of electron energy loss and gain provides a convenient platform for analysing these processes. Possibilities for selected phonon mapping and imaging are discussed. Effects should certainly be observable in atomic resolution structure imaging but diffraction contrast imaging could perhaps be more informative. Additional exciting prospects to be explored include the transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil and the boosting of energy loss and gain signals with tuned laser illumination. - Highlights: • Electron energy gains and losses measure thermal or laser boosting of excitations. • Electron energy gains and losses are conveniently analysed by near field theory. • Diffraction contrast theory is relevant for phonon imaging by electrons. • The transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil deserves study.

  2. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment...

  3. Electron impact on excited helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhong, Z. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, National Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, 130023 (China); Ratnavelu, K. [Department of Mathematics, University of Malaya, 59100, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); McCarthy, I.E. [School of Physical Sciences, The Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, SA 5001 (Australia)

    1998-12-14

    Differential cross sections, integrated cross sections and ionization cross sections for electron scattering on the metastable level 2 {sup 3}S of helium are calculated at intermediate energies and compared with experimental measurements and other theoretical calculations. The method used is the coupled-channels optical method with an ab initio complex polarization potential. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  4. 激发态Cs2和H2的电子-振转能级的碰撞转移%The Electronic-to-Rovibrational Levels Energy Transfer between Electronically Excited Cs2 and H2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青; 沈异凡; 戴康

    2011-01-01

    Using the CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy) detection technique, we have investigated the electronic-to-rovibrational levels energy transfer between electronically excited Cs2 and H2. In this CARS experiment, the S-branch(△v =1, △J =2) transition of H2 are excited by two laser pulses, the pump and the Stokes, respectively, centered at 532 and 716 nm. The internal state distribution of collisionally populated H2 has probed. The scanned CARS spectra reveal that during energy transfer processes H2molecules are produced only at the v= 1, J = 4,5 and v= 2, J= 3,4 rovibrational levels.From scanned CARS spectral peaks the population ratios are obtained. The n2/n1 ,n3/n1and n4/n1 are 6.34±1.27,3.66±0. 73 and 1.45±0.29,respectively, where n1 ,n2 ,n3 and n4 represent the number densities of H2 at the rovibrational levels(2,4), (2,3),(1,4) ,and (1,5), respectively. The relative fractions (<fv>: <fR>: <fr>) of average energy disposal are derived as (0.44, 0.06, 0.50), having major translational and vibrational en ergy release. Through shape simulation of the time-resolved CARS profiles under a sim-ple kinetic model at the experimental conditions of T= 523K and P= 2. 5 × 103 Pa, colli-sional transfer rate coefficients k1 = (6.0± 1.2) × 10-14 cm-3 s-1 and k2 = (4. 0± 0. 8) ×10-13 cm-3s-1 have obtained.%利用相干反斯托克斯拉曼光谱(CARS)探测技术,研究了激发态Cs2与H2间的电子-振转能级的碰撞转移.用波长为532 nm和中心波长为716 nm的两束激光同时聚焦到样品池中,扫描CARS谱确认了H2分子的S支(△v=1,△J=2)仅在v=1,J=4,5及v=2,J=3,4能级上有布居,用n1、n2、n3、n4、分别表示(2,4)、(2,3)、(1,4)及(1,5)上的粒子数密度.从CARS线的峰值得到n2/n1、n3/n1、n4/n1分别为6.34士1.27、3.66士0.73和1.45士0.29.转移能配置到振动、转动和平动的比例分别为0.44、0.06和0.50,能量主要分配在振动和平动上.在T=523 K和PPHZ=2.5×103Pa条件下,通

  5. Electron impact cross sections of vibrationally and electronically excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung-Sik, E-mail: jsyoon@nfri.re.kr [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2, Osikdo-Dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-Do, 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi-Young; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Choi, Heechol [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2, Osikdo-Dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-Do, 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang-Geun [National Center for Standard Reference Data, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Doryong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Vijay [B-82, Aarohi Twin Bungalows, Near Govt. Tubewell, Bopal, Ahmedabad-380058 (India)

    2014-10-30

    It is well known that the electron impact cross sections for elastic and inelastic processes for the vibrationally and electronically excited molecules are predominantly different than those for molecules in the ground state. Collisions of low energy electrons with excited molecules play an important role in explaining the behavior of gas discharges in laser and plasma physics, in planetary atmospheres, stars, and interstellar medium and in plasmas widely used in the fabrication of microelectronics. This explains as to why there is a need for having validated sets of electron impact cross sections for different processes. This work reviews the subject of electron collisions with vibrationally and electronically excited molecules in a comprehensive way. The survey has been carried out for a few excited molecules such as H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, HD, HT, DT, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. This review includes the discussion on the methods to produce and detect vibrationally and electronically excited molecules. We will take up the cross section data available in the literature for such molecules on electron scattering, dissociation, ionization and attachment processes and will discuss, evaluate and well-validate the same wherever and whenever possible.

  6. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  7. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Trail, John R; Burke, Kieron; Needs, Richard J; Ullrich, Carsten A

    2014-01-01

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange (SEHX), is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components, the virial theorem for both exchange and correlation, and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  8. Excitation energy transfer in organic materials: from fundamentals to optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquai, Frédéric; Park, Young-Seo; Kim, Jang-Joo; Basché, Thomas

    2009-07-16

    In this review, we discuss investigations of electronic excitation energy transfer in conjugated organic materials at the bulk and single molecule level and applications of energy transfer in fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light emitting devices. A brief overview of common descriptions of energy transfer mechanisms is given followed by a discussion of some basic photophysics of conjugated materials including the generation of excited states and their subsequent decay through various channels. In particular, various examples of bimolecular excited state annihilation processes are presented. Energy transfer studies at the single molecule level provide a new tool to study electronic couplings in simple donor/acceptor dyads and conjugated polymers. Finally, energy transfer in organic electronic devices is discussed with particular emphasis on triplet emitter doped OLEDs and blends for white light emission.

  9. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-01

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000), 10.1007/s002149900083] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ⩽ N ⩽ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ⩽ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B_u^- states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B_u^- state is the third excited singlet state for N 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  10. Electronic Excited States of Tungsten(0) Arylisocyanides

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    W(CNAryl)_6 complexes containing 2,6-diisopropylphenyl isocyanide (CNdipp) are powerful photoreductants with strongly emissive long-lived excited states. These properties are enhanced upon appending another aryl ring, e.g., W(CNdippPh^(OMe)_2)_6; CNdippPh^(OMe)_2 = 4-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,6-diisopropylphenylisocyanide (Sattler et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 1198−1205). Electronic transitions and low-lying excited states of these complexes were investigated by time-dependent density fun...

  11. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials.

  12. Fishbone Instability Excited by Barely Trapped Electrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-Tian; LONG Yong-Xing; DONG Jia-Qi; WANG Long; Fulvio Zonca

    2006-01-01

    Fishbone instability excited by barely trapped suprathermal electrons (BTSEs) in tokamaks is investigated theoretically. The frequency of the mode is found to close to procession frequency of BTSEs. The growth rate of the mode is much smaller than that of the ideal magnetohytrodynamic (MHD) internal kink mode that is in contrast to the case of trapped ion driven fishbone instability. The analyses also show that spatial density gradient reversal is necessary for the instability. The correlation of the results with experiments is discussed.

  13. Computer simulation of electronic excitations in beryllium

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, A V

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for the quantitative description of the electronic excited states of polyatomic systems is developed by using computer technology. The proposed method allows calculating various properties of matter at the atomic level within the uniform scheme. A special attention is paid to the description of beryllium atoms interactions with the external fields, comparable by power to the fields in atoms, molecules and clusters.

  14. Inner Shell Excitations of Lithium Studied by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Wei-Chun; ZHU Lin-Fan; XU Ke-Zun

    2008-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectra for the inner shell excitations of atomic lithium are measured at an incident electron energy of 2500eV and scattering angles of 0°, 2°, 4° and 6°. Two optically forbidden transitions of (1s2s2)2S and (1s2s3S)3s2 S are observed. The generalized oscillator strength ratios for 1s(2s2p3P)2 P0 to 1s(2s2p1P)2P0 were determined, and they are independent of the momentum transfer.

  15. Electromagnetic Instabilities Excited by Electron Temperature Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆全明; 王连启; 周艳; 王水

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic instabilities excited by the electron temperature anisotropy in homogeneous plasmas with different parameters. The results show that the electron temperature anisotropy can excite the two right-hand electromagnetic instabilities, one has the frequency higher than Ωe, the other is the whistler instability with larger amplitude,and its frequency is below Ωe. Their dispersion relations are consistent with the prediction from the cold plasma theory. In the initial growth stage (prediction from linear theory), the frequency of the dominant mode (the mode whose amplitude is large enough) of the whistler wave almost does not change, but in the saturation stage the situation is different. In the case that the ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency is larger than 1, the frequency of the dominant mode of the whistler wave drifts from high to low continuously. However, for the case of the ratio smaller than 1, besides the original dominant mode of the whistler wave whose frequency is about 2.6ωe, another dominant mode whose frequency is about 1.55ωe also begins to be excited at definite time,and its amplitude increases with time until it exceeds the original dominant mode.

  16. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  17. Charge transfer and excitation in H++CH3 collisions below 10keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Masatoshi; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Rai, Sachchida N.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Suno, Hiroya; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2008-07-01

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of H+ ions with CH3 from a few tens of eV up to 10keV are theoretically investigated. The adiabatic potential energy curves and corresponding wave functions are calculated by using the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction method, and the scattering dynamics is studied based on the semiclassical impact parameter molecular-orbital close-coupling approach. Charge-transfer cross sections are found to be large and rather energy-dependent over the entire energy region studied. Electronic excitation is also energy-dependent with a sharp increase from below 10-17to10-16cm2 . Most of the molecular products produced through charge transfer or excitation are known to be unstable and undergo fragmentation producing various hydrocarbon radical species. Hence, identification of fragmented species and their production mechanism are important for spectroscopic analysis.

  18. Ultrafast Non-Förster Intramolecular Donor-Acceptor Excitation Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Stavros; Alfonso Hernandez, Laura; Beljonne, David; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei

    2017-04-06

    Ultrafast intramolecular electronic energy transfer in a conjugated donor-acceptor system is simulated using nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics. After initial site-selective photoexcitation of the donor, transition density localization is monitored throughout the S2 → S1 internal conversion process, revealing an efficient unidirectional donor → acceptor energy-transfer process. Detailed analysis of the excited-state trajectories uncovers several salient features of the energy-transfer dynamics. While a weak temperature dependence is observed during the entire electronic energy relaxation, an ultrafast initially temperature-independent process allows the molecular system to approach the S2-S1 potential energy crossing seam within the first ten femtoseconds. Efficient energy transfer occurs in the absence of spectral overlap between the donor and acceptor units and is assisted by a transient delocalization phenomenon of the excited-state wave function acquiring Frenkel-exciton character at the moment of quantum transition.

  19. Ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of aloesaponarin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Uno, Hidemitsu; Huppert, Dan

    2013-04-25

    Time-resolved emission of aloesaponarin I was studied with the fluorescence up-conversion and time-correlated single-photon-counting techniques. The rates of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, of the solvent and molecular rearrangements, and of the decay from the excited proton-transferred species were determined and interpreted in the light of time-dependent density functional calculations. These results were discussed in conjunction with UV protection and singlet-oxygen quenching activity of aloe.

  20. Electronic excitation as a mode of heat dissipation in laser-driven cluster plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeev, R.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Krishnamurthy, M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai-5 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Electrons streaming out of laser plasma are known for non-local heat transport and energy deposition by the ionization wave. At 100 eV electron temperature, since the electronic excitation cross section is comparable to that of ionization for Ar and CO{sub 2}, a non-local excitation wave akin to the ionization wave is envisaged where energy deposition in excitations forms a excited cluster sheath beyond the laser focus. Here, we show that nano-cluster systems have the right parameters to form such an exciton sheath and experimentally demonstrate this via charge transfer reactions.

  1. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Dependence of the rate of transfer on distance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N; Komarov, V M

    1998-01-01

    Based on the assumption that electron transfer between globular proteins occurs by a collective excitation of polaron type, the dependence of the rate of this process on the distance between the donor and acceptor centers with regard to their detailed electron structure was calculated. The electron structure of the heme was calculated by the quantum-chemical MNDO-PM3 method. The results were compared with experimental data on interprotein and intraglobular electron transfer. It is shown that, in the framework of this model, the electron transfer is not exponential and does not require a particular transfer pathway since the whole protein macromolecule is involved in the formation of the electron excited state.

  2. Electron-impact excitation of Ne4+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, D. C.; Badnell, N. R.

    2000-10-01

    We present the results of extensive close-coupling calculations of electron-impact excitation of the C-like ion, Ne4+. We first compare effective collision strengths determined from a 20-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation with those obtained from a 20-level intermediate-coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix calculation. The ICFT method was also employed to perform two much larger calculations; we compare the effective collision strengths determined from these calculations with each other and with those obtained from the 20-level calculations in order to assess the effects of increasing both the size of the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and the size of the close-coupling expansion. Our final calculation, with 130 terms and 261 levels in the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and 66 terms and 138 levels in the close-coupling expansion, provides improved data for excitation between the levels of the 2s22p2, 2s2p3 and 2p4 configurations and the first close-coupling results for excitation to the levels of the 2s22p3ℓ configurations in Ne4+.

  3. Density matrix theory for reductive electron transfer in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinekathoefer, Ulrich [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)]. E-mail: kleinekathoefer@physik.tu-chemnitz.de; Li Guangqi [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Schreiber, Michael [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Reductive electron transfer in DNA is investigated using the reduced density matrix formalism. For reductive electron transfer in DNA an electron donor is attached to the DNA. The photo-excitation of this donor by ultrashort laser pulses is described explicitly in the current investigation, as well as the transfer of the electron from the donor to the acceptor. In addition, the effect of an additional bridge molecule is studied. All these studies are performed using three different quantum master equations: a Markovian one and two non-Markovian ones derived from either a time-local or a time-nonlocal formalism. The deviations caused by these three different approaches are discussed.

  4. Effects of Herzberg--Teller vibronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Xu, Rui-Xue; Yan, YiJing

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of non-Condon vibronic coupling on the quantum coherence of excitation energy transfer, via the exact dissipaton-equation-of-motion (DEOM) evaluations on excitonic model systems. Field-triggered excitation energy transfer dynamics and two dimensional coherent spectroscopy are simulated for both Condon and non-Condon vibronic couplings. Our results clearly demonstrate that the non-Condon vibronic coupling intensifies the dynamical electronic-vibrational energy transfer and enhances the total system-and-bath quantum coherence. Moreover, the hybrid bath dynamics for non-Condon effects enriches the theoretical calculation, and further sheds light on the interpretation of the experimental nonlinear spectroscopy.

  5. Kinetics of electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozik, A.J.; Turner, J.A.; Peterson, M.W.

    1988-05-05

    A kinetic model has been developed that quantitatively describes electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes into liquid solutions. The model permits electron transfer from all quantum levels as well as from surface states; it also takes into account recombination in the bulk, space charge layer, and surfaces states, and band-edge movement. The model calculations define the values of the rate constants for heterogeneous electron transfer and hot electron thermalization among the various energy levels in the supperlattice quantum wells that are necessary to achieve hot electron transfer from excited quantum states. The question of whether hot electron transfer is manifested by a dependence of the photocurrent action spectra on acceptor redox potential is examined in detail.

  6. Vibronic speed-up of the excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    CERN Document Server

    Nalbach, P; Thorwart, M

    2013-01-01

    We show that the efficient excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson molecular aggregate under realistic physiological conditions is fueled by underdamped vibrations of the embedding proteins. For this, we present numerically exact results for the quantum dynamics of the excitons in the presence of nonadiabatic vibrational states in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson aggregate employing a environmental fluctuation spectral function derived from experiments. Assuming the prominent 180 cm$^{-1}$ vibrational mode to be underdamped, we observe, on the one hand, besides vibrational coherent oscillations between different excitation levels of the vibration also prolonged electronic coherent oscillations between the initially excited site and its neighbours. On the other hand, however, the underdamped vibrations provide additional channels for the excitation energy transfer and by this increase the transfer speed by up to $30\\%$ .

  7. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    , we examine the effect of the nanoscale interfacial morphology and solvation on the electronic excited states of TFB/F8BT. Here, we employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the relevant excited states of two stacking configurations. We show that the calculated states agree with the excited states responsible for the experimentally observed emission peaks and that these states are blue shifted relative to those of the isolated chain. Furthermore, slight lateral shifts in the stacking orientation not only shift the excited state energies; more importantly, they alter the nature of these states altogether. Lastly, we see that solvation greatly stabilizes the charge-transfer states.

  8. Excited State Dynamics of Protonated Phenylalanine and Tyrosine: Photo-Induced Reactions Following Electronic Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féraud, Géraldine; Broquier, Michel; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Grégoire, Gilles; Soorkia, Satchin

    2015-06-11

    The electronic spectroscopy and the electronic excited state properties of cold protonated phenylalanine and protonated tyrosine have been revisited on a large spectral domain and interpreted by comparison with ab initio calculations. The protonated species are stored in a cryogenically cooled Paul trap, maintained at ∼10 K, and the parent and all the photofragment ions are mass-analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, which allows detecting the ionic species with an improved mass resolution compared to what is routinely achieved with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. These new results emphasize the competition around the band origin between two proton transfer reactions from the ammonium group toward either the aromatic chromophore or the carboxylic acid group. These reactions are initiated by the coupling of the locally excited ππ* state with higher charge transfer states, the positions and coupling of which depend on the conformation of the protonated molecules. Each of these reaction processes gives rise to specific fragmentation channels that supports the conformer selectivity observed in the photofragmentation spectra of protonated tyrosine and phenylalanine.

  9. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  10. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Weitao

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  11. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  12. The effect of atoms excited by electron beam on metal evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Guo Feng; Ying Chun Tong

    2002-01-01

    In atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), the metal is heated to melt by electron beams. The vapor atoms may be excited by electrons when flying through the electron beam. The excited atoms may be deexcited by inelastic collision during expansion. The electronic energy transfers translational energy. In order to analyse the effect of reaction between atoms and electron beams on vapor physical parameters, such as density, velocity and temperature, direct-simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is used to simulate the 2-D gadolinium evaporation from long and narrow crucible. The simulation results show that the velocity and temperature of vapor increase, and the density decreases

  13. Excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jai

    1994-01-01

    Applying a unified quantum approach, contributors offer fresh insights into the theoretical developments in the excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter This comprehensive volume examines Frenkel and Wannier excitonic processes; rates of excitonic processes; theory of laser sputter and polymer ablation; and polarons, excitonic polarons and self-trapping

  14. Heterostructure Intervalley Transferred Electron Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Fang-Shi

    2001-01-01

    A Gunn active layer is used as an X electron probe to detect the X tunnelling current in the GaAs-AlAs heterostructure, from which a new heterostructure intervalley transferred electron (HITE) device is obtained. In the 8 mm band, the highest pulse output power of these diodes is 2.65 W and the highest conversion efficiency is 18%. The dc and rf performance of the HITE devices was simulated by the band mixing resonant tunnelling theory and Monte Carlo transport simulation. The HITE effect has transformed the transit-time dipole-layer mode in the Gunn diode into a relaxation oscillation mode in the HITE device. From the comparison of simulated results to the measured data, the HITE effect is demonstrated straightforwardly

  15. Excitation energies with time-dependent density matrix functional theory: Singlet two-electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbertz, K J H; Pernal, K; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2009-03-21

    Time-dependent density functional theory in its current adiabatic implementations exhibits three striking failures: (a) Totally wrong behavior of the excited state surface along a bond-breaking coordinate, (b) lack of doubly excited configurations, affecting again excited state surfaces, and (c) much too low charge transfer excitation energies. We address these problems with time-dependent density matrix functional theory (TDDMFT). For two-electron systems the exact exchange-correlation functional is known in DMFT, hence exact response equations can be formulated. This affords a study of the performance of TDDMFT in the TDDFT failure cases mentioned (which are all strikingly exhibited by prototype two-electron systems such as dissociating H(2) and HeH(+)). At the same time, adiabatic approximations, which will eventually be necessary, can be tested without being obscured by approximations in the functional. We find the following: (a) In the fully nonadiabatic (omega-dependent, exact) formulation of linear response TDDMFT, it can be shown that linear response (LR)-TDDMFT is able to provide exact excitation energies, in particular, the first order (linear response) formulation does not prohibit the correct representation of doubly excited states; (b) within previously formulated simple adiabatic approximations the bonding-to-antibonding excited state surface as well as charge transfer excitations are described without problems, but not the double excitations; (c) an adiabatic approximation is formulated in which also the double excitations are fully accounted for.

  16. Search for Excited Electrons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deák, M; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagouliasl, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopouloul, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; VargasTrevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wünsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2008-01-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full $e^{\\pm}p$ data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb$^{-1}$. The electroweak decays of excited electrons ${e}^{*}\\to{e}{\\gamma}$, ${e}^{*}\\to{e}Z$ and ${e}^{*}{\\to}\

  17. Variable Electron Transfer Pathways in an Amphibian Cryptochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Till; Paulus, Bernd; Okafuji, Asako; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions play vital roles in many biological processes. Very often the transfer of charge(s) proceeds stepwise over large distances involving several amino acid residues. By using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy, we have studied the mechanism of light-induced reduction of the FAD cofactor of cryptochrome/photolyase family proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that electron abstraction from a nearby amino acid by the excited FAD triggers further electron transfer steps even if the conserved chain of three tryptophans, known to be an effective electron transfer pathway in these proteins, is blocked. Furthermore, we were able to characterize this secondary electron transfer pathway and identify the amino acid partner of the resulting flavin-amino acid radical pair as a tyrosine located at the protein surface. This alternative electron transfer pathway could explain why interrupting the conserved tryptophan triad does not necessarily alter photoreactions of cryptochromes in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that light-induced electron transfer is a robust property of cryptochromes and more intricate than commonly anticipated. PMID:23430261

  18. Fundamental studies of interfacial excited-state charge transfer in molecularly tethered semiconductor nanoassemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youker, Diane Greer

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on elucidating the parameters affecting dynamics and yield of electron transfer reactions in semiconducting nanoparticle assemblies through the use of time-resolved spectroscopy. In particular, the dissertation focuses on photoinduced electron injection in assemblies of CdSe, CdS, or PbS quantum dots covalently bound to either metal oxide films or each other through the use of bifunctional molecular linkers. Chapter 2 elucidates the influence of electronic coupling on excited-state electron transfer from CdS quantum dots to TiO2 nanoparticles via molecular linkers with phenylene bridges. We establish that the efficiency of electron injection from CdS quantum dots to TiO2 nanoparticle varies dramatically with electronic coupling, which can be controlled by tuning the properties of molecular linkers. Chapter 3 presents the role of excitation energy on interfacial electron transfer in tethered assemblies of CdSe quantum dots and TiO2 nanoparticles. Through this work, we determined that injection efficiency from band-edge states is independent of excitation energy. However, the efficiency of injection from trap-states decreases at lower-energy excitation. We attribute the decrease to a lower energy distribution of emissive trap-states from which injection is less efficient. Chapter 4 presents the observation of multiphasic electron injection dynamics from photoexcited PbS quantum dots to TiO2 nanoparticles. In this collaborative study with Dr. Masumoto from the University of Tsukuba we observed electron injection on multiple timescales. We determined that electron injection occurred in this system through two different mechanisms. The first involved injection from thermalized PbS excited states and the second through injection of hot electrons through Auger recombination of biexcitons that creates high lying excitonic states. Chapter 5 investigates charge transfer in covalently bound quantum dot assemblies. We utilize

  19. Electronic excitation of molecular hydrogen by low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-09-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, particularly in interstellar plasmas such as atmospheres of gas giant planets and stars. Electron collision data for hydrogen is critical to interpreting the spectroscopy of interstellar objects, as well as being of applied value for modelling technological plasmas. Hydrogen is also fundamentally interesting, as while highly accurate wave functions for this simple molecule are available, providing an accurate, ab initio, treatment the collision dynamics has proven challenging, on account of the need to have a complete description of channel coupling and polarization effects. To date, no single theoretical approach has been able to replicate experimental results across all transitions and incident energies, while the experimental database that is available is far from complete and not all available measurements are in satisfactory agreement. In this talk, we present differential and integral cross section measurements for electronic excitation cross sections for molecular hydrogen by low-energy electron impact. The data were measured at incident energies below 20eV, using a well-tested crossed beam apparatus and employing a moveable gas source approach to ensure that background contributions to the scattering are accurately accounted for. These measurements are compared with new theoretical results employing the convergent close coupling approach.

  20. An Accurate and Linear Scaling Method to Calculate Charge-Transfer Excitation Energies and Diabatic Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Pavanello, Michele; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Quantum--Mechanical methods that are both computationally fast and accurate are not yet available for electronic excitations having charge transfer character. In this work, we present a significant step forward towards this goal for those charge transfer excitations that take place between non-covalently bound molecules. In particular, we present a method that scales linearly with the number of non-covalently bound molecules in the system and is based on a two-pronged approach: The molecular electronic structure of broken-symmetry charge-localized states is obtained with the Frozen Density Embedding formulation of subsystem Density-Functional Theory; subsequently, in a post-SCF calculation, the full-electron Hamiltonian and overlap matrix elements among the charge-localized states are evaluated with an algorithm which takes full advantage of the subsystem DFT density partitioning technique. The method is benchmarked against Coupled-Cluster calculations and achieves chemical accuracy for the systems considered...

  1. Ultrafast modulation of electronic structure by coherent phonon excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaupt, J.; Rouzée, A.; Woerner, M.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Elsaesser, T.; Shirley, E. L.; Borgschulte, A.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a laser-driven high-harmonic source is used to map ultrafast changes of x-ray absorption by femtometer-scale coherent phonon displacements. In LiBH4, displacements along an Ag phonon mode at 10 THz are induced by impulsive Raman excitation and give rise to oscillatory changes of x-ray absorption at the Li K edge. Electron density maps from femtosecond x-ray diffraction data show that the electric field of the pump pulse induces a charge transfer from the BH4- to neighboring Li+ ions, resulting in a differential Coulomb force that drives lattice vibrations in this virtual transition state.

  2. Separating annihilation and excitation energy transfer dynamics in light harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengris, Mikas; Larsen, Delmar S; Valkunas, Leonas; Kodis, Gerdenis; Herrero, Christian; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas; Moore, Ana; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2013-09-26

    The dependence of excitation energy transfer kinetics on the electronic state of the acceptor (ground vs excited) has been resolved with a novel multipulse prePump-Pump-Probe spectroscopy. The primary energy transfer and annihilation dynamics in two model light-harvesting systems were explored: an artificially synthesized carotenoid-zinc-phthalocyanine dyad and a naturally occurring light-harvesting peridinin-chlorophyll protein complex from Amphidinium carterae. Both systems use carotenoid as the primary excitation energy donor with porphyrin chromophores as the acceptor molecules. The prePump-Pump-Probe transient signals were analyzed with Monte Carlo modeling to explicitly address the underlying step-by-step kinetics involved in both excitation migration and annihilation processes. Both energy transfer and annihilation dynamics were demonstrated to occur with approximately the same rate in both systems, regardless of the excitation status of the acceptor pigments. The possible reasons for these observations are discussed in the framework of the Förster energy transfer model.

  3. Theoretical study of excitation energy transfer in DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuehe; Garcia, Jorge; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2008-07-24

    Photolyase (PL) is a DNA repair enzyme which splits UV light-induced thymine dimers on DNA by an electron transfer reaction occurring between the photoactivated FADH(-) cofactor and the DNA dimer in the DNA/PL complex. The crystal structure of the DNA/photolyase complex from Anacystis nidulans has been solved. Here, using the experimental crystal structure, we re-examine the details of the repair electron transfer reaction and address the question of energy transfer from the antenna HDF to the redox active FADH(-) cofactor. The photoactivation of FADH(-) immediately preceding the electron transfer is a key step in the repair mechanism that is largely left unexamined theoretically. An important butterfly thermal motion of flavin is identified in ab initio calculations; we propose its role in the back electron transfer from DNA to photolyase. Molecular dynamics simulation of the whole protein/DNA complex is carried out to obtain relevant cofactor conformations for ZINDO/S spectroscopic absorption and fluorescence calculations. We find that significant thermal broadening of the spectral lines, due to protein dynamics, as well as the alignment of the donor HDF and the acceptor FADH(-) transition dipole moments both contribute to the efficiency of energy transfer. The geometric factor of Förster's dipolar coupling is calculated to be 1.82, a large increase from the experimentally estimated 0.67. Using Förster's mechanism, we find that the energy transfer occurs with remarkable efficiency, comparable with the experimentally determined value of 98%.

  4. Local operator partitioning of electronic energy for electronic energy transfer: An efficient algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient computational algorithm to implement a local operator approach to partitioning electronic energy in general molecular systems is presented. This approach, which rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule, gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. We apply the technique to the $9-$(($1-$naphthyl)$-$methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH$_2-$naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst these excited electronic states.

  5. Electron transfer at sensitized semiconductor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, M.T.

    1977-03-01

    Electron transfer from the excited state of sensitizing dyes to the conduction band of semiconductors has been studied through photoelectrochemical techniques. Two systems were analyzed in detail: rhodamine B on ZnO and rose bengal on TiO/sub 2/. Prior to electrochemical experimentation, the adsorption characteristics of these dyes were investigated using ZnO, ZnS, and TiO/sub 2/ single crystals as substrates. Absorbance measurements of the adsorbed dye were taken as a function of the solution concentration of the dye. Adsorption isotherms heats of adsorption were also established; they were similar to literature data reported for adsorption of these dyes on powdered substrates. Using the absorbance data, the quantum efficiency for photoinjection of electrons from rhodamine B into a ZnO electrode was determined to be 2.7 x 10/sup -2/. This value was independent of the dye surface concentration down to 50% coverage of the electrode. With the assumption that not all of the rhodamine B adsorbed on the electrode has the same rate of electron injection, a kinetic model for the time decay of the photocurrent was developed; data were analyzed according to this theory. A rate constant for photoreduction of the adsorbed dye was determined for the reducing agents. 86 references.

  6. Low-energy electron attachment and detachment in vibrationally excited oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Anokhin, E. M.

    2009-11-01

    Three-body electron attachment to O2 molecules and electron detachment from O_{2}^{-} ions have been theoretically studied in vibrationally excited oxygen and O2-containing mixtures. Assuming that electron attachment and detachment proceed via the formation of vibrationally excited temporary O_{2}^{-} ions, the rates of these processes were determined on the basis of the statistical approach for the vibrational transfer and relaxation in collisions between O_{2}^{-} ions and O2 molecules. The calculated attachment and detachment rate constants turned out to agree well with available measurements in unexcited oxygen. This method was extended to calculate attachment and detachment rates in vibrationally excited oxygen. It was shown that the effect of vibrational excitation on electron detachment is profound, whereas attachment of low-energy electrons to vibrationally excited O2 is inefficient. The calculated vibrational distribution of stable O_{2}^{-} ions turned out to be non-equilibrium in an excited gas and the effective vibrational temperature of the ions was much lower than the vibrational temperature of molecules. An analytical method was suggested to determine this distribution and the effective vibrational temperature. The calculated rate constants were used to simulate the formation and decay of an electron-beam-generated plasma in N2 : O2 mixtures at elevated vibrational temperatures. The calculations showed that vibrational excitation of molecules leads to orders of magnitude increase in the plasma density and in the plasma lifetime, in agreement with available observations.

  7. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  8. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  9. Failures of TDDFT in describing the lowest intramolecular charge-transfer excitation in para-nitroaniline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin;

    2013-01-01

    for charge{transfer character, we furthermore conrm that the di¿erence between excitation energies calculated with TDDFT and with the Tamm-Danco¿ approximation (TDA) to TDDFT is indeed correlated with the charge-transfer character of a given electronic transition both in vacuo and in solution...

  10. Vibrationally Resolved Electron Transfer Rates in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Kenneth G.

    2002-03-01

    We have re-examined our earlier report of electron transfer in the [Co(Cp)_2|V(CO)_6] radical-pair using ultrafast infrared transient absorption spectroscopy in room temperature solutions. The radical-pair is created from the [Co(Cp)_2^+|V(CO)_6^-] ion-pair by ultrafast visible charge-transfer excitation. Transient absorption experiments with ps time constants. A small ET component with a 75 ps time constant is due to some separation and reformation of the radical-pairs. Transient absorption experiments monitoring the recovery of the ion-pair state shows that both fast components are due to ET rather than some other vibrational relaxation (VR) process in the radical state. We analyze the visible charge-transfer band and assign the two fast ET decay times to two ion-pair contact geometries with absorption origins different by about 1250 ± 350 cm-1. For excitation at 800 and 700 nm the 700 fs ET lifetime depends on the vibrational quantum state of the nontotally symmetric CO stretch in the V(CO)6 radical, where the lifetime decreases by 10% for the first vibrational quantum and 45% for the second quantum. There is no quantum effect for the second ion-pair geometry with a 5 ps ET lifetime. Standard ET rate models cannot explain the rate dependence upon vibrational quantum state for a nontotally symmetric vibration, and it may arise from a breakdown of the Condon approximation. We also report rates for IVR of CO stretching modes and for VR of low frequency vibrations. At excitation wavelengths of 620 and 555 nm there is sufficient internal vibrational energy in low-frequency vibrations to cause geometric inter-conversion between energetically similar Jahn-Teller geometries in the V(CO)6 radical. This process creates a 200 fs rise time for the V(CO)6 radical species to assume a stable geometry, which requires VR of low frequency vibrations to the solvent. These results demonstrate that earlier ET measurements from our group on the same molecule had insufficient time

  11. Phonon-assisted excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xin; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong

    2016-09-01

    The phonon-assisted process of energy transfer aiming at exploring the newly emerging frontier between biology and physics is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of the intramolecular vibrational modes for excitation energy transfer in the photosynthetic systems. Based on a dimer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor modeled by two two-level systems, in which one of them is coupled to a high-energy vibrational mode, we derive an effective Hamiltonian describing the vibration-assisted coherent energy transfer process in the polaron frame. The effective Hamiltonian reveals in the case that the vibrational mode dynamically matches the energy detuning between the donor and the acceptor, the original detuned energy transfer becomes resonant energy transfer. In addition, the population dynamics and coherence dynamics of the dimer system with and without vibration-assistance are investigated numerically. It is found that, the energy transfer efficiency and the transfer time depend heavily on the interaction strength of the donor and the high-energy vibrational mode, as well as the vibrational frequency. The numerical results also indicate that the initial state and dissipation rate of the vibrational mode have little influence on the dynamics of the dimer system. Results obtained in this article are not only helpful to understand the natural photosynthesis, but also offer an optimal design principle for artificial photosynthesis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174233).

  12. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis;

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  13. Excitation transfer through open quantum networks: a few basic mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos

    2011-01-01

    A variety of open quantum networks are currently under intense examination to model energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Here we study the coherent transfer of a quantum excitation over a network incoherently coupled with a structured and small environment that effectively models the photosynthetic reaction center. Our goal is to distill a few basic, possibly universal, mechanisms or "effects" that are featured in simple energy-transfer models. In particular, we identify three different phenomena: the congestion effect, the asymptotic unitarity and the staircase effects. We begin with few-site models, in which these effects can be fully understood, and then proceed to study more complex networks similar to those employed to model energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes. Our numerical studies on such networks seem to suggest that some of the effects observed in simple networks may be of relevance for biological systems, or artificial analogues of them as well.

  14. Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions following Electronic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-configurational wave functions is demonstrated for several processes: tautomerization reactions in the ground and excited states of the DNA base adenine, dissociation of glycine molecule after electronic excitation, and decomposition/deformation of novel rare gas molecules HRgF. These processes involve bond brealung/formation and require multi-configurational approaches that include dynamic correlation.

  15. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin

    2015-06-07

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S (λ 1, T∼ 2, λ 3)) along the population time (T∼ 2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S (λ 1, ν∼ 2, λ 3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ ν∼ 2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (- ν∼ 2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  16. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania)]|[Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full e{sup {+-}}p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb{sup -1}. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e{sup *} {yields}e{gamma}, e{sup *} {yields}eZ and e{sup *} {yields}{nu}W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e{sup *} production cross sections and on the ratio f/{lambda} of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e{sup *} production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions. (orig.)

  17. Coherent excitation with short electron pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertler, Andreas; Robicheaux, Francis; Noordam, Bart

    2000-06-01

    [1pt] The probability for a transition within an atom to be driven by a collision with a long pulse of electrons is proportional to the electron flux with the proportionality factor being the cross section for this transition. Recently it was shown [1] that for electron pulses shorter than the orbit time of the electron in the atom, a contribution of coherent scattering plays a role, which is proportional to the differential cross section in forward direction and the square of the electron flux. To investigate this effect, we are developing a picosecond electron gun [2]. Collision experiments will be done with Rydberg states in lithium around n=40 with Kepler orbit times in the order of 10 ps. For picosecond electron pulses, a quadratic dependance of the transition probability on the electron flux is expected in contrast to the linear dependance expected for nanosecond electron pulses. [1pt] References [1pt] [1] F. Robicheaux and L. D. Noordam, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. [1pt] [2] F. Robicheaux, G. M. Lankhuijzen, and L. D. Noordam, JOSA B 15, 1 (1998)

  18. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-12-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudostate and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the {(2s2p)}3P and {(2s2p)}1P states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set of electron scattering data for neutral beryllium, which should be sufficient for most modeling applications.

  19. Quantum electrodynamical theory of high-efficiency excitation energy transfer in laser-driven nanostructure systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental theory is developed for describing laser-driven resonance energy transfer (RET) in dimensionally constrained nanostructures within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed emitter and detector particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the emitter. Here, we demonstrate that the transfer rate can be significantly increased by propagation of an auxiliary laser beam through a pair of nanostructure particles. This is due to the higher order perturbative contribution to the Förster-type RET, in which laser field is applied to stimulate the energy transfer process. We construct a detailed picture of how excitation energy transfer is affected by an off-resonant radiation field, which includes the derivation of second and fourth order quantum amplitudes. The analysis delivers detailed results for the dependence of the transfer rates on orientational, distance, and laser intensity factor, providing a comprehensive fundamental understanding of laser-driven RET in nanostructures. The results of the derivations demonstrate that the geometry of the system exercises considerable control over the laser-assisted RET mechanism. Thus, under favorable conformational conditions and relative spacing of donor-acceptor nanostructures, the effect of the auxiliary laser beam is shown to produce up to 70% enhancement in the energy migration rate. This degree of control allows optical switching applications to be identified.

  20. Resonant excitation of coupled skyrmions by spin-transfer torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y. Y.; Wang, H.; Yang, T.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2016-12-01

    Resonant excitations of coupled skyrmions in Co/Ru/Co nanodisks activated by spin-transfer torque (STT) have been studied by micromagnetic simulations. It is found that STT is an effective method to manipulate skyrmion dynamics. Unlike the dynamics driven by a microwave field, two skyrmions with opposite chiralities move synchronously in the same direction when they are driven by STT, which makes it easier to observe the dynamics of coupled skyrmions in experiments. Resonant excitations of coupled skyrmions can be controlled by changing the frequency or amplitude ratio of a dual-frequency alternating current (AC). In addition, the magnetostatic interaction between the two skyrmions plays an important role in the dynamics of coupled skyrmions.

  1. Excited-state intermolecular proton transfer of firefly luciferin V. Direct proton transfer to fluoride and other mild bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presiado, Itay; Gepshtein, Rinat; Erez, Yuval; Huppert, Dan

    2011-07-07

    We studied the direct proton transfer (PT) from electronically excited D-luciferin to several mild bases. The fluorescence up-conversion technique is used to measure the rise and decay of the fluorescence signals of the protonated and deprotonated species of D-luciferin. From a base concentration of 0.25 M or higher the proton transfer rates to the fluoride, dihdyrogen phosphate or acetate bases are fast and comparable. The fluorescence signals are nonexponential and complex. We suggest that the fastest decay component arises from a direct proton transfer process from the hydroxyl group of D-luciferin to the mild base. The proton donor and acceptor molecules form an ion pair prior to photoexcitation. Upon photoexcitation solvent rearrangement occurs on a 1 ps time-scale. The PT reaction time constant is ∼2 ps for all three bases. A second decay component of about 10 ps is attributed to the proton transfer in a contact pair bridged by one water molecule. The longest decay component is due to both the excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) to the solvent and the diffusion-assisted PT process between a photoacid and a base pair positioned remotely from each other prior to photoexcitation.

  2. Noisy Quantum Cellular Automata for Quantum versus Classical Excitation Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalle, Michele; Serafini, Alessio

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a class of noisy quantum cellular automata on a qubit lattice that includes all classical Markov chains, as well as maps where quantum coherence between sites is allowed to build up over time. We apply such a construction to the problem of excitation transfer through 1D lattices, and compare the performance of classical and quantum dynamics with equal local transition probabilities. Our discrete approach has the merits of stripping down the complications of the open system dynamics, of clearly isolating coherent effects, and of allowing for an exact treatment of conditional dynamics, all while capturing a rich variety of dynamical behaviors.

  3. Vibrational dynamics in photoinduced electron transfer. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, K.G.

    1993-09-08

    Objective is to perform a new type of measurement for optically excited electron transfer processes that can provide unique experimental insight into the molecular mechanism of electron transfer. Measurements of optically excited electron transfer are done with picosecond infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy to monitor the vibrational motions of the molecules immediately after electron transfer. Theory and experiment suggest that molecular vibrations and distortions are important controlling elements for electron transfer, and direct information has yet to be obtained on these elements of electron transfer mechanisms. The second period of funding has been dedicated to finishing technique development and performing studies of electron transfer in ion pair systems to identify if vibrational dependent electron transfer rates are present in this system. We have succeeded in measuring, for the first time, electron transfer rates as a function of vibrational state in an ion pair complex in solution. In a different area of electron transfer research we have proposed a new mechanism of solvent gated electron transfer.

  4. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Irish, E K; Lovett, B W

    2013-01-01

    Coherent quantum energy transfer, as observed in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, is inhibited by energetic disorder. While this difficulty can be overcome to some extent by the addition of environmental noise, it has recently has begun to be appreciated that discrete intra- and/or intermolecular vibrational modes may play an important role in quantum dynamics. We present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrational modes create resonant energy transfer pathways, enhancing the efficiency of both coherent and dephasing-assisted transfer. The principles of this vibration-assisted resonance are illustrated in a simple model based on one energy-transfer branch of the well-characterised Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. Despite its simplicity, this model captures the interplay between strong electronic coupling that produces delocalised exciton states and resonance-enhanced weak coupling to local vibrational modes. Analytical and numerical results show that intramolecular vibrations can enhance...

  5. Dynamics of the Chemistry of Electronically Excited Atoms in Defined Quantum States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    laser development . In essence, this research concerns itself with the elucidation of the role of electronic energy in affecting the chemistry or photochemistry of excited halogen atoms and molecules. While much is known about the dynamics of chemical and physical processes which are carried out on the lowest potential energy hypersurface correlating with reactants and products in their electronic ground state, relatively little is known about the dynamics of such phenomena as energy transfer and chemical reactivity on higher-lying potential

  6. Theoretical Investigation on Triplet Excitation Energy Transfer in Fluorene Dimer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-bing Si; Xin-xin Zhong; Wei-wei Zhang; Yi Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Triplet-triplet energy transfer in fluorene dimer is investigated by combining rate theories with electronic structure calculations.The two key parameters for the control of energy transfer,electronic conpling and reorganization energy,are calculated based on the diabatic states constructed by the constrained density functional theory.The fluctuation of the electronic coupling is further revealed by molecular dynamics simulation.Succeedingly,the diagonal and off-diagonal fluctuations of thc Hamiltonian are mapped from the correlation functions of those parameters,and the rate is then estimated both from the perturbation theory and wavepacket diffusion method.The results manifest that both the static and dynamic fluctuations enhance the rate significantly,but the rate from the dynamic fluctuation is smaller than that from the static fluctuation.

  7. The ground and excited state electron affinities of cytosine and trans-azobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward C. M.; Herder, Charles; Chen, Edward S.

    2007-06-01

    The electron capture detector, reduction potential, electron transfer and photon methods of determining electron affinities are compared. The adiabatic electron affinities are (in eV): t-azobenzene(O 2), 1.578(5); t-azobenzene, 1.378(5); cytosine, 1.043(5) from anion photoelectron spectra. The largest or ground state value for trans-azobenzene and an excited state electron affinity for cytosine, 0.70 eV are also determined by reduction potentials. Other excited state energies are (in eV): t-azobenzene, 0.328(5), 0.589(5), 0.690(5), 0.768(5), 0.954(5), 1.038(5), 1.150(5), 1.275(5) and cytosine, 0.089(5), 0.098(5), 0.198(5), 0.235(5). The cytosine values are consistent with electron transport and radiation damage and repair in DNA.

  8. Momentum-Dependent Charge Transfer Excitations in Sr{sub {bold 2}}CuO {sub {bold 2}}Cl{sub {bold 2}} Angle-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Zhang, F.C.; Dravid, V.P.; Ng, K.K.; Klein, M.V.; Schnatterly, S.E.; Miller, L.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)]|[Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)]|[Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22901 (United States)]|[Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Electron-hole pair excitations in the insulating cuprates Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} were investigated by angle-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy. The optically allowed and optically forbidden transitions were observed to be strongly anisotropic in Cu-O{sub 2} plane. The former show a large energy dispersion {approximately}1.5 eV along [110], and the latter appear at a higher energy position ({approximately}4.5 eV) only along [100], but not along [110]. We interpret these results as transitions involving excitons. A small exciton model is examined to explain both the observed features. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  10. Electron-driven excitations and dissociation of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Greg [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Orel, Ann E. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-02-13

    This program studied how energy is interchanged in electron and photon collisions with molecules leading to ex-citation and dissociation. Modern ab initio techniques, both for the photoionization and electron scattering, and the subsequent nuclear dynamics studies, are used to accurately treat these problems. This work addresses vibrational ex-citation and dissociative attachment following electron impact, and the dynamics following inner shell photoionzation. These problems are ones for which a full multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear dynamics is essential and where non-adiabatic effects are expected to be important.

  11. An Exciting Aspect of Nanotechnology: Unimolecular Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger R. M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief update on our experimental work towards better one-molecule-thick monolayer rectifiers of electrical current, and on theoretical progress towards a one-molecule amplifier of electrical current. This program aims to provide electronic devices at the 2 to 3 nm level, as a dramatic advance towards practical integrated circuits of the future.

  12. Excitation energy-transfer in functionalized nanoparticles: Going beyond the Förster approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, G.; Corni, S.; Delgado, A.; Bertoni, A.; Goldoni, G.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a novel approach to treat excitation energy transfer in hybrid nanosystems composed by an organic molecule attached to a semiconductor nanoparticle. Our approach extends the customary Förster theory by considering interaction between transition multipole moments of the nanoparticle at all orders and a point-like transition dipole moment representing the molecule. Optical excitations of the nanoparticle are described through an envelope-function configuration interaction method for a single electron-hole pair. We applied the method to the prototypical case of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dot which shows a complete suppression of the energy transfer for specific transitions which could not be captured by Förster theory.

  13. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    CERN Document Server

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Fursa, Dmitry V; Bray, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudo-state and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the $(2s2p)^3P$ and $(2s2p)^1P$ states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set o...

  14. Characterization of adsorption and electronic excited states of quercetin on titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of quercetin on colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles in ethanol and its excited-state electronic structure were investigated by means of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. The changes in electronic charge redistribution as reflected by the dipole moment difference, ∆μ, between the ground and excited electronic states were measured with electroabsorption spectroscopy and analyzed using results of TD DFT computations. Adsorption of quercetin causes a red shift of its absorption spectrum. Raman spectra of quercetin analyzed with reference to analogous data for morin indicate binding of quercetin through the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety. The difference dipole moment, which is 5.5 D in free quercetin, increases to 11.8 D in opposite direction in adsorbed quercetin, and is associated with charge-transfer to the Ti atom. The computed transition energy, intensity, vector Δμ and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transition at different molecular configurations indicate a bidentate chelating mode of binding of quercetin.

  15. Transport coefficients and heat fluxes in non-equilibrium high-temperature flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of electronic excitation on transport processes in non-equilibrium high-temperature ionized mixture flows is studied. Two five-component mixtures, N 2 / N2 + / N / N + / e - and O 2 / O2 + / O / O + / e - , are considered taking into account the electronic degrees of freedom for atomic species as well as the rotational-vibrational-electronic degrees of freedom for molecular species, both neutral and ionized. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion) are calculated in the temperature range 500-50 000 K. Thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity coefficients are strongly affected by electronic states, especially for neutral atomic species. Shear viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients are not sensible to electronic excitation if the size of excited states is assumed to be constant. The limits of applicability for the Stokes relation are discussed; at high temperatures, this relation is violated not only for molecular species but also for electronically excited atomic gases. Two test cases of strongly non-equilibrium flows behind plane shock waves corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II) are simulated numerically. Fluid-dynamic variables and heat fluxes are evaluated in gases with electronic excitation. In inviscid flows without chemical-radiative coupling, the flow-field is weakly affected by electronic states; however, in viscous flows, their influence can be more important, in particular, on the convective heat flux. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the heat transfer is evaluated as well as the effect of reaction rate coefficients. The competition of diffusion and heat conduction processes reduces the overall effect of electronic excitation on the convective heating, especially for the Fire II test case. It is shown that reliable models of chemical reaction rates are of great

  16. Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Linear Polyenes: A Study of Excited State Intramolecular Charge Transfer, Photoisomerization and Fluorescence Probe Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2014-07-27

    Numerous studies of donor-acceptor conjugated linear polyenes have been carried out with the goal to understand the exact nature of the excited state electronic structure and dynamics. In this article we discuss our endeavours with regard to the excited state intramolecular charge transfer, photoisomerization and fluorescence probe properties of various donor-acceptor substituted compounds of diphenylpolyene [Ar(CH = CH) n Ar] series and ethenylindoles.

  17. Electronically excited negative ion resonant states in chloroethylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, O.G., E-mail: khv@mail.ru; Lukin, V.G.; Tuimedov, G.M.; Khatymova, L.Z.; Kinzyabulatov, R.R.; Tseplin, E.E.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Several novel dissociative negative ion channels were revealed in chloroethylenes. • The electronically excited resonant states were recorded in all chloroethylenes under study. • The states were assigned to the inter-shell types, but not to the core-excited Feshbach one. - Abstract: The negative ion mass spectra of the resonant electron capture by molecules of 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene-cis, 1,2-dichloroethylene-trans, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene have been recorded in the 0–12 eV range of the captured electron energy using static magnetic sector mass spectrometer modified for operation in the resonant electron capture regime. As a result, several novel low-intensive dissociation channels were revealed in the compounds under study. Additionally, the negative ion resonant states were recorded at approximately 3–12 eV, mostly for the first time. These resonant states were assigned to the electronically excited resonances of the inter-shell type by comparing their energies with those of the parent neutral molecules triplet and singlet electronically excited states known from the energy-loss spectra obtained by previous studies.

  18. Dissociative Electron Attachment to Rovibrationally Excited Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-31

    taken from the tables of Clementi and Roetti.7’ Defining, for convenience, v=n(p,i)+n(p~j), z= (pji)+(p,j), a A(L,pJi)A(4,p~j)v!, s=z- ’ - ], m=[l/(t+l...Scientific, Singapore, 1985), p. 425. 451. E. McCarthy, C. J. Noble, B. A. Phillips, and A. D. Turn- 71E. Clementi and C. Roetti, At. Data Nucl. Data...r1I r-r 2 l 0 0e(B) (r,r 2) is the antisymmetric Hartree-Fock wave function of Li+ in terms of one-electron Slater-type orbitals given 9D by Clementi

  19. Theoretical study of intermolecular energy transfer involving electronically excited molecules: He(/sup 1/S) + H/sub 2/(B /sup 1/. sigma. /sub u//sup +/). [Solution for coupled channel equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    To further understanding of gas phase collision dynamics involving electronically-excited molecules, a fully quantum mechanical study of He + H/sub 2/(B /sup 1/..sigma../sub u//sup +/) was undertaken. Iterative natural orbital configuration interaction (CI) calculations were performed to obtain the interaction potential between He and H/sub 2/(B /sup 1/..sigma../sub u//sup +/). The potential energy surface (PES) is highly anisotropic and has a van der Waals well of about 0.03 eV for C/sub 2v/ approach. Avoided PES crossings occur with He + H/sub 2/(E,F /sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/) and with He + H/sub 2/(X /sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/) and cause a local maximum and a deep minimum in the He + H/sub 2/(B /sup 1/..sigma../sub u//sup +/) PES, respectively. The crossing with He + H/sub 2/(X /sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/) provides a mechanism for fluorescence quenching. The computed CI energies were combined with previous multi-reference double excitation CI calculations and fit with analytic functions for convenience in scattering calculations. Accurate dipole polarizabilities and quadrupole moment of H/sub 2/(B /sup 1/..sigma../sub u//sup +/) were computed for use in the multipole expansion, which is the analytic form of the long-range PES. 129 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

  20. Excitation energy transfer between Light-harvesting complex II and Photosystem I in reconstituted membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Lingvay, Mónika; Kiss, Teréz; Deák, Róbert; Bóta, Attila; Ughy, Bettina; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H

    2016-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the major peripheral antenna of Photosystem II in plants, participates in several concerted mechanisms for regulation of the excitation energy and electron fluxes in thylakoid membranes. In part, these include interaction of LHCII with Photosystem I (PSI) enhancing the latter's absorption cross-section - for example in the well-known state 1 - state 2 transitions or as a long-term acclimation to high light. In this work we examined the capability of LHCII to deliver excitations to PSI in reconstituted membranes in vitro. Proteoliposomes with native plant thylakoid membrane lipids and different stoichiometric ratios of LHCII:PSI were reconstituted and studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission from LHCII was strongly decreased in PSI-LHCII membranes due to trapping of excitations by PSI. Kinetic modelling of the time-resolved fluorescence data revealed the existence of separate pools of LHCII distinguished by the time scale of energy transfer. A strongly coupled pool, equivalent to one LHCII trimer per PSI, transferred excitations to PSI with near-unity efficiency on a time scale of less than 10ps but extra LHCIIs also contributed significantly to the effective antenna size of PSI, which could be increased by up to 47% in membranes containing 3 LHCII trimers per PSI. The results demonstrate a remarkable competence of LHCII to increase the absorption cross-section of PSI, given the opportunity that the two types of complexes interact in the membrane.

  1. Heat Transfer Augmentation for Electronic Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suabsakul Gururatana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The performance of electronic devices has been improving along with the rapid technology development. Cooling of electronic systems is consequently essential in controlling the component temperature and avoiding any hot spot. The study aims to review the present electronic cooling methods which are widely used in electronic devices. Approach: There are several methods to cool down the electronics components such as the pin-fin heat sink, confined jet impingement, heat pipe, micro heat sink and so on. Results: The cooling techniques can obviously increase heat transfer rate. Nonetheless, for active and passive cooling methods the pressure drop could extremely rise, when the heat transfer rate is increased. Conclusion: When the cooling techniques are used, it is clearly seen that the heat transfer increases with pressure drop. To avoid excessive expense due to high pressure drop, optimization method is required to obtain optimum cost and cooling rate.

  2. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Is as Accurate as CASPT2 for Electronic Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Chad E; Ghosh, Soumen; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-02-04

    A correct description of electronically excited states is critical to the interpretation of visible-ultraviolet spectra, photochemical reactions, and excited-state charge-transfer processes in chemical systems. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory and a new kind of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here, we show that MC-PDFT with a first-generation on-top density functional performs as well as CASPT2 for an organic chemistry database including valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. The results are very encouraging for practical applications.

  3. Low-energy electron attachment and detachment in vibrationally excited oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, N L; Anokhin, E M, E-mail: nick_aleksandrov@mail.r, E-mail: nick_aleksandrov@hotmail.co [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-21

    Three-body electron attachment to O{sub 2} molecules and electron detachment from O{sub 2}{sup -} ions have been theoretically studied in vibrationally excited oxygen and O{sub 2}-containing mixtures. Assuming that electron attachment and detachment proceed via the formation of vibrationally excited temporary O{sub 2}{sup -} ions, the rates of these processes were determined on the basis of the statistical approach for the vibrational transfer and relaxation in collisions between O{sub 2}{sup -} ions and O{sub 2} molecules. The calculated attachment and detachment rate constants turned out to agree well with available measurements in unexcited oxygen. This method was extended to calculate attachment and detachment rates in vibrationally excited oxygen. It was shown that the effect of vibrational excitation on electron detachment is profound, whereas attachment of low-energy electrons to vibrationally excited O{sub 2} is inefficient. The calculated vibrational distribution of stable O{sub 2}{sup -} ions turned out to be non-equilibrium in an excited gas and the effective vibrational temperature of the ions was much lower than the vibrational temperature of molecules. An analytical method was suggested to determine this distribution and the effective vibrational temperature. The calculated rate constants were used to simulate the formation and decay of an electron-beam-generated plasma in N{sub 2} : O{sub 2} mixtures at elevated vibrational temperatures. The calculations showed that vibrational excitation of molecules leads to orders of magnitude increase in the plasma density and in the plasma lifetime, in agreement with available observations.

  4. Electronic and photophysical properties of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole and its derivatives enhancing in the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer processes: A TD-DFT study on substitution effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daengngern, Rathawat; Kungwan, Nawee, E-mail: naweekung@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    The effect of electron donating and withdrawing substituents on the enol absorption and keto emission spectra of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and its derivatives has been systematically investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The enol absorption spectra of HBO were simulated by using five different DFTs with various exchange-correlation functions to validate a suitable functional prior to being further used as a method of choice to study the effect of substituents on the spectral characteristics of HBO derivatives. The popular B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee–Yang–Parr) exchange-correlation functional is found to provide the best desirable result in predicting the absorption spectrum close to experimental data. In the ground state, enol forms of HBO and its derivatives are more stable than those of keto forms, while in the first lowest excited state, keto forms are found to be more stable than their enol forms. Overall, simulated absorption and emission spectra of HBO and its derivatives from TD-B3LYP calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. For enol, absorption maxima of HBO derivatives having electron-withdrawing groups are red-shift corresponding to their lower HOMO–LUMO energy gaps compared to that of HBO. For keto emission, HBO having electron donating groups (m-MeHBO and MHBO) and withdrawing group (CNHBO) at 4′-position on the phenol fragment as well as electron donating groups (HBOMe and HBOM) at 6-position on the benzoxazole fragment make the position of keto emission peak shift to shorter wavelength (blue-shift). However, HBO derivatives with electron withdrawing groups (HBOF, HBOCl, HBOA and HBOE) at 6-position give redshifted emission compared to the parent compound (HBO). The type of substituent on both 4′- and 6-positions certainly has a pronounced effect on the absorption and emission spectra of HBO derivatives. - Highlights: • Simulated spectra

  5. Transfer and excitation processes studied in H-like S and Li-like and H-like F colliding with H/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M.; Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Giese, J.P.; Krause, H.F.; Miller, P.D.; Schoene, H.; Swenson, J.K.; Vane, C.R.; Schuch, R.; Justiniano, E.; Benhenni, M.; Shafroth, S.M.; Mokler, P.H.; Reusch, S.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied transfer and simultaneous excitation by three different experimental techniques. Coincidences between two K x rays were measured for S/sup 15 +/, coincidences between one K x ray and the charge exchanged projectile for Li-like F and projectile Auger electrons for H-like F in each case colliding with H/sub 2/. For all three collision systems, the measured cross sections are dominated by Resonant Transfer and Excitation (RTE). Also, for the F projectiles, strong contributions from Two Electron Transfer and Excitation (2eTE) were found. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Ultrafast interatomic electronic decay in multiply excited clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kuleff, Alexander I; Kopelke, Soeren; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2010-01-01

    An ultrafast mechanism belonging to the family of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) phenomena is proposed. When two excited species are present, an ultrafast energy transfer can take place bringing one of them to its ground state and ionizing the other one. It is shown that if large homoatomic clusters are exposed to an ultrashort and intense laser pulse whose photon energy is in resonance with an excitation transition of the cluster constituents, the large majority of ions will be produced by this ICD mechanism rather than by two-photon ionization. A related collective-ICD process that is operative in heteroatomic systems is also discussed.

  7. Theoretical Study on Inner Shell Electron Impact Excitation of Lithium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ning-Xuan; DONG Chen-Zhong; JIANG Jun

    2009-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact excitation of lithium from the ground state ls22s to the excited states 1s2s2,1s2p2,1s2snp (n = 2-5),1s2sns (n = 3-5),1s2pns (n = 3-5),and 1s2pnp (n=3-5) are calculated by using a full relativistic distorted wave method.The latest experimental electron energy loss spectra for inner-shell electron excitations of lithium at a given incident electron energy of 2500 eV[Chin.Phys.Lett.25 (2008) 3649]have been reproduced by the present theoretical investigation excellently.At the same time,the structures of electron energy loss spectra of lithium at low incident electron energy are also predicted theoretically,it is found that the electron energy loss spectra in the energy region of 55-57eV show two-peak structures.

  8. Beyond the Förster theory of excitation energy transfer: importance of higher-order processes in supramolecular antenna systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Volkhard

    2009-12-07

    Electronic excitation energy transfer in molecular systems is connected with the de-excitation of one molecule and the excitation of the other. Mostly, it can be understood in terms of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer. An increasing interest in the optimization of artificial light harvesting systems, however, requires a more detailed study going beyond the standard Förster scheme. There are two main routes to do this. Considering a Coulombic less-strongly coupled system first, coherences among different chromophores may be considered in the framework of perturbation theory with higher-order mechanisms correcting the standard second-order description. Secondly, if inter-chromophore coherences are dominant and delocalized Frenkel-exciton states are formed, it becomes of some importance to study their decay due to the coupling to vibrational degrees of freedom. While we will also comment on this latter mechanism, the first description based on localized excitations will be the main focus. A general higher-order theory resulting in respective transition rates and rate equations is utilized. Its capability is demonstrated when presenting a systematic description of short-range and long-range corrections to the basic Förster mechanism. Accordingly, a unique description of bridge-mediated and photon-mediated long-range electronic excitation energy transfer is offered. Moreover, short-range excitation energy transfer appearing as a two electron exchange is also discussed. And, the exciton-exciton annihilation process present at higher optical excitation intensities is described as a direct higher-order transition. The related higher-order vibrational correlation functions are presented and estimated for the reference case where the coupling to vibrational degrees of freedom either of intra-molecular or inter-molecular type is reduced to a simple electronic state dephasing process.

  9. Controlling multipolar surface plasmon excitation through the azimuthal phase structure of electron vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Daniel; Ducati, Caterina

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically studied how the azimuthal phase structure of an electron vortex beam excites surface plasmons on metal particles of different geometries as observed in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We have developed a semiclassical approximation combining a ring-shaped beam and the dielectric formalism. Our results indicate that for the case of total orbital angular momentum transfer, we can manipulate surface plasmon multipole excitation and even attain an enhancement factor of several orders of magnitude. Since electron vortex beams interact with particles mostly through effects due to azimuthal symmetry, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam, anisotropy information (longitudinal and transversal) of the sample may be derived in EELS studies by comparing nonvortex and vortex beam measurements.

  10. Dissociative excitation and fragmentation of S8 by electron impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotton, S J; McConkey, J W

    2011-05-28

    The vacuum-ultraviolet emission spectrum from 136 nm to 168 nm following the dissociative excitation of a predominantly S(8) target by electron impact at 100 eV incident energy was measured. The relative cross sections for the dominant multiplets at 138.9, 142.9, 147.9, and 166.7 nm are presented. Excitation functions are shown for electron-impact energies from below threshold to 360 eV for the two most prominent emissions at 142.5 nm and 147.4 nm. Five thresholds are clearly apparent in both excitation functions. For the four highest energy channels, the energy separation between the adjacent thresholds is approximately constant and the cross sections reduce regularly as the threshold energies increase. We suggest possible fragmentation pathways of the dissociating S(8) molecule that reproduce the energies of our observed thresholds.

  11. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer and charge transfer dynamics of a 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole derivative in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul Hoon; Park, Jaehun; Seo, Jangwon; Park, Soo Young; Joo, Taiha

    2010-05-13

    Excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and subsequent intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) dynamics of a 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole derivative conjugated with an electron withdrawing group (HBOCE) in solutions and a polymer film has been investigated by femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) and TRF spectra measurements without the conventional spectral reconstruction method. TRF with high enough resolution (benzoxazole groups is invoked to account for the dispersive ESIPT dynamics in liquids. From the TRF spectra of both the enol and keto isomers, we have identified the ICT reaction of the keto isomer occurring subsequent to the ESIPT. The ICT proceeds also by two time constants of near instantaneous and 2.7 ps. Since the ICT dynamics of HBOCE is rather close to the polar solvation dynamics, we argue that the ICT is barrierless and determined mostly by the solvent fluctuation.

  12. Transfer matrices and excitations with matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauner, V.; Draxler, D.; Vanderstraeten, L.; Degroote, M.; Haegeman, J.; Rams, M. M.; Stojevic, V.; Schuch, N.; Verstraete, F.

    2015-05-01

    We use the formalism of tensor network states to investigate the relation between static correlation functions in the ground state of local quantum many-body Hamiltonians and the dispersion relations of the corresponding low-energy excitations. In particular, we show that the matrix product state transfer matrix (MPS-TM)—a central object in the computation of static correlation functions—provides important information about the location and magnitude of the minima of the low-energy dispersion relation(s), and we present supporting numerical data for one-dimensional lattice and continuum models as well as two-dimensional lattice models on a cylinder. We elaborate on the peculiar structure of the MPS-TM’s eigenspectrum and give several arguments for the close relation between the structure of the low-energy spectrum of the system and the form of the static correlation functions. Finally, we discuss how the MPS-TM connects to the exact quantum transfer matrix of the model at zero temperature. We present a renormalization group argument for obtaining finite bond dimension approximations of the MPS, which allows one to reinterpret variational MPS techniques (such as the density matrix renormalization group) as an application of Wilson’s numerical renormalization group along the virtual (imaginary time) dimension of the system.

  13. Coherent versus incoherent excitation energy transfer in molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Tzu; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2012-10-28

    We investigate the Markovian limit of a polaronic quantum master equation for coherent resonance energy transfer proposed recently by Jang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 101104 (2008)]. An expression for the rate of excitation energy transfer (EET) is derived and shown to exhibit both coherent and incoherent contributions. We then apply this theory to calculated EET rates for model dimer systems, and demonstrate that the small-polaron approach predicts a variety of dynamical behaviors. Notably, the results indicate that the EET dynamical behaviors can be understood by the interplay between noise-assisted EET and dynamical localization, while both are well captured by the polaron theory. Finally, we investigate bath correlation effects on the rate of EET and show that bath correlations (or anti-correlations) can either enhance or suppress EET rate depending on the strength of individual system-bath couplings. In summary, we introduce the small-polaron approach as an intuitive physical framework to consolidate our understanding of EET dynamics in the condensed phase.

  14. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures.

  15. The lifetime of electronic excitations in metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, M.; Díez Muiño, R.; Echenique, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Density functional theory and the self-energy formalism are used to evaluate the lifetime of electronic excitations in metal clusters of nanometre size. The electronic structure of the cluster is obtained in the jellium model and spherical symmetry is assumed. Two effects that depend on the size of the clusters are discussed: the change in the number of final states to which the excitation can decay, and the modification in the screened interaction between electrons. For clusters with density parameter rs = 4 and diameter a few nanometres, a lifetime value of {\\approx }5 fs is reached for electronic excitations of {\\approx }1 eV. This value is of the same order of magnitude of that obtained in the bulk limit at the same level of approximation. For smaller clusters, a distinct non-monotonic behaviour of the lifetime as a function of the cluster size is found and the lifetime of excitations of {\\approx }1 eV can vary between 4 and 30 fs.

  16. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying...

  17. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Peroxide Dianion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bryce L; Maher, Andrew G; Nava, Matthew; Lopez, Nazario; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-06-18

    The encapsulation of peroxide dianion by hexacarboxamide cryptand provides a platform for the study of electron transfer of isolated peroxide anion. Photoinitiated electron transfer (ET) between freely diffusing Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the peroxide dianion occurs with a rate constant of 2.0 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). A competing electron transfer quenching pathway is observed within an ion pair. Picosecond transient spectroscopy furnishes a rate constant of 1.1 × 10(10) s(-1) for this first-order process. A driving force dependence for the ET rate within the ion pair using a series of Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives allows for the electronic coupling and reorganization energies to be assessed. The ET reaction is nonadiabatic and dominated by a large inner-sphere reorganization energy, in accordance with that expected for the change in bond distance accompanying the conversion of peroxide dianion to superoxide anion.

  18. Resonant transfer and excitation in Li-like F colliding with H/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M.; Schuch, R.; Datz, S.; Justiniano, E.L.B.; Miller, P.D.; Schoene, H.

    1988-11-15

    We have measured conicidences between x rays and projectiles that have captured one electron in F/sup 6+/+H/sub 2/ collisions at projectile energies between 15 and 33 MeV. The cross sections for capture and simultaneous x-ray emission as a function of projectile energy show clear structures. Indications of an unexpectedly high population of high-n states predominantly formed by resonant transfer and excitation (RTE) was found. Above the KLn (n>1) RTE resonance energies another maximum was observed.

  19. Emergence of Electron Distributions Related to Banded Chorus Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Min, K.; Fu, X.; Gary, S. P.; Winske, D.; Cowee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the emergence of electron velocity distributions with an "anisotropy gap" in the radiation belts. Such distributions have been shown to be able to excite banded chorus as anisotropic electrons with T⊥/T||>1 at different T|| , where || and ⊥ denote directions relative to the background geomagnetic field, can drive the whistler anisotropy instability in the upper- and lower-bands, independently. Energy-dependent convection and loss of the electrons in the radiation belts can generally lead to anisotropic electrons which, subsequently, excite whistler waves. As a simplification of reality, the simulations in the present study start with an electron distribution which is constantly anisotropic at all energies. The anisotropic electrons lead to growth of whistlers in the system. The enhanced waves, in turn, scatter the electrons and reduce their anisotropy. Interestingly, the reduction of anisotropy is more dramatic for electrons with intermediate energies. An anisotropy gap arises as a natural consequence of the self-consistent wave-particle interactions and, in the quasi-steady phase of the simulations, produces the banded structure in the spectrum of the enhanced whistler waves.

  20. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  1. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione studied by ultrafast absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ transient absorption from the deep-UV to the visible region and fluorescence upconversion to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer dynamics in a biologically relevant drug molecule, 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione. The molecule is a ß-diketone which in the electronic ground state exists as exocyclic enol with an intramolecular H-bond. Upon electronic excitation at 300 nm, the first excited state of the exocyclic enol is initially populated, followed by ultrafast proton transfer (≈160 fs to form the vibrationally hot endocyclic enol. Subsequently, solvent-induced vibrational relaxation takes place (≈10 ps followed by decay (≈390 ps to the corresponding ground state.

  2. Charge-Transfer Excited States in Aqueous DNA: Insights from Many-Body Green's Function Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen; Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states play an important role in the excited-state dynamics of DNA in aqueous solution. However, there is still much controversy on their energies. By ab initio many-body Green's function theory, together with classical molecular dynamics simulations, we confirm the existence of CT states at the lower energy side of the optical absorption maximum in aqueous DNA as observed in experiments. We find that the hydration shell can exert strong effects (˜1 eV) on both the electronic structure and CT states of DNA molecules through dipole electric fields. In this case, the solvent cannot be simply regarded as a macroscopic screening medium as usual. The influence of base stacking and base pairing on the CT states is also discussed.

  3. Distributed Multipolar Expansion Approach to Calculation of Excitation Energy Transfer Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Maj, Michał; Cho, Minhaeng; Góra, Robert W

    2015-07-14

    We propose a new approach for estimating the electrostatic part of the excitation energy transfer (EET) coupling between electronically excited chromophores based on the transition density-derived cumulative atomic multipole moments (TrCAMM). In this approach, the transition potential of a chromophore is expressed in terms of truncated distributed multipolar expansion and analytical formulas for the TrCAMMs are derived. The accuracy and computational feasibility of the proposed approach is tested against the exact Coulombic couplings, and various multipole expansion truncation schemes are analyzed. The results of preliminary calculations show that the TrCAMM approach is capable of reproducing the exact Coulombic EET couplings accurately and efficiently and is superior to other widely used schemes: the transition charges from electrostatic potential (TrESP) and the transition density cube (TDC) method.

  4. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  5. Cold transfer between deformed, Coulomb excited nuclei; Kalter Transfer zwischen deformierten, Coulomb-angeregten Kernen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, H.

    1998-12-31

    The scattering system {sup 162}Dy {yields} {sup 116}Sn has been examined at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier using the Heidelberg-Darmstadt Crystal Ball spectrometer combined with 5 Germanium-CLUSTER detectors. In order to study pairing correlations as a function of angular momentum cold events were selected in the 2n stripping channel by identifying and suppressing the dominant hot part of the transfer with the Crystal Ball. The CLUSTER detectors with their high {gamma}-efficiency were used to identify the transfer channel and to resolve individual final states. Cross sections for the population of individual yrast states in a cold transfer reaction have been measured for the first time indicating the strong influence of higher transfer multipolarities. At small surface distances Coulomb-nuclear interferences were found to be responsible for the stronger decline of the population of higher yrast states in the transfer channel as compared to the Coulex channel. As a preparatory study for 2n transfer measurements between high spin yrast states in the backbending region of deformed nuclei the Coulomb excitation process in the crossing region of two bands in {sup 162}Dy has been analyzed. The gross properties of the measured population probabilities could be interpreted in a simple band mixing model. (orig.)

  6. Excitement tem-horn antenna by impulsive relativistic electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Balakirev, V A; Egorov, A M; Lonin, Y F

    2000-01-01

    In the given operation the opportunity of reception powerful electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) is observationally explored by excitation by a impulsive relativistic electronic beam (IREB) of a TEM-horn antenna. It is revealed, that at such expedient of excitation of the TEM-horn antenna, the signal of radiation of the antenna contains three various components caused by oscillation of radiation by forward front IREB, high-voltage discharge between plates irradiation of TEM-horn antenna a and resonant properties of the antenna devices.

  7. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  8. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  9. Electromicrobiology: Electron Transfer via Biowires in Nature and Practical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting developments in the field of electromicrobiology has been the discovery of electrically conductive pili (e-pili in Geobacter species that transport electrons with a metallic-like mechanism. The e-pili are essential for extracellular electron transport to Fe(III oxides and longrange electron transport through the conductive biofilms that form on the anodes of microbial fuel cells. The e-pili also facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species. Metatranscriptomic studies have demonstrated that Geobacter/Methanosaeta DIET is an important process in anaerobic digesters converting brewery wastes to methane. Increasing e-pili expression through genetic modification of regulatory systems or adaptive evolution yields strains with enhanced rates of extracellular electron transfer. Measurement of the conductivity of individual e-pili has demonstrated that they have conductivities higher than those of a number of synthetic conducting organic polymers. Multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that aromatic amino acids play an important role in the electron transport along e-pili, suggesting opportunities to tune e-pili conductivity via genetic manipulation of the amino acid composition of e-pili. It is expected that e-pili will be harnessed to improve microbe-electrode processes such as microbial electrosynthesis and for the development of novel biosensors. Also, e-pili show promise as a sustainable ‘green’ replacement for electronic materials that contain toxic components and/or are produced with harsh chemicals.

  10. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  11. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion.

  12. Excited-state kinetics of the carotenoid S//1 state in LHC II and two-photon excitation spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution Efficient Car S//1 yields Chl electronic energy transfer via hot S//1 states?

    CERN Document Server

    Walla, P J; Linden, Patricia A; Ohta, Kaoru

    2002-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids (Car) in light- harvesting complex II (LHC II) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied by transient absorption measurements. The decay of the Car S //1 population ranges from similar to 200 fs to over 7 ps, depending on the excitation and detection wavelengths. In contrast, a 200 fs Car S//1 yields Chlorophyll (Chl) energy transfer component was the dominant time constant for our earlier two-photon fluorescence up- conversion measurements (Walla, P.J. ; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 4799-4806). We also present the two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution and compare them with the TPE spectrum of LHC II. The TPE-spectrum of LHC II has an onset much further to the blue and a width that is narrower than expected from comparison to the S//1 fluorescence of lutein and beta-carotene in solution. Different environments may affect the shape of the S//1 spectrum significantly. To explain the blue shift of the TPE spectrum and the d...

  13. Controlling autoionization in strontium two-electron-excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Robert; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    One challenge in engineering long-lived two-electron-excited states, i.e., so-called planetary atoms, is autoionization. Autoionization, however, can be suppressed if the outermost electron is placed in a high- n, n ~ 300 - 600 , high- L state because such states have only a very small overlap with the inner electron, even when this is also excited to a state of relatively high n and hence of relatively long lifetime. Here the L-dependence of the autoionization rate for high- n strontium Rydberg atoms is examined during excitation of the core ion 5 s 2S1 / 2 - 5 p 2P3 / 2 transition. Measurements in which the angular momentum of the Rydberg electron is controlled using a pulsed electric field show that the autoionization rate decreases rapidly with increasing L and becomes very small for values larger than ~ 20 . The data are analyzed with the aid of calculations undertaken using complex scaling. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  14. Theoretical studies on the reaction pathways of electronically excited DAAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quenneville, Jason M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of temporally and spectrally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to initiate, as well as detect, high explosives is being explored at Los Alamos. High level ab initio calculations, presented here, are employed to help guide and interpret the experiments. The ground and first excited electronic states of 3,3{prime}-diamino-4,4{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) are investigated using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The geometrical and energetic character of the excited state minima, conical intersections and reaction pathways of DAAF are described. Two radiative and two non-radiative excited state population quenching mechanisms are outlined, and possible pathways for photochemical and spectroscopic control are discussed. The use of laser light to control chemical reactions has many applications. The initiation and the detection of explosives are two such applications currently under development at Los Alamos. Though inherently experimental, the project can be aided by theory through both prediction and interpretation. When the laser light is in the UV/visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorbing molecule is excited electronically and excitation decay may occur either radiatively (fluorescence or phosphorescence) or non-radiatively (through internal conversion). In many cases decay of the excitation occurs through a mixture of processes, and maximizing the desired result requires sophisticated laser pulses whose amplitude has been optimally modulated in time and/or frequency space. Control of cis-stilbene photochemistry was recently demonstrated in our group, and we aim to extend this work to high explosive compounds. Maximizing radiative decay leads to increased fluorescence quantum yields and enhances the possibility of spectral detection of the absorbing molecule. Maximizing non-radiative decay can lead to chemistry, heating of the sample and possibly detonation initiation in

  15. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Do, T. P. T. [School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  16. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  17. Electronic Excitation Temperature in DC Positive Streamer Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaochen; WANG Ninghui; DING Zhenfeng

    2007-01-01

    The electronic excitation temperature in a direct current positive streamer discharge based on ultra-thin sheet electrodes was measured by optical emission spectrometry in order to deposit materials for potential future applications. It was remarkable that the electronic excitation temperature (Texc) did not vary monotonically with the discharge current, but demonstrated a peak at a certain position. In a mixture of oxygen and argon (80% oxygen), the maximum Texc reached about 6300 K at an average current of 600 μA. Both the positive ions accumulation in the discharge region and the increase of the local temperature around the streamer channel caused by Joule heating are considered to be the main reasons for the variations of Texc.

  18. Multi-pair excitations in an electron liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, M. E.; Holas, A.; Böhm, H. M.; Schinner, A.

    1996-07-01

    Single (particle-hole)-pair excitations, as described in the well-known Lindhard function, are restricted to a strip in the ( q, ω) plane — the so-called particle-hole continuum. We present a perturbational analysis of the dynamic dielectric function allowing a generalization of this property for n-pair contributions. Consequences for the electron energy-loss function and related quantities are discussed.

  19. State-specific transport properties of partially ionized flows of electronically excited atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-03-01

    State-to-state approach for theoretical study of transport properties in atomic gases with excited electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species is developed. The dependence of atomic radius on the electronic configuration of excited atoms is taken into account in the transport algorithm. Different cutoff criteria for increasing atomic radius are discussed and the limits of applicability for these criteria are evaluated. The validity of a Slater-like model for the calculation of state-resolved transport coefficients in neutral and ionized atomic gases is shown. For ionized flows, a method of evaluation for effective cross-sections of resonant charge-transfer collisions is suggested. Accurate kinetic theory algorithms for modelling the state-specific transport properties are applied for the prediction of transport coefficients in shock heated flows. Based on the numerical observations, different distributions over electronic states behind the shock front are considered. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 14,000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the partial thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found for both neutral and ionized atomic gases: increasing radius of excited atoms causes a strong decrease in these transport coefficients. Similarly, the presence of electronically excited states with increased atomic radii leads to reduced diffusion coefficients. Nevertheless the overall impact of increasing effective cross-sections on the transport properties just behind the shock front under hypersonic reentry conditions is found to be minor since the populations of high-lying electronic energy levels behind the shock waves are low.

  20. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagyi-Palffy, A.

    2006-07-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments with trapped or stored ions was discussed focusing on the cases with the largest calculated resonance strength. As the photons emitted in different channels of the electron recombination process are indistinguishable in the total cross section, the interference between NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus and radiative recombination was investigated. The angular distribution of the emitted photons in the recombination process provides means to discern the two processes. Angular differential cross sections for the emitted photons in the case of E2 nuclear transitions were presented for several heavy elements. (orig.)

  1. 75 FR 16579 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Part II Federal Reserve System 12 CFR Part 205 Electronic Fund Transfers; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 62... Consumers from Hidden Gift Card Fees Secretly Draining Shoppers' Pockets'', Press Release, Mar. 27,...

  2. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical prediction of transport and optical properties of protein-pigment complexes is of significant importance when aiming at understanding the structure versus function relationship in such systems. Electronic energy transfer (EET) couplings represent a key property in this respect since...

  3. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  4. Many-body approach to electronic excitations concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The many-body-theoretical basis and applications of theoretical spectroscopy of condensed matter, e.g. crystals, nanosystems, and molecules are unified in one advanced text for readers from graduate students to active researchers in the field. The theory is developed from first principles including fully the electron-electron interaction and spin interactions. It is based on the many-body perturbation theory, a quantum-field-theoretical description, and Green's functions. The important expressions for ground states as well as electronic single-particle and pair excitations are explained. Based on single-particle and two-particle Green's functions, the Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations are derived. They are applied to calculate spectral and response functions. Important spectra are those which can be measured using photoemission/inverse photoemission, optical spectroscopy, and electron energy loss/inelastic X-ray spectroscopy. Important approximations are derived and discussed in the light of selected computa...

  5. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual building accelerometer data, the linear response of a structure to strong ground motion is estimated by the convolution of the dynamic response of the structure with an input ground motion. The input motion is usually provided by a local `reference' station record. In this study, we look at whether actual recorded ground motion at two instrumented buildings with well studied dynamic properties can be satisfactorily modeled using a local ground station. All stations record continuous 24-bit data streams on the CISN network, so analysis of a variety of weak earthquake motions, as well as ambient noise, is possible. Our buildings are the 9-story reinforced concrete Millikan Library (CISN Station MIK) and the 3-story braced steel frame Broad Center (CBC), both on the Caltech Campus. Motions recorded on their upper floors are compared with motions from ground stations located in the basement of a lightweight wood-frame house (GSA), and in a subsurface vault (CRP). All stations are within 200m of each other. Recent work using the new continuous datastream indicates that the natural frequencies of these structures can vary by up to 5% during normal ambient conditions, due to such factors as changing building usage, diurnal temperature variation, and wind/rainfall events. These shifts can be sudden, and models of building motions are sensitive to these previously un-documented changes. Further, during stronger motions, such as forced vibration testing, and minor earthquake shaking, natural frequencies are shown to drop by up to 10% (2003 M5.4 Big Bear Earthquake, Δ = 119km), with near-instantaneous recovery once the excitation is over. Moderate earthquakes can temporarily reduce frequencies by up to 30% with no apparent structural damage (1971 M6.6 San Fernando Earthquake, Δ = 31km). Post-event permanent reductions of about 10% have been observed. The ability to monitor these evolving dynamic characteristics makes a re-evaluation of the

  6. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Mašín, Zdeněk [Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Straße 2A, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gorfinkiel, Jimena D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  7. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  8. Dynamic Effects in Core Electron Impact Excitation of Lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuroh, Kofi

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data of inelastic electron scattering exciting inner3d-shell of metallic lanthanum show strong dependence on the projectile electron energy.^1 Calculations based on an atomic physics description of the triply ionized free atom are made. The large spin-orbit coupling constant of the 3d-hole leads to an approximate jK-coupling. The resulting excitation strength is formulated in terms of the Born approximation including resonant contributions. The intensity is folded with a Lorentzian broadening with full width at half maximum (FWHM) parameter Γ. This parameter is considered to be dependent on the projectile electron energy so that the dynamic effects found in experimental electron-energy-loss-spectra (EELS) may be addressed. The systematic variation of the relative intensities of the spin-orbit doublet structures with exciation energy found in experiment is generally accounted for as Γ is varied from the experimentally measured values of 0.7eV - 0.5eV and beyond^2 ^1J. Kanski and G. Wendin, Phys. Rev.B24, 1981 (4977). ^2K. Nuroh, Physica Scripta 61, 2000(in press).

  9. Investigation on the electronically excited state properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MDDA) in solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sub-microsecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the electronically excited state behavior of soluble multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNTsCON((CH2)9- CH3)2, denoted as MDDA) in chloroform, toluene and cyclohexane. Following pulsed photo-excitation of MDDA at 355 nm, three major spectral components are clearly identified with the help of global analysis carried out over 7 representative kinetics curves from 450 to 700 nm. The solvent dependence of decay associated difference spectra (DADS) and the corresponding lifetimes help to assign these transient species to singlet state (S1), triplet state (T1) and charge-separated state (CS), respectively. Preliminary discussion had been made to explore the involved photophysical and electron transfer processes.

  10. Hot electron mediated desorption rates calculated from excited state potential energy surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for Desorption Induce by (Multiple) Electronic Transitions (DIET/DIMET) based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the Delta Self-Consistent Field extension of Density Functional Theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various transition metal surfaces, and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system, with parameters obtained from the excited state potential energy surface, and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics in both the DIET and DIMET regime, and reproduce the power law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong.

  11. Solvent-mediated electron hopping: long-range charge transfer in IBr-(CO2) photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheps, Leonid; Miller, Elisa M; Horvath, Samantha; Thompson, Matthew A; Parson, Robert; McCoy, Anne B; Lineberger, W Carl

    2010-04-09

    Chemical bond breaking involves coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics that can take place on multiple electronic surfaces. Here we report a time-resolved experimental and theoretical investigation of nonadiabatic dynamics during photodissociation of a complex of iodine monobromide anion with carbon dioxide [IBr-(CO2)] on the second excited (A') electronic state. Previous experimental work showed that the dissociation of bare IBr- yields only I- + Br products. However, in IBr-(CO2), time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that a subset of the dissociating molecules undergoes an electron transfer from iodine to bromine 350 femtoseconds after the initial excitation. Ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism for this charge hop and highlight the crucial role of the carbon dioxide molecule. The charge transfer between two recoiling atoms, assisted by a single solvent-like molecule, provides a notable limiting case of solvent-driven electron transfer over a distance of 7 angstroms.

  12. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  13. Ultrafast spin-transfer torque driven by femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Bert

    A hot topic in the field of ultrafast laser-induced manipulation of the magnetic state is that of the role and exploitation of laser-induced spin currents. Intense debate has been triggered by claims that such a spin-transfer, e.g. in the form of super-diffusive spin currents over tens of nanometers, might be a main contributor to the demagnetization process in ferromagnetic thin films after femtosecond laser excitation. In this presentation the underlying concepts will be introduced and recent developments reviewed. Particularly we demonstrate the possibility to apply a laser-induced spin transfer torque on a free magnetic layer, using a non-collinear multilayer configuration consisting of a free in-plane layer on top of a perpendicularly magnetized injection layer, as separated by a nonmagnetic spacer. Interestingly, this approach allows for a quantitative measurement of the amount of spin transfer. Moreover, it might provide access to novel device architectures in which the magnetic state is controlled by fs laser pulses. Careful analysis of the resulting precession of the free layer allows us to quantify the applied torque, and distinguish between driving mechanisms based on laser-induced transfer of hot electrons versus a spin Seebeck effect due to the large thermal gradients. Further engineering of the layered structures in order to gain fundamental understanding and optimize efficiencies will be reported. A simple model that treats local non-equilibrium magnetization dynamics to spin transport effects via a spin-dependent chemical potential will be introduced.

  14. Excitation transfer pathways in excitonic aggregates revealed by the stochastic Schr\\"odinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Abramavicius, Vytautas

    2014-01-01

    We derive the stochastic Schr\\"odinger equation for the system wave vector and use it to describe the excitation energy transfer dynamics in molecular aggregates. We suggest a quantum-measurement based method of estimating the excitation transfer time. Adequacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated by performing calculations on a model system. The theory is then applied to study the excitation transfer dynamics in a photosynthetic pigment-protein Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) aggregate using both the Debye spectral density and the spectral density obtained from earlier molecular dynamics simulations containing strong vibrational high-frequency modes. The obtained results show that the excitation transfer times in the FMO system are affected by the presence of the vibrational modes, however the transfer pathways remain the same.

  15. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    –310 fs were found for all samples. Comparison between TA dynamics on uncoated and dye-sensitized hematite nanoparticles revealed the dye de-excitation pathway to consist of a competition between electron and energy transfer to the nanoparticles. We analyzed the TA data for hematite nanoparticles using...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...... photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported...

  16. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  17. Excitation of heavy hydrogen-like ions by light atoms in relativistic collisions with large momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Najjari, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for excitation of heavy hydrogen-like projectile-ions by light target-atoms in collisions where the momentum transfers to the atom are very large on the atomic scale. It is shown that in this process the electrons and the nucleus of the atom behave as (quasi-) free particles with respect to each other and that their motion is governed by the field of the nucleus of the ion. The effect of this field on the atomic particles can be crucial for the contribution to the excitation of the ion caused by the electrons of the atom. Due to comparatively very large nuclear mass, however, this field can be neglected in the calculation of the contribution to the excitation due to the nucleus of the atom.

  18. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  19. Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A; Foulkes, W M C; Horsfield, A P; Mason, D R; Schleife, A; Draeger, E W; Correa, A A

    2016-01-29

    We use time-dependent density functional theory to study self-irradiated Si. We calculate the electronic stopping power of Si in Si by evaluating the energy transferred to the electrons per unit path length by an ion of kinetic energy from 1 eV to 100 keV moving through the host. Electronic stopping is found to be significant below the threshold velocity normally identified with transitions across the band gap. A structured crossover at low velocity exists in place of a hard threshold. An analysis of the time dependence of the transition rates using coupled linear rate equations enables one of the excitation mechanisms to be clearly identified: a defect state induced in the gap by the moving ion acts like an elevator and carries electrons across the band gap.

  20. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  1. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Thin Film Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani E. [Old Dominion University

    2011-01-31

    The effect of nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100) at 250 degrees C was studied. In Situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to measure the surface diffusion coefficient while ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to probe the structure and morphology of the grown quantum dots. The results show that laser excitation of the substrate increases the surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100), changes the growth morphology, improves crystalline structure of the grown quantum dots, and decreases their size distribution. A purely electronic mechanism of enhanced surface diffusion of the deposited Ge is proposed. Ge quantum dots were grown on Si(100)-(2x1) by pulsed laser deposition at various substrate temperatures using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex-situ atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the fim structure and morphology. The morphology of germanium islands on silicon was studied at differect coverages. The results show that femtosecond pulsed laser depositon reduces the minimum temperature for epitaxial growth of Ge quantum dots to ~280 degrees C, which is 120 degrees C lower then previously observed in nanosecond pulsed laser deposition and more than 200 degrees C lower than that reported for molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition.

  2. Regulation of excitation energy transfer in diatom PSII dimer: How does it change the destination of excitation energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokono, Makio; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Energy transfer dynamics in dimeric photosystem II (PSII) complexes isolated from four diatoms, Chaetoceros gracilis, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are examined. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were conducted in the range of 0-80ns. Delayed fluorescence spectra showed a clear difference between PSII monomer and PSII dimer isolated from the four diatoms. The difference can be interpreted as reflecting suppressed energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer for efficient energy trapping at the reaction center. The observation was especially prominent in C. gracilis and T. pseudonana. The pathways seem to be suppressed under a low pH condition in isolated PSII complexes from C. gracilis, and excitation energy may be quenched with fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein (FCP) that was closely associated with PSII in C. gracilis. The energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer may play a role in excitation energy regulation in diatoms.

  3. Role of core excitation in (d ,p ) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltuva, A.; Ross, A.; Norvaišas, E.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    Background: Recent work found that core excitations can be important in extracting structure information from (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d ,p ) reactions and to understand the origin of the dynamical effects. Method: Based on the particle-rotor model of n +10Be , we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies (Sn=0.1 -5.0 MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space-based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the 10Be(d ,p )11Be -like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies Ed=15 -90 MeV. Results: We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, and that of the original structure model. We also explore how different partial waves affect the final cross section. Conclusions: Our results show a strong beam-energy dependence of the extracted spectroscopic factors that become smaller for intermediate beam energies. This dependence increases for loosely bound systems.

  4. Role of core excitation in (d,p) transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Deltuva, A; Norvaišas, E; Nunes, F M

    2016-01-01

    [Background:] Recent work found that core excitation can be important in extracting structure information from (d,p) reactions. [Purpose:] Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d,p) reactions, and understand the origin of the dynamical effects. [Method:] Based on the particle-rotor model of $n+^{10}$Be, we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies ($S_n=0.1-5.0$ MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the $^{10}$Be(d,p)$^{11}$Be like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies from $E_d=15-90$ MeV. [Results:] We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, to that of the original structure model. We al...

  5. Excitation of the lowest electronic transitions in ethanol by low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2016-09-01

    We report absolute differential and integral cross sections for electronic excitation of ethanol, by low-energy electron impact. Cross sections for low-lying excited states were measured at incident electron energies from 9 to 20 eV and at scattering angles from {5}\\circ through {130}\\circ . Our results include cross sections for excitation of the 1{}3A\\prime \\prime and 1{}1A\\prime \\prime states as well as for the 2{}3A\\prime \\prime + 1{}3A\\prime and 2{}1A\\prime \\prime + 2{}1A\\prime cross section sums. Corresponding calculations were also performed using the Schwinger multichannel method, within an 11-channel close-coupling scheme.

  6. Inelastic electron and light scattering from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wells: Zero magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most fundamental approach to an understanding of electronic, optical, and transport phenomena which the condensed matter physics (of conventional as well as nonconventional systems offers is generally founded on two experiments: the inelastic electron scattering and the inelastic light scattering. This work embarks on providing a systematic framework for the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering from the electronic excitations in GaAs/Ga1−xAlxAs quantum wells. To this end, we start with the Kubo's correlation function to derive the generalized nonlocal, dynamic dielectric function, and the inverse dielectric function within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. This is followed by a thorough development of the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering. The methodological part is then subjected to the analytical diagnoses which allow us to sense the subtlety of the analytical results and the importance of their applications. The general analytical results, which know no bounds regarding, e.g., the subband occupancy, are then specified so as to make them applicable to practicality. After trying and testing the eigenfunctions, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum made up of intrasubband and intersubband – single-particle and collective (plasmon – excitations, the loss functions for all the principal geometries envisioned for the inelastic electron scattering, and the Raman intensity, which provides a measure of the real transitions induced by the (laser probe, for the inelastic light scattering. It is found that the dominant contribution to both the loss peaks and the Raman peaks comes from the collective (plasmon excitations. As to the single-particle peaks, the analysis indicates a long-lasting lack of quantitative comparison between theory and experiments. It is inferred that the inelastic electron

  7. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  8. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  9. Time dependent thermal lensing measurements of V-T energy transfer from highly excited NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Beatriz M.; Walunas, Theresa L.; Barker, John R.

    1990-04-01

    The vibrational relaxation of NO2 (excited at 21,631/cm) by Ar, Kr, and Xe is investigated experimentally using the time-dependent thermal lensing (TDTL) apparatus and methods described by Barker and Rothem (1982) and Barker and Toselli (1989). The theoretical basis of TDTL is reviewed; the techniques used to analyze the TDTL signals and determine the beam size are discussed; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The bulk average energy transfer per collision is shown to depend strongly on the vibrational energy, and a sharp increase above about 10,000/cm is tentatively attributed to large-amplitude vibration associated with coupled electronic states. Ar deactivation of NO2 (010) is found to have a V-T rate constant of (5.1 + or - 1.0) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/sec.

  10. Education and solar conversion. Demonstrating electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smestad, Greg P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, ICP-2, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-07-23

    A simplified solar cell fabrication procedure is presented that uses natural anthocyanin or chlorophyll dyes extracted from plants. This procedure illustrates how interdisciplinary science can be taught at lower division university and upper division high school levels for an understanding of renewable energy as well as basic science concepts. Electron transfer occurs on the Earth in the mitochondrial membranes found in living cells, and in the thylakoid membranes found in the photosynthetic cells of green plants. Since we depend on the results of this electron and energy transfer, e.g. in our use of petroleum and agricultural products, it is desirable to understand and communicate how the electron transfer works. The simplified solar cell fabrication procedure, based on nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells, has therefore been developed so that it can be inexpensively reproduced and utilized in the teaching of basic principles in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. A water-based solution of commercial nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) powder is used to deposit a highly porous semiconductor electron acceptor. This acceptor couples the light-driven processes occurring at an organic dye to the macroscopic world and an external electrical circuit. Materials science and semiconductor physics are emphasized during the deposition of the sintered TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline ceramic film. Chelation, complexation and molecular self-assembly are demonstrated during the attachment of the dye molecule to the surface of the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor particles. Environmental chemistry and energy conversion can be linked to these concepts via the regenerative oxidation and reduction cycle found in the cell. The resulting device, made in under 3 h, can be used as a light detector or power generator that produces 0.4-0.5 V at open circuit, and 1-2 mA per square cm under solar illumination

  11. Excited-state intermolecular proton transfer of firefly luciferin III. Proton transfer to a mild base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presiado, Itay; Erez, Yuval; Huppert, Dan

    2010-12-30

    Steady-state and time-resolved techniques were employed to study the excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) from d-luciferin, the natural substrate of the firefly luciferase, to the mild acetate base in aqueous solutions. We found that in 1 M aqueous solutions of acetate or higher, a proton transfer (PT) process to the acetate takes place within 30 ps in both H(2)O and D(2)O solutions. The time-resolved emission signal is composed of three components. We found that the short-time component decay time is 300 and 600 fs in H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively. This component is attributed either to a PT process via the shortest water bridged complex available, ROH··H(2)O··Ac(-), or to PT taking place within a contact ion pair. The second time component of 2000 and 3000 fs for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, is attributed to ROH* acetate complex, whose proton wire is longer by one water molecule. The decay rate of the third, long-time component is proportional to the acetate concentration. We attribute it to the diffusion-assisted reaction as well as to PT process to the solvent.

  12. Vibration transfers to measure the performance of vibration isolated platforms on site using background noise excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segerink, F.B.; Korterik, J.P.; Offerhaus, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    This article demonstrates a quick and easy way of quantifying the performance of a vibration-isolated platform. We measure the vibration transfer from floor to table using background noise excitation from the floor. As no excitation device is needed, our setup only requires two identical sensors (in

  13. Small-angle electron-impact excitation of He 3^1D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Andersen, Nils

    2002-05-01

    With few exceptions, the angular momentum transfer L_⊥ in small-angle electron-impact excitation of atoms is found to be positive, independent of the collision energy, the transition, and even the target of interest. The origin of this strong propensity and its range of validity has been subject of many discussions (see [1] for details). A major violation was found in recent experimental work [2] on electron-impact excitation of the He 3^1D state. We further investigated this problem by analyzing results from various numerical models that differ in the number of coupled states included in a close-coupling expansion. We found that only the most sophisticated ``convergent close-coupling'' (CCC) and ``R-matrix with pseudo-states'' (RMPS) models could reproduce the experimental data. Surprising results were also obtained for the charge cloud representing the excited 3d-electron, e.g., cases where this cloud extends predominantly in a direction perpendicular (rather than parallel) to the collision plane. [1] N. Andersen and K. Bartschat, Polarization, Alignment, and Orientation in Atomic Collisions, Springer (New York, 2000). [2] D. Cvejanović, D.T. McLaughlin, and A. Crowe (2000), J. Phys. B 33, 3013.

  14. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  15. Heat transfer in high density electronics packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to get an insight into the thermal characteristic and to evaluate the thermal reliability of the "System in Packaging"(SIP), a new solution of electronics packaging, a heat transfer model of SIP was developed to predict the heat dissipation capacity and to investigate the effect of different factors on the temperature distribution in the electronics. The affecting parameters under consideration include the thermophysical properties of the substrates, the coefficient of convection heat transfer, the thickness of the chip, and the density of power dissipation. ALGOR, a kind of finite element analysis software,was used to do the model simulation. Based on the sinulation and analysis of the heat conduction and convection resistance, criteria for the thermal design were established and possible measurement for enhancing power dissipation was provided, The results show that the heat transfer model provides a new and effective way to the thermal design and thermal analysis of SIP and to the mechanical analysis for the further investigation of SIP.

  16. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer to carbon atoms: nonadiabatic surface-hopping dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-21

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) between two highly electronegative atoms, for example, oxygen and nitrogen, has been intensely studied experimentally and computationally, whereas there has been much less theoretical work on ESIPT to other atoms such as carbon. We have employed CASSCF, MS-CASPT2, RI-ADC(2), OM2/MRCI, DFT, and TDDFT methods to study the mechanistic photochemistry of 2-phenylphenol, for which such an ESIPT has been observed experimentally. According to static electronic structure calculations, irradiation of 2-phenylphenol populates the bright S1 state, which has a rather flat potential in the Franck-Condon region (with a shallow enol minimum at the CASSCF level) and may undergo an essentially barrierless ESIPT to the more stable S1 keto species. There are two S1/S0 conical intersections that mediate relaxation to the ground state, one in the enol region and one in the keto region, with the latter one substantially lower in energy. After S1 → S0 internal conversion, the transient keto species can return back to the S0 enol structure via reverse ground-state hydrogen transfer in a facile tautomerization. This mechanistic scenario is verified by OM2/MRCI-based fewest-switches surface-hopping simulations that provide detailed dynamic information. In these trajectories, ESIPT is complete within 118 fs; the corresponding S1 excited-state lifetime is computed to be 373 fs in vacuum. Most of the trajectories decay to the ground state via the S1/S0 conical intersection in the keto region (67%), and the remaining ones via the enol region (33%). The combination of static electronic structure computations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations is expected to be generally useful for understanding the mechanistic photophysics and photochemistry of molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  17. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline Payment System (FEDLINE) or the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment...

  18. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  19. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ratnavelu, K. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  20. The collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited molecules: Glimpses of the energy transfer mechanism and distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Chris Arthur

    The relaxation of highly vibrationally excited donor molecules, C4H4N2 and C6F6, (E vib ~ 5 eV), by collisions with a bath of CO2 is investigated using high resolution, infrared transient absorption spectroscopy. The vibrationally hot donor molecules are formed by 248 nm excimer laser pumping, followed by rapid radiationless decay to the ground electronic state. This technique yields the nascent bath quantum state distributions following a single donor/bath collision. Absolute energy transfer rates are measured along with the partitioning of energy among the bath degrees of freedom. These measurements provide insight into the nature of the intermolecular forces mediating the energy transfer and allow the construction of energy transfer distribution functions, P(E,E') for these systems. Pyrazine/CO2 collisions which result in the excitation of bath vibrational modes, including the anti- symmetric stretch (0001), the Fermi-mixed symmetric stretch/bending overtone (1000 r1 and 1000 r2) and the unmixed bending overtone (0220), are studied. The vibrational energy transfer is accompanied by very little rotational and translational excitation and displays the characteristic strong, inverse temperature dependence (probability of transfer increases with decreasing temperature) expected of energy transfer mediated by a long range attractive interaction. Collisions between highly vibrationally excited C6F6 and CO2, which result in significant excitation of the bath rotational and translational degrees of freedom, are examined. This type of energy transfer is mediated by the short range repulsive region of the C6F6/CO2 intermolecular potential. A gap law model is used to fit the weak temperature dependence of these scattering processes in an effort to quantify the energy transfer magnitudes. A prescription for mapping bath quantum state resolved energy transfer rate constants onto an energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E') is described in detail. Analysis of

  1. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-09

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  2. Energy transfer in aminonaphthalimide-boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyads upon one- and two-photon excitation: applications for cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Daniel; Remón, Patricia; Vida, Yolanda; Najera, Francisco; Sen, Pratik; Pischel, Uwe; Perez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel

    2014-03-01

    Aminonaphthalimide-BODIPY energy transfer cassettes were found to show very fast (kEET ≈ 10(10)-10(11) s(-1) and efficient BODIPY fluorescence sensitization. This was observed upon one- and two-photon excitation, which extends the application range of the investigated bichromophoric dyads in terms of accessible excitation wavelengths. In comparison with the direct excitation of the BODIPY chromophore, the two-photon absorption cross-section δ of the dyads is significantly incremented by the presence of the aminonaphthalimide donor [δ ≈ 10 GM for the BODIPY versus 19-26 GM in the dyad at λ(exc)=840 nm; 1 GM (Goeppert-Mayer unit)=10(-50) cm(4) smolecule(-1) photon-(1)]. The electronic decoupling of the donor and acceptor, which is a precondition for the energy transfercassette concept, was demonstrated by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The applicability of the new probes in the one- and twophoton excitation mode was demonstrated in a proof-of-principle approach in the fluorescence imaging of HeLa cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the merging of multiphoton excitation with the energy transfer cassette concept for a BODIPY-containing dyad.

  3. Enhanced energy transfer in respiratory-deficient endothelial cells probed by microscopic fluorescence excitation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Bauer, Manfred; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1996-12-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction may be concomitant with changes of the redox states of the coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH), as well as flavin.mononucleotide or dinucleotide. The intrinsic fluorescence of these coenzymes was therefore proposed to be a measure of malfunction. Since mitochondrial fluorescence is strongly superposed by autofluorescence from various cytoplasmatic fluorophores, cultivated endothelial cells were incubated with the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123), and after excitation of flavin molecules, energy transfer to R123 was investigated. Due to spectral overlap of flavin and R123 fluorescence, energy transfer flavin yields R123 could not be detected from their emission spectra. Therefore, the method of microscopic fluorescence excitation spectroscopy was established. When detecting R123 fluorescence, excitation maxima at 370 - 390 nm and 420-460 nm were assigned to flavins, whereas a pronounced excitation band at 465 - 490 nm was attributed to R123. Therefore, excitation at 475 nm reflected the intracellular concentration of R123, whereas excitation at 385 nm reflected flavin excitation with a subsequent energy transfer to R123 molecules. An enhanced energy transfer after inhibition of specific enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain is discussed in the present article.

  4. Electron-impact excitation of open d-shell ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsbottom, C. A.; Ballance, C. P.; Hibbert, A.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-09-01

    Astrophysics is driven by observations, and in the present era there are a wealth of state-of-the-art ground-based and satellite facilities. The astrophysical spectra emerging from these are of exceptional quality and quantity and cover a broad wavelength range. To meaningfully interpret these spectra, astronomers employ highly complex modelling codes to simulate the astrophysical observations. Important input to these codes include atomic data such as excitation rates, photoionization cross sections, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities and energy levels/line wavelengths. Due to the relatively low temperatures associated with many astrophysical plasmas, the accurate determination of electron-impact excitation rates in the low energy region is essential in generating a reliable spectral synthesis. Hence it is these atomic data, and the main computational methods used to evaluate them, which we focus on in this publication. We consider in particular the complicated open d- shell structures of the Fe-peak ions in low ionization stages. While some of these data can be obtained experimentally, they are usually of insufficient accuracy or limited to a small number of transitions.

  5. Donor-acceptor substituted phenylethynyltriphenylenes – excited state intramolecular charge transfer, solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Nandy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Several 2-(phenylethynyltriphenylene derivatives bearing electron donor and acceptor substituents on the phenyl rings have been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence emission properties of these molecules have been studied in solvents of different polarity. For a given derivative, solvent polarity had minimal effect on the absorption maxima. However, for a given solvent the absorption maxima red shifted with increasing conjugation of the substituent. The fluorescence emission of these derivatives was very sensitive to solvent polarity. In the presence of strongly electron withdrawing (–CN and strongly electron donating (–NMe2 substituents large Stokes shifts (up to 130 nm, 7828 cm−1 were observed in DMSO. In the presence of carbonyl substituents (–COMe and –COPh, the largest Stokes shift (140 nm, 8163 cm−1 was observed in ethanol. Linear correlation was observed for the Stokes shifts in a Lippert–Mataga plot. Linear correlation of Stokes shift was also observed with ET(30 scale for protic and aprotic solvents but with different slopes. These results indicate that the fluorescence emission arises from excited state intramolecular charge transfer in these molecules where the triphenylene chromophore acts either as a donor or as an acceptor depending upon the nature of the substituent on the phenyl ring. HOMO–LUMO energy gaps have been estimated from the electrochemical and spectral data for these derivatives. The HOMO and LUMO surfaces were obtained from DFT calculations.

  6. Influence of multiphonon excitations and transfer on the fusion of Ca+Zr

    CERN Document Server

    Esbensen, H

    2014-01-01

    Fusion data for $^{48}$Ca+$^{90,96}$Zr are analyzed by coupled-channels calculations that are based on the M3Y+repulsion, double-folding potential. By applying a previously determined nuclear density of $^{48}$Ca, the neutron densities of the zirconium isotopes are adjusted to optimize the fit to the fusion data, whereas the proton densities are determined by electron scattering experiments. It is shown that the fusion data can be explained fairly well by including couplings to one- and two-phonon excitations of the reacting nuclei and to one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions but there is also some sensitivity to multiphonon excitations. The neutron skin thicknesses extracted for the two zirconium isotopes are consistent with anti-proton measurements. The densities of the zirconium isotopes are used together with the previously determined nuclear density of $^{40}$Ca to calculate the M3Y+repulsion potentials and predict the fusion cross sections of $^{40}$Ca+$^{90,96}$Zr. The predicted cross sections for $^...

  7. Electron impact excitation of carbon and oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, N.H. Jr.; Mann, J.B.; Merts, A.L.; Robb, W.D.

    1977-04-01

    This report is an attempt at a comprehensive compilation of currently available theoretical data on electron impact excitation of carbon and oxygen ions. It is designed to be of use primarily to theoretical atomic physicists, allowing them a broader than usual view of how various approximations compare. We do not attempt to place an estimate on the accuracy to which any of the collision strengths are known. The reader may obtain some idea of the accuracy from the spread in the calculations. Further, we do not evaluate rate coefficients or make any comparison with observed results. We do provide simple analytic fits to the data, where possible, thus allowing the reader to make comparison with observation or evaluate rate coefficients if he desires. The present data contains little about resonance effects, due to the difficulty of their presentation. It is possible that resonances could make a considerable change in the average collision strength near threshold, and this topic requires further study.

  8. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  9. Photophysical Parameters, Excitation Energy Transfer, and Photoreactivity of 1,4-Bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP Laser Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy A. El-Daly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solvents on the absorption and emission spectra of 1,4-bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP laser dye has been studied in various solvents at 298 K. A bathochromic shift was observed in absorption and fluorescence spectra upon increase of solvent polarity, which indicates that this transition is π-∗. The ground and excited state dipole moments were calculated as 2.23 and 6.34 Debye, respectively. The dye solution in MeOH, n-heptane, and methyl isobutyl ketone gives laser emission in the blue region upon excitation by a 337.1 nm nitrogen pulse; the gain coefficient and emission cross section as well as normalized photostability have been determined. Excitation energy transfer from POPOP to rhodamine B and fluorescine was studied to improve the laser emission from these dyes. Such an energy transfer dye laser system (ETDL obeys a long range columbic energy transfer mechanism with a critical transfer distance, R0, of 25 and 33 Å and kq equal to 10.4×1012 and 26.2×1012M−1s−1 for the POPOP/RB and POPOP/fluorescine pair, respectively. The POPOP dye is highly photostable in polar protic and polar aprotic solvents, while it displays photodecomposition in chloromethane solvent via formation of a contact ion pair. The photochemical quantum yield and rate of photodecomposition depend on the electron affinity of solvent.

  10. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, S M; Pilania, G; Liu, X Y; Allen, J R; Wu, T-C; Atlas, S R; Dunlap, D H

    2015-11-14

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transfer hopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U((FH)). The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. We demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U((FH)), thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. This result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U.

  11. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valone, S. M.; Pilania, G.; Liu, X. Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Allen, J. R.; Wu, T.-C.; Atlas, S. R.; Dunlap, D. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transfer hopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U{sup (FH)}. The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. We demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U{sup (FH)}, thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. This result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U.

  12. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  13. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  14. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    state lifetime of iron based complexes due to spin crossover-the extremely fast intersystem crossing and internal conversion to high spin metal-centered excited states. We revitalize a 30 year old synthetic strategy for extending the MLCT excited state lifetimes of iron complexes by making mixed ligand...... iron complexes with four cyanide (CN-;) ligands and one 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. This enables MLCT excited state and metal-centered excited state energies to be manipulated with partial independence and provides a path to suppressing spin crossover. We have combined X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL......-visible measurement probes allowed electronic transitions between valence states making it sensitive to ligand-centered electronic states such as MLCT states, whereas the Kβ fluorescence spectroscopy provides a sensitive measure of changes in the Fe spin state characteristic of metal-centered excited states. We...

  15. Microwave beatwave excitation of electron plasma wave and high energy electron production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsuzuka, M.; Obata, K.; Nobuhara, S. [Himeji Inst. of Tech., Hyogo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Two X-band microwave beams with a slightly different frequency and the maximum output power of 50 kW are injected into a target plasma antiparallel to each other through a standard horn. The resonant excitation of an electron plasma wave is observed when the difference in frequency between counterstreaming microwaves is equal to the electron plasma frequency. The excited wave propagates in the same direction as the higher-frequency microwave with a wave length which satisfies the resonance condition of wave number. The wave amplitude grows with an increase in incident microwave power, and reaches the density perturbation {delta}n/n{sub 0} of approximately 3.2 % at the incident microwave power of 40 kW and beat frequency of 600 MHz. A small amount of high-energy electrons with the speed of 27 eV are observed in the high-power region of incident microwave. (author)

  16. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  17. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron tr

  18. Generalization of the Mulliken-Hush treatment for the calculation of electron transfer matrix elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for the calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element for electron transfer processes is introduced and results for several systems are presented. The method can be applied to ground and excited state systems and can be used in cases where several states interact strongly. Within the set of states chosen it is a non-perturbative treatment, and can be implemented using quantities obtained solely in terms of the adiabatic states. Several applications based on quantum chemical calculations are briefly presented. Finally, since quantities for adiabatic states are the only input to the method, it can also be used with purely experimental data to estimate electron transfer matrix elements.

  19. DFT study of electronic transfer properties of carboxyl and nitro substituted benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megala, M.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M., E-mail: beulah-rajkumar@yahoo.co.in [PG and Research Department of Physics, Lady Doak College, Madurai – 625002 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The electronic and optical transfer properties of Benzene, Benzoic Acid (BA), Nitrobenzene (NB) and Para Nitro Benzoic Acid (PNBA) at ground and first excited state has been investigated by the Density functional theory (DFT)and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) using SVWN functional/3-21G basis set respectively. Possible intra-molecular charge transfer and n to π* transitions in the ground and the first excitation states have been predicted by the molecular orbitals and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The simulated absorption spectra have been generated and the result compared with existing experimental results.

  20. Transfer line TT70 (electrons from PS to SPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    As injectors for LEP, PS and SPS had to be converted to the acceleration of electrons and positrons. So far, only positively charged particles had been transferred from the PS to the SPS, for the negatively charged electrons a new transfer line, TT70, had to be built. Due to the difference in level of the two machines, the transfer line slopes and tilts.

  1. Excited-state proton transfer of firefly dehydroluciferin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presiado, Itay; Erez, Yuval; Simkovitch, Ron; Shomer, Shay; Gepshtein, Rinat; Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G; Huppert, Dan

    2012-11-08

    Steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques were used to study the protolytic processes in the excited state of dehydroluciferin, a nonbioluminescent product of the firefly enzyme luciferase. We found that the ESPT rate coefficient is only 1.1 × 10(10) s(-1), whereas those of d-luciferin and oxyluciferin are 3.7 × 10(10) and 2.1 × 10(10) s(-1), respectively. We measured the ESPT rate in water-methanol mixtures, and we found that the rate decreases nonlinearly as the methanol content in the mixture increases. The deprotonated form of dehydroluciferin has a bimodal decay with short- and long-time decay components, as was previously found for both D-luciferin and oxyluciferin. In weakly acidic aqueous solutions, the deprotonated form's emission is efficiently quenched. We attribute this observation to the ground-state protonation of the thiazole nitrogen, whose pK(a) value is ~3.

  2. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-05

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes.

  3. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; do N. Varella, M. T.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C5H4O2). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C5H4O2. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20-40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ˜80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6-50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  4. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-10-29

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning we reformulate the method in a computationally e?cient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9-((1-naphthyl)-methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH2-naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety o...

  6. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chodash, Perry Adam [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated con icting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of 235U. If NEET of 235U were to occur, 235mU would be created. 235mU decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of 235mU and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of 235U was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. In addition, explanations for the con icting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of 235U, it is likely that NEET of 235U has never been observed.

  7. Decision making based on optical excitation transfer via near-field interactions between quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Naruse, Makoto; Aono, Masashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Kim, Song-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Optical near-field interactions between nanostructured matter, such as quantum dots, result in unidirectional optical excitation transfer when energy dissipation is induced. This results in versatile spatiotemporal dynamics of the optical excitation, which can be controlled by engineering the dissipation processes and exploited to realize intelligent capabilities such as solution searching and decision making. Here we experimentally demonstrate the ability to solve a decision making problem on the basis of optical excitation transfer via near-field interactions by using colloidal quantum dots of different sizes, formed on a geometry-controlled substrate. We characterize the energy transfer behavior due to multiple control light patterns and experimentally demonstrate the ability to solve the multi-armed bandit problem. Our work makes a decisive step towards the practical design of nanophotonic systems capable of efficient decision making, one of the most important intellectual attributes of the human brain.

  8. Carboxylate shifts steer interquinone electron transfer in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2011-02-18

    Understanding the mechanisms of electron transfer (ET) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) may inspire novel catalysts for sunlight-driven fuel production. The electron exit pathway of type II RCs comprises two quinone molecules working in series and in between a non-heme iron atom with a carboxyl ligand (bicarbonate in photosystem II (PSII), glutamate in bacterial RCs). For decades, the functional role of the iron has remained enigmatic. We tracked the iron site using microsecond-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy after laser-flash excitation of PSII. After formation of the reduced primary quinone, Q(A)(-), the x-ray spectral changes revealed a transition (t½ ≈ 150 μs) from a bidentate to a monodentate coordination of the bicarbonate at the Fe(II) (carboxylate shift), which reverted concomitantly with the slower ET to the secondary quinone Q(B). A redox change of the iron during the ET was excluded. Density-functional theory calculations corroborated the carboxylate shift both in PSII and bacterial RCs and disclosed underlying changes in electronic configuration. We propose that the iron-carboxyl complex facilitates the first interquinone ET by optimizing charge distribution and hydrogen bonding within the Q(A)FeQ(B) triad for high yield Q(B) reduction. Formation of a specific priming intermediate by nuclear rearrangements, setting the stage for subsequent ET, may be a common motif in reactions of biological redox cofactors.

  9. Soliton-like Solutions and Electron Transfer in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D

    2000-06-01

    We consider various mechanisms of long-range electron transfer in DNAwhich enable us to explain recent controversial experiments. We show thatcontinuous super-exchange theory can explain the values of electron rateconstants in short fragments of DNA. The soliton-type electron transfer inlong segments of DNA is also dealt with.

  10. Soliton-like Solutions and Electron Transfer in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhno, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    We consider various mechanisms of long-range electron transfer in DNAwhich enable us to explain recent controversial experiments. We show thatcontinuous super-exchange theory can explain the values of electron rateconstants in short fragments of DNA. The soliton-type electron transfer inlong segments of DNA is also dealt with.

  11. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  12. Optically Forbidden Excitations of 3s Electron of Argon by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱林繁; 成华东; 刘小井; 田鹏; 苑震生; 李文斌; 徐克尊

    2003-01-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of argon in the energy region of 24.5-30.5eV was measured at 2.5 keV impact energy. The line profile parameters of the optically forbidden excitations of 3s-1ns (n = 4-6) and 3s-1nd (n = 3-7) of argon, I.e.,Eγ,Г,q and p,were determined.

  13. Nonlinear lattice relaxation of photogenerated charge-transfer excitation in halogen-bridged mixed-valence metal complexes. II. Polaron channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, A.; Nasu, K.

    1989-03-01

    The one-dimensional extended Peierls-Hubbard model with half-filled-band electrons is studied in order to clarify the lattice relaxation path of the photogenerated charge-transfer excitation in halogen-bridged mixed-valence metal complexes. The ground and excited states are calculated within mean-field theory for electrons and the adiabatic approximation for phonons. It is concluded that the main origin of the photoinduced absorption is a distant pair of the hole-polaron and the electron-polaron. This distant pair is created not from the ground state of the self-trapped exciton (STE), but from the excited states of the STE through their autodissociation. This is consistent with the experiment on the excitation energy dependence of the photoinduced absorption yield.

  14. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d{sup 6}4p (3d{sup 5}4s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6–9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels. - Highlights: • This paper describes the excitation mechanism of iron ion in Okamoto-cavity MIP in comparison with conventional ICP. • Boltzmann distribution is studied among iron ionic lines of

  15. Intramolecular proton or hydrogen-atom transfer in the ground- and excited-states of 2-hydroxybenzophenone: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ping G. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Liang, Yong H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)], E-mail: kaixgl@sina.com.cn; Cao, Chen Z. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2005-08-29

    The internal rotational motion and the ground- and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (GISPT, EISPT) reaction of 2-hydroxybenzophenone (HBP) are studied at the B3LYP/6-31G**, CIS/6-31G** and TD B3LYP/6-31++G** level. The calculated results show that there is only one minimum at the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} state, the enol form (E) is the single minimum at the S{sub 0} state, and its rotamers and tautomers are with more than 8.24 and 10.43 kcal/mol less stable, respectively, however, the keto tautomer (K*) is the single minimum at the S{sub 1} state. Therefore, the ground- and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reacts without a barrier between E and K or E* and K*. The energy gap between the first excited electronic state S{sub 1} 1({pi}, {pi}*){sup 1} and the second excited electronic state S{sub 2} 2(n, {pi}*){sup 1} of E is only 0.019 eV at CIS/6-31G** level. So the S{sub 0} {yields} S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} {yields} S{sub 2} excitation may occur at the same time, and the S{sub 1} state may occur the EISPT process and result a large Stokes shifted fluorescence. And the S{sub 2} state may through internal conversion to the S{sub 1} state or intersystem crossing to the T{sub 2} state. These theoretical results contrast with the conclusion of Nakayama and his coworkers [M. Hagiri, N. Ichinose, J. Kinugasa, T. Iwasa, T. Nakayama, Chem. Lett. 33 (2004) 326] stating the present of two ground-state conformers of HBP.

  16. Nonlinearity and trapping in excitation transfer Dimers and Trimers.

    CERN Document Server

    Barvik, I; Schanz, H; Barvik, Ivan; Esser, Bernd; Schanz, Holger

    1995-01-01

    We study the interplay between nonlinearity in exciton transport and trapping due to a sink site for the dimer and the trimer with chain configuration by a numerical integration of the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Our results for the dimer show, that the formation of a self trapped state due to the nonlinear coupling increases the life time of the exciton substantially. Self trapping can be enhanced by the sink for short times, but for long times it disappears. In the trimer consisting of a subdimer extended by a sink site exists a transition between states localized on the two sites of the subdimer before for larger nonlinear coupling self trapping on one site of the subdimer is observed. For large trapping rates the fear of death effect leads to an increasing life time of the excitation on both, the dimer and the trimer. The sink site is then effectively decoupled. We explain this effect using an asymptotic theory for strong trapping and demonstrate it by direct numerical computation.

  17. Differential cross sections for the electron-impact near-threshold electronic excitation of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, S; Lower, J; Buckman, S; McEachran, R P [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Garcia, G, E-mail: Suhendu.mondal@anu.edu.a [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006, Madrid (Germany)

    2009-11-01

    Absolute accurate differential cross section data are presented for the excitation of the 3p{sup 5}4s state in argon by electron impact. The study focuses on the near-threshold region, where previous studies have revealed persistent disparities between measurement and theory. The time-of-flight (TOF) technique is employed, allowing scattered electrons to be measured over a broad range of energies with constant transmission, thereby eliminating a potential source of error in relating relative intensities of elastic and inelastic transitions inherent to other techniques. The experimental results are compared to new relativistic distorted-wave (RDW) calculations as well as to previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  18. [Excitation energy and frequency of transition spectral line of electron in an asymmetry quantum dot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In an asymmetry quantum dot, the properties of the electron, which is strongly coupled with phonon, were investigated. The variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were studied by using a linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. Numerical calculations for the variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were performed and the results show that the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will strongly increase with decreasing the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length. The first internal excited state energy of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will decrease with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength. The excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will increase with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  19. Differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); and others

    2015-03-14

    We report results from a joint theoretical and experimental investigation into electron scattering from the important organic species phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 15–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10{sup ∘} and 90{sup ∘}. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potentials calculations, with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were conducted at the static exchange plus polarisation (SEP)-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOBSCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was typically fair, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOBSCI.

  20. Theory of interrelated electron and proton transfer processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic and nonadiaba......A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic...

  1. Polarization of Radiation Emitted after Electron Impact Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ze-Qing; LI Yue-Ming; DUAN Bin; YAN Jun; ZHANG Hong

    2007-01-01

    A programme is developed to calculate the polarizations of the radiation emitted after electron impact excitation. The fully relativistic distorted-wave method is used in cross-section calculations. The programme is applied to He- and Li-like ions. The calculated values of line polarization are compared with other theoretical results and experimental values. For He-like U, at lower incident energy, the present polarization agrees with the other theoretical ones within 1%, while at higher energy, the differences increase up to about 10%. For He-like Fe and Ti, the present results of polarization degree for most of the lines agree with the experimental data within the experimental error bars. For the Li-like Ti line q (1s2s2p2P3/2 to 1s22s), the present value of the polarization agree excellently with another theoretical one, and both the values are consistent with the measured data within the experimental error bar.

  2. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  3. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  4. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  5. Excited electronic states and spectroscopy of unsymmetrically substituted polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takao

    2013-09-01

    α-Methyl-ω-phenylpolyenes, Me-(CH=CH)N-Ph, (MPPNs) with N = 2, 3, and 4 were synthesized. Fluorescence, absorption, and excitation spectra of MPPNs have been measured under different conditions along with those of β-methylstyrene. It is shown that there is a forbidden singlet (π, π*) excited state located at energies below the absorbing state for MPPNs with N = 3 and 4. Excitation energies of these polyenes are determined as a function of N. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependence of the relative intensity of the fluorescence spectrum and its solvent shift behavior extract estimates of the various physical parameters that characterize excitation energies and excited-state dynamical behavior of MPPN with N = 3. The singlet excited states of the MPPNs were compared with those of the α,ω-diphenylpolyenes and α,ω-dimethylpolyenes.

  6. The evaluation of temporal electronic structures of nonresonant Raman excited virtual state of thiourea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chao; Sun Li-Feng

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm has been introduced to calculate molecular bond polarizabilities of thiourea, which supply essential electronic information about the nonresonant Raman excited virtual states.The main dynamical behaviour of the excited virtual states of thiourea is that the Raman excited electrons tend to flow to the N-H bonds and C-N bonds from the S-C bonds because of the electronic repulsion effect. The difference in Raman excited electron relaxation time of thiourea under 514.5-nm and 325-nm excitations has been observed, which quantitatively shows that the Raman scattering process is dependent on the wavelength of the pumping laser. Finally, the distribution of the electrons at the final stage of relaxation is given out through the comparison between the bond electronic densities of the ground states and the bond polarizabilities after deexcitation.

  7. Photoinduced Electron Transfer within Supramolecular Donor-Acceptor Peptide Nanostructures under Aqueous Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Allix M; Magnanelli, Timothy J; Bragg, Arthur E; Tovar, John D

    2016-03-16

    We report the synthesis, self-assembly, and electron transfer capabilities of peptide-based electron donor-acceptor molecules and supramolecular nanostructures. These modified peptides contain π-conjugated oligothiophene electron donor cores that are peripherally substituted with naphthalene diimide electron acceptors installed via imidation of site-specific lysine residues. These molecules self-assemble into one-dimensional nanostructures in aqueous media, as shown through steady-state absorption, photoluminescence, and circular dichroism spectra, as well as transmission electron microscopy. Excitation of the oligothiophene donor moieties results in electron transfer to the acceptor units, ultimately creating polar, charge-separated states that persist for over a nanosecond as observed with transient absorption spectroscopy. This study demonstrates how transient electric fields can be engineered into aqueous nanomaterials of biomedical relevance through external, temporally controlled photonic inputs.

  8. Optically Forbidden Excitations of 2s Electron of Neon Studied by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Min; ZHU Lin-Fan; LIU Cun-Ding; XU Ke-Zun

    2008-01-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum in the energy region of 42-48.5 eV of neon is measured with an angle-resolved fast-electron energy-loss spectrometer at an incident electron energy of 2500eV. Besides the dipole-allowed autoionization transitions of 2s-1np (n = 3, 4) and 2p-23s3p, the dipole-forbidden ones of 2s-1ns (n = 3 - 6) and 2s-13d are observed. The line profile parameters, i.e. ET, F and q for these transitions, are determined, and the momentum transfer dependence behaviour is discussed.

  9. Comparison of excitation energy transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I in solution and immobilized on conducting glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Sebastian; Giera, Wojciech; D'Haene, Sandrine; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Excitation energy transfer in monomeric and trimeric forms of photosystem I (PSI) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in solution or immobilized on FTO conducting glass was compared using time-resolved fluorescence. Deposition of PSI on glass preserves bi-exponential excitation decay of ~4-7 and ~21-25 ps lifetimes characteristic of PSI in solution. The faster phase was assigned in part to photochemical quenching (charge separation) of excited bulk chlorophylls and in part to energy transfer from bulk to low-energy (red) chlorophylls. The slower phase was assigned to photochemical quenching of the excitation equilibrated over bulk and red chlorophylls. The main differences between dissolved and immobilized PSI (iPSI) are: (1) the average excitation decay in iPSI is about 11 ps, which is faster by a few ps than for PSI in solution due to significantly faster excitation quenching of bulk chlorophylls by charge separation (~10 ps instead of ~15 ps) accompanied by slightly weaker coupling of bulk and red chlorophylls; (2) the number of red chlorophylls in monomeric PSI increases twice-from 3 in solution to 6 after immobilization-as a result of interaction with neighboring monomers and conducting glass; despite the increased number of red chlorophylls, the excitation decay accelerates in iPSI; (3) the number of red chlorophylls in trimeric PSI is 4 (per monomer) and remains unchanged after immobilization; (4) in all the samples under study, the free energy gap between mean red (emission at ~710 nm) and mean bulk (emission at ~686 nm) emitting states of chlorophylls was estimated at a similar level of 17-27 meV. All these observations indicate that despite slight modifications, dried PSI complexes adsorbed on the FTO surface remain fully functional in terms of excitation energy transfer and primary charge separation that is particularly important in the view of photovoltaic applications of this photosystem.

  10. Cation-modulated electron-transfer channel: H-atom transfer vs proton-coupled electron transfer with a variable electron-transfer channel in acylamide units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2007-08-08

    The mechanism of proton transfer (PT)/electron transfer (ET) in acylamide units was explored theoretically using density functional theory in a representative model (a cyclic coupling mode between formamide and the N-dehydrogenated formamidic radical, FF). In FF, PT/ET normally occurs via a seven-center cyclic proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism with a N-->N PT and an O-->O ET. However, when different hydrated metal ions are bound to the two oxygen sites of FF, the PT/ET mechanism may significantly change. In addition to their inhibition of PT/ET rate, the hydrated metal ions can effectively regulate the FF PT/ET cooperative mechanism to produce a single pathway hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) or a flexible proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism by changing the ET channel. The regulation essentially originates from the change in the O...O bond strength in the transition state, subject to the binding ability of the hydrated metal ions. In general, the high valent metal ions and those with large binding energies can promote HAT, and the low valent metal ions and those with small binding energies favor PCET. Hydration may reduce the Lewis acidity of cations, and thus favor PCET. Good correlations among the binding energies, barrier heights, spin density distributions, O...O contacts, and hydrated metal ion properties have been found, which can be used to interpret the transition in the PT/ET mechanism. These findings regarding the modulation of the PT/ET pathway via hydrated metal ions may provide useful information for a greater understanding of PT/ET cooperative mechanisms, and a possible method for switching conductance in nanoelectronic devices.

  11. Excited-state proton transfer from pyranine to acetate in methanol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudip Kumar Mondal; Subhadip Ghosh; Kalyanasis Sahu; Pratik Sen; Kankan Bhattacharyya

    2007-03-01

    Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulphonate, HPTS) to acetate in methanol has been studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The rate constant of direct proton transfer from pyranine to acetate (1) is calculated to be ∼ 1 × 109 M-1 s-1. This is slower by about two orders of magnitude than that in bulk water (8 × 1010 M-1 s-1) at 4 M acetate.

  12. Distant- and Shape-Dependent Excitation Energy Transfer in Nanohybrid Systems: Computations on a Pheophorbide-α CdSe Nanocrystal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Dirk; May, Volkhard

    2014-04-03

    The combination of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) and molecules for efficient electronic excitation energy transfer is expected to be a promising ingredient of novel hybrid photovoltaic devices. Here energy transfer from a CdSe NC to the tetrapyrrole-type Pheophorbide-a molecule (Pheo) is studied theoretically. The rate expression accounts for the correct NC-Pheo transfer coupling, for the multitude of NC single exciton levels as well as their thermal distribution, and for the electron-vibrational Pheo states. A spherical Cd1159Se1450 NC is compared with a similar large NC of pyramidal and hemisphere shape. Because of the different exciton energies and wave functions, the transfer rates differ somewhat. For all three types of NC, however, the Coulomb correlation essentially determines the magnitude of the transfer coupling and the exciton energy. In any case, the energy-transfer coupling is below 1 meV, excluding hybrid-state formation.

  13. Targeting excited states in all-trans polyenes with electron-pair states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-12-01

    Wavefunctions restricted to electron pair states are promising models for strongly correlated systems. Specifically, the pair Coupled Cluster Doubles (pCCD) ansatz allows us to accurately describe bond dissociation processes and heavy-element containing compounds with multiple quasi-degenerate single-particle states. Here, we extend the pCCD method to model excited states using the equation of motion (EOM) formalism. As the cluster operator of pCCD is restricted to electron-pair excitations, EOM-pCCD allows us to target excited electron-pair states only. To model singly excited states within EOM-pCCD, we modify the configuration interaction ansatz of EOM-pCCD to contain also single excitations. Our proposed model represents a simple and cost-effective alternative to conventional EOM-CC methods to study singly excited electronic states. The performance of the excited state models is assessed against the lowest-lying excited states of the uranyl cation and the two lowest-lying excited states of all-trans polyenes. Our numerical results suggest that EOM-pCCD including single excitations is a good starting point to target singly excited states.

  14. Effect of vacuum polarization on the excitation of hydrogen atom by electron impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Bhattacharyya

    1981-01-01

    for 1S−2S excitation of the hydrogen atom by electron impact. The excitation amplitude calculated field theoretically is found to be lowered by 0.47t2/(t2+93 where t2=4|P−Q|2, P and Q being the momenta of the incident and scattered electrons respectively.

  15. Electronic transfer of sensitive patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, A M W; Kaiser, J; Hirschfelder, U

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop decision-making aids and recommendations for dental practitioners regarding the utilization and sharing of sensitive digital patient data. In the current environment of growing digitization, healthcare professionals need detailed knowledge of secure data management to maximize confidentiality and minimize the risks involved in both archiving patient data and sharing it through electronic channels. Despite well-defined legal requirements, an all-inclusive technological solution does not currently exist. The need for a preliminary review and critical appraisal of common practices of data transfer prompted a search of the literature and the Web to identify viable methods of secure data exchange and to develop a flowchart. A strong focus was placed on the transmission of datasets both smaller than and larger than 10 MB, and on secure communication by smartphone. Although encryption of patient-related data should be routine, it is often difficult to implement. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) are viable standards for secure e-mail encryption. Sharing of high-volume data should be accomplished with the help of file encryption. Careful handling of sensitive patient data is mandatory, and it is the end-user's responsibility to meet any requirements for encryption, preferably by using free, open-source (and hence transparent) software.

  16. Investigation of the charge-transfer in photo-excited nanoparticles for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Nada M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoinduced charge separation in TiO2 and Cu2O semiconductor nanoparticles was examined using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy in order to get insight into the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 in nonaqueous media. For dissolution/grafting of CO2 we have used carboxy-PEG4-amine, and as a solvent poly(ethylene glycol 200. We have found that, in this system, reduction of CO2 starts at potential of -0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl, which is significantly more positive than the potential for electrochemical reduction of CO2 in most organic solvents and water (-2.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The electron transfer from excited nanoparticles to CO2 is governed both by thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, namely by the redox potential of conduction band electrons and adsorption/binding of CO2 on the surface of nanoparticles.

  17. Time-dependent transition density matrix for visualizing charge-transfer excitations in photoexcited organic donor-acceptor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Ullrich, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    The time-dependent transition density matrix (TDM) is a useful tool to visualize and interpret the induced charges and electron-hole coherences of excitonic processes in large molecules. Combined with time-dependent density functional theory on a real-space grid (as implemented in the octopus code), the TDM is a computationally viable visualization tool for optical excitation processes in molecules. It provides real-time maps of particles and holes which gives information on excitations, in particular those that have charge-transfer character, that cannot be obtained from the density alone. Some illustration of the TDM and comparison with standard density difference plots will be shown for photoexcited organic donor-acceptor molecules. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1005651

  18. Coronenetetraimide-centered cruciform pentamers containing multiporphyrin units: synthesis and sequential photoinduced energy- and electron-transfer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasobe, Taku; Ida, Koichi; Sakai, Hayato; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-07-27

    A series of coronenetetraimide (CorTIm)-centered cruciform pentamers containing multiporphyrin units, in which four porphyrin units are covalently linked to a CorTIm core through benzyl linkages, were designed and synthesized to investigate their structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties as well as photoinduced electron- and energy-transfer dynamics. These systems afforded the first synthetic case of coroneneimide derivatives covalently linked with dye molecules. The steady-state absorption and electrochemical results indicate that a CorTIm and four porphyrin units were successfully characterized by the corresponding reference monomers. In contrast, the steady-state fluorescence measurements demonstrated that strong fluorescence quenching relative to the corresponding monomer units was observed in these pentamers. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis measurements revealed the occurrence of intermolecular electron transfer from triplet excited state of zinc porphyrins to CorTIm. Femtosecond laser-induced transient absorption measurements for excitation of the CorTIm unit clearly demonstrate the sequential photoinduced energy and electron transfer between CorTIm and porphyrins, that is, occurrence of the initial energy transfer from CorTIm (energy donor) to porphyrins (energy acceptor) and subsequent electron transfer from porphyrins (electron donor) to CorTIm (electron acceptor) in these pentamers, whereas only the electron-transfer process from porphyrins to CorTIm was observed when we mainly excite porphyrin units. Finally, construction of high-order supramolecular patterning of these pentamers was performed by utilizing self-assembly and physical dewetting during the evaporation of solvent.

  19. Symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state of meso-linked BODIPY dyads

    KAUST Repository

    Whited, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of symmetric BODIPY dyads where the chromophores are attached at the meso position, using either a phenylene bridge or direct linkage. Both molecules undergo symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state, and the directly linked dyad serves as a visible-light-absorbing analogue of 9,9′-bianthryl.

  20. Excited-state proton transfer and ion pair formation in a Cinchona organocatalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumpulainen, T.; Brouwer, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The excited-state proton transfer and subsequent intramolecular ion pair formation of a cupreidine-derived Cinchona organocatalyst (BnCPD) were studied in THF-water mixtures using picosecond time-resolved fluorescence together with global analysis. Full spectral and kinetic characterization of all t

  1. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low-to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work. (author)

  2. Generating Excitement: Build Your Own Generator to Study the Transfer of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kurt; Rommel-Esham, Katie; Farthing, Dori; Sheldon, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of energy from one form to another can be difficult to understand. The electrical energy that turns on a lamp may come from the burning of coal, water falling at a hydroelectric plant, nuclear reactions, or gusts of wind caused by the uneven heating of the Earth. The authors have developed and tested an exciting hands-on activity to…

  3. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredin, Lisa A.; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-01

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective.

  4. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredin, Lisa A; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-14

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective.

  5. Nonlocality in the excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    CERN Document Server

    Bengtson, Charlotta; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Pigment protein complexes involved in photosynthesis are remarkably efficient in transferring excitation energy from light harvesting antenna molecules to a reaction centre where it is converted to and stored as chemical energy. Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that quantum coherence and correlations may play a role in explaining this efficiency. We examine whether bipartite nonlocality, a property that verifies a strong correlation between two quantum systems, exists between different pairs of chromophore states in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex and how this is connected to the amount of bipartite entanglement. In particular, it is tested in what way these correlation properties are affected by different initial conditions (i.e., which chromophore is initially excited). When modeling the excitation energy transfer (EET) in the FMO complex with the hierarchically coupled equations of motions (HEOM), it is found that bipartite nonlocality indeed exists for some pairs of chromophore s...

  6. Peroxyacetyl radical: Electronic excitation energies, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and symmetry breaking in the first excited state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copan, Andreas V.; Wiens, Avery E.; Nowara, Ewa M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Agarwal, Jay, E-mail: jagarwal@uga.edu [Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    Peroxyacetyl radical [CH{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2}] is among the most abundant peroxy radicals in the atmosphere and is involved in OH-radical recycling along with peroxyacetyl nitrate formation. Herein, the ground (X{sup ~}) and first (A{sup ~}) excited state surfaces of cis and trans peroxyacetyl radical are characterized using high-level ab initio methods. Geometries, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic excitation energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit are reported from computations with coupled-cluster theory. Excitation of the trans conformer is found to induce a symmetry-breaking conformational change due to second-order Jahn-Teller interactions with higher-lying excited states. Additional benchmark computations are provided to aid future theoretical work on peroxy radicals.

  7. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of ru(II)-polypy6ridine sensitized TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubikova, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Snoeberger, Robert C [YALE UNIV.; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory calculations are applied to study interfacial electron transfer (IET) from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} into the (101) surface of anatase TiO{sub 2}. IET rate from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid attached to the nanoparticle in bidentate mode ({tau} {approx} 100 fs) is an order of magnitude faster than the IET rate of the adsorbate attached in the monodentate mode ({tau} {approx} 1 ps). Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} attached to TiO{sub 2} in bidentate binding mode will undergo IET with the rate of {approx} 1-10 ps, which is competitive with the excited state decay into the ground state. The probability of electron injection from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} is rather low, as the excitation with visible light localizes the excited electron in the tpy-tpy bridge, which does not have favorable coupling with the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle. The results are relevant to better understanding of the adsorbate features important for promoting efficient interfacial electron transfer into the semiconductor.

  8. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P; Kirkby, Oliver M; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A; Fielding, Helen H

    2016-04-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block.

  9. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P.; Kirkby, Oliver M.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block.

  10. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1005 RIN 3170-AA15 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer... Financial Protection (Bureau) is proposing to amend Regulation E, which implements the Electronic Fund... phrase ``normal course of business'' in the definition of ``remittance transfer provider.''...

  11. Time-resolved EPR identifies unexpected electron transfer in cryptochrome**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Schleicher, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tuning photoinduced electron transfer: Subtle differences in local sequence and conformation can produce diversity and specificity in electron transfer (ET) in proteins, despite high structural conservation of redox partners. For individual ET steps, distance is not necessarily the decisive parameter; orientation and solvent accessibility of ET partners, and therefore, stabilization of charge-separated states contribute substantially. PMID:22086606

  12. 78 FR 66251 - Electronic Fund Transfers(Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1005 RIN 3170-AA33 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer... countries that qualify for an exception in subpart B of Regulation E, which implements the Electronic Fund....consumerfinance.gov/remittances-transfer-rule-amendment-to-regulation-e/ . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  13. THE ELECTRONIC COURSE OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Solodov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electronic course of heat and mass transfer in power engineering is presented containing the full Electronic book as the structured hypertext document, the full set of Mathcad-documents with the whole set of educative computer models of heat and mass transfer, the computer labs, and selected educational presentations. 

  14. Electron and hole transfer from indium phosphide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, J L; Selmarten, D C; Ellingson, R J; Jones, M; Micic, O; Nozik, A J

    2005-02-24

    Electron- and hole-transfer reactions are studied in colloidal InP quantum dots (QDs). Photoluminescence quenching and time-resolved transient absorption (TA) measurements are utilized to examine hole transfer from photoexcited InP QDs to the hole acceptor N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) and electron transfer to nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) films. Core-confined holes are effectively quenched by TMPD, resulting in a new approximately 4-ps component in the TA decay. It is found that electron transfer to TiO2 is primarily mediated through surface-localized states on the InP QDs.

  15. Probing nuclear shell structure beyond the N=40 subshell using multiple Coulomb excitation and transfer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Stefanie Christine

    2015-11-13

    In this work, the N=40 subshell closure is investigated with two complementary methods using a radioactive {sup 72}Zn ISOLDE beam: One- and two-neutron transfer reactions and multiple Coulomb excitation. In the one-neutron transfer reaction, two new levels of {sup 73}Zn were discovered. The two-neutron transfer channel allowed to study the differential cross section of the ground state and the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state of {sup 74}Zn. In the Coulomb excitation experiment, the measured B(E2) values and quadrupole moments of {sup 72}Zn showed that the yrast states 0{sup +}{sub 1}, 2{sup +}{sub 1} and 4{sup +}{sub 1} are moderately collective. Contrary, the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state has a different structure, since it features a stronger closed N=40 configuration compared to the ground state.

  16. Excited-state proton coupled charge transfer modulated by molecular structure and media polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-02-01

    Charge and proton transfer reactions in the excited states of organic dyes can be coupled in many different ways. Despite the complementarity of charges, they can occur on different time scales and in different directions of the molecular framework. In certain cases, excited-state equilibrium can be established between the charge-transfer and proton-transfer species. The interplay of these reactions can be modulated and even reversed by variations in dye molecular structures and changes of the surrounding media. With knowledge of the mechanisms of these processes, desired rates and directions can be achieved, and thus the multiple emission spectral features can be harnessed. These features have found versatile applications in a number of cutting-edge technological areas, particularly in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  17. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. I.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of CO2 are reported in the 7 to 10 eV energy-loss range, at energies of 0.2, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 7.0 eV above threshold, and at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct overlapping continua with weak, diffuse bands superimposed are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of recent ab initio configuration-interaction calculations of the vertical transition energies of CO2. The experimental spectra are shown to be consistent with the excitation states of CO2.

  18. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  19. Dielectronic recombination and resonant transfer excitation processes for helium-like krypton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Xiao-Li; Qu Yi-Zhi; Zhang Song-Bin; Zhang Yu

    2012-01-01

    The relativistic configuration interaction method is employed to calculate the dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections of helium-like krypton via the 1s21nl' (n =2,3,...,15) resonances.Then,the resonant transfer excitation (RTE) processes of Kr34+ colliding with H,He,H2,and CHx (x =0-4) targets are investigated under the impulse approximation.The needed Compton profiles of targets are obtained from the Hartree-Fock wave functions.The RTE cross sections are strongly dependent on DR resonant energies and strengths,and the electron momentum distributions of the target.For H2 and H targets,the ratio of their RTE cross sections changes from 1.85 for the 1s2121' to 1.88 for other resonances,which demonstrates the weak molecular effects on the Compton profiles of H2.For CHx (x =0-4) targets,the main contribution to the RTE cross section comes from the carbon atom since carbon carries 6 electrons;as the number of hydrogen increases in CHx,the RTE cross section almost increases by the same value,displaying the strong separate atom character for the hydrogen.However,further comparison of the individual orbital contributions of C(2p,2s,ls) and CH4(1t2,2a1,1a1) to the RTE cross sections shows that the molecular effects induce differences of about 25.1%,19.9%,and 0.2% between 2p-1t2,2s-2a1,and 1s-1a1 orbitals,respectively.

  20. Ruthenium-phenothiazine electron transfer dyad with a photoswitchable dithienylethene bridge: flash-quench studies with methylviologen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bice; Wenger, Oliver S

    2012-04-02

    A molecular ensemble composed of a phenothiazine (PTZ) electron donor, a photoisomerizable dithienylethene (DTE) bridge, and a Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) electron acceptor was synthesized and investigated by optical spectroscopic and electrochemical means. Our initial intention was to perform flash-quench transient absorption studies in which the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) unit is excited selectively ("flash") and its (3)MLCT excited state is quenched oxidatively ("quench") by excess methylviologen prior to intramolecular electron transfer from phenothiazine to Ru(III) across the dithienylethene bridge. However, after selective Ru(bpy)(3)(2+1)MLCT excitation of the dyad with the DTE bridge in its open form, (1)MLCT → (3)MLCT intersystem crossing on the metal complex is followed by triplet-triplet energy transfer to a (3)π-π* state localized on the DTE unit. This energy transfer process is faster than bimolecular oxidative quenching with methylviologen at the ruthenium site (Ru(III) is not observed); only the triplet-excited DTE then undergoes rapid (10 ns, instrumentally limited) bimolecular electron transfer with methylviologen. Subsequently, there is intramolecular electron transfer with PTZ. The time constant for formation of the phenothiazine radical cation via intramolecular electron transfer occurring over two p-xylene units is 41 ns. When the DTE bridge is photoisomerized to the closed form, PTZ(+) cannot be observed any more. Irrespective of the wavelength at which the closed isomer is irradiated, most of the excitation energy appears to be funneled rapidly into a DTE-localized singlet excited state from which photoisomerization to the open form occurs within picoseconds.

  1. Terahertz and Microwave Devices Based on the Photo-Excited Low Dimensional Electronic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-11

    condition that is realized by photo-exciting the system with electromagnetic waves in the microwave and THz parts of the radiation spectrum, in the...electron system. This research aimed to advance the understanding of such radiation -induced phenomena in the two-dimensional electron system, while helping...exciting a high mobility low dimensional electron system. This research aimed to advance the understanding of such radiation -induced phenomena in the two

  2. Electron-beam-sustained discharge revisited - light emission from combined electron beam and microwave excited argon at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Dandl, T; Neumeier, A; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    A novel kind of electron beam sustained discharge is presented in which a 12keV electron beam is combined with a 2.45GHz microwave power to excite argon gas at atmospheric pressure in a continuous mode of operation. Optical emission spectroscopy is performed over a wide wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared (NIR). Several effects which modify the emission spectra compared to sole electron beam excitation are observed and interpreted by the changing plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and gas temperature.

  3. Femtosecond spectroscopic studies of photoinduced electron transfer in MDMO-PPV:ZnO hybrid bulk heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchetto, E.; De Cola, L. [Institute of Physics, University of Muenster, Mendelstrasse 7, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Slooff, H. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zhang, H. [Van ' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129, 1018 WS Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-01-15

    The photophysics of charge carriers (polaron) in MDMO-PPV:ZnO hybrid bulk heterojunction is studied at 80 K by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A short-lived positive polaron is observed in the blend phase in MDMO-PPV:ZnO blend films with a weight ratio of 1:1 and 1:2. Further increase of ZnO weight ratio results in a significant quenching of the polaron absorption. The results are discussed in the concept that both pristine polymer and MDMO-PPV:ZnO blend phases coexist in the blend films. It is concluded that a polaron is photogenerated within the excitation laser pulse (<100 fs) and electron transfer efficiency is highest in blend films 1:1 and 1:2. Lack of the interfacial area and faster back electron transfer process are discussed to be responsible for the quenching of the electron transfer efficiency in blend film 1:3.

  4. Excited-state proton transfer of fluorescein anion as an ionic liquid component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Catarina A B; Graça, Cátia; Maçôas, Ermelinda; Fedorov, Alexander; Afonso, Carlos A M; Martinho, José M G

    2013-11-14

    Fluorescent ionic liquids (FILs) incorporating the fluorescein anion have been prepared by anion exchange of the parent quaternary ammonium chloride (Quat(+)Cl(-)) ionic liquid. By controlling the molar ratio of fluorescein to Quat(+)Cl(-), ionic liquids incorporating different prototropic forms of fluorescein were prepared. The 1:1 molar ratio ionic liquid (FIL1) is essentially composed of monoanionic fluorescein, while dianionic fluorecein is predominant in the FIL with a 1:2 molar ratio (FIL2). The fluorescence excitation spectrum of FIL2 is markedly different from its absorption spectrum. Absorption features the fluorescein dianion, while the excitation spectrum is exclusively due to the monoanion. In FIL1, the absorption and excitation spectra are both characteristic of the monoanion. In both FILs, emission of the dianion is observed upon excitation of the monoanion. This unusual behavior is interpreted in the context of a fast deprotonation of the monoanion in the excited state. The presence of residual water in the ionic liquid is important for the proton transfer process. By lowering the pH of FIL1, the transient proton transfer is inhibited, and the emission of the monoanion could be observed. The FILs have completely different spectroscopic properties from solvated fluorescein in Quat(+)Cl(-), where the prototropic equilibrium is shifted toward the neutral forms.

  5. Dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact resonant dissociation of vibrationally excited O2 molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J

    2015-01-01

    State-by-state cross sections for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation for molecular oxygen are computed using ab initio resonance curves calculated with the R-matrix method. When O2 is in its vibrational ground state, the main contribution for both processes comes from the $^2\\Pi_u$ resonance state of $O_2^-$ but with a significant contribution from the $^4\\Sigma$ resonant state. Vibrational excitation leads to an increased contribution from the low-lying $^2\\Pi_{g}$ resonance, greatly increased cross sections for both processes, and the threshold moving to lower energies. These results provide important input for models of O2-containing plasmas in nonequilibrium conditions.

  6. Ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics of the ultrafast excitation energy transfer in small semiconducting carbon nanotube aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupna, Olena; Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2012-02-01

    Outstanding physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), such as well-defined optical resonance and ultrafast nonlinear response, result in CNTs gaining popularity in academic and industrial endeavors as potential effective energy generating devices. Following recent experiments on ultrafast excitation energy transfer in small semiconducting carbon nanotube aggregates [1], we report results of ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation of the energy transfer taking place in two carbon nanotube systems. We investigate the energy transfer between (8,4) and (10,0) CNTs, as well as (8,4) and (13,0) CNTs. In both cases, the CNTs are orthogonal to each other. Luer et al. in [1] elucidate the second excitonic transitions followed by fast intratube relaxation and energy transfer from the (8,4) CNT toward other acceptor tubes. Our project aims to provide a better understanding of the energy transfer mechanism in the given systems, which should foster development of a theory for the electronic structure and dynamics of CNT networks, hence enhancing their tailoring and application in the future. References 1.Larry Luer, Jared Crochet, Tobias Hertel, Giulio Cerullo, Gugliermo Lanzani. ACSNano. Vol.4, No. 7, 4265-4273

  7. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  8. Nonradiative transfer of excitation in coherent decay from a Gaussian atomic distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Richard, E-mail: rfriedberg1@nyc.rr.com [Physics Department, Columbia University, NY (United States)

    2011-09-14

    Coherent decay of a spherically symmetric ensemble of initially resonantly phased two-level atoms is studied in the scalar photon model, in the continuum and Markov approximations. Emphasis is on the Gaussian distribution, where nonradiative transfer of excitation to excited states orthogonal to the initial one is found to be nonzero even in the limit of short wavelength, whether or not the scalar kernel exp(ik{sub 0}R)/ik{sub 0}R is replaced by its real part. Numerical results are compared to known values for the uniform distribution.

  9. Dissection of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain in Escherichia coli DNA photolyase: Trp382 is the primary donor in photoactivation

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    In Escherichia coli photolyase, excitation of the FAD cofactor in its semireduced radical state (FADH•) induces an electron transfer over ≈15 Å from tryptophan W306 to the flavin. It has been suggested that two additional tryptophans are involved in an electron transfer chain FADH• ← W382 ← W359 ← W306. To test this hypothesis, we have mutated W382 into redox inert phenylalanine. Ultrafast transient absorption studies showed that, in WT photolyase, excited FADH• de...

  10. First-principle studies of electronic structure and magnetic excitations in FeSe monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhirov, Timur; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2013-03-01

    Recent experimental advances made it possible to study single-layered superconducting systems of iron-based compounds. The results show evidence of significant enhancement of superconducting properties compared to the bulk case. We use first-principle pseudopotential density functional theory techniques and the local spin-density approximation to study the electronic properties of an FeSe monolayer in different spin configurations. The results show that the experimental shape of the Fermi surface is best described by a checkerboard antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin arrangement. To explore the underlying pairing mechanism, we study the evolution of the non-magnetic to the AFM-ordered structures under constrained magnetization, and we estimate the electronic coupling to magnetic excitations involving transfer and increase of iron magnetic moments and compare it to the electron-phonon coupling. Finally, we simulate the substrate-induced interaction by using uniform charge doping and show that the latter can lead to an increase in the density of states at the Fermi level and possibly produce higher superconducting transition temperatures. This work was supported by NSF grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility

  11. On the ultrashort lifetime of electronically excited thiophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovejas, Virginia; Fernández-Fernández, Marta; Montero, Raúl; Longarte, Asier

    2016-09-01

    The relaxation dynamics of thiophenol, excited from the onset of the S1 (11ππ∗) state absorption, to the more intense S3 (21ππ∗) state band (290-244 nm), has been studied by time resolved ion yield spectroscopy. Along the studied energy range, the reached excited states relax in less 100 fs. These results evidence that the photophysics is dominated by the non-adiabatic coupling between the initially excited S1 and S31ππ∗ states, and the dissociative character 1πσ∗ state. Contrarily to phenol, the 11ππ∗/1πσ∗ crossing is reached from the origin of the 11ππ∗ state absorption, through a nearly barrierless pathway.

  12. Fully Relativistic Electron Impact Excitation Cross-Section and Polarization for Tungsten Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron impact excitation of highly charged tungsten ions in the framework of a fully relativistic distorted wave approach is considered in this paper. Calculations of electron impact excitation cross-sections for the M- and L-shell transitions in the tungsten ions Wn+ (n = 44–66 and polarization of the decay of photons from the excited tungsten ions are briefly reviewed and discussed. New calculations in the wide range of incident electron energies are presented for M-shell transitions in the K-like through Ne-like tungsten ions.

  13. Valence-Shell Excitations of Nitrous Oxide Studied by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-Wei; WANG You-Yan; ZHU Lin-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The valence-shell excitations of nitrous oxide are studied by fast electron energy loss spectroscopy.From the spectra measured at 2.5keV and scattering angles of 3.5°-8.5°,it is found that the asymmetric peak of the transition B 1△ can be well fitted by Haarhoff-Van der Linde function,while the symmetric peaks of the transitions of C1Π and D1∑+ can be well fitted by the Voigt function.The parameters of the peak profiles of B1△,C1Π and D1∑+,i.e.,their energy level positions and linewidths,are determined.With the aid of these parameters,the overlapping spectra measured at the low-energy electron impact can be deconvolved,which provides the possibility to determine the quantitative differential cross sections.The present results also show that the peak profiles of the transitions of B1△,C1Π and D1∑+ are independent of the momentum transfer.%The valence-shell excitations of nitrous oxide are studied by fast electron energy loss spectroscopy. From the spectra measured at 2.5keV and scattering angles of 3.5°-8.5°, it is found that the asymmetric peak of the transition B1A can be well fitted by Haarhoff-Van der Linde function, while the symmetric peaks of the transitions of C1II. And D1∑+ can be well fitted by the Voigt function. The parameters of the peak profiles of B1△, C1II and D1∑+, I.e., their energy level positions and linewidths, are determined. With the aid of these parameters, the overlapping spectra measured at the low-energy electron impact can be deconvolved, which provides the possibility to determine the quantitative differential cross sections. The present results also show that the peak profiles of the transitions of B1△, C1II and D1∑+ are independent of the momentum transfer.

  14. Longest-Wavelength Electronic Excitations of Linear Cyanines: The Role of Electron Delocalization and of Approximations in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Barry Moore; Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-11-12

    The lowest-energy/longest-wavelength electronic singlet excitation energies of linear cyanine dyes are examined, using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and selected wave function methods in comparison with literature data. Variations of the bond-length alternation obtained with different optimized structures produce small differences of the excitation energy in the limit of an infinite chain. Hybrid functionals with range-separated exchange are optimally 'tuned', which is shown to minimize the delocalization error (DE) in the cyanine π systems. Much unlike the case of charge-transfer excitations, small DEs are not strongly correlated with better performance. A representative cyanine is analyzed in detail. Compared with accurate benchmark data, TDDFT with 'pure' local functionals gives too high singlet excitation energies for all systems, but DFT-based ΔSCF calculations with a local functional severely underestimates the energies. TDDFT strongly overestimates the difference between singlet and triplet excitation energies. An analysis points to systematically much too small magnitudes of integrals from the DFT components of the exchange-correlation response kernel as the likely culprit. The findings support previous suggestions that the differential correlation energy between the ground and excited state is not correctly produced by TDDFT with most functionals.

  15. Properties of atoms in electronically excited molecules within the formalism of TDDFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Flores, Eric Iván; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; Keith, Todd A; Cuevas, Gabriel; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2014-04-15

    The topological analysis of the electron density for electronic excited states under the formalism of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is presented. Relaxed electron densities for electronic excited states are computed by solving a Z-vector equation which is obtained by means of the Sternheimer interchange method. This is in contrast to previous work in which the electron density for excited states is obtained using DFT instead of TDDFT, that is, through the imposition of molecular occupancies in accordance with the electron configuration of the excited state under consideration. Once the electron density of the excited state is computed, its topological characterization and the properties of the atoms in molecules are obtained in the same manner that for the ground state. The analysis of the low-lying π→π* singlet and triplet vertical excitations of CO and C6H6 are used as representative examples of the application of this methodology. Altogether, it is shown how this procedure provides insights on the changes of the electron density following photoexcitation and it is our hope that it will be useful in the study of different photophysical and photochemical processes.

  16. Electron delocalization and aromaticity in low-lying excited states of archetypal organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, Ferran; Vandenbussche, Jelle; Bultinck, Patrick; Matito, Eduard; Solà, Miquel

    2011-12-14

    Aromaticity is a property usually linked to the ground state of stable molecules. Although it is well-known that certain excited states are unquestionably aromatic, the aromaticity of excited states remains rather unexplored. To move one step forward in the comprehension of aromaticity in excited states, in this work we analyze the electron delocalization and aromaticity of a series of low-lying excited states of cyclobutadiene, benzene, and cyclooctatetraene with different multiplicities at the CASSCF level by means of electron delocalization measures. While our results are in agreement with Baird's rule for the aromaticity of the lowest-lying triplet excited state in annulenes having 4nπ-electrons, they do not support Soncini and Fowler's generalization of Baird's rule pointing out that the lowest-lying quintet state of benzene and septet state of cyclooctatetraene are not aromatic.

  17. Electron emission from insulator and semiconductor surfaces by multiphoton excitation below the optical damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Kinney, J. H.; Milam, D.; Chase, L. L.

    1986-03-01

    Electron emission due to 1.06 and 0.35 μm laser excitation has been measured at several pulse lengths for a number of wide bandgap semiconductors and insulators. The dependence on fluence and wavelength is consistent with multiphoton excitation across the bandgap. The work functions of the materials investigated do not appear to influence the rate-limiting multiphoton excitation process.

  18. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Izmaylov, Artur F. [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-02-28

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning, we reformulate the method in a computationally efficient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9 − ((1 − naphthyl) − methyl) − anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH{sub 2} − naphthyl groups as subsystems and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using configuration interaction singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst the excited electronic states.

  19. Theory of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from a bulk semiconductor to a quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Andrew M., E-mail: andyras@gmail.com; Ramakrishna, S.; Weiss, Emily A.; Seideman, Tamar, E-mail: t-seideman@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States)

    2014-04-14

    This paper describes analytical and numerical results from a model Hamiltonian method applied to electron transfer (ET) from a quasicontinuum (QC) of states to a set of discrete states, with and without a mediating bridge. Analysis of the factors that determine ET dynamics yields guidelines for achieving high-yield electron transfer in these systems, desired for instance for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. These include the choice of parameters of the laser pulse that excites the initial state into a continuum electronic wavepacket and the design of the coupling between the bridge molecule and the donor and acceptor. The vibrational mode on a bridging molecule between donor and acceptor has an influence on the yield of electron transfer via Franck-Condon factors, even in cases where excited vibrational states are only transiently populated. Laser-induced coherence of the initial state as well as energetic overlap is crucial in determining the ET yield from a QC to a discrete state, whereas the ET time is influenced by competing factors from the coupling strength and the coherence properties of the electronic wavepacket.

  20. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  1. Intermolecular and intramolecular electron transfer from eosin ester to viologen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰雷; 张曼华; 沈涛

    1996-01-01

    The covalently -(CH2)10- linked eosin-butylviologen compound has been synthesized. The photoinduced electron transfer of eosin ester and butylviologen as well as the influence of addition of cyclodextrin or amylose into the solution of linked compound on the system have been studied by the absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime. The results indicated that the intramolecular electron transfer is much more efficient than the intermolecular one. Due to the formation of inclusion complex, the process of intramolecular electron transfer was changed after adding cydodextrin or amylose.

  2. Detailed theoretical investigation of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer mechanism of a new chromophore II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanling; Li, Yafei; Dai, Yumei; Verpoort, Francis; Song, Peng; Xia, Lixin

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, TDDFT has been used to investigate the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) mechanism of a new chromophore II [Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical. 202 (2014) 1190]. The calculated absorption and fluorescence spectra agree well with experimental results. In addition, two types of II configurations are found in the first excited state (S1), which can be ascribed to the ESIPT reaction. Based on analysis of the calculated infrared (IR) spectra of O-H stretching vibration as well as the hydrogen bonding energies, the strengthening of the hydrogen bond in the S1 state has been confirmed. The frontier molecular orbitals (MOs), Hirshfeld charge distribution and the Natural bond orbital (NBO) have also been analyzed, which displays the tendency of the ESIPT process. Finally, potential energy curves of the S0 and S1 states were constructed, demonstrating that the ESIPT reaction can be facilitated based on the photo-excitation.

  3. Is dipole moment a valid descriptor of excited state's charge-transfer character?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelenz, Piotr; Pac, Barbara

    2013-11-20

    In the ongoing discussion on excited states of the pentacene crystal, dipole moment values have been recently invoked to gauge the CT admixture to excited states of Frenkel parentage in a model cluster. In the present paper, a simple dimer model is used to show that, in general, the dipole moment is not a valid measure of the CT contribution. This finding eliminates some apparent disagreement between the computational results published by different research groups. The implications of our results and other related aspects of cluster-type quantum chemistry calculations are discussed in the context of the standing literature dispute concerning the mechanism of singlet fission in the pentacene crystal, notably the role of charge transfer contributions vs the involvement of an excimer-like doubly excited intermediate (D state).

  4. Love at first fright: partner salience moderates roller-coaster-induced excitation transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meston, Cindy M; Frohlich, Penny F

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the effects of residual nervous system arousal on perceptions of sexual attraction. Researchers approached individuals (males, n = 165; females, n = 135) at amusement parks as they were either waiting to begin or as they had just gotten off a roller-coaster ride. Participants were shown a photograph of an average attractive, opposite-gendered individual and asked to rate the individual on attractiveness and dating desirability. Participants were also asked to rate their seatmates' levels of attractiveness. Consistent with the predictions of excitation transfer theory, for males and females riding with a nonromantic partner, ratings of attractiveness and dating desirability toward the photographed individual were higher among persons exiting than entering the ride. Among persons riding with a romantic partner, there were no significant differences in attractiveness or dating desirability ratings between persons entering and exiting the ride. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential moderator effects of a salient romantic partner on excitation transfer.

  5. Collisional energy transfer from highly excited CS{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimbayo, A.; Barker, J.R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Toselli, B.M. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina)

    1995-12-31

    We have used Time Dependent Thermal Lensing (TDTL) to monitor energy deposition from laser excited CS{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in baths of rare gas at pressures from 50 Torr to 600 Torr. The experimental TDTL signals are simulated by using a unified theory of Thermal lensing and an assumed expression for k{sub e}(E), the energy dependent rate coefficient for V-T energy transfer. By empirically adjusting the parameters and form of k{sub e}(E) to obtain the best simulations, we find energy transfer to be significantly more efficient when the collision frequency is low. These results are interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model in which the excited species loses energy in a collision and is left with a nascent intramolecular energy distribution which cannot transfer energy efficiently by collisions. This distribution then undergoes collision free relaxation with a single time constant to one which is more favorable for subsequent collisional energy transfer. If the next collision occurs before the intramolecular relaxation is complete, energy transfer is less efficient.

  6. Dynamics of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reactions in piroxicam. Role of triplet states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae Won; Kim, Yong Hee; Yoon, Minjoong; Jeoung, Sae Chae; Kim, Dongho

    1994-08-01

    The picosecond time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption behavior of piroxicam at room temperature are reported. The keto tautomer in the excited singlet state ( 1K*) formed via the fast intramolecular proton transfer (≈ 20 ps) is observed. The short-lived (7.5 ns) triplet state of keto tauomer ( 3K*) is generated from 1K * in toluene whereas it is hardly observed in ethanol. Consequently, rapid reverse proton transfer takes place from 3K * to the enol triplet state ( 3E *.

  7. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer in a solvated phenol-amine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-02-12

    Photoinduced concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT), denoted photo-EPT, is important for a wide range of energy conversion processes. Transient absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments on the hydrogen-bonded p-nitrophenylphenol-t-butylamine complex, solvated in 1,2-dichloroethane, suggested that this complex may undergo photo-EPT. The experiments probed two excited electronic states that were interpreted as an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state and an EPT state. Herein mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical nonadiabatic surface hopping dynamics is used to investigate the relaxation pathways following photoexcitation. The potential energy surface is generated on the fly with a semiempirical floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction method for the solute molecule and a molecular mechanical force field for the explicit solvent molecules. The free energy curves along the proton transfer coordinate illustrate that proton transfer is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable on the lower-energy excited state but not on the higher-energy excited state, supporting the characterization of these states as EPT and ICT, respectively. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulations indicate that the population decays from the ICT state to the EPT state in ∼100 fs and from the EPT state to the ground state on the slower time scale of ∼1 ps, qualitatively consistent with the experimental measurements. For ∼54% of the trajectories, the proton transfers from the phenol to the amine in ∼400 fs on the EPT state and then transfers back to the phenol rapidly upon decay to the ground state. Thus, these calculations augment the original interpretation of the experimental data by providing evidence of proton transfer on the EPT state prior to decay to the ground state. The fundamental insights obtained from these simulations are also relevant to other photo-EPT processes.

  8. REFLECTIONS ON THE TWO-STATE ELECTRON TRANSFER MODEL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunschwig, B.S.

    2000-01-12

    There is general agreement that the two most important factors determining electron transfer rates in solution are the degree of electronic interaction between the donor and acceptor sites, and the changes in the nuclear configurations of the donor, acceptor, and surrounding medium that occur upon the gain or loss of an electron Ll-51. The electronic interaction of the sites will be very weak, and the electron transfer slow, when the sites are far apart or their interaction is symmetry or spin forbidden. Since electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, energy conservation requires that, prior to the actual electron transfer, the nuclear configurations of the reactants and the surrounding medium adjust from their equilibrium values to a configuration (generally) intermediate between that of the reactants and products. In the case of electron transfer between , two metal complexes in a polar solvent, the nuclear configuration changes involve adjustments in the metal-ligand and intraligand bond lengths and angles, and changes in the orientations of the surrounding solvent molecules. In common with ordinary chemical reactions, an electron transfer reaction can then be described in terms of the motion of the system on an energy surface from the reactant equilibrium configuration (initial state) to the product equilibrium configuration (final state) via the activated complex (transition state) configuration.

  9. Free electron degeneracy effects on collisional excitation, ionization, de-excitation and three-body recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models enable average ionization and ionization populations, plus the rates of absorption and emission of radiation to be calculated for plasmas not in thermal equilbrium. At high densities and low temperatures, electrons may have a high occupancy of the free electron quantum states and evaluations of rate coefficients need to take into account the free electron degeneracy. We demonstrate that electron degeneracy can reduce collisional rate coefficients by orders-of-magnitude from values calculated neglecting degeneracy. We show that assumptions regarding the collisional differential cross-section can alter collisional ionization and recombination rate coefficients by a further factor two under conditions relevant to inertial fusion.

  10. First-principles calculations of heat capacities of ultrafast laser-excited electrons in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J. P.; Recoules, V.; Stoian, R.

    2015-05-01

    Ultrafast laser excitation can induce fast increases of the electronic subsystem temperature. The subsequent electronic evolutions in terms of band structure and energy distribution can determine the change of several thermodynamic properties, including one essential for energy deposition; the electronic heat capacity. Using density functional calculations performed at finite electronic temperatures, the electronic heat capacities dependent on electronic temperatures are obtained for a series of metals, including free electron like, transition and noble metals. The effect of exchange and correlation functionals and the presence of semicore electrons on electronic heat capacities are first evaluated and found to be negligible in most cases. Then, we tested the validity of the free electron approaches, varying the number of free electrons per atom. This shows that only simple metals can be correctly fitted with these approaches. For transition metals, the presence of localized d electrons produces a strong deviation toward high energies of the electronic heat capacities, implying that more energy is needed to thermally excite them, compared to free sp electrons. This is attributed to collective excitation effects strengthened by a change of the electronic screening at high temperature.

  11. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Alex Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  12. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  13. Photoinduced electron and energy transfer in a new porphyrin-phthalocyanine triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermilov, Eugeny A. [Institut fuer Physik, Photobiophysik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: ermilov@physik.hu-berlin.de; Tannert, Sebastian [Institut fuer Physik, Photobiophysik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Werncke, Thomas [Institut fuer Physik, Photobiophysik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Choi, Michael T.M. [Department of Chemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China); Ng, Dennis K.P. [Department of Chemistry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: dkpn@cuhk.edu.hk; Roeder, Beate [Institut fuer Physik, Photobiophysik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-09-29

    Complexes of porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and chlorophylls are well suited for modelling both the electron and energy transfer processes in photosynthetic reaction centers and natural chlorophyll complexes. In the present paper, we report the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a novel tetraphenylporphyrin-silicon(IV) phthalocyanine triad, where two porphyrins are linked to the central silicon atom of a phthalocyanine moiety. It has been found that the photophysical properties of the triad (Tr) are strongly affected by two different types of interactions between the porphyrin (P) and the phthalocyanine (Pc) parts of Tr, namely excitation energy transfer (EET) and photoinduced electron transfer (ET). The first one results in appearance of the Pc fluorescence when the P-part was initially excited and plays dominant role in fast depopulation of the first excited singlet state of the P moiety. Another competitive process in quenching of P-part fluorescence is electron transfer, but the probability of it is six times less compared to that of EET. If the first excited singlet state of the Pc-part is populated (directly or via EET), it undergoes fast depopulation via ET to the charge-separated state. As a result, the fluorescence quantum yield of the Pc-part of Tr is approximately three orders of magnitude less compared to that of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine with two axial poly(ethylene glycol) chains (SiPc) used as a reference. Analysis of transient absorption data has shown that charge-recombination occurs with a decay time of 30 ps directly to the ground state.

  14. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer molecules bearing o-hydroxy analogues of green fluorescent protein chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wei-Ti; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Hung; Lai, Cheng-Hsuan; Shih, Chun-Wei; Chen, Kew-Yu; Hung, Wen-Yi; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2011-10-21

    o-Hydroxy analogues, 1a-g, of the green fluorescent protein chromophore have been synthesized. Their structures and electronic properties were investigated by X-ray single-crystal analyses, electrochemistry, and luminescence properties. In solid and nonpolar solvents 1a-g exist mainly as Z conformers that possess a seven-membered-ring hydrogen bond and undergo excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reactions, resulting in a proton-transfer tautomer emission. Fluorescence upconversion dynamics have revealed a coherent type of ESIPT, followed by a fast vibrational/solvent relaxation (decay of a few to several tens of picoseconds was resolved in cyclohexane. Accordingly, the proton-transfer tautomer emission intensity is moderate (0.08 in 1e) to weak (∼10(-4) in 1a) in cyclohexane. The stronger intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 1g suppresses the rotation of the aryl-alkene bond, resulting in a high yield of tautomer emission (Φ(f) ≈ 0.2). In the solid state, due to the inhibition of exo-C(5)-C(4)-C(3) rotation, intense tautomer emission with a quantum yield of 0.1-0.9 was obtained for 1a-g. Depending on the electronic donor or acceptor strength of the substituent in either the HOMO or LUMO site, a broad tuning range of the emission from 560 (1g) to 670 nm (1a) has been achieved.

  15. A fluorescent sensing membrane for iodine based on intramolecular excitation energy transfer of anthryl appended porphyrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A single anthryl appended meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) dyad has been synthesized and applied in fluorescence sensing of iodine based on the intramolecular excitation energy transfer. The molecular recognition of the sensor is based on the interaction of iodine with inner anthracene moiety of the dyad, while the signal reporter for the recognition process is the TPP fluorescence quenching. Because the emission spectrum of anthracene is largely overlapped with the Soret band absorption of TPP, intramolecular excitation energy transfer interaction occurs between the donor, anthracene and acceptor, TPP. This energy transfer leads to TPP fluorescence emission by excitation of anthracene. The sensor was constructed by immobilizing the dyad in a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane. The sensing membrane shows higher sensitivity compared to the sensors by using anthracene, TPP, or a mixture of anthracene and TPP as sensing materials. Under the optimum conditions, iodine in a sample solution can be determined from 2.04 to 23.6 mmol·L-1 with a detection limit of 33 nmol·L-1. The sensing membrane shows satisfactory response characteristics including good reproducibility, reversibility and stability, as well as the short response time of less than 60 s. Except for Cr2O72- and MnO4-, other common metal ions and anions in foodstuff do not interfere with iodine determination. The proposed method was applied in the determination of iodine in table salt samples. The results agree well with those obtained by other methods.

  16. A fluorescent sensing membrane for iodine based on intramolecular excitation energy transfer of anthryl appended porphyrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG LiPing; YOU MingXu; WANG Hao; WANG YongXiang; YANG RongHua

    2009-01-01

    A single anthryl appended meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) dyed has been synthesized and applied in fluorescence sensing of iodine based on the intramolecular excitation energy transfer. The molecular recognition of the sensor is based on the interaction of iodine with inner anthracene moiety of the dyad, while the signal reporter for the recognition process is the TPP fluorescence quenching. Because the emission spectrum of anthracene is largely overlapped with the Soret band absorption of TPP, in-tremolecular excitation energy transfer interaction occurs between the donor, anthracene and acceptor, TPP. This energy transfer leads to TPP fluorescence emission by excitation of anthracene. The sensor was constructed by immobilizing the dyad in a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane. The sensing membrane shows higher sensitivity compared to the sensors by using anthracene, TPP, or a mixture of anthracene and TPP as sensing materials. Under the optimum conditions, iodine in a sample membrane shows satisfactory response characteristics including good reproducibility, reversibility end stability, as well as the short response time of less than 60 s. Except for Cr2O2-7 and MnO-4, other common metal ions and anions in foodstuff do not interfere with iodine determination. The proposed method was applied in the determination of iodine in table salt samples. The results agree well with those obtained by other methods.

  17. Excited-state charge coupled proton transfer reaction in dipole-functionalized salicylideneaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kew-Yu, E-mail: kyuchen@fcu.edu.tw; Hu, Jiun-Wei

    2015-03-15

    Based on design and synthesis of salicylideneaniline derivatives 1–4, we demonstrate an exceedingly useful system to investigate the excited-state intramolecular charge transfer (ESICT) coupled with excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction via the dipolar functionality of Schiff base salicylideneaniline. In solid and aprotic solvents 1–4 exist mainly as E conformers that possess a strong intramolecular six-membered-ring hydrogen bond. Compounds 2–4 exhibit solely a long-wavelength proton-transfer tautomer emission, while dipole-functionalized Schiff base 1 exhibits remarkable dual emission due to the different solvent-polarity environments between ESICT and ESIPT states. Moreover, the geometric structures, frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and the potential energy curves for 1–4 in the ground and the first singlet excited state were fully rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations. - Highlights: • A dipole-functionalized salicylideneaniline derivative was synthesized. • The Schiff base exhibits remarkable dual emission. • A novel ESICT/ESIPT coupled system was created.

  18. Electron impact excitation of helium in Debye plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, S.; Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Tall, M. S.; Diédhiou, I. [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences and Techniques, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Diatta, C. S. [Institut International des Sciences et de Technologie, 28 Avenue des Ambassadeurs Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Zammit, M. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The probability, differential, and integral scattering cross sections of the 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}S and 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}P transitions of helium have been calculated in the first Born approximation. The projectile-target interactions depending on the temperature and the density of plasma are described by the Debye-Hückel model. Wave functions of the target before and after collision were modeled by non orthogonal Hartree-Fock orbitals. The wave functions parameters are calculated with the Ritz variational method. We improve our unscreened first Born approximation integral cross sections by using the BE-scaled (B stands for binding energy and E excitation energy) method. The second Born approximation has also been used to calculate the excitation cross sections in Debye plasma. Our calculations are compared to other theoretical and experimental results where applicable.

  19. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  20. Direct evidences for inner-shell electron-excitation by laser induced electron recollision

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Yunpei; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe sub-femtosecond dynamics in the microcosms of atoms, molecules and solids[1]. However, with the current technology, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray \\hbar\\omega>300 eV attosecond bursts and the lower absorption cross-sections in this spectral range. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources.Such an excitation process occurs in a sub-femtosecond timescale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment[2]. Here we used a few cycle infrared \\lambda_{0}~1800nm source[3] and observed direct evidences for i...

  1. Distance and orientation dependence of excitation energy transfer: from molecular systems to metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sangeeta; Srinivas, Goundla; Bagchi, Biman

    2009-02-19

    The elegant theory developed by Forster to describe the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor has played a key role in understanding the structure and dynamics of polymers, biopolymers (proteins, nucleic acids), and self-assemblies (photosystems, micellar systems). Forster theory assumes the transition charge densities of donor and acceptor molecules are point dipoles and hence predicts a 1/R(6) dependence of energy transfer rate on center-to-center separation distance, R. In addition, a preaveraging over the orientations of the two dipoles is usually performed. The present review examines the validity of these assumptions in following different donor-acceptor (D-A) systems: (i) dye molecules attached to a flexible polymer chain in solution, (ii) extended conjugated dye molecules in quenched conformation, (iii) dye and a spherical metal nanoparticle of different sizes, (iv) two spherical metal nanoparticles, and (v) two prolate shaped metal nanoparticles at different relative orientations. In the case of dye molecules attached to a flexible polymer chain, we discuss the recent theoretical and computer simulation studies of energy transfer dynamics. It includes an analysis of Wilemski-Fixman (WF) theory of a bimolecular reaction in solution, applied to the excitation energy transfer between two ends of the polymer. We briefly describe the limitation of the WF theory and its generalizations that lead to a better agreement between the theory and the simulation results. The orientational dynamics of dye molecules is found to significantly influence the rate of excitation energy transfer, and may play a "hidden role" in influencing the observed distance dependence. For extended conjugated D-A systems and those involving nonspherical metal nanoparticles, even at intermediate separations, a significant deviation from 1/R(6)-type distance dependence of the energy transfer rate is found. Surprisingly, however, this distance

  2. Effect of electronic excitation on high-temperature flows of ionized nitrogen and oxygen mixtures behind strong shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    Strongly non-equilibrium flows of reacting five-component ionized mixtures of nitrogen (N2/N2+/N /N+/e-) and oxygen (O2/O2+/O /O+/e-) behind the plane shock wave are studied taking into account electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species. The kinetic scheme includes non-equilibrium reactions of ionization, dissociation, recombination and charge-transfer. Two test cases corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II experiments) are considered; fluid-dynamic variables, transport coefficients and heat flux are calculated, and different contribution to the heat flux are analyzed. The effect of electronic excitation on the heat transfer is governed by the competition of diffusion and heat conduction; it becomes weak if diffusive processes prevail. An important role of thermal diffusion in ionized flows is emphasized. The influence of dissociation rates on the heat flux is assessed.

  3. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  4. Substituent and Solvent Effects on Excited State Charge Transfer Behavior of Highly Fluorescent Dyes Containing Thiophenylimidazole-Based Aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    The excited state charge transfer for a series of highly fluorescent dyes containing thiophenylimidazole moiety was investigated. These systems follow the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model. Dual fluorescence was observed for each substituted dye. X-ray structures analysis reveals a twisted ground state geometry for the donor substituted aryl on the 4 and 5 position at the imidazole ring. The excited state charge transfer was modeled by a linear solvation energy relationship using Taft's pi and Dimroth's E(sub T)(30) as solvent parameters. There is linear relation between the energy of the fluorescence transition and solvent polarity. The degree of stabilization of the excited state charge transfer was found to be consistent with the intramolecular molecular charge transfer. Excited dipole moment was studied by utilizing the solvatochromic shift method.

  5. The excitation energy transfer between b -Car and Chla molecules in PSⅡ core antenna complexes CP43 and CP47

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The excitation energy transfer efficiency between b -Car and Chla molecules in purified CP43 and CP47 was calculated by comparing absorption and fluorescence excitation after normalization at 550 nm, CP43 had an energy transfer efficiency of 29.1% while the CP47 had an energy transfer efficiency of 62.8%, proving that excitation energy was transferred between b -Car and Chla molecules in CP43 and CP47 at normal conditions. The excitation energy transfer between b -Car and Chla molecules in CP43 and CP47 may occur through the "Dexter" mechanism and the distance between these two kinds of pigments should be less than 1 nm. In addition, the results were also used to discuss the conformational relationship between b -Car and Chla molecules in CP43 and CP47.

  6. Charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the 7-azaindole dimer. A hybrid configuration interactions singles/time-dependent density functional theory description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelabert, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, José M

    2006-01-26

    The hybrid configuration interaction singles/time dependent density functional theory approach of Dreuw and Head-Gordon [Dreuw, A.; Head-Gordon, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 4007] has been applied to study the potential energy landscape and accessibility of the charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the dimer of 7-azaindole, which has been traditionally considered a model for DNA base pairing. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state preferentially stabilizes the product of a single proton transfer. In this situation, the crossing between this state and the photoactive electronic state of the dimer is accessible. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state has a very steep potential energy profile with respect to any single proton-transfer coordinate and, in contrast, an extremely flat potential energy profile with respect to the stretch of the single proton-transfer complex. This is predicted to bring about a pair of rare fragments of the 7-azaindole dimer, physically separated and hence having very long lifetimes. This could have implications in the DNA base pairs of which the system is an analogue, in the form of replication errors.

  7. 76 FR 29901 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... trust in the provider, security, reliability (i.e., having funds available at the specified time), and... group participants identified cost, convenience, and security among the most important factors when... provider to advertise, solicit, or market remittance transfer services at a particular office, with...

  8. Promoting Knowledge Transfer with Electronic Note Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Shambaugh, R. Neal; Doctor, Tasneem

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the differences between (a) copying and pasting text versus typed note-taking methods of constructing study notes simultaneously with (b) vertically scaffolded versus horizontally scaffold notes on knowledge transfer. Forty-seven undergraduate educational psychology students participated. Materials included 2 electronic…

  9. Benchmark calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium for energies from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with previous results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudostate and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a shape resonance. The ionization from the (2 s 2 p) 3 P and (2 s 2 p) 1 P states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set of electron scattering data for neutral beryllium, which should be sufficient for most modeling applications. This work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation (OZ and KB) and the Australian Research Council (DVF and IB).

  10. Experimental and Quantum-Chemical Study of Electronically Excited States of Protolytic Isovanillin Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Methods of electronic spectroscopy and quantum chemistry are used to compare protolytic vanillin and isovanillin species. Three protolytic species: anion, cation, and neutral are distinguished in the ground state of the examined molecules. Vanillin and isovanillin in the ground state in water possess identical spectral characteristics: line positions and intensities in the absorption spectra coincide. Minima of the electrostatic potential demonstrate that the deepest isomer minimum is observed on the carbonyl oxygen atom. However, investigations of the fluorescence spectra show that the radiative properties of isomers differ. An analysis of results of quantum-chemical calculations demonstrate that the long-wavelength ππ* transition in the vanillin absorption spectra is formed due to electron charge transfer from the phenol part of the molecule to oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups, and in the isovanillin absorption spectra, it is formed only on the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. The presence of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in the structure of the examined molecules leads to the fact that isovanillin in the ground S0 state, the same as vanillin, possesses acidic properties, whereas in the excited S1 state, they possess basic properties. A comparison of the рKа values of aqueous solutions demonstrates that vanillin possesses stronger acidic and basic properties in comparison with isovanillin.

  11. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, T. P. T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  12. Supramolecular networks with electron transfer in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Shveyd, Alexander K.; Tayi, Alok S.; Sue, Chi-Hau; Narayanan, Ashwin

    2016-09-13

    Organic charge-transfer (CT) co-crystals in a crossed stack system are disclosed. The co-crystals exhibit bidirectional charge transfer interactions where one donor molecule shares electrons with two different acceptors, one acceptor face-to-face and the other edge-to-face. The assembly and charge transfer interaction results in a pleochroic material whereby the optical absorption continuously changes depending on the polarization angle of incident light.

  13. TDDFT study of the polarity controlled ion-pair separation in an excited-state proton transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Mehata, Mohan Singh; Lan, Sheng-Cheng

    2014-07-15

    6-Hydroxyquinoline (6HQ) is an ideal photoacid system for exploring excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. We have previously (Mahata et al. (2002)) shown that the ESPT reaction between 6HQ and trimethylamine (TMA) leads to an "unusual" emission in the 440-450 nm range, containing two decay components (∼5 ns and ∼12 ns). The observed results suggest the presence of a contact ion-pair and a solvent separated ion-pair. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) have been employed to study the nature of the contact ion-pair formed between 6HQ and TMA and to determine why the decay component ∼12 ns is absent in a non-polar solvent. Calculations of the hydrogen-bonded complexes formed between 6HQ and TMA and its ESPT reaction product, namely 6HQ-TMA and 6HQ-TMA-PT, respectively, have been carried out, both in the electronic ground and excited states. Moreover, by using the CPCM model, different dielectric constants have been introduced into the calculations. On increasing the dielectric constant, the hydrogen bond in 6HQ-TMA-PT becomes weaker and the hydrogen bond length becomes larger; this effectively facilitates the proton transfer reaction and formation of separated ion-pair. Thus, the separation and diffusion of the contact ion-pair can be controlled by changing the polarity of the surroundings.

  14. Analysis of transmission efficiency of SSRF electron beam transfer lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the main factors which influence transmission efficiency of the SSRF electron beam transfer lines are described, including physical requirements for magnet system, vacuum system, beam diagnostic system,trajectory correction system, etc. The dynamic simulation calculation and transmission efficiency analysis of the SSRF electron beam transfer lines are presented, and the studies show that the design purpose of efficient beam transmission and injection will be achieved.

  15. 78 FR 30661 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Transfers (Regulation E); Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 99 / Wednesday, May 22, 2013... Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Final rule.../regulations/final-remittance-rule-amendment-regulation-e/ . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Summary of the...

  16. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...... vibrational frequency changes, local mode anharmonicity, and rotational reorganization, in both diabatic and adiabatic limits. Systems for which this formalism is appropriate are discussed....

  17. First Principles Calculations of Electronic Excitations in 2D Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Filip Anselm

    -thin electronics and high efficiency solar cells. Contrary to many other nano-materials, methods for large scale fabrication and patterning have already been demonstrated and the first real technological applications have already be showcased. Still the technology is very young and the number of well-studied 2D...... materials are few. However as the list of 2D materials is growing it is necessary to investigate their fundamental structural, electronic and optical properties. These are determined by the atomic and electronic structure of the materials that can quite accurately predicted by computational quantum...... as if it is being screened by the electrons in the material. This method has been very successful for calculating quasiparticle energies of bulk materials but results have been more varying for 2D materials. The reason is that the 2D confined electrons are less able to screen the added charge and some...

  18. A theoretical study of electronic excited states of photosynthetic reaction center in Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN; Yanliang; CHENG; Lin; WAN; Jian; LI; Yongjian; LIU; Junjun; YANG; Guangfu; ZHANG; Lihua; YANG; Song

    2006-01-01

    The electronic singlet vertical excited states of photosynthetic reaction center (PSRC) in Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis were investigated by ZINDO and INDO/S methods. The effects of the interactions of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein on the electronic excitations were examined. The calculation results showed that the interactions of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein play an important role in reasonably assigning the experimental absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of PSRC in Rps. virids. By comparing the theoretically computed excited states with the experimental absorption and CD spectra, satisfactory assignments of the experimental spectroscopic peaks were achieved.

  19. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity by a helical current and an axial electron beam current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, M. V.; Bushuev, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    The explicit expressions (in the Vainshtein and Markov forms) are derived for the excitation of a cylindrical cavity with perfectly conducting walls and with impedance end faces. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity and a cylindrical waveguide with a preset nonuniform axial electron-beam current and a helical current with a variable pitch, which is excited by a concentrated voltage source and is loaded by a preset pointlike matched load, is considered. For the helical current, the integro-differential equation is formulated. The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is simulated in the preset beam current approximation taking into account the nonuniform winding of the spiral coil, nonuniform electron beam, and losses.

  20. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  1. Electron Donor-Acceptor Quenching and Photoinduced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-31

    Mechanism of cousarin photodegradation . Ithe behavior of eoiuma dyes is water ad In aqueous detergent media,. and the effsects of medism aud, additives on...D-i36 345 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR UENCHING AND PHOTOINDUCED i/i Ai ELECTRON TRANSFER FOR COUMARIN DYES (U) BOSTON UNIY MR DEPT OF CHEMISTRY G JONES...TYPE OF REPORT & PEIOD COVERED Electron Donor-acceptor Quenching and Photo- Technical, 1/1/82-10/31/82 induced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes S

  2. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2016-10-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer and persistent spectral hole-burning in natural emerald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Hans

    2011-06-02

    Wavelength-selective excited-state lifetime measurements and absorption, luminescence, and hole-burning spectra of a natural African emerald crystal are reported. The (2)E excited-state lifetime displays an extreme wavelength dependence, varying from 190 to 37 μs within 1.8 nm of the R(1)-line. Overall, the excited state is strongly quenched, in comparison to laboratory-created emerald (τ=1.3 ms), with an average quenching rate of ∼6 × 10(3) s(-1) at 2.5 K. This quenching is attributed to photoinduced electron transfer caused by a relatively high concentration of Fe(2+) ions. The forward electron-transfer rate, k(f), from the nearest possible Fe(2+) sites at around 5 Å is estimated to be ∼20 × 10(3) s(-1) at 2.5 K. The photoreductive quenching of the excited Cr(3+) ions by Fe(2+) is followed by rapid electron back-transfer in the ground state upon deactivation. The exchange interaction based quenching can be modeled by assuming a random quencher distribution within the possible Fe(2+) sites with the forward electron-transfer rate, k(f), given as a function of acceptor-donor separation R by exp[(R(f)-R)/a(f)]; R(f) and a(f) values of 13.5 and 2.7 Å are obtained at 2.5 K. The electron transfer/back-transfer reorganizes the local crystal lattice, occasionally leading to a minor variation of the short-range structure around the Cr(3+) ions. This provides a mechanism for spectral hole-burning for which a moderately high quantum efficiency of about ∼0.005% is observed. Spectral holes are subject to spontaneous hole-filling and spectral diffusion, and both effects can be quantified within the standard two-level systems for non-photochemical hole-burning. Importantly, the absorbance increases on both sides of broad spectral holes, and isosbestic points are observed, in accord with the expected distribution of the "photoproduct" in a non-photochemical hole-burning process.

  4. Subphthalocyanines: tuneable molecular scaffolds for intramolecular electron and energy transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, David; Torres, Tomás; Guldi, Dirk M; Rivera, José; Herranz, Maria Angeles; Echegoyen, Luis

    2004-05-26

    A series of four subphthalocyanine-C(60) fullerene dyads have been prepared through axial functionalization of the macrocycle with m-hydroxybenzaldehyde and a subsequent dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The subphthalocyanine moiety has been peripherally functionalized with substituents of different electronic character, namely fluorine or iodine atoms and ether or amino groups, thus reaching a control over its electron-donating properties. This is evidenced in cyclic voltammetry experiments by a progressive shift to lower potentials, by ca. 200 mV, of the first oxidation event of the SubPc unit in the dyads. As a consequence, the energy level of the SubPc(*)(+)-C(60)(*)(-) charge-transfer state may be tuned so as to compete with energy transfer deactivation pathways upon selective excitation of the SubPc component. For instance, excitation of those systems where the level of the radical pair lies high in energy triggers a sequence of exergonic photophysical events that comprise (i) nearly quantitative singlet-singlet energy transfer to the C(60) moiety, (ii) fullerene intersystem crossing, and (iii) triplet-triplet energy transfer back to the SubPc. On the contrary, the stabilization of the SubPc(*)(+)-C(60)(*)(-) radical pair state by increasing the polarity of the medium or by lowering the donor-acceptor redox gap causes charge transfer to dominate. In the case of 1c in benzonitrile, the thus formed radical pair has a lifetime of 0.65 ns and decays via the energetically lower lying triplet excited state. Further stabilization is achieved for dyad 1d, whose charge-transfer state would lie now below both triplets. The radical pair lifetime consequently increases in more than 2 orders of magnitude with respect to 1c and presents a significant stabilization in less polar solvents, revealing a low reorganization energy for this kind of SubPc-C(60) systems.

  5. State-to-state kinetics and transport properties of electronically excited N and O atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical model of transport properties in electronically excited atomic gases in the state-to-state approach is developed. Different models for the collision diameters of atoms in excited states are discussed, and it is shown that the Slater-like models can be applied for the state-resolved transport coefficient calculations. The influence of collision diameters of N and O atoms with electronic degrees of freedom on the transport properties is evaluated. Different distributions on the electronic energy are considered for the calculation of transport coefficients. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 15000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found; the coefficients decrease significantly when many electronic states are taken into account. It is shown that under hypersonic reentry conditions the impact of collision diameters on the transport properties is not really important since the populations of high levels behind the shock waves are low.

  6. The role of electron scattering with vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules on non-equilibrium plasma kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitelli, Mario [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Colonna, Gianpiero; D' Ammando, Giuliano; Laricchiuta, Annarita [CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Laporta, Vincenzo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Electron energy distribution functions have been calculated by a self-consistent model which couples the electron Boltzmann equation with vibrationally and electronically excited state kinetics and plasma chemistry. Moderate pressure nitrogen gas discharges in the E/N range from 30 to 60 Townsend are investigated comparing an electron-impact cross section set considering transitions starting from all the vibrational states, with reduced models, taking into account only collisions involving the ground vibrational level. The results, while confirming the important role of second kind collisions in affecting the eedf, show a large dependence of the eedf on the set of inelastic processes involving vibrationally and electronically excited molecules, pointing out the need of using a cross section database including processes linking excited states in non-equilibrium plasma discharge models.

  7. Methods, algorithms and computer codes for calculation of electron-impact excitation parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovich, P; Stonys, D

    2015-01-01

    We describe the computer codes, developed at Vilnius University, for the calculation of electron-impact excitation cross sections, collision strengths, and excitation rates in the plane-wave Born approximation. These codes utilize the multireference atomic wavefunctions which are also adopted to calculate radiative transition parameters of complex many-electron ions. This leads to consistent data sets suitable in plasma modelling codes. Two versions of electron scattering codes are considered in the present work, both of them employing configuration interaction method for inclusion of correlation effects and Breit-Pauli approximation to account for relativistic effects. These versions differ only by one-electron radial orbitals, where the first one employs the non-relativistic numerical radial orbitals, while another version uses the quasirelativistic radial orbitals. The accuracy of produced results is assessed by comparing radiative transition and electron-impact excitation data for neutral hydrogen, helium...

  8. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Between Dye and Catalyst on a Mesoporous NiO Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allison M; Antila, Liisa J; Mirmohades, Mohammad; Pullen, Sonja; Ott, Sascha; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-07-01

    The combination of molecular dyes and catalysts with semiconductors into dye-sensitized solar fuel devices (DSSFDs) requires control of efficient interfacial and surface charge transfer between the components. The present study reports on the light-induced electron transfer processes of p-type NiO films cosensitized with coumarin C343 and a bioinspired proton reduction catalyst, [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6 (mcbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate). By transient optical spectroscopy we find that ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (τ ≈ 200 fs) from NiO to the excited C343 ("hole injection") is followed by rapid (t1/2 ≈ 10 ps) and efficient surface electron transfer from C343(-) to the coadsorbed [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6. The reduced catalyst has a clear spectroscopic signature that persists for several tens of microseconds, before charge recombination with NiO holes occurs. The demonstration of rapid surface electron transfer from dye to catalyst on NiO, and the relatively long lifetime of the resulting charge separated state, suggests the possibility to use these systems for photocathodes on DSSFDs.

  9. A high current, high gradient, laser excited, pulsed electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, K.; Farrell, J.P.; Dudnikova, G. [Brookhaven Technology Group, Inc., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Yakimenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes a pulsed electron gun that can be used as an FEL, as an injector for electron linear accelerators or for rf power generation. It comprises a 1 to 5 MeV, 1 to 2 ns pulsed power supply feeding a single diode, photoexcited acceleration gap. Beam quality of a {approximately}1nC charge in {approximately}1 GV/m field was studied. Computations of the beam parameters as a function of electrode configuration and peak electron current are presented together with descriptions of the power supply, laser and beam diagnostics systems.

  10. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...... and asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended...

  11. Electron transfer dissociation facilitates the measurement of deuterium incorporation into selectively labeled peptides with single residue resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehl, Martin; Rand, Kasper D; Jensen, Ole N;

    2008-01-01

    show in the present study that electron transfer dissociation in a 3D-quadrupole ion trap retains the site-specific solution-phase deuterium incorporation pattern and allows for localization of incorporated deuterium with single residue resolution. Furthermore, we exploit this finding to monitor how...... collisional activation induces proton mobility in a gaseous peptide ion at various levels of vibrational excitation....

  12. On the validity of the electron transfer model in photon emission from ion bombarded vanadium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait El Fqih, M.; El Boujlaidi, A.; Jourdani, R.; Kaddouri, A. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Materiaux, Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Ait El Fqih, M. [Faculte Polydisciplinaire, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 2390 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2011-06-15

    The spectral structure of the radiation (250-500 nm) emitted during sputtering of clean and oxygen-covered polycrystalline vanadium and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} by 5 keV Kr{sup +} ions is presented. The optical spectra obtained by bombarding the vanadium target consist of series of sharp lines, which are attributed to neutral and ionic excited V. The same lines are observed in the spectra of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and vanadium when oxygen is present. The absolute intensities of VI and VII lines are measured under similar conditions for all spectra. The difference in photon yield from the clean and oxide vanadium targets is discussed in terms of the electron-transfer processes between the excited sputtered and electronic levels of the two types of surfaces. We have examined the existing models of ionisation, excitation, neutralisation and de-excitation of atomic particles in the vicinity of solid surfaces. Continuum radiation was also observed and interpreted as a result of the emission of excited molecules of the metal-oxide. (authors)

  13. On the validity of the electron transfer model in photon emission from ion bombarded vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fqih, M. Ait; El Boujlaïdi, A.; Jourdani, R.; Kaddouri, A.

    2011-06-01

    The spectral structure of the radiation (250-500 nm) emitted during sputtering of clean and oxygen-covered polycrystalline vanadium and V2O5 by 5 keV Kr+ ions is presented. The optical spectra obtained by bombarding the vanadium target consist of series of sharp lines, which are attributed to neutral and ionic excited V. The same lines are observed in the spectra of V2O5 and vanadium when oxygen is present. The absolute intensities of VI and VII lines are measured under similar conditions for all spectra. The difference in photon yield from the clean and oxide vanadium targets is discussed in terms of the electron-transfer processes between the excited sputtered and electronic levels of the two types of surfaces. We have examined the existing models of ionisation, excitation, neutralisation and de-excitation of atomic particles in the vicinity of solid surfaces. Continuum radiation was also observed and interpreted as a result of the emission of excited molecules of the metal-oxide.

  14. Multistep photoinduced electron transfer in a photoacceptor terminated molecular triode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, N.A.C.; Wiering, P.G.; Brouwer, A.M.; Warman, J.M.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    A mol.ecular triode (I) containing a nonconjugatively interconnected array (D2-D1-Pa) of 2 potential 1-electron donor (D) moieties and a powerful photoacceptor (Pa), is described. In a related diode (II) consisting of the array D1-Pa excitation of the photoacceptor, Pa, induces charge-separation as

  15. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  16. Effect of the Bethe surface description on the electronic excitations induced by energetic proton beams in liquid water and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, Isabel, E-mail: ias@ua.e [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d' Alacant, Apartat 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Denton, Cristian D.; Vera, Pablo de [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d' Alacant, Apartat 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, Ioannina 451 10 (Greece); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica - CIOyN, Universidad de Murcia, Apartado 4021, E-30080 Murcia (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    The irradiation of biological systems by energetic ion beams has multiple applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadrontherapy for cancer treatment or protection of astronauts against space radiation. Therefore, for a better control and understanding of the effects of radiation damage in living tissues, it is necessary to advance an accurate description of the energy loss from the ion beam to the target. In the present work we use the dielectric formalism to calculate the probability for an energetic proton to produce electronic excitations in two targets of high biological interest, namely, liquid water and DNA. Also, the mean energy of the electronic excitations in these targets is found as a function of the incident proton energy. The electronic response of the target, characterized by its energy-loss function (ELF), is described by several models that fit the available experimental optical data (at zero momentum transfer), but use different approaches to obtain the Bethe surface, that is, to extend the ELF to any energy and momentum transferred.

  17. Effect of the Bethe surface description on the electronic excitations induced by energetic proton beams in liquid water and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; de Vera, Pablo; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    The irradiation of biological systems by energetic ion beams has multiple applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadrontherapy for cancer treatment or protection of astronauts against space radiation. Therefore, for a better control and understanding of the effects of radiation damage in living tissues, it is necessary to advance an accurate description of the energy loss from the ion beam to the target. In the present work we use the dielectric formalism to calculate the probability for an energetic proton to produce electronic excitations in two targets of high biological interest, namely, liquid water and DNA. Also, the mean energy of the electronic excitations in these targets is found as a function of the incident proton energy. The electronic response of the target, characterized by its energy-loss function (ELF), is described by several models that fit the available experimental optical data (at zero momentum transfer), but use different approaches to obtain the Bethe surface, that is, to extend the ELF to any energy and momentum transferred.

  18. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer and photoswitching in hydroxyphenyl-imidazopyridine derivatives: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Iravani, Maryam

    2016-11-01

    The MP2/CC2 and CASSCF theoretical approaches have been employed to determine the excited state proton transfer and photophysical nature of the four organic compounds, having the main frame of hydroxyphenyl-imidzaopyridine (HPIP). The nitrogen insertion effect, in addition to amine (-NH2) substitution has been investigated extensively by following the transition energies and deactivation pathways of resulted HPIP derivatives. It has been predicted that the excited state intramolecular proton transfer with or without small barrier is the most important feature of these compounds. Also, for all of the considered HPIP derivatives, a conical intersection (CI) between ground and the S1 excited state has been predicted. The strong non-adiabatic coupling in the CI (S1/S0), drives the system back to the ground state in which the proton may either return to the phenoxy unit and thus close the photocycle, or the system can continue the twisting motion that results in formation of a γ-photochromic species. This latter species can be responsible for photochromism of HPIP derivative systems.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...

  20. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M;

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the elect......The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens...... was the electron-accepting partner for either Geobacter metallireducens, which performs DIET, or Pelobacter carbinolicus, which relies on HIT. Transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens uptake hydrogenase genes was 7-fold lower in cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus...

  1. Electron transfer through rigid organic molecular wires enhanced by electronic and electron-vibration coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukegawa, Junpei; Schubert, Christina; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Tsuji, Hayato; Guldi, Dirk M; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental process in a wide range of biological systems, photovoltaics and molecular electronics. Therefore to understand the relationship between molecular structure and ET properties is of prime importance. For this purpose, photoinduced ET has been studied extensively using donor-bridge-acceptor molecules, in which π-conjugated molecular wires are employed as bridges. Here, we demonstrate that carbon-bridged oligo-p-phenylenevinylene (COPV), which is both rigid and flat, shows an 840-fold increase in the ET rate compared with the equivalent flexible molecular bridges. A 120-fold rate enhancement is explained in terms of enhanced electronic coupling between the electron donor and the electron acceptor because of effective conjugation through the COPVs. The remainder of the rate enhancement is explained by inelastic electron tunnelling through COPV caused by electron-vibration coupling, unprecedented for organic molecular wires in solution at room temperature. This type of nonlinear effect demonstrates the versatility and potential practical utility of COPVs in molecular device applications.

  2. Bacterial Electron Transfer Chains Primed by Proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, H.; Almeida, N.M. de; Kartal, B.; Keltjens, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Electron transport phosphorylation is the central mechanism for most prokaryotic species to harvest energy released in the respiration of their substrates as ATP. Microorganisms have evolved incredible variations on this principle, most of these we perhaps do not know, considering that only a fracti

  3. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla;

    2014-01-01

    to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...

  4. Fast electronic relaxation in metal nanoclusters via excitation of coherent shape deformations: Circumventing a bottleneck

    CERN Document Server

    Kresin, V V; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.

    2006-01-01

    Electron-phonon relaxation in size-quantized systems may become inhibited when the spacing of discrete electron energy levels exceeds the magnitude of the phonon frequency. We show, however, that nanoclusters can support a fast nonradiative relaxation channel which derives from their distinctive ability to undergo Jahn-Teller shape deformations. Such a deformation represents a collective and coherent vibrational excitation and enables electronic transitions to occur without a multiphonon bottleneck. We analyze this mechanism for a metal cluster within the analytical framework of a three-dimensional potential well undergoing a spheroidal distortion. An expression for the time evolution of the distortion parameter is derived, the electronic level crossing condition formulated, and the probability of electronic transition at a level crossing is evaluated. An application to electron-hole recombination in a closed-shell aluminum cluster with 40 electrons shows that the short (~250 fs) excitation lifetime observed ...

  5. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  6. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen, E-mail: karen.hemelsoet@ugent.be [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); De Meyer, Thierry [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); De Clerck, Karen [Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  7. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  8. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative CH bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative CH bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

  9. POSITRON-ELECTRON DECAY OF SI-28, AT AN EXCITATION-ENERGY OF 50-MEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUDA, A; BACELAR, JC; BALANDA, A; VANDERPLOEG, H; SUJKOWSKI, Z; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1993-01-01

    The electron-positron pair decay of Si-28 at 50 MeV excitation produced by the isospin T=0 (alpha + Mg-24) and the mixed isospin T=0,1 (He-3 + Mg-25) reactions has been studied using a special designed Positron-Electron pair spectrometer PEPSI.

  10. Neutrino production of electron-positron pairs at excited Landau levels in a strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, A V; Savin, V N

    2014-01-01

    The process of neutrino production of electron positron pairs in a magnetic field of arbitrary strength, where electrons and positrons can be created in the states corresponding to excited Landau levels, is analysed. The mean value of the neutrino energy loss due to the process $\

  11. Calculated low-energy electron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections for CO2 molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Celiberto, R

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational-excitation cross sections of ground electronic state of carbon dioxide molecule by electron-impact through the CO2-(2\\Pi) shape resonance is considered in the separation of the normal modes approximation. Resonance curves and widths are computed for each vibrational mode. The calculations assume decoupling between normal modes and employ the local complex potential model for the treatment of the nuclear dynamics, usually adopted for the electron-scattering involving diatomic molecules. Results are presented for excitation up to 10 vibrational levels in each mode and comparison with data present in the literature is discussed.

  12. Dissociative excitation of vacuum ultraviolet emission features by electron impact on molecular gases. 3: CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, M. J.; Borst, W. L.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet multiplets of C I, C II, and O I were produced by electron impact on CO2. Absolute emission cross sections for these multiplets were measured from threshold to 350 eV. The electrostatically focused electron gun used is described in detail. The atomic multiplets which were produced by dissociative excitation of CO2 and the cross sections at 100 eV are presented. The dependence of the excitation functions on electron energy shows that these multiplets are produced by electric-dipole-allowed transitions in CO2.

  13. What is the "best" atomic charge model to describe through-space charge-transfer excitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Denis; Le Bahers, Tangui; Adamo, Carlo; Ciofini, Ilaria

    2012-04-28

    We investigate the efficiency of several partial atomic charge models (Mulliken, Hirshfeld, Bader, Natural, Merz-Kollman and ChelpG) for investigating the through-space charge-transfer in push-pull organic compounds with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory approaches. The results of these models are compared to benchmark values obtained by determining the difference of total densities between the ground and excited states. Both model push-pull oligomers and two classes of "real-life" organic dyes (indoline and diketopyrrolopyrrole) used as sensitisers in solar cell applications have been considered. Though the difference of dipole moments between the ground and excited states is reproduced by most approaches, no atomic charge model is fully satisfactory for reproducing the distance and amount of charge transferred that are provided by the density picture. Overall, the partitioning schemes fitting the electrostatic potential (e.g. Merz-Kollman) stand as the most consistent compromises in the framework of simulating through-space charge-transfer, whereas the other models tend to yield qualitatively inconsistent values.

  14. Theory of coupled hybrid inorganic/organic systems: Excitation transfer at semiconductor/molecule interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Judith; Verdenhalven, Eike; Theuerholz, Sverre; Knorr, Andreas; Richter, Marten

    2016-03-01

    We derive a theoretical framework for describing hybrid organic-inorganic systems consisting of an ordered organic molecular layer coupled to a semiconductor quantum well (e.g., ZnO). A Heisenberg equation of motion technique based on a density matrix formalism is applied to derive dynamical equations for the composite system on a mesoscopic scale. Our theoretical approach focuses on the inuence of nonradiative Förster excitation transfer across the hybrid interface on linear optical absorption spectra. Therefore, the dielectric screening is discussed at the interface of two materials with different dielectric constants. Moreover, the Förster transfer matrix element is calculated in the point-dipole approximation. For a consistent theoretical description of both constituents (i.e., the molecular layer and the semiconductor substrate), the problem is treated in momentum space. Solving the equations of motion for the microscopic polarizations in frequency space directly leads to an equation for the frequency-dependent linear absorption coefficient. Our theoretical approach forms the basis for studying parameter regimes and geometries with optimized excitation transfer efficiency across the semiconductor/ molecule interface.

  15. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of excited states of the pyridine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linert, Ireneusz; Zubek, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the pyridine, C5H5N, molecules in the gas phase have been measured to investigate electronic excitation in the energy range 3.5-10 eV. The applied wide range of residual electron energy and the scattering angle range from 10° to 180° enabled to differentiate between optically-allowed and -forbidden transitions. These measurements have allowed vertical excitation energies of the triplet excited states of pyridine to be determined and tentative assignments of these states to be proposed. Some of these states have not been identified in the previous works. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  16. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  17. Excitations of incoherent spin-waves due to spin-transfer torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jin; Deac, Alina; Redon, Olivier; Nozières, Jean-Pierre; Dieny, Bernard

    2004-12-01

    The possibility of exciting microwave oscillations in a nanomagnet by a spin-polarized current, as predicted by Slonczewski and Berger, has recently been demonstrated. This observation opens important prospects of applications in radiofrequency components. However, some unresolved inconsistencies are found when interpreting the magnetization dynamics within the coherent spin-torque model. In some cases, the telegraph noise caused by spin-currents could not be quantitatively described by that model. This has led to controversy about the need for an effective magnetic temperature model. Here we interpret the experimental results of Kiselev et al. using micromagnetic simulations. We point out the key role played by incoherent spin-wave excitation due to spin-transfer torque. The incoherence is caused by spatial inhomogeneities in local fields generating distributions of local precession frequencies. We observe telegraph noise with gigahertz frequencies at zero temperature. This is a consequence of the chaotic dynamics and is associated with transitions between attraction wells in phase space.

  18. Excited-state solvation and proton transfer dynamics of DAPI in biomimetics and genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debapriya; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2008-08-14

    The fluorescent probe DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) is an efficient DNA binder. Studies on the DAPI-DNA complexes show that the probe exhibits a wide variety of interactions of different strengths and specificities with DNA. Recently the probe has been used to report the environmental dynamics of a DNA minor groove. However, the use of the probe as a solvation reporter in restricted environments is not straightforward. This is due to the presence of two competing relaxation processes (intramolecular proton transfer and solvation stabilization) in the excited state, which can lead to erroneous interpretation of the observed excited-state dynamics. In this study, the possibility of using DAPI to unambiguously report the environmental dynamics in restricted environments including DNA is explored. The dynamics of the probe is studied in bulk solvents, biomimetics like micelles and reverse micelles, and genomic DNA using steady-state and picosecond-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies.

  19. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  20. Imaging population transfer in atoms with ultrafast electron pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy have made significant progress recently in investigating atomic-scale structural dynamics in gas-phase and condensed materials. With these advances, direct imaging of electronic motions in atoms and molecules by ultrafast electron diffraction is anticipated. We propose imaging a laser-driven coherent population transfer in lithium atoms by femtosecond ultrafast electron pulses. Valuable information and insight can be obtained from studying such a system in order to refine ultrafast electron techniques and to interpret experimental results. Adiabatic passage by level crossing is used to transfer the electron population from the 2 s to the 2 p state. Our simulations demonstrate the ability of ultrafast electron diffraction to image this population transfer, as the time-dependent diffraction images reflect the electronic motion in the scattering intensity and angular distribution. Furthermore, asymmetric diffraction patterns indicate that even the relative phases of the electronic wave function can be resolved, provided there is sufficient temporal resolution. This work has been supported in part by DOE Award No. DE-SC0012193 [H.-C.S.] and by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492 [A.F.S.].

  1. Theoretical resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections of ro-vibrationally excited BeH+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, V.; Chakrabarti, K.; Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Mezei, J. Zs; Niyonzima, S.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I. F.

    2017-02-01

    A theoretical study of resonant vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation processes of the beryllium monohydride cation, BeH+, induced by electron impact, is reported. Full sets of ro-vibrationally-resolved cross sections and of the corresponding Maxwellian rate coefficients are presented for the three processes. Particular emphasis is given to the high-energy behaviour. Potential curves of {}2{{{Σ }}}+, {}2{{\\Pi }} and {}2{{Δ }} symmetries and the corresponding resonance widths, obtained from R-matrix calculations, provide the input for calculations which use a local complex-potential model for resonant collisions in each of the three symmetries. Rotational motion of nuclei and isotopic effects are also discussed. The relevant results are compared with those obtained using a multichannel quantum defect theory method. Full results are available from the Phys4Entry database.

  2. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hirendra N Ghosh

    2007-03-01

    Dynamics of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in ruthenium polypyridyl complex [{bis-(2,2'-bpy)-(4-[2-(4'-methyl-[2,2']bipyridinyl-4-yl)-vinyl]-benzene-1,2-diol)}ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate] (Ru-cat) and 5,10,15-tris phenyl-20-(3,4-dihydroxy benzene) porphyrin (TPP-cat)-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic detection in the visible and near-infrared region. We have observed that both Ru-cat and TPP-cat are coupled strongly with the TiO2 nanoparticles through their pendant catechol moieties. We have observed a single exponential and pulse-width limited (< 100 fs) electron injection from nonthermalized-excited states of Ru-complex. Here electron injection competes with the singlet-triplet manifold relaxation due to strong coupling of catecholate binding, which is a unique observation. Optical absorption measurements indicate that the catechol moiety interacts with TiO2 nanoparticles showing the characteristic pure catechol-TiO2 charge-transfer (CT) band in the visible region. Transient absorption studies on TPP-cat/TiO2 system exciting both the Soret band at 400 nm and the Q-band at 800 nm have been carried out to determine excitation wavelength-dependence on ET dynamics. The reaction channel for the electron-injection process has been found to be different for both the excitation wavelengths. Excitation at 800 nm, is found directly populate directly the excited CT state from where diffusion of electrons into the conduction band takes place. On the other hand, excitation at 400 nm light excites both the CT band of cat-TiO2 and also Soret band of TPP-cat.

  3. Where Does the Electron Go? Stable and Metastable Peptide Cation Radicals Formed by Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Robert; Layton, Erik D.; Liu, Yang; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2017-01-01

    Electron transfer to doubly and triply charged heptapeptide ions containing polar residues Arg, Lys, and Asp in combination with nonpolar Gly, Ala, and Pro or Leu generates stable and metastable charge-reduced ions, (M + 2H)+●, in addition to standard electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragment ions. The metastable (M + 2H)+● ions spontaneously dissociate upon resonant ejection from the linear ion trap, giving irregularly shaped peaks with offset m/ z values. The fractions of stable and metastable (M + 2H)+● ions and their mass shifts depend on the presence of Pro-4 and Leu-4 residues in the peptides, with the Pro-4 sequences giving larger fractions of the stable ions while showing smaller mass shifts for the metastables. Conversion of the Asp and C-terminal carboxyl groups to methyl esters further lowers the charge-reduced ion stability. Collisional activation and photodissociation at 355 nm of mass-selected (M + 2H)+● results in different dissociations that give sequence specific MS3 spectra. With a single exception of charge-reduced (LKGLADR + 2H)+●, the MS3 spectra do not produce ETD sequence fragments of the c and z type. Hence, these (M + 2H)+● ions are covalent radicals, not ion-molecule complexes, undergoing dramatically different dissociations in the ground and excited electronic states. The increased stability of the Pro-4 containing (M + 2H)+● ions is attributed to radicals formed by opening of the Pro ring and undergoing further stabilization by hydrogen atom migrations. UV-VIS photodissociation action spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used in a case in point study of the stable (LKGPADR + 2H)+● ion produced by ETD. In contrast to singly-reduced peptide ions, doubly reduced (M + 3H)+ ions are stable only when formed from the Pro-4 precursors and show all characteristics of even electron ions regarding no photon absorption at 355 nm or ion-molecule reactions, and exhibiting proton driven

  4. Iterative linearized density matrix propagation for modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, P; Coker, D F

    2010-11-14

    Rather than incoherent hopping between chromophores, experimental evidence suggests that the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently, and involves coherent superposition states in which excitation spreads over multiple chromophores separated by several nanometers. Treating such delocalized coherent superposition states in the presence of decoherence and dissipation arising from coupling to an environment is a significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that either use a perturbative approach or make the Markovian approximation. In this paper, we extend the recently developed iterative linearized density matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme [E. R. Dunkel et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 114106 (2008)] to study coherent excitation energy transfer in a model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light harvesting complex from green sulfur bacteria. This approach is nonperturbative and uses a discrete path integral description employing a short time approximation to the density matrix propagator that accounts for interference between forward and backward paths of the quantum excitonic system while linearizing the phase in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the environmental degrees of freedom resulting in a classical-like treatment of these variables. The approach avoids making the Markovian approximation and we demonstrate that it successfully describes the coherent beating of the site populations on different chromophores and gives good agreement with other methods that have been developed recently for going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study coherent exciton transfer in light harvesting systems. We conclude with a discussion of decoherence in independent bilinearly coupled harmonic chromophore baths. The ILDM propagation approach in principle can be applied to more general descriptions of the environment.

  5. Excited-state proton transfer of photoexcited pyranine in water observed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Fangyuan; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong, E-mail: Chong.Fang@oregonstate.edu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: • A number of low – frequency modes are sequentially observed in photoexcited HPTS. • Evidence of coherent quantum beat in several low – frequency modes with anharmonic coupling. • The most transient low – frequency mode is the symmetric ring breathing of HPTS. • Excited – state proton transfer occurs nonadiabatically on the 5–200 ps timescale. • Kinetic isotope effect is 3–4 for the two-stage ESPT components in water. - Abstract: We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to illuminate the choreography of intermolecular excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) of photoacid pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, HPTS) in water. The multidimensional reaction coordinate responsible for photoacidity is revealed to involve sequential activation of characteristic skeletal motions during the ca. 1 ps preparation stage preceding ESPT. The initial ring-coplanarity breaking follows in-plane ring breathing (191 cm{sup −1}), and is facilitated by HPTS ring wagging (108 cm{sup −1}) and ring-H out-of-plane motions (321, 362, 952 cm{sup −1}), which largely decay within ∼1 ps. ESPT then occurs with intrinsic inhomogeneity via various number of intervening water molecules over relatively larger distances than those in acetate–water system. The intricate relationship between the time-resolved excited-state vibrational modes of HPTS reveals the essential role of coherent low-frequency skeletal motions gating ESPT, and the multi-staged proton-transfer process having the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 3–4 in aqueous solution on the 5–200 ps timescale.

  6. Plugging in or Going Wireless: Strategies for Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Malla Shrestha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET in which two species establish electrical contacts is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. It seems likely that there are additional alternative strategies for interspecies electrical connections that have yet to be discovered. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions.

  7. Momentum and Doping Dependence of Spin Excitations in Electron-Doped Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pengfei; Zhao, Huaisong; Kuang, Lülin; Lan, Yu; Feng, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Superconductivity in copper oxides emerges on doping holes or electrons into their Mott-insulating parent compounds. The spin excitations are thought to be the mediating glue for the pairing in superconductivity. Here the momentum and doping dependence of the dynamical spin response in the electron-doped cuprate superconductors is studied based on the kinetic-energy-driven superconducting mechanism. It is shown that the dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations changes strongly upon electron doping; however, the hour-glass-shaped dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations appeared in the hole-doped case is absent on the electron-doped side due to the electron-hole asymmetry. In particular, the commensurate resonance appears in the superconducting state with the resonance energy that correlates with the dome-shaped doping dependence of the superconducting gap. Moreover, the spectral weight and dispersion of the high-energy spin excitations in the superconducting state are comparable with those in the corresponding normal state, indicating that the high-energy spin excitations do not play an important part in the pair formation.

  8. Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments via electronic Stark spectroscopy: 5-methoxyindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Josefin; Wilke, Martin; Meerts, W Leo; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-28

    The dipole moments of the ground and lowest electronically excited singlet state of 5-methoxyindole have been determined by means of optical Stark spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The resulting spectra arise from a superposition of different field configurations, one with the static electric field almost parallel to the polarization of the exciting laser radiation, the other nearly perpendicular. Each field configuration leads to different intensities in the rovibronic spectrum. With an automated evolutionary algorithm approach, the spectra can be fit and the ratio of both field configurations can be determined. A simultaneous fit of two spectra with both field configurations improved the precision of the dipole moment determination by a factor of two. We find a reduction of the absolute dipole moment from 1.59(3) D to 1.14(6) D upon electronic excitation to the lowest electronically excited singlet state. At the same time, the dipole moment orientation rotates by 54(∘) showing the importance of the determination of the dipole moment components. The dipole moment in the electronic ground state can approximately be obtained from a vector addition of the indole and the methoxy group dipole moments. However, in the electronically excited state, vector addition completely fails to describe the observed dipole moment. Several reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  9. Coherent oscillations of electrons in tunnel-coupled wells under ultrafast intersubband excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Cabrera, A [Departamento de FIsica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna 38206-Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Aceituno, P [Departamento de FIsica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna 38206-Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Vasko, F T [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kiev, 252650 (Ukraine)

    2004-07-28

    Ultrafast intersubband excitation of electrons in tunnel-coupled wells is studied in respect of its dependence on the structure parameters, the duration of the infrared pump and the detuning frequency. The temporal dependences of the photoinduced carrier concentration and dipole moment are obtained for two cases of transitions: from the single ground state to the tunnel-coupled excited states and from the tunnel-coupled states to the single excited state. The peculiarities of dephasing and population relaxation processes are also taken into account. The nonlinear regime of the response is also considered when the splitting energy between the tunnel-coupled levels is renormalized by the photoexcited electron concentration. The dependences of the period and the amplitude of oscillations on the excitation pulse are presented with a description of the damping of the nonlinear oscillations.

  10. Mode-selective phonon excitation in gallium nitride using mid-infrared free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, Muneyuki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heishun; Hachiya, Kan; Sagawa, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    The single-phonon mode was selectively excited in a solid-state sample. A mid-infrared free-electron laser, which was tuned to the target phonon mode, was irradiated onto a crystal cooled to a cryogenic temperature, where modes other than the intended excitation were suppressed. An A 1(LO) vibrational mode excitation on GaN(0001) face was demonstrated. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering was used to observe the excited vibrational mode, and the appearance and disappearance of the scattering band at the target wavenumber were confirmed to correspond to on and off switching of the pump free-electron laser and were fixed to the sample vibrational mode. The sum-frequency generation signals of the pump and probe lasers overlapped the Raman signals and followed the wavenumber shift of the pump laser.

  11. Excitation energy transfer rates: comparison of approximate methods to the exact solution

    CERN Document Server

    Jesenko, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We have evaluated excitation energy transfer rates in photosyntetic complexes using the exact HEOM method and various approximate methods frequently used in the literature, namely, the F\\"orster method, the Redfield method, the modified Redfield method and the variational master equation. The rates are evaluated for the case of a simple dimer and a trimer photosynthetic complex, with vibrational environment characterized by the Drude-Lorentz spectral density. Comparing approximate rates to the exact ones, we have confirmed the validity of approximate methods within appropriate limits, however these limits are often well outside parameter ranges that are relevant for the dynamics in real photosynthetic complexes.

  12. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile: Solvent isotope effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Piue Ghoshal; Ranjit Biswas

    2009-01-01

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other properties such as quantum yield and radiative rates have been found to be insensitive to the solvent isotope substitution in all these solvents. The origin of the solvent isotope insensitivity of the reaction is discussed and correlated with the observed slowing down of the solvation dynamics upon isotope substitution.

  13. Finite Size Corrections to the Excitation Energy Transfer in a Massless Scalar Interaction Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, N; Tobita, Y; Ishikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the excitation energy transfer (EET) for a simple model in which a virtual massless scalar particle is exchanged between two molecules. If the time interval is finite, then the finite size effect generally appears in a transition amplitude through the regions where the wave nature of quanta remains. We calculated the transition amplitude for EET and obtained finite size corrections to the standard formula derived by using Fermi's golden rule. These corrections for the transition amplitude appear outside the resonance energy region. The estimation in a photosynthesis system indicates that the finite size correction could reduce the EET time considerably.

  14. Nature of Electronically Excited States of Organic Compounds and Processes of Nonradiative Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, G. V.; Plotnikov, V. G.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.

    2016-08-01

    Models of quantum-chemical calculation of rate constants for internal processes and intersystem crossing in polyatomic molecules are considered. The influence of the nature of electronically excited states in organic compounds is investigated. It is shown that the explicit allowance for the nature of wave functions of electronic states for estimation of electronic matrix elements of nonadiabaticity operators and spin-orbit interaction allows photophysical processes in organic compounds to be considered in detail.

  15. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-08-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P.carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable,making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells.

  16. Environmental correlation effects on excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies of energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes have revealed a subtle interplay between coherent and decoherent dynamic contributions to the overall transfer efficiency in these open quantum systems. In this work we systematically investigate the impact of temporal and spatial correlations in environmental fluctuations on excitation transport in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex. We demonstrate that the exact nature of the correlations can have a large impact on the efficiency of light harvesting. In particular, we find that spatial correlations can enhance coherences in the site basis while at the same time slowing transport, and that the overall efficiency of transport is maximized at a finite temporal correlation that results in optimal driving of transitions between excitonic states.

  17. Coherent excitation transferring via dark state in light-harvesting process

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    We study the light absorption and energy transferring in a donor-acceptor system with a bionic structure. In the optimal case with uniform couplings, it is found that the quantum dynamics of this seemingly complicated system is reduced as a three-level system of $\\Lambda$-type. With this observation, we show that the dark state based electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) effect could enhance the energy transfer efficiency, through a quantum interference effect suppressing the excited population of the donors. We estimate the optimal parameters of the system to achieve the maximum output power. The splitting behavior of maximum power may be used to explain the phenomenon that the photosynthesis systems mainly absorb two colors of light.

  18. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-01-01

    inadequate when the molecule has near-degeneracies and/or low-lying double-excited states. To address these issues we have recently proposed multiconfiguration short-range density-functional theory-MC-srDFT-as a new tool in the toolbox. While initial applications for systems with multireference character......-srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2...

  19. The attosecond regime of impulsive stimulated electronic Raman excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Ware, Matthew R; Cryan, James P; Haxton, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We have calculated the resonant and nonresonant contributions to attosecond impulsive stimulated electronic Raman scattering (SERS) in regions of autoionizing transitions. Comparison with Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) calculations find that attosecond SERS is dominated by continuum transitions and not autoionizing resonances. These results agree quantitatively with a rate equation that includes second-order Raman and first-and second-order photoionization rates. Such rate models can be extended to larger molecular systems. Our results indicate that attosecond SERS transition probabilities may be understood in terms of two-photon generalized cross sections even in the high-intensity limit for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths.

  20. Charge-transfer excitations in low-gap systems under the influence of solvation and conformational disorder: exploring range-separation tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Thiago B; Kümmel, Stephan

    2014-08-28

    Charge transfer excitations play a prominent role in the fields of molecular electronics and light harvesting. At the same time they have developed a reputation for being hard to predict with time-dependent density functional theory, which is the otherwise predominant method for calculating molecular structure and excitations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that range-separated hybrid functionals, in particular with an "optimally tuned" range separation parameter, describe charge-transfer excitations reliably for different molecules. Many of these studies focused on molecules in vacuum. Here we investigate the influence of solvation on the electronic excitations of thiophene oligomers, i.e., paradigm low gap systems. We take into account bulk solvation using a continuum solvation model and geometrical distortions from molecular dynamics. From our study, three main findings emerge. First, geometrical distortions increase absorption energies by about 0.5 eV for the longer thiophene oligomers. Second, combining optimal tuning of the range separation parameter with a continuum solvation method is not straightforward and has to be approached with great care. Third, optimally tuned range-separated hybrids without a short-range exchange component tend to inherit undesirable characteristics of semi-local functionals: with increasing system size the range separation parameter takes a smaller value, leading to a functional of effectively more semi-local nature and thus not accurately capturing, e.g., the saturation of the optical gap with increasing system size.

  1. Charge-transfer excitations in low-gap systems under the influence of solvation and conformational disorder: Exploring range-separation tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Thiago B.; Kümmel, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    Charge transfer excitations play a prominent role in the fields of molecular electronics and light harvesting. At the same time they have developed a reputation for being hard to predict with time-dependent density functional theory, which is the otherwise predominant method for calculating molecular structure and excitations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that range-separated hybrid functionals, in particular with an "optimally tuned" range separation parameter, describe charge-transfer excitations reliably for different molecules. Many of these studies focused on molecules in vacuum. Here we investigate the influence of solvation on the electronic excitations of thiophene oligomers, i.e., paradigm low gap systems. We take into account bulk solvation using a continuum solvation model and geometrical distortions from molecular dynamics. From our study, three main findings emerge. First, geometrical distortions increase absorption energies by about 0.5 eV for the longer thiophene oligomers. Second, combining optimal tuning of the range separation parameter with a continuum solvation method is not straightforward and has to be approached with great care. Third, optimally tuned range-separated hybrids without a short-range exchange component tend to inherit undesirable characteristics of semi-local functionals: with increasing system size the range separation parameter takes a smaller value, leading to a functional of effectively more semi-local nature and thus not accurately capturing, e.g., the saturation of the optical gap with increasing system size.

  2. Charge-transfer excitations in low-gap systems under the influence of solvation and conformational disorder: Exploring range-separation tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Thiago B. de, E-mail: thiago.branquinho-de-queiroz@uni-bayreuth.de; Kümmel, Stephan [Theoretical Physics IV, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-08-28

    Charge transfer excitations play a prominent role in the fields of molecular electronics and light harvesting. At the same time they have developed a reputation for being hard to predict with time-dependent density functional theory, which is the otherwise predominant method for calculating molecular structure and excitations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that range-separated hybrid functionals, in particular with an “optimally tuned” range separation parameter, describe charge-transfer excitations reliably for different molecules. Many of these studies focused on molecules in vacuum. Here we investigate the influence of solvation on the electronic excitations of thiophene oligomers, i.e., paradigm low gap systems. We take into account bulk solvation using a continuum solvation model and geometrical distortions from molecular dynamics. From our study, three main findings emerge. First, geometrical distortions increase absorption energies by about 0.5 eV for the longer thiophene oligomers. Second, combining optimal tuning of the range separation parameter with a continuum solvation method is not straightforward and has to be approached with great care. Third, optimally tuned range-separated hybrids without a short-range exchange component tend to inherit undesirable characteristics of semi-local functionals: with increasing system size the range separation parameter takes a smaller value, leading to a functional of effectively more semi-local nature and thus not accurately capturing, e.g., the saturation of the optical gap with increasing system size.

  3. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  4. Role of methylene spacer in the excitation energy transfer in europium 1- and 2- naphthylcarboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, K. [V.A. Kotelnikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, 1 Vvedenskii sq., Fryazino Moscow reg. 141190 (Russian Federation); Tsaryuk, V., E-mail: vit225@ire216.msk.s [V.A. Kotelnikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, 1 Vvedenskii sq., Fryazino Moscow reg. 141190 (Russian Federation); Kudryashova, V.; Pekareva, I. [V.A. Kotelnikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, 1 Vvedenskii sq., Fryazino Moscow reg. 141190 (Russian Federation); Sokolnicki, J. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of WrocLaw, 14 F. Joliot-Curie str., WrocLaw 50-383 (Poland); Yakovlev, Yu. [V.A. Kotelnikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, 1 Vvedenskii sq., Fryazino Moscow reg. 141190 (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    A series of compounds Ln(RCOO){sub 3}.Phen (Ln=Eu, Gd, Tb; RCOO{sup -}-1- and 2-naphthoate, 1- and 2-naphthylacetate, 1- and 2-naphthoxyacetate anions, Phen-1,10-phenanthroline) was investigated by methods of optical spectroscopy. Compounds of composition Ln(RCOO){sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O with the same carboxylate ligands are also considered. Results of studies of the effects of methylene spacer decoupling the {pi}-{pi}- or p-{pi}-conjugation in the naphthylcarboxylate ligand on the structure of Eu{sup 3+} coordination centre, on the lifetime of {sup 5}D{sub 0} (Eu{sup 3+}) state, and on processes of the excitation energy transfer to Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} ions are presented. Introduction of the methylene bridge in the ligand weakens the influence of the steric hindrances in forming of a crystal lattice and results in lowering the distortion of the Eu{sup 3+} luminescence centre, and in elongation of the observed {sup 5}D{sub 0} lifetime {tau}{sub obs}. The latter is caused by decrease in contribution of the radiative processes rate 1/{tau}{sub r}. This is confirmed by the correlation between the lifetimes {tau}{sub obs} and the quantities '{tau}{sub r}.const' inversely proportional to the total integral intensities of Eu(RCOO){sub 3}.Phen luminescence spectra. The methylene spacer performs a role of regulator of sensitization of the Ln{sup 3+} luminescence efficiency by means of an influence on mutual location of lowest triplet states of the ligands, the ligand-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, and the emitting states of Ln{sup 3+} ions. The lowest triplet state in lanthanide naphthylcarboxylate adducts with Phen is related to carboxylate anion. A presence of the methylene spacer in naphthylcarboxylate ligand increases the triplet state energy. At the same time, the energy of 'carboxylic group-Eu{sup 3+} ion' charge transfer states falls, which can promote the degradation of excitation energy. In naphthylcarboxylates investigated a range of the

  5. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  6. Dissection of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain in Escherichia coli DNA photolyase: Trp382 is the primary donor in photoactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdin, Martin; Eker, André P M; Vos, Marten H; Brettel, Klaus

    2003-07-22

    In Escherichia coli photolyase, excitation of the FAD cofactor in its semireduced radical state (FADH*) induces an electron transfer over approximately 15 A from tryptophan W306 to the flavin. It has been suggested that two additional tryptophans are involved in an electron transfer chain FADH* FADH* decayed with a time constant tau approximately 26 ps to fully reduced flavin and a tryptophan cation radical. In W382F mutant photolyase, the excited flavin was much longer lived (tau approximately 80 ps), and no significant amount of product was detected. We conclude that, in WT photolyase, excited FADH* is quenched by electron transfer from W382. On a millisecond scale, a product state with extremely low yield ( approximately 0.5% of WT) was detected in W382F mutant photolyase. Its spectral and kinetic features were similar to the fully reduced flavin/neutral tryptophan radical state in WT photolyase. We suggest that, in W382F mutant photolyase, excited FADH* is reduced by W359 at a rate that competes only poorly with the intrinsic decay of excited FADH* (tau approximately 80 ps), explaining the low product yield. Subsequently, the W359 cation radical is reduced by W306. The rate constants of electron transfer from W382 to excited FADH* in WT and from W359 to excited FADH* in W382F mutant photolyase were estimated and related to the donor-acceptor distances.

  7. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  8. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-08-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules.

  9. Nature does not rely on long-lived electronic quantum coherence for photosynthetic energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Cogdell, Richard; Ashraf, Khuram; Stevens, Amy L; Thorwart, Michael; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    During the first steps of photosynthesis, the energy of impinging solar photons is transformed into electronic excitation energy of the light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. The subsequent energy transfer to the reaction center is understood in terms of exciton quasiparticles which move on a grid of biomolecular sites on typical time scales less than 100 femtoseconds (fs). Since the early days of quantum mechanics, this energy transfer is described as an incoherent Forster hopping with classical site occupation probabilities, but with quantum mechanically determined rate constants. This orthodox picture has been challenged by ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments with the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein in which interference oscillatory signals up to 1.5 picoseconds were reported and interpreted as direct evidence of exceptionally long-lived electronic quantum coherence. Here, we show that the optical 2D photon echo spectra of this complex at ambient temperature in aqueous solution do not provide evidenc...

  10. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander James

    The last decade has seen incredible growth in the quality of experiments being done on single molecule junctions. Contemporary experimental measurements have expanded far beyond simple electron transport. Measurement of vibronic eects, quantum interference and decoherence eects, molecular optical response (Raman spectroscopy), and molecular spintronics are just some of the continuing areas of research in single molecule junctions. Experimental advancements demand advanced theoretical treatments, which can be used accurately within appropriate physical regimes, in order to understand measured phenomena and predict interesting directions for future study. In this dissertation we will study systems with strong intra-system interactions using a many-body states based approach. We will be focused on three related processes in molecular junctions: electron transport, electronic energy transfer, and molecular excitation. Inelastic electron transport in the regime of strong and nonlinear electron-vibration coupling within and outside of the Born-Oppenheimer regime will be investigated. To understand their appropriateness, we will compare simple semi-classical approximations in molecular redox junctions and electron-counting devices to fully quantum calculations based on many-body system states. The role of coherence and quantum interference in energy and electron transfer in molecular junctions is explored. Experiments that simultaneously measure surface enhanced Raman scattering and electron conduction have revealed a strong interaction between conducting electrons and molecular excitation. We investigate the role of the molecular response to a classical surface plasmon enhanced electric eld considering the back action of the oscillating molecular dipole. Raman scattering is quantum mechanical by nature and involves strong interaction between surface plasmons in the contacts and the molecular excitation. We develop a scheme for treating strong plasmon-molecular excitation

  11. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole and its naphthalene-fused analogs: a TD-DFT quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Hossein; Hejazi, Fahimeh; Mohtamedifar, Nafiseh; Jahantab, Mahjobeh

    2014-01-24

    The intramolecular proton transfer reactions in 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and its naphthalene-fused analogs, (HNB1-3) in both S0 and S1 states at the PBE1PBE/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of theory in the gas phase and water have been investigated to find the effects of extension of aromaticity on the intramolecular proton transfer and photophysical properties. The results show that the ground state intramolecular proton transfer (GSIPT) in the studied species is impossible. Excited states potential energy surface calculations support the existence of ESIPT process. Structural parameters, relative energy of isomers, H-bonding energy, adsorption and emission bands, vertical excitation and emission energies, oscillator strength, fluorescence rate constant, dipole moment, atomic charges and electron density at critical points were calculated. Orbital analysis shows that vertical S0→S1 transition in the studied molecules corresponds essentially to the excitation from HOMO (π) to LUMO (π(*)). The potential of HNB2 molecule as an emissive and electron transport material in designing improved organic white light emitting diodes is predicted in this work. Our calculations are also supported by the experimental observations.

  12. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-01-01

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A.F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Stratman-Scuseria-Frisch atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1-naphthyl)-methyl)-anthracene and 4-((2-naphthyl)-methyl)-benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that are not accessible using simple density difference analysis.

  13. Optical and structural characterisation of low dimensional structures using electron beam excitation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, A

    2000-01-01

    suppressed by nonradiative recombination centres. The temperatures at which the QW luminescence starts to quench and the activation energies of luminescence quenching are found to depend on excitation conditions, sample quality and QW depth. The results of CL intensity dependence on the excitation intensity revealed that luminescence from good quality QW structures is dominated by radiative recombination processes even at high temperatures during thermal quenching. In contrast, in defected structures non-radiative recombination mechanisms dominate the luminescence properties at all temperatures. Secondary electron images of hexagonal growth hillocks of GaN obtained at a range of electron beam excitation energies vary because of the different signals involved in the imaging. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements have been used for phase identification and lattice constants determination in a strained GaN epilayer. This thesis presents studies on optical and structural characterisation of low dimensiona...

  14. Energy transfer kinetics of the np5(n + 1)p excited states of Ne and Kr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Heaven, Michael C

    2011-09-01

    Energy transfer rate constants for Ne(2p(5)3p) and Kr(4p(5)5p) atoms colliding with ground state rare gas atoms (Rg) have been measured. In part, this study is motivated by the possibility of using excited rare gas atoms as the active species in optically pumped laser systems. Rg(np(5)(n + 1)s) metastable states may be produced using low-power electrical discharges. The potential then exits for optical pumping and laser action on the np(5)(n + 1)p ↔ np(5)(n + 1)s transitions. Knowledge of the rate constants for collisional energy transfer and deactivation of the np(5)(n + 1)p states is required to evaluate the laser potential for various Rg + buffer gas combinations. In the present study we have characterized energy transfer processes for Ne (2p(5)3p) + He for the six lowest energy states of the multiplet. Rate constants for state-to-state transfer have been determined. Deactivation of the lowest energy level of Kr (4p(5)5p) by He, Ne, and Kr has also been characterized. Initial results suggest that Kr (4p(5)5p) + Ne mixtures may be the best suited for optically pumped laser applications.

  15. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  16. Protein folding: the optically induced electronic excitations model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeknic-Dugic, J [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nis (Serbia)], E-mail: jjeknic@pmf.ni.ac.yu

    2009-07-15

    The large-molecules conformational transitions problem (the 'protein folding problem') is an open issue of vivid current science research work of fundamental importance for a number of modern science disciplines as well as for nanotechnology. Here, we elaborate the recently proposed quantum-decoherence-based approach to the issue. First, we emphasize a need for detecting the elementary quantum mechanical processes (whose combinations may give a proper description of the realistic experimental situations) and then we design such a model. As distinct from the standard approach that deals with the conformation system, we investigate the optically induced transitions in the molecule electrons system that, in effect, may give rise to a conformation change in the molecule. Our conclusion is that such a model may describe the comparatively slow conformational transitions.

  17. Influence of different environments on the excited-state proton transfer and dual fluorescence of fisetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Jayanti; Dennison, S. Moses; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    1999-05-01

    The influence of different protic and aprotic solvent environments on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leading to a dual fluorescence behaviour of a biologically important, naturally occurring, polyhydroxyflavone, fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), has been investigated. The normal fluorescence band, in particular, is extremely sensitive to solvent polarity with νmax shifting from 24 510 cm -1 in dioxane ( ET(30)=36.0) to 20 790 cm -1 in methanol ( ET(30)=55.5). This is rationalized in terms of solvent dipolar relaxation process, which also accounts for the red edge excitation shifts (REES) observed in viscous environments such as glycerol at low temperatures. Significant solvent dependence of the tautomer fluorescence properties ( νmax, yield and decay kinetics) reveals the influence of external hydrogen bonding perturbation on the internal hydrogen bond of the molecule. These excited-state relaxation phenomena and their relevant parameters have been used to probe the microenvironment of fisetin in a membrane mimetic system, namely AOT reverse micelles in n-heptane at different water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0).

  18. Marcus Electron Transfer Reactions with Bulk Metallic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer organic reaction rates are considered employing the classic physical picture of Marcus wherein the heats of reaction are deposited as the energy of low frequency mechanical oscillations of reconfigured molecular positions. If such electron transfer chemical reaction events occur in the neighborhood of metallic plates, then electrodynamic interface fields must also be considered in addition to mechanical oscillations. Such electrodynamic interfacial electric fields in principle strongly effect the chemical reaction rates. The thermodynamic states of the metal are unchanged by the reaction which implies that metallic plates are purely catalytic chemical agents.

  19. PHOTOINDUCED CHARGE TRANSFER POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY ELECTRON ACCEPTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Weixiao; ZHANG Peng; FENG Xinde

    1995-01-01

    Photoinduced charge transfer polymerization of styrene(St) with electron acceptor as initiator was investigated. In case of fumaronitrile (FN) or maleic anhydride (MA) as initiator the polymerization takes place regularly, whereas the tetrachloro-1, 4-benzenequinone (TCQ), 2, 3-dichloro-5, 6-dicyano-1, 4-benzenequinone (DDQ) . or tetracyano ethylene (TCNE) as initiator the polymerization proceeds reluctantly only after the photoaddition reaction. A mechanism was proposed that free radicals would be formed following the charge and proton transfer in the exciplex formed between St and electron acceptors.

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I;

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu...... of the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and molecular structure calculation of the TUPS modified proteins, electron transfer pathways were calculated. Analysis of the results revealed a good correlation between separation distance from donor to Cu ligating atom (His-N or Cys-S) and the observed...

  1. Investigation of transferred-electron oscillations in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntornwipat, N.; Majdi, S.; Gabrysch, M.; Isberg, J.

    2016-05-01

    The recent discovery of Negative Differential Mobility (NDM) in intrinsic single-crystalline diamond enables the development of devices for high frequency applications. The Transferred-Electron Oscillator (TEO) is one example of such devices that uses the benefit of NDM to generate continuous oscillations. This paper presents theoretical investigations of a diamond TEO in the temperature range of 110 to 140 K where NDM has been observed. Our simulations map out the parameter space in which transferred-electron oscillations are expected to occur for a specific device geometry. The results are promising and indicate that it is possible to fabricate diamond based TEO devices.

  2. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  3. Reactant-Product Quantum Coherence in Electron Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of quantum superposition states between reactants and products in electron transfer reactions. We show that such superpositions are strongly suppressed and to leading orders of perturbation theory do not pertain in electron transfer reactions. This is because of the intermediate manifold of states separating the reactants from the products. We provide an intuitive description of these considerations with Feynman diagrams. We also discuss the relation of such quantum coherences to understanding the fundamental quantum dynamics of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions.

  4. The investigation of excited state proton transfer mechanism in water-bridged 7-azaindole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Jia; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Li, Yong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), the excited-state intermolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) mechanism of water-bridged 7-azaindole has been investigated theoretically. The calculations of primary bond lengths and the IR vibrational spectra between the S0 state and the S1 state that verified the intramolecular hydrogen bond were strengthened. The fact that reproduced experimental absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra well theoretically demonstrate that the TDDFT theory we adopted is reasonable and effective. In addition, intramolecular charge transfer based on the frontier molecular orbitals demonstrated the indication of the ESIPT reaction. The constructed potential energy curves of ground state and the first excited state based on keeping the H2···O3 and H6···N7 distances fixed at a series of values have been used to illustrate the ESIPT process. A relative lower barrier of 5.94 kcal/mol in the S1 state potential energy curve for type II (lower than that of 9.82 kcal/mol in the S1 state for type I) demonstrates that type II ESIPT process occurs firstly in 7Al-2H2O complex.

  5. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase.

  6. Radiative charge transfer lifetime of the excited state of (NaCa)$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, O P; Michels, H J; Smith, W W; Makarov, Oleg P.

    2003-01-01

    New experiments were proposed recently to investigate the regime of cold atomic and molecular ion-atom collision processes in a special hybrid neutral-atom--ion trap under high vacuum conditions. The collisional cooling of laser pre-cooled Ca$^+$ ions by ultracold Na atoms is being studied. Modeling this process requires knowledge of the radiative lifetime of the excited singlet A$^1\\Sigma^+$ state of the (NaCa)$^+$ molecular system. We calculate the rate coefficient for radiative charge transfer using a semiclassical approach. The dipole radial matrix elements between the ground and the excited states, and the potential curves were calculated using Complete Active Space Self-Consistent field and M\\"oller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (CASSCF/MP2) with an extended Gaussian basis, 6-311+G(3df). The semiclassical charge transfer rate coefficient was averaged over a thermal Maxwellian distribution. In addition we also present elastic collision cross sections and the spin-exchange cross section. The ra...

  7. The S1 ← S0 fluorescence excitation spectrum and structure of propanal in the S1 excited electronic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, I A; Yakovlev, N N; Terentiev, R V; Maslov, D V; Abramenkov, A V

    2016-06-01

    We have obtained and analyzed the S1 ← S0 fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled propanal-h1 (CH3CH2CHO) and -d1 (CH3CH2CDO). Using the results of theoretical studies of the structure of propanal molecule in the S1 lowest excited singlet electronic state, we have assigned the bands of both spectra to the vibronic transitions of the cis conformer (in the S0 ground electronic state) to the 1 and 3 conformers (in the S1 state) differed by the angle of the C2H5 ethyl group rotation around the central C-C bond. The origins of the 1 ← cis and 3 ← cis electronic transitions have been observed at 29 997 and 30 075 cm(-1) for propanal-h1 and at 30 040 and 30 115 cm(-1) for propanal-d1, respectively. The high activity of torsional (C2H5 ethyl groups) and inversional (CCHO/CCDO carbonyl fragments) vibrations and the intensity distribution of the bands in torsional sequences (passing through maximum) are in agreement with the theoretical prediction that the S1 ← S0 electronic excitation of the cis conformer causes (after geometrical relaxation) the pyramidalization of carbonyl fragments and the rotation of ethyl groups around the central C-C bond. A number of energy levels have been found for torsional and inversional vibrations, and also fundamentals of ν10 (CCO bend) and ν13 (CCC bend) for the both 1 and 3 conformers of propanal-h1 and -d1 have been found. Then the "experimental" potential functions of inversion for the pair of the 1 and 3 conformers have been determined. The heights of potential barriers to inversion and the angle values corresponding to the minima of potential functions of inversion are 900 cm(-1) and 35° for propanal-h1 and 820 cm(-1) and 34° for propanal-d1, respectively.

  8. Vibronically coherent speed-up of the excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbach, P.; Mujica-Martinez, C. A.; Thorwart, M.

    2015-02-01

    We show that underdamped molecular vibrations fuel the efficient excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson molecular aggregate under realistic physiological conditions. By employing an environmental fluctuation spectral function derived from experiments, we obtain numerically exact results for the exciton quantum dynamics in the presence of underdamped vibrationally coherent quantum states. Assuming the prominent 180 -cm-1 vibrational mode to be underdamped, additional coherent transport channels for the excitation energy transfer open up and we observe an increase of the transfer speed towards the reaction center by up to 24 % .

  9. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states of protolytic forms of vanillic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercombination conversions) occurring after the absorption of light in these forms are evaluated.

  10. Single & Two-photon Excited Fluorescence of Two New Compounds with 2-Benzothiazolyl as Electron Acceptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two new D-π-A type compounds, where electron-donor D is tertiary amino group, electron-acceptor A is 2-benzothiazolyl and π is two conjugated styryl units, have been synthesized.They are named as trans, trans-2-{4-[4-(N, N-diethylamino)styryl]styryl}-1, 3-benzothiazole and trans, trans-2-{4-[4-(N, N-diphenylamino)styryl]styryl}-1, 3-benzothiazole.Both compounds show strong two-photon excited fluorescence in yellow-orange region when excited by a femtosecond laser at 800 nm.

  11. Electron impact excitation of the Meinel band system of N2/+/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, D.; Feldman, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    The emission spectrum of the Meinel band system of N2(+) was obtained in the region between 0.72 and 1.6 micrometers by electron impact excitation of N2. The relative excitation function is presented for the (0, 0) band from 22 to 120 eV. Cross sections of the Meinel bands that fall in this region were measured relative to the (2, 0) Meinel band. The results obtained are in good agreement with previously published values below 1.1 micrometers except for the (0, 0) band which is 30% higher. The electronic transition moment at large internuclear distances is found to agree with theoretical estimates.

  12. Observation of Fishbone-Like Instabilities Excited by Energetic Electrons on the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; DENG Wei; YANG Qing-Wei; DING Xuan-Wong; LIU Yi; YUAN Guo-Liang; ZHANG Yi-Po; DONG Yun-Bo; SONG Xian-Ying; ZHOU Jun; SONG Xian-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Strong burst of an internal kink mode is observed on the HL-2A tokamak. Features of the fishbone-like mode are presented. The fishbone-like instabilities can be driven during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and can be excited on the high field side (HFS) by ECRH. It is found for the first time that the modes also present themselves on the low field side (LFS) during ECRH. Experiments show that the energetic electrons with energy of 35-70 keV play a dominant role in the excitation mechanism, and the experimental results are also consistent with our calculation ones.

  13. Excited state absorption and energy transfer in Ho3+-doped indium fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Laercio; Fortin, Vincent; Bernier, Martin; Maes, Frédéric; Vallée, Réal; Poulain, Samuel; Poulain, Marcel; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2017-04-01

    This investigation examines in detail the rates of energy transfer relevant to the 5I5 → 5I6 transition (at 3930 nm) in Ho3+-doped InF3 glass as a function of the Ho3+ concentration. The decay times, branching ratios and rate parameters for energy transfer were measured in this investigation for Ho3+ (x)-doped InF3 glass with x = 2, 4 and 10 mol.% and they were used as the input parameters for a rate equation analysis. Excited state absorption (ESA) initiating from the lower laser level is included in the study. Numerical simulation of CW laser emission at 3.9 μm was performed using two pump wavelengths, one for upper laser level excitation (i.e., 5I8 → 5I5 = λP1) and the other for lower laser level de-excitation (i.e., 5I6 → 5S2 = λP2). The pump wavelength λP2 = 962 nm was chosen based on the measurements of ESA and the application of the McCumber method. Critically, the estimated ESA cross section at λP2 = 962 nm (σESA = 7.1 × 10-21 cm2) is approximately sixteen times larger than ground state (5I8) absorption cross section (σGSA = 4.3 × 10-22 cm2) and ESA does not overlap with any ground state absorption process. Our calculations suggest that even for high Ho3+ concentration in which cross relaxation has been shown in a previous study to quench the 5I5 level, ESA is nevertheless strong enough to allow a sufficient population inversion required for practical CW emission.

  14. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits... RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of government... consumer for use in initiating an electronic fund transfer of government benefits from an account,...

  15. Conduction mechanism studies on electron transfer of disordered system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慧; 宋祎璞; 李新梅

    2002-01-01

    Using the negative eigenvalue theory and the infinite order perturbation theory, a new method was developed to solve the eigenvectors of disordered systems. The result shows that eigenvectors change from the extended state to the localized state with the increase of the site points and the disordered degree of the system. When electric field is exerted, the electrons transfer from one localized state to another one. The conductivity is induced by the electron transfer. The authors derive the formula of electron conductivity and find the electron hops between localized states whose energies are close to each other, whereas localized positions differ from each other greatly. At low temperature the disordered system has the character of the negative differential dependence of resistivity and temperature.

  16. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K.

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne-Kr mixed clusters.

  17. Impact of Electron Collision Mixing on the delay times of an electron beam excited Atomic Xenon laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Peter J.; Lan, Yun Fu; Ohwa, Mieko; Kushner, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    The atomic xenon (5d¿6p) infrared laser has been experimentally and theoretically investigated using a short-pulse (30-ns), high-power (1-10-MW/cm3) coaxial electron beam excitation source. In most cases, laser oscillation is not observed during the e-beam current pulse. Laser pulses of hundreds of

  18. The one-electron description of excited states: Natural excitation orbitals of density matrix theory and Kohn-Sham orbitals of density functional theory as ideal orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2015-10-01

    Linear response density matrix functional theory has been shown to solve the main problems of time-dependent density functional theory (deficient in case of double, charge transfer and bond breaking excitations). However, the natural orbitals preclude the description of excitations as (approximately) simple orbital-to-orbital transitions: many weakly occupied 'virtual' natural orbitals are required to describe the excitations. Kohn-Sham orbitals on the other hand afford for many excitations such a simple orbital description. In this communication we show that a transformation of the set of weakly occupied NOs can be defined such that the resulting natural excitation orbitals (NEOs) restore the single orbital transition structure for excitations generated by the linear response DMFT formalism.

  19. Photoinduced Reductive Electron Transfer in LNA:DNA Hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenge, Ulrike; Wengel, Jesper; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2012-01-01

    Lock it, but not too much: LNA units (locked or bridging nucleic acids) in LNA:DNA hybrids lead to a negative effect on electron transfer (ET), but they also force the nucleic acid structure in the A-type double helix, which allows a better base stacking than the normal B-type and thus positively...... influences the ET. This result is significant for the design of nucleic acids of molecular electronics....

  20. Quantum Mechanical Hysteresis and the Electron Transfer Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Etchegoin, P G

    2004-01-01

    We study a simple quantum mechanical symmetric donor-acceptor model for electron transfer (ET) with coupling to internal deformations. The model contains several basic properties found in biological ET in enzymes and photosynthetic centers; it produces tunnelling with hysteresis thus providing a simple explanation for the slowness of the reversed rate and the near 100% efficiency of ET in many biological systems. The model also provides a conceptual framework for the development of molecular electronics memory elements based on electrostatic architectures.

  1. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as an alternative material to support surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with its excellent properties such as the tight electromagnetic field localization, low dissipative loss, and versatile tunability. Thus, graphene surface plasmon polaritons (GSPs) provide an exciting platform to develop a series of novel devices and systems from the optical band to the terahertz (THz) band. In this paper, theoretical and simulated studies about the excitation of SPPs by an injected electron beam with periodic graphene ribbon arrays deposited on a dielectric medium are presented. The analytical dispersion expression of the GSP mode on the graphene ribbon arrays is obtained by using a modal expansion method along with periodic boundary conditions in the structure. With this result, the dispersion relation, propagation loss, and field pattern of the propagating GSPs for both periodic graphene microribbon arrays and the complete graphene sheet are investigated and analyzed in the THz band. It is shown that the electromagnetic field with a better concentration on the interface can be realized with graphene ribbon arrays compared with the graphene sheet for a given frequency. Besides, the excitation of GSPs by an injected electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays is modeled and implemented by the particle-in-cell simulation based on the finite difference time domain algorithm. GSPs can be excited effectively when the dispersion line of the electron beam and SPPs on the graphene ribbon arrays is matched with each other well. Besides, the dependences of output power on electron beam parameters such as the distance of the electron beam above the graphene ribbon surface and beam voltage are studied and analyzed. Finally, the tunability of graphene conductivity via biased voltage with a ground metal is considered and the tunable excitation of GSPs on the structure with biased drive voltage by the injected electron beam is also realized. The present work can find a

  2. Energy loss spectroscopy of Buckminster C60 with twisted electrons: Influence of orbital angular momentum transfer on plasmon generation

    CERN Document Server

    Schüler, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental progress in creating and controlling singular electron beams that carry orbital angular momentum allows for new types of local spectroscopies. We theoretically investigate the twisted-electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) from the C60 fullerene. Of particular interest are the strong multipolar collective excitations and their selective response to the orbital angular momentum of the impinging electron beam. Based on ab-initio calculations for the collective response we compute EELS signals with twisted electron beams and uncover the interplay between the plasmon polarity and the amount of angular momentum transfer.

  3. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin, E-mail: yuanbin.wu@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana, E-mail: Palffy@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  4. Theoretical insight into the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer mechanisms of three amino-type hydrogen-bonding molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Beibei; Yuan, Huijuan; Zhu, Qiuling; Li, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xugeng; Zhang, Jinglai

    2017-03-01

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) dynamics of the amino-type hydrogen-bonding compound 2-(2‧-aminophenyl)benzothiazole (PBT-NH2) as well as its two derivatives 2-(5‧-cyano-2‧-aminophenyl)benzothiazole (CN-PBT-NH2) and 2-(5‧-cyano-2‧-tosylaminophenyl)benzothiazole (CN-PBT-NHTs) were studied by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach with the B3LYP density functional, and their absorption and emission spectra were also explored at the same level of theory. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical simulations and experimental spectra, indicating that the present calculations are reasonably reliable. In addition, it is also found that the energy barriers of the first excited singlet state of the three targeted molecules along the ESIPT reaction are computed to be 0.38, 0.34 and 0.12 eV, respectively, showing the trend of gradual decrease, which implies that the introduction of the electron-withdrawing cyano or tosyl group can facilitate the occurrence of the ESIPT reaction of these amino-type H-bonding systems. Following the ESIPT, both CN-PBT-NH2 and CN-PBT-NHTs dye molecules can undergo the cis-trans isomerization reactions in the ground-state and excited-state potential energy curves along the C2-C3 bond between benzothiazole and phenyl moieties, where the energy barriers of the trans-tautomer → cis-tautomer isomerizations in the ground states are calculated to be 0.83 and 0.34 eV, respectively. According to our calculations, it is plausible that there may exist the long-lived trans-tautomer species in the ground states of CN-PBT-NH2 and CN-PBT-NHTs.

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules-incorporated semiconductor/zeolites: New photocatalytic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minjoong Yoon; Devendra P S Negi

    2002-12-01

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, -N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing the concentration of TiO2 colloids, while the normal emission was slightly enhanced. Upon illumination of the heteropoly acid (HPA) incorporated TiO2 colloids, interfacial electron transfer takes place from the conduction band of TiO2 to the incorporated HPA which is also excited to catalyze the photoreduction of Methyl Orange. It is found that the interfacial electron transfer mechanism of HPA/TiO2 is quite analogous to the Z-scheme mechanism for plant photosynthetic systems. In DMABA-adsorbed TiO2/Y-zeolite the ICT/LE ratio of DMABA is quite small implying that electron transfer takes place from DMABA to the conduction band of TiO2. This results in drastic enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of DMABA-adsorbed TiO2/Y-zeolite compared to free TiO2/Y-zeolite.

  6. Modeling of Vibration-to-Vibration and Vibration-to-Electronic Energy Transfer Processes in Optically Pumped Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Ploenjes, Elke; Palm, Peter; Rich, J. William; Chernukho, Andrey

    1998-10-01

    - The paper presents the results of modeling of the optical pumping experiments in CO/N2/O2/Ar mixtures. In these experiments, the low vibrational levels of carbon monoxide (vinfrared and ultraviolet radiation from the excited electronic states is measured by a high-resolution step-scan Fourier transform spectrometer. The kinetic model incorporates coupled master equation for the CO, N2, and O2 vibrational level populations, and Boltzmann equation for the electrons. The comparison of the experimental and synthetic time-resolved spectra allowed inference of the V-V exchange rates for CO-CO up to v=40, cross-sections for the energy transfer between the highly excited CO molecules and electrons, and V-V transfer rates for CO-N2 and CO-O2.

  7. Resonant electron transfer in slow collisions of protons with Rydberg hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Joachain, C.J.; Nedeljkovic, N.N.

    1984-05-01

    The resonant charge-transfer reaction of protons on highly excited hydrogen atoms is considered by taking into account both the tunneling (under-barrier) and the over-barrier (classically allowed) electron transitions. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of variation of the reduced ve- locity v = vn, the classical transition mechanism is predominant. Cross-section calculations for principal quantum numbers n between 10 and 50 are presented. The results for 45< or =n< or =50 are compared with the available experimental data and with other theoretical calculations.

  8. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  9. Excitation energy transfer in the LHC-II trimer: from carotenoids to chlorophylls in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiskainen, Jari; Kananavičius, Robertas; Linnanto, Juha; Lehtivuori, Heli; Keränen, Mika; Aumanen, Viivi; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko

    2011-02-01

    Exciton model for description of experimentally determined excitation energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophylls in the LHC-II trimer of spinach is presented. Such an approach allows connecting the excitonic states to the spatial structure of the complex and hence descriptions of advancements of the initially created excitations in space and time. Carotenoids were excited at 490 nm and at 500 nm and induced absorbance changes probed in the Chl Q(y) region to provide kinetic data that were interpreted by using the results from exciton calculations. Calculations included the 42 chlorophylls and the 12 carotenoids of the complex, Soret, Q(x) and Q(y) states of the chlorophylls, and the main absorbing S(2) state of the carotenoids. According to the calculations excitation at 500 nm populates mostly a mixed Lut S(2) Chl a Soret state, from where excitation is transferred to the Q(x) and Q(y) states of the Chl a's on the stromal side. Internal conversion of the mixed state to a mixed Lut S(1) and Chl a Q(y) state provides a channel for Lut S(1) to Chl a Q(y) energy transfer. The results from the calculations support a picture where excitation at 490 nm populates primarily a mixed neoxanthin S(2) Chl b Soret state. From this state excitation from neoxanthin is transferred to iso-energetic Chl b Soret states or via internal conversion to S(1) Chl b Q(y) states. From the Soret states excitation proceeds via internal conversion to Q(y) states of Chl b's mostly on the lumenal side. A rapid Chl b to Chl a transfer and subsequent transfer to the stromal side Chl a's and to the final state completes the process after 490 nm excitation. The interpretation is further supported by the fact that excitation energy transfer kinetics after excitation of neoxanthin at 490 nm and the Chl b Q(y) band at 647 nm (Linnanto et al., Photosynth Res 87:267-279, 2006) are very similar.

  10. Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryszard Jankowiak, Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, CBC Bldg., Manhattan KS, 66505; Phone: (785) 532-6785

    2012-09-12

    In this project we studied both natural photosynthetic antenna complexes and various artificial systems (e.g. chlorophyll (Chl) trefoils) using high resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy and excitonic calculations. Results obtained provided more insight into the electronic (excitonic) structure, inhomogeneity, electron-phonon coupling strength, vibrational frequencies, and excitation energy (or electron) transfer (EET) processes in several antennas and reaction centers. For example, our recent work provided important constraints and parameters for more advanced excitonic calculations of CP43, CP47, and PSII core complexes. Improved theoretical description of HB spectra for various model systems offers new insight into the excitonic structure and composition of low-energy absorption traps in very several antenna protein complexes and reaction centers. We anticipate that better understanding of HB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (i.e. absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) provides more insight into the underlying electronic structures of these important biological systems. Our recent progress provides a necessary framework for probing the electronic structure of these systems via Hole Burning Spectroscopy. For example, we have shown that the theoretical description of non-resonant holes is more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra. We have demonstrated that simultaneous description of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provides more realistic site energies. We have also developed new algorithms to describe both nonresonant and resonant hole-burn spectra using more advanced Redfield theory. Simultaneous description of various optical spectra for complex biological system, e.g. artificial antenna systems, FMO protein complexes, water soluble protein complexes, and various mutants of reaction centers

  11. Modulation of energy/electron transfer in gold nanoclusters by single walled carbon nanotubes and further consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tarasankar; Maity, Arnab; Mondal, Somen; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor or metallic character in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed because of their chirality and diameter. Depending upon the extent of these characters in a particular sample of SWCNT, various electronic and mechanical applications are formulated. In this work we used protein protected red emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) to enhance the metallic character in SWCNTs through electron transfer induced by photonic excitation. The AuNCs have been synthesized following a known protocol that generates Au+ protected Au0 clusters. Normal and carboxylic acid functionalized SWCNTs were obtained commercially for usage in the experiments. The non-functionalized SWCNTs facilitate intersystem electron transfer while the functionalized ones defer the phenomenon, which, in turn, affects the metallic character in the nanotubes. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy prove the dynamics and electrochemistry supports the intersystem electron transfer process.

  12. Possible interaction between thermal electrons and vibrationally excited N2 in the lower E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the tasks to find the energy source(s of thermal electrons, which elevate(s electron temperature higher than neutral temperature in the lower ionosphere E-region, energy distribution function of thermal electron was measured with a sounding rocket at the heights of 93–131 km by the applying second harmonic method. The energy distribution function showed a clear hump at the energy of ~0.4 eV. In order to find the reason of the hump, we conducted laboratory experiment. We studied difference of the energy distribution functions of electrons in thermal energy range, which were measured with and without EUV radiation to plasma of N2/Ar and N2/O2 gas mixture respectively. For N2/Ar gas mixture plasma, the hump is not clearly identified in the energy distribution of thermal electrons. On the other hand for N2/O2 gas mixture, which contains vibrationally excited N2, a clear hump is found when irradiated by EUV. The laboratory experiment seems to suggest that the hump is produced as a result of interaction between vibrationally excited N2 and thermal electrons, and this interaction is the most probable heating source for the electrons of thermal energy range in the lower E-region. It is also suggested that energy distribution of the electrons in high energy part may not be Maxwellian, and DC probe measures the electrons which are non Maxwellian, and therefore "electron temperature" is calculated higher.

  13. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  14. Fluorescence excitation involving multiple electron transition states of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Chen, F.Z.; Hung, T.; Judge, D.L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The electronic states and electronic structures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the 8-50 eV energy region have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. In the energy region higher than 25 eV there exists many electronic states including multiple electron transition (MET) states which are responsible for producing most of the dissociative photoionization products. The electronic states at energies higher than 50 eV have been mainly determined by Auger spectroscopy, double charge transfer, photofragment spectroscopy and ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The absorption and ionization spectra of these molecules at energies higher than 50 eV mainly show a monotonic decrease in cross section values and exhibit structureless features. The decay channels of MET and Rydberg (or superexcited) states include autoionization, ionization, dissociative ionization, predissociation, and dissociation while those of single ion and multiple ion states may involve predissociation. and dissociation processes. The study of fluorescence specifically probes electronically excited species resulting from the above-mentioned decay channels and provides information for understanding the competition among these channels.

  15. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua;

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri, to participate in DIET was evaluated in co-culture with Geobacter...

  16. Electron transfer in syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a key process in methanogenic and sulphate-reducing environments. Bacteria and archaea that live in syntrophic communities take advantage of the metabolic abilities of their syntrophic partner to overcome energy barriers and break down compounds that they cannot dig

  17. Dimers of Azurin as model systems for electron transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, Thyra Estrid de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of crosslinked complexes of the blue copper protein azurin by means of spectroscopic techniques such as Uv-Vis and NMR as well as by X-ray crystallography. These non-physiological dimers serve as model systems for interprotein electron transfer (ET) and allow

  18. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta...

  19. Polymer glass transitions switch electron transfer in individual molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siekierzycka, J.R.; Hippius, C.; Würthner, F.; Williams, R.M.; Brouwer, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Essentially complete photoinduced electron transfer quenching of the fluorescence of a perylene−calixarene compound occurs in poly(methyl acrylate) and poly(vinyl acetate) above their glass transition temperatures (T-g), but the fluorescence is completely recovered upon cooling the polymer matrix to

  20. Correlating electronic and vibrational motions in charge transfer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Munira [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.