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Sample records for electron-ion temperature equilibration

  1. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  2. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ≲ 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ≈ 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩ for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ≤ Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron-ion

  3. Temperature equilibration rate with Fermi-Dirac statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lowell S.; Singleton, Robert L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We calculate analytically the electron-ion temperature equilibration rate in a fully ionized, weakly to moderately coupled plasma, using an exact treatment of the Fermi-Dirac electrons. The temperature is sufficiently high so that the quantum-mechanical Born approximation to the scattering is valid. It should be emphasized that we do not build a model of the energy exchange mechanism, but rather, we perform a systematic first principles calculation of the energy exchange. At the heart of this calculation lies the method of dimensional continuation, a technique that we borrow from quantum field theory and use in a different fashion to regulate the kinetic equations in a consistent manner. We can then perform a systematic perturbation expansion and thereby obtain a finite first-principles result to leading and next-to-leading order. Unlike model building, this systematic calculation yields an estimate of its own error and thus prescribes its domain of applicability. The calculational error is small for a weakly to moderately coupled plasma, for which our result is nearly exact. It should also be emphasized that our calculation becomes unreliable for a strongly coupled plasma, where the perturbative expansion that we employ breaks down, and one must then utilize model building and computer simulations. Besides providing different and potentially useful results, we use this calculation as an opportunity to explain the method of dimensional continuation in a pedagogical fashion. Interestingly, in the regime of relevance for many inertial confinement fusion experiments, the degeneracy corrections are comparable in size to the subleading quantum correction below the Born approximation. For consistency, we therefore present this subleading quantum-to-classical transition correction in addition to the degeneracy correction

  4. Generalized Lenard-Balescu calculations of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Da-Fang; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping

    2015-09-01

    The problem of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma at various densities (0.185-18.5g/cm^{3}) and temperatures [(1.0-8)×10^{3} eV] is investigated by using the generalized Lenard-Balescu theory. We consider the correlation effects between electrons and ions via classical and quantum static local field corrections. The numerical results show that the electron-ion pair distribution function at the origin approaches the maximum when the electron-electron coupling parameter equals unity. The classical result of the Coulomb logarithm is in agreement with the quantum result in both the weak (Γ_{ee}1) electron-electron coupling ranges, whereas it deviates from the quantum result at intermediate values of the coupling parameter (10^{-2}Coulomb logarithm will decrease and the corresponding relaxation rate ν_{ie} will increase. In addition, a simple fitting law ν_{ie}/ν_{ie}^{(0)}=a(ρ_{Be}/ρ_{0})^{b} is determined, where ν_{ie}^{(0)} is the relaxation rate corresponding to the normal metal density of Be and ρ_{0}, a, and b are the fitting parameters related to the temperature and the degree of ionization 〈Z〉 of the system. Our results are expected to be useful for future inertial confinement fusion experiments involving Be plasma.

  5. Photoionization and electron-ion recombination of Fe XVII for high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2012-01-01

    Earlier studies on electron-ion recombination of Fe XVII, e+FeXVIII→FeXVII, concentrated on low temperature region. However, due to its higher abundance, recombination in the high temperature region is of great importance. Total and level-specific recombination cross sections and rates of Fe XVII are presented from the detailed study in the high temperature. The calculations were carried out using the unified method which incorporates both the radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) including the interference effects. The method also yields self-consistent set of recombination rates and photoionization cross sections. Unified method is implemented through relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method and close coupling (CC) approximation. For the details of the high energy and high temperature features a CC wave function expansion consisting of 60 levels from n=2 and 3 complexes of the core Fe XVIII was considered. Earlier study included core excitations to n=2 levels only. It is found that the resonances due to core excitations to n=3 levels are much more extensive and stronger than those to n=2 levels and increase the recombination considerably in the high temperature region. While earlier study of 3-level calculations agree very well with the experimentally derived low temperature recombination, the high temperature rate shows a broad peak at about 5×10 6 K, near the maximum abundance of the ion, due to dominance of DR via PEC (photo-excitation-of-core) resonances of n=3 levels. Level-specific recombination rate coefficients, which include both the RR and DR, are presented for 454 levels (n≤10, l≤9, 0 ≤J≤8 with even and odd parities) of Fe XVII. This is the first large-scale BPRM calculations for recombination of a complex atomic system beyond He- and Li-like ions. The results are expected to be accurate with 10-20% uncertainty and provide accurate modelings of ultraviolet to X-ray spectra.

  6. Two-temperature equilibration in warm dense hydrogen measured with x-ray scattering from the LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Sciences Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the properties of warm dense hydrogen plasmas is critical for modeling stellar and planetary interiors, as well as for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Of central importance are the electron-ion collision and equilibration times that determine the microscopic properties in a high energy density state. Spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from fs-laser heated hydrogen have resolved the picosecond evolution and energy relaxation from a two-temperature plasma towards thermodynamic equilibrium in the warm dense matter regime. The interaction of rapidly heated cryogenic hydrogen irradiated by a 400 nm, 5x1017 W/cm2 , 70 fs-laser is visualized with ultra-bright 5.5 kev x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light (LCLS) source in 1 Hz repetition rate pump-probe setting. We demonstrate that the energy relaxation is faster than many classical binary collision theories that use ad hoc cutoff parameters used in the Landau-Spitzer determination of the Coulomb logarithm. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under contract No. SF00515 and supported under FWP 100182 and DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  7. Investigation of effective impact parameters in electron-ion temperature relaxation via Particle-Particle Coulombic molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinjian

    2017-09-01

    Aiming at a high simulation accuracy, a Particle-Particle (PP) Coulombic molecular dynamics model is implemented to study the electron-ion temperature relaxation. In this model, the Coulomb's law is directly applied in a bounded system with two cutoffs at both short and long length scales. By increasing the range between the two cutoffs, it is found that the relaxation rate deviates from the BPS theory and approaches the LS theory and the GMS theory. Also, the effective minimum and maximum impact parameters (bmin* and bmax*) are obtained. For the simulated plasma condition, bmin* is about 6.352 times smaller than the Landau length (bC), and bmax* is about 2 times larger than the Debye length (λD), where bC and λD are used in the LS theory. Surprisingly, the effective relaxation time obtained from the PP model is very close to the LS theory and the GMS theory, even though the effective Coulomb logarithm is two times greater than the one used in the LS theory. Besides, this work shows that the PP model (commonly known as computationally expensive) is becoming practicable via GPU parallel computing techniques.

  8. Electron-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments

  9. Surface roughness statistics and temperature step stress effects for D-T solid layers equilibrated inside a 2 mm beryllium torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheliak, J.D.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Solid D-T layers are equilibrated inside a 2 mm diameter beryllium toroidal cell at temperatures ranging from 19.0 K to 19.6 K, using the beta-layering process. The experimental runs consists of multiple cycles of rapid- or slow-freezing of the initially liquid D-T charge, followed by a lengthy period of beta-layering equilibration, terminated by melting the layer. The temperature was changed in discrete steps at the end of some equilibration cycles in an attempt to simulate actual ICF target conditions. High-precision images of the D-T solid-vapor interface were analyzed to yield the surface roughness σ mns as a sum of modal contributions. Results show an overage σ mns of 1.3 ± 0.3 microm for layers equilibrated at 19.0 K and show an inverse dependence of σ mns on equilibration temperature up to 19.525 K. Inducing sudden temperature perturbations lowered σ mns to 1.0 ± 0.05 microm

  10. Time evolution of temperature fluctuation in a non-equilibrated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath; Samantray, Prasant

    2016-01-01

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for a hot gas of massless particles. Also, specializing to a situation created after a heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation of the medium using its temperature profile. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations in the latter case is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored. (orig.)

  11. Time evolution of temperature fluctuation in a non-equilibrated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Samantray, Prasant [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Centre of Astronomy, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India)

    2016-09-15

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for a hot gas of massless particles. Also, specializing to a situation created after a heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation of the medium using its temperature profile. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations in the latter case is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored. (orig.)

  12. Determination of trapping parameters of the high temperature thermoluminescence peak in equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akridge, Jannette M.C.; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W.G.

    2001-01-01

    Most meteorites exhibit thermoluminescence (TL) that can be used to constrain their recent thermal and irradiation history, but quantitative conclusions require a knowledge of the detailed TL peak structure of the TL glow curve. We have determined TL peak parameters for the high temperature portion of the glow curve for six ordinary chondrites: Chicora (LL6); Innisfree (L5); Lost City (H5); Paragould (LL6); Pribram (H5); and Tilden (L6). The saturation dose for all these meteorites is approximately 3600 Gy. Published procedures were used to determine the number and temperatures of peaks in the high temperature (>570 K) portion of the glow curve and peak fitting was used to estimate TL trap parameters for each peak. These data were then tested and adjusted, if necessary, by comparing calculated decay results with TL glow curves for samples heated at ∼420 K for various times. We find evidence for four TL peaks in the high temperature portion of the glow curve, where trapping parameters vary slightly from meteorite to meteorite. For the Lost City meteorite, the TL peak temperatures (K), activation energies (E, eV), and Arrhenius factors (s, x 10 -9 s -1 ) are: 325, 1.26, 4.8; 360, 1.33, 3.88; 401, 1.44, 5.8; and 455, 1.5, 2.25, respectively. These data could be used to estimate dose rates for meteorites; however, the albedo values required for the calculation are not yet sufficiently known. However, terrestrial ages, or surface exposure ages, for meteorite finds from hot deserts like those in Australia or North Africa, can be estimated from these data

  13. Determination of trapping parameters of the high temperature thermoluminescence peak in equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akridge, Jannette M.C.; Benoit, Paul H. E-mail: pbenoit@comp.uark.edu; Sears, Derek W.G

    2001-02-01

    Most meteorites exhibit thermoluminescence (TL) that can be used to constrain their recent thermal and irradiation history, but quantitative conclusions require a knowledge of the detailed TL peak structure of the TL glow curve. We have determined TL peak parameters for the high temperature portion of the glow curve for six ordinary chondrites: Chicora (LL6); Innisfree (L5); Lost City (H5); Paragould (LL6); Pribram (H5); and Tilden (L6). The saturation dose for all these meteorites is approximately 3600 Gy. Published procedures were used to determine the number and temperatures of peaks in the high temperature (>570 K) portion of the glow curve and peak fitting was used to estimate TL trap parameters for each peak. These data were then tested and adjusted, if necessary, by comparing calculated decay results with TL glow curves for samples heated at {approx}420 K for various times. We find evidence for four TL peaks in the high temperature portion of the glow curve, where trapping parameters vary slightly from meteorite to meteorite. For the Lost City meteorite, the TL peak temperatures (K), activation energies (E, eV), and Arrhenius factors (s, x 10{sup -9} s{sup -1}) are: 325, 1.26, 4.8; 360, 1.33, 3.88; 401, 1.44, 5.8; and 455, 1.5, 2.25, respectively. These data could be used to estimate dose rates for meteorites; however, the albedo values required for the calculation are not yet sufficiently known. However, terrestrial ages, or surface exposure ages, for meteorite finds from hot deserts like those in Australia or North Africa, can be estimated from these data.

  14. Spectroscopy of heavy few-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we ask first, why is it interesting to investigate heavy-few electron ions. Then the various accelerator-based methods to produce heavy few-electron ions are discussed. In the main part an overview on available heavy few-electron ion data and current experiments is given. The summary will end up with future aspects in this field. (orig.)

  15. Electron-ion recombination rates for merged-beams experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Energy dependence of the electron-ion recombination rates are studied for different recombination processes (radiative recombination, three-body recombination, dissociative recombination) for Maxwellian relative velocity distribution of arbitrary asymmetry. The results are discussed in context of the electron-ion merged beams experiments in cooling ion storage rings. The question of indication of a possible contribution of the three-body recombination to the measured recombination rates versus relative energy is particularly addressed. Its influence on the electron beam temperature derived from the energy dependence of recombination rate is discussed

  16. Structure of liquid alkali metals as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, D.K.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-08-01

    The static structure factor of liquid alkali metals near freezing, and its dependence on temperature and pressure, are evaluated in an electron-ion plasma model from an accurate theoretical determination of the structure factor of the one-component classical plasma and electron-screening theory. Very good agreement is obtained with the available experimental data. (author)

  17. Equilibrator: Modeling Chemical Equilibria with Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Griend, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrator is a Microsoft Excel program for learning about chemical equilibria through modeling, similar in function to EQS4WIN, which is no longer supported and does not work well with newer Windows operating systems. Similar to EQS4WIN, Equilibrator allows the user to define a system with temperature, initial moles, and then either total…

  18. Effect of Equilibrated pH and Indigenous Spoilage Microorganisms on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Experimental Meals under Temperature Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Kottapalli, Bala; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a foreseeable biological hazard in prepared refrigerated meals that needs to be addressed in food safety plans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of product composition and storage temperature on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in nine experimental meals (meat, vegetable, or carbohydrate based). Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin in samples stored at 25°C for up to 96 h for phase 1, or at 25°C for 12 h and then transferred to 12.5°C for up to 12 and 6 weeks in phases 1 and 2, respectively. For phase 1, none of the treatments (equilibrated pH 5.8) supported toxin production when stored at 25°C for 48 h, but toxin production was observed in all treatments at 72 h. For the remaining experiments with storage at 12.5°C, toxin production was dependent on equilibrated pH, storage time, and growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms. In phase 1, no gross spoilage and no botulinum toxin was detected for any treatment (pH ≤5.8) stored at 12.5°C for 12 weeks. In phase 2, gross spoilage varied by commodity, with the brussels sprouts meal with pH 6.5 showing the most rapid spoilage within 2 weeks and botulinum toxin detected at 5 and 6 weeks for the control and cultured celery juice treatments, respectively. In contrast, spoilage microbes decreased the pH of a pH 5.9 beef treatment by 1.0 unit, potentially inhibiting C. botulinum through 6 weeks at 12.5°C. None of the other treatments with pH 5.8 or below supported toxin production or spoilage. This study provides validation for preventive controls in refrigerated meals. These include equilibrated product pH and storage temperature and time to inhibit toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum, but the impact of indigenous microflora on safety and interpretation of challenge studies is also highlighted.

  19. Electron - ion recombination processes - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Yukap

    1997-01-01

    Extensive theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out for the past 20 years on electron - ion recombination processes, as they are applied to the analysis of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We review the basic understanding gained through these efforts, with emphasis on some of the more recent progress made in recombination theory as the recombining system is affected by time-dependent electric fields and plasma particles at low temperature. Together with collisional ionization and excitation processes, recombination is important in determining ionization balance and excited-state population in non-equilibrium plasmas. The radiation emitted by plasmas is usually the principal medium with which to study the plasma condition, as it is produced mainly during the recombination and decay of excited states of ions inside the plasma. This is especially true when the plasma under study is not readily accessible by direct probes, as in astrophysical plasmas. Moreover, external probes may sometimes cause undesirable disturbances of the plasma. Electron-ion recombination proceeds in several different modes. The direct modes include three-body recombination (TBR) and one-step radiative recombination (RR), all to the ground- and singly-excited states of the target ions. By contrast, the indirect resonant mode is a two-step dielectronic recombination (DR), which proceeds first with the formation of doubly-excited states by radiationless excitation/capture. The resonant states thus formed may relax by autoionization and/or radiative cascades. For more exotic modes of recombination, we consider off-shell dielectronic recombination (radiative DR = RDR), in which an electron capture is accompanied by simultaneous radiative emission and excitation of the target ion. Some discussion on attachment of electrons to neutral atoms, resulting in the formation of negative ions, is also given. When resonance states involve one or more electrons in high Rydberg states

  20. [Post mortem temperature equilibration of the structures of the head. I. Thermometric techniques and principal investigations (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, B; May, D; Riemann, U

    1976-06-30

    Special thin and flexible thermometric probes showing a diameter of 1 mm and a sharp end were used for post mortem (p.m.) thermometric studies in several tissues. Brain temperatures were measured by inserting a double probe through the superior orbital fissura thus allowing to record the central and the peripheral brain regions separately. Another probe was inserted into the galea and a fourth into the liver. Temperature changes were recorded simultaneously. Many variables of the human head were measured. Sixteen corpses were investigated. The results were as follows: 1. Of all temperature curves registered those of the central brain regions showed the smallest variance. 2. The p.m. temperature curve of the brain shows a sigmoid shape with a rather short "plateau" in the beginning. 3. In the early p.m. phase there is an increasing difference of temperatures between central and peripheral brain regions amounting to 2-4, 6 degrees C in the time period between 78th and 128th minute. 4. The insertion of the thin probes does not cause visible damages. Thus it should be considered for use in forensic practice. 5. Some artificial "head models" were constructed and temperature decrease recorded after warming. The curves showed the same type of sigmoid shape as those obtained from the corpses. 6. Of the possible variables measured that could influence the temperature decrease only the density of the hair seems to be of interest.

  1. Chemical equilibration due to heavy Hagedorn states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C; Koch-Steinheimer, P; Liu, F M; Shovkovy, I A; Stoecker, H

    2005-01-01

    A scenario of heavy resonances, called massive Hagedorn states, is proposed which exhibits a fast (t ∼ 1 fm/c) chemical equilibration of (strange) baryons and anti-baryons at the QCD critical temperature T c . For relativistic heavy ion collisions this scenario predicts that hadronization is followed by a brief expansion phase during which the equilibration rate is higher than the expansion rate, so that baryons and antibaryons reach chemical equilibrium before chemical freeze-out occurs

  2. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination

  3. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination.

  4. PIC simulation of the electron-ion collision effects on suprathermal electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yanqing; Han Shensheng

    2000-01-01

    The generation and transportation of suprathermal electrons are important to both traditional ICF scheme and 'Fast Ignition' scheme. The author discusses the effects of electron-ion collision on the generation and transportation of the suprathermal electrons by parametric instability. It indicates that the weak electron-ion term in the PIC simulation results in the enhancement of the collisional absorption and increase of the hot electron temperature and reduction in the maximum electrostatic field amplitude while wave breaking. Therefore the energy and distribution of the suprathermal electrons are changed. They are distributed more close to the phase velocity of the electrostatic wave than the case without electron-ion collision term. The electron-ion collision enhances the self-consistent field and impedes the suprathermal electron transportation. These factors also reduce the suprathermal electron energy. In addition, the authors discuss the effect of initial condition on PIC simulation to ensure that the results are correct

  5. Biophase equilibration times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veng-Pedersen, P; Mandema, J W; Danhof, M

    1991-09-01

    Various methods for describing how quickly a drug equilibrates at the biophase are proposed. The biophase equilibration time (BET) is the time it takes the biophase drug level to reach a given percentage (p) of its predicted steady state in a drug administration that leads to a steady-state condition. The time to reach biophase equilibrium may be defined as the BET value for p = 95, and the 50% biophase equilibration time is obtained when p = 50. Biophase equilibration profiles (BEPs), obtained by plotting p versus BET, give a dynamic representation of the approach to equilibrium and may serve as an indicator of the rate of drug delivery to the biophase. A pharmacodynamic system analysis method is proposed to determine BETs and BEPs from the biophase conduction function. The approach is demonstrated using pharmacodynamic data from the CNS effect of amobarbital evaluated by an aperiodic analysis of EEG recordings. The relevance of the BET and/or BEP principles in optimal computer-controlled drug infusion, drug design, and evaluation of targeted drug delivery is discussed. Both vascular and extravascular drug administrations are considered in the analysis.

  6. Electron-ion-x-ray spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; Deslattes, R.D.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a spectrometer system developed for electron, ion, and x-ray spectroscopy of gas-phase atoms and molecules following inner-shell excitation by tunable synchrotron radiation. The spectrometer has been used on beamline X-24A at the National Synchrotron Light Source for excitation-dependent studies of Ar L-shell and K-shell photoexcitation and vacancy decay processes. The instrumentation and experimental methods are discussed, and examples are given of electron spectra and coincidence spectra between electrons and fluorescent x-rays

  7. GPDs at an electron ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility for a precise determination of Generalized Parton Distribution (GPDs) functions at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) has been explored. The high luminosity of the machine, together with the large resolution and rapidity acceptance of the new dedicated detector, will open opportunity for high precision measurements of GPDs. We report on the study of GPDs from deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). We also point out that such measurements at a proposed EIC provide insight to both, the transverse distribution of sea quarks and gluons as well as the proton spin decomposition.

  8. GPDs at an electron ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazio, Salvatore [Brookhaven National Laboratory, 11973 Upton NY (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The feasibility for a precise determination of Generalized Parton Distribution (GPDs) functions at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) has been explored. The high luminosity of the machine, together with the large resolution and rapidity acceptance of the new dedicated detector, will open opportunity for high precision measurements of GPDs. We report on the study of GPDs from deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). We also point out that such measurements at a proposed EIC provide insight to both, the transverse distribution of sea quarks and gluons as well as the proton spin decomposition.

  9. Chemical equilibration of antihyperons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C.

    2002-01-01

    Rapid chemical equilibration of antihyperons by means of the interplay between strong annihilation on baryons and the corresponding backreactions of multi-mesonic (fusion-type) processes in the later, hadronic stage of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision will be discussed. Explicit rate calculations for a dynamical setup are presented. At maximum SPS energies yields of each antihyperon specie are obtained which are consistent with chemical saturated populations of T∼150-160 MeV. The proposed picture supports dynamically the popular chemical freeze-out parameters extracted within thermal models. (orig.)

  10. Flow shear stabilization of hybrid electron-ion drift mode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, L.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a model of sheared flow stabilization on hybrid electron-ion drift mode is proposed. At first, in the presence of dissipative trapped electrons, there exists an intrinsic oscillation mode in tokamak plasmas, namely hybrid dissipative trapped electron-ion temperature gradient mode (hereafter, called as hybrid electron-ion drift mode). This conclusion is in agreement with the observations in the simulated tokamak experiment on the CLM. Then, it is found that the coupling between the sheared flows and dissipative trapped electrons is proposed as the stabilization mechanism of both toroidal sheared flow and poloidal sheared flow on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode, that is, similar to the stabilizing effect of poloidal sheared flow on edge plasmas in tokamaks, in the presence of both dissipative trapped electrons and toroidal sheared flow, large toroidal sheared flow is always a strong stabilizing effect on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode in internal transport barrier location, too. This result is consistent with the experimental observations in JT-60U. (author)

  11. Flow shear stabilization of hybrid electron-ion drift mode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a model of sheared flow stabilization on hybrid electron-ion drift mode is proposed. At first, in the presence of dissipative trapped electrons, there exists an intrinsic oscillation mode in tokamak plasmas, namely hybrid dissipative trapped electron-ion temperature gradient mode (hereafter, called as hybrid electron-ion drift mode). This conclusion is in agreement with the observations in the simulated tokamak experiment on the CLM. Then, it is found that the coupling between the sheared flows and dissipative trapped electrons is proposed as the stabilization mechanism of both toroidal sheared flow and poloidal sheared flow on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode, that is, similar to the stabilizing effect of poloidal sheared flow on edge plasmas in tokamaks, in the presence of both dissipative trapped electrons and toroidal sheared flow, large toroidal sheared flow is always a strong stabilizing effect on the hybrid electron-ion drift mode in internal transport barrier location, too. This result is consistent with the experimental observations in JT-60U. (author)

  12. Characteristics of electron-ion whistlers and their application to ionospheric probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.N.; Tiwari, S.; Tolpadi, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    In this communication the effect of ion temperature on the propagation of electron-ion whistlers in the ionosphere is investigated. A general expression including the effect of ion temperature is derived for the group travel time for the electron-ion whistler as it travels from the base of the ionosphere to the satellite. A study of the dependence of the group travel time for the proton whislters. Further, from the expression for the group travel time including the effect of the ion temperature in conjunction with the generalized dispersion relation a relation for the cyclotron damping rate (both temporal and spatial) has been obtained. A detailed study if the cyclotron damping rate with travel time and ion temperature leads to the conclusion that the observed amplitude cutoff characteristics for the proton whistler can be explained on the basis of the mechanism of cyclotron damping. It is also shown that the knowledge of the group travel time of an electron-ion whistler can be used to estimate the ion temperature at the satellite

  13. Future directions in electron--ion collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K.J.; Griffin, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Summary of session on synergistic co-ordination of theory and experiment; synergism between experiment and theory in atomic physics; comparison of theory and experiment for electron-ion excitation and ionization; summary of session on new theoretical and computational methods; new theoretical and computational methods-r-matrix calculations; the coulomb three-body problem: a progress report; summary of session on needs and applications for electron-ion collisional data; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; needs and applications of theoretical data for electron impact excitation; summary of session on relativistic effects, indirect effects, resonance, etc; direct and resonant processes in electron-ion collisions; relativistic calculations of electron impact ionization and dielectronic recombination cross section for highly charged ions; electron-ion recombination in the close-coupling approximation; modified resonance amplitudes with strongly correlated channels; a density-matrix approach to the broadening of spectral lines by autoionization, radiative transitions and electron-ion collisions; towards a time-dependent description of electron-atom/ion collisions two electron systems; and comments on inclusion of the generalized bright interaction in electron impact excitation of highly charged ions

  14. Electron-ion collision rates in atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, M; Hilse, P; Schlanges, M; Bornath, Th; Krainov, V P

    2010-01-01

    In atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses, plasmas with high density and high temperature are created. The heating is mainly caused by inverse bremsstrahlung, i.e. determined by electron-ion collisions. In the description of the scattering of electrons on noble gas ions in such plasmas, it is important to account for the inner structure of the ions and the screening by the surrounding plasma medium which can be accomplished by using suitable model potentials. In the wide parameter range met in experiments, the Born approximation is not applicable. Instead, the electron-ion collision frequency is calculated on the basis of classical momentum transport cross sections. Results are presented for xenon, krypton and argon ions in different charge states. A comparison of these results to those for the scattering on Coulomb particles with the same charge shows an enhancement of the collision frequency. The Born approximation, however, leads to an overestimation.

  15. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  16. Thermal lattice Boltzmann simulation for multispecies fluid equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, Linda; Wah, Darren; Vahala, George; Carter, Jonathan; Pavlo, Pavol

    2000-01-01

    The equilibration rate for multispecies fluids is examined using thermal lattice Boltzmann simulations. Two-dimensional free-decay simulations are performed for effects of velocity shear layer turbulence on sharp temperature profiles. In particular, parameters are so chosen that the lighter species is turbulent while the heavier species is laminar--and so its vorticity layers would simply decay and diffuse in time. With species coupling, however, there is velocity equilibration followed by the final relaxation to one large co- and one large counter-rotating vortex. The temperature equilibration proceeds on a slower time scale and is in good agreement with the theoretical order of magnitude estimate of Morse [Phys. Fluids 6, 1420 (1963)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  17. Thermal lattice Boltzmann simulation for multispecies fluid equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Wah, Darren [Department of Physics, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Vahala, George [Department of Physics, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Carter, Jonathan [NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 97320 (United States); Pavlo, Pavol [Institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Science, Praha 8, (Czech Republic)

    2000-07-01

    The equilibration rate for multispecies fluids is examined using thermal lattice Boltzmann simulations. Two-dimensional free-decay simulations are performed for effects of velocity shear layer turbulence on sharp temperature profiles. In particular, parameters are so chosen that the lighter species is turbulent while the heavier species is laminar--and so its vorticity layers would simply decay and diffuse in time. With species coupling, however, there is velocity equilibration followed by the final relaxation to one large co- and one large counter-rotating vortex. The temperature equilibration proceeds on a slower time scale and is in good agreement with the theoretical order of magnitude estimate of Morse [Phys. Fluids 6, 1420 (1963)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Photoionization and electron-ion recombination of Cr I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2009-01-01

    Using the unified method, the inverse processes of photoionization and electron-ion recombination are studied in detail for neutral chromium, (CrI+hν↔CrII+e), for the ground and excited states. The unified method based on close-coupling approximation and R-matrix method (i) subsumes both the radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) for the total rate and (ii) provides self-consistent sets of photoionization cross sections σ PI and recombination rates α RC . The present results show in total photoionization of the ground and excited states an enhancement in the background at the first excited threshold, 3d 4 4s 5 D state of the core. One prominent phot-excitation-of-core (PEC) resonance due to one dipole allowed transition ( 6 S- 6 P o ) in the core is found in the photoionization cross sections of most of the valence electron excited states. Structures in the total and partial photoionization, for ionization into various excited core states and ground state only, respectively, are demonstrated. Results are presented for the septet and quintet states with n≤10 and l≤9 of Cr I. These states couple to the core ground state 6 S and contribute to the recombination rates. State-specific recombination rates are also presented for these states and their features are illustrated. The total recombination rate shows two DR peaks, one at a relatively low temperature, at 630 K, and the other around 40,000 K. This can explain existence of neutral Cr in interstellar medium. Calculations were carried out in LS coupling using a close-coupling wave function expansion of 40 core states. The results illustrate the features in the radiative processes of Cr I and provide photoionization cross sections and recombination rates with good approximation for this astrophysically important ion.

  19. Structure and electron-ion correlation in liquid Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Shuta [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yokota, Yukinobu [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-15

    For liquid Mg at 700 deg. C, structure factors were obtained from both neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements. The bond angle and coordination number distributions were derived from the reverse Monte Carlo analysis. By a combination of both structure factors, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor were deduced.

  20. Spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faenov, A.; Marchand, R.; Tawara, H.; Vainshtein, L.; Wiese, W.

    1992-01-01

    This Working Group Report briefly reviews and summarizes the available spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities. Included are lithium, neon, and argon, which, although they are not plasma impurities per se, are introduced into the plasma through the application of diagnostic techniques. 32 refs, 2 tabs

  1. Equilibration Influence on Jet Energy Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Luan; Wang Enke

    2010-01-01

    With the initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution. With considering the parton equilibration, we obtain the time dependence of the opacity when the jet propagates through the QGP medium. The parton equilibration affect the jet energy loss with detailed balance evidently. Both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss.

  2. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  3. Chemical equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Gerald E.; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, Mannque

    2005-01-01

    In the hadronic sector of relativistic heavy ion physics, the ρ<-2π reaction is the strongest one, strong enough to equilibrate the ρ with the pions throughout the region from chemical freezeout to thermal freezeout when free-particle interactions (with no medium-dependent effects) are employed. Above the chiral restoration temperature, only ρ's and π's are present, in that the chirally restored A1 is equivalent to the ρ and the mesons have an SU(4) symmetry, with no dependence on isospin and negligible dependence on spin. In the same sense the σ and π are 'equivalent' scalars. Thus the chirally restored ρ<-2π exhaust the interspecies transitions. We evaluate this reaction at Tc and find it to be much larger than below Tc, certainly strong enough to equilibrate the chirally restored mesons just above Tc. When emitted just below Tc the mesons remain in the Tc+ε freezeout distribution, at least in the chiral limit because of the Harada-Yamawaki 'vector manifestation' that requires that mesonic coupling constants go to zero (in the chiral limit) as T goes to Tc from below. Our estimates in the chiral limit give deviations in some particle ratios from the standard scenario (of equilibrium in the hadronic sector just below Tc) of about double those indicated experimentally. This may be due to the neglect of explicit chiral symmetry breaking in our estimates. We also show that the instanton molecules present above Tc are the giant multipole vibrations found by Asakawa, Hatsuda and Nakahara and of Wetzorke et al. in lattice gauge calculations. Thus, the matter formed by RHIC can equivalently be called: chirally restored mesons, instanton molecules, or giant collective vibrations. It is a strongly interacting liquid

  4. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective and simple multiscale method for equilibrating Kremer Grest model polymer melts of varying stiffness. In our approach, we progressively equilibrate the melt structure above the tube scale, inside the tube and finally at the monomeric scale. We make use of models designed...

  5. Equilibration and thermalization in finite quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V I

    2011-01-01

    Experiments with trapped atomic gases have opened novel possibilities for studying the evolution of nonequilibrium finite quantum systems, which revived the necessity of reconsidering and developing the theory of such processes. This review analyzes the basic approaches to describing the phenomena of equilibration, thermalization, and decoherence in finite quantum systems. Isolated, nonisolated, and quasi-isolated quantum systems are considered. The relations between equilibration, decoherence, and the existence of time arrow are emphasized. The possibility for the occurrence of rare events, preventing complete equilibration, are mentioned

  6. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H; Frees, G; Peric, Z [Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Materials and Solid State Research, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1980-05-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  7. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.; Frees, G.; Peric, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  8. Ultrafast equilibration of excited electrons in dynamical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhibin; Allen, Roland E

    2009-12-02

    In our density-functional-based simulations of materials responding to femtosecond-scale laser pulses, we have observed a potentially useful phenomenon: the excited electrons automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within ∼100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion. Microscopic simulations like these can then provide the separate electronic and kinetic temperatures, chemical potentials, pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses as input for studies on larger lengths and timescales.

  9. Polarized Parton Distributions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We study the potential impact of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from a future electron-ion collider (EIC) on longitudinally polarized parton distribution (PDFs). We perform a PDF determination using the NNPDF methodology, based on sets of deep-inelastic EIC pseudodata, for different realistic choices of the electron and proton beam energies. We compare the results to our current polarized PDF set, NNPDFpol1.0, based on a fit to fixed-target inclusive DIS data. We show that the uncertainties on the first moments of the polarized quark singlet and gluon distributions are substantially reduced in comparison to NNPDFpol1.0, but also that more measurements may be needed to ultimately pin down the size of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin.

  10. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  11. New method of ionization energy calculation for two-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for calculation of the ionization energy of two-electron ions is proposed. The method is based on the calculation of the energy of second electron interaction with the field of an one-electron ion the potential of which is well known

  12. TMDs and GPDs at a future Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ent, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) of energy √(s) = 20-100 GeV is under design, with two options studied at Brookhaven National Lab and Jefferson Laboratory. The recent 2015 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort included a future EIC as a recommendation for future construction. The EIC will be unique in colliding polarised electrons off polarised protons and light nuclei, providing the spin degrees of freedom essential to pursue its physics program driven by spin structure, multi-dimensional tomographic images of protons and nuclei, and discovery of the role of collective effects of gluons in nuclei. The foreseen luminosity of the EIC, coupled with its energy variability and reach, will allow unprecedented three-dimensional imaging of the gluon and sea quark distributions, via both TMDs and GPDs, and to explore correlations amongst them. Its hermetic detection capability of correlated fragments promises to similarly allow for precise tomographic images of the quark-gluon landscape in nuclei, transcending from light few-body nuclei to the heaviest nuclei, and could uncover how the TMD and GPD landscape changes when gluons display an anticipated collective behavior at the higher energies. (orig.)

  13. Device for monitoring electron-ion ring parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutyunnikov, S.I.; Shalyapin, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is classified as the method of collective ion acceleration. The device for electron-ion ring parameters monitoring is described. The invention is aimed at increasing functional possibilities of the device at the expense of the enchance in the number of the ring controlled parameters. The device comprises three similar plane mirrors installed over accelerating tube circumference and a mirror manufactured in the form of prism and located in the tube centre, as well as the system of synchrotron radiation recording and processing. Two plane mirrors are installed at an angle of 45 deg to the vertical axis. The angle of the third plane mirror 3 α and that of prismatic mirror 2 α to the vertical axis depend on geometric parameters of the ring and accelerating tube and they are determined by the expression α=arc sin R K /2(R T -L), where R K - ring radius, R T - accelerating tube radius, L - the height of segment, formed by the mirror and inner surface of the accelerating tube. The device suggested permits to determine longitudinal dimensions of the ring, its velocity and the number of electrons and ions in the ring

  14. Polarized positrons in Jefferson lab electron ion collider (JLEIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fanglei; Grames, Joe; Guo, Jiquan; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2018-05-01

    The Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) is designed to provide collisions of electron and ion beams with high luminosity and high polarization to reach new frontier in exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches with proper cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) and electron can be easily preserved, manipulated and maintained by taking advantage of the unique figure-8 shape rings. With a growing physics interest, polarized positron-ion collisions are considered to be carried out in the JLEIC to offer an additional probe to study the substructure of nucleons and nuclei. However, the creation of polarized positrons with sufficient intensity is particularly challenging. We propose a dedicated scheme to generate polarized positrons. Rather than trying to accumulate "hot" positrons after conversion, we will accumulate "cold" electrons before conversion. Charge accumulation additionally provides a novel means to convert high repetition rate (>100 MHz) electron beam from the gun to a low repetition rate (<100 MHz) positron beam for broad applications. In this paper, we will address the scheme, provide preliminary estimated parameters and explain the key areas to reach the desired goal.

  15. Measuring the electron-ion ring parameters by bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkin, V.D.; Mozelev, A.A.; Sarantsev, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the number of electrons and ions in the electron-ion rings of a collective heavy ion accelerator. The system operation is based on detecting gamma quanta of bremsstrahlung following the ring electron interaction with the nuclei of neutral atoms and ions at different stages of filling the ring with ions. The radiation detector is a scintillation block - a photomultiplier operating for counting with NaI(Tl) crystal sized 30x30 mm and ensuring the detection efficiency close to unity. The system apparatus is made in the CAMAC standard and rems on-line with the TRA/i miniature computer. The block-diagrams of the system and algorithm of data processing are presented. A conclusion is drawn that the results of measuring the ring parameters with the use of the diagnostics system described are in good agreement within the range of measuring errors with those obtained by means of the diagnostics system employing synchrotron radiation and induction sensors

  16. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  17. Equilibration and nonclassicality of a double-well potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steve; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-01-29

    A double well loaded with bosonic atoms represents an ideal candidate to simulate some of the most interesting aspects in the phenomenology of thermalisation and equilibration. Here we report an exhaustive analysis of the dynamics and steady state properties of such a system locally in contact with different temperature reservoirs. We show that thermalisation only occurs 'accidentally'. We further examine the nonclassical features and energy fluxes implied by the dynamics of the double-well system, thus exploring its finite-time thermodynamics in relation to the settlement of nonclassical correlations between the wells.

  18. Equilibration of particles with abelian charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redlich, K.; Tounsi, A.

    2002-01-01

    We formulate the kinetic equation for time evolution and chemical equilibration of particles that carries an abelian charge. We show that dependently on the thermal conditions inside a fireball the system approaches to different chemical equilibrium limits. The role of exact conservation of quantum numbers in the kinetic description of rarely produced particles is explained. (orig.)

  19. Electron-ion correlation effects in ion-atom single ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colavecchia, F.D.; Garibotti, C.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2000-06-28

    We study the effect of electron-ion correlation in single ionization processes of atoms by ion impact. We present a distorted wave model where the final state is represented by a correlated function solution of a non-separable three-body continuum Hamiltonian, that includes electron-ion correlation as coupling terms of the wave equation. A comparison of the electronic differential cross sections computed with this model with other theories and experimental data reveals that the influence of the electron-ion correlation is more significant for low energy emitted electrons. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  20. Strangeness Production in a Chemically Equilibrating Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ze-Jun; LONG Jia-Li; MA Yu-Gang; MA Guo-Liang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the strangeness of a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma at finite baryon density based on the and will accelerate with the change of the initial system from a chemically non-equilibrated to an equilibrated system. We also find that the calculated strangeness is very different from the one in the thermodynamic equilibrium system. This study may be helpful to understand the formation of quark-gluon plasma via a chemically non-equilibrated evolution framework.

  1. Crabbing system for an electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As high energy and nuclear physicists continue to push further the boundaries of knowledge using colliders, there is an imperative need, not only to increase the colliding beams' energies, but also to improve the accuracy of the experiments, and to collect a large quantity of events with good statistical sensitivity. To achieve the latter, it is necessary to collect more data by increasing the rate at which these processes are being produced and detected in the machine. This rate of events depends directly on the machine's luminosity. The luminosity itself is proportional to the frequency at which the beams are being delivered, the number of particles in each beam, and inversely proportional to the cross-sectional size of the colliding beams. There are several approaches that can be considered to increase the events statistics in a collider other than increasing the luminosity, such as running the experiments for a longer time. However, this also elevates the operation expenses, while increasing the frequency at which the beams are delivered implies strong physical changes along the accelerator and the detectors. Therefore, it is preferred to increase the beam intensities and reduce the beams cross-sectional areas to achieve these higher luminosities. In the case where the goal is to push the limits, sometimes even beyond the machines design parameters, one must develop a detailed High Luminosity Scheme. Any high luminosity scheme on a modern collider considers|in one of their versions|the use of crab cavities to correct the geometrical reduction of the luminosity due to the beams crossing angle. In this dissertation, we present the design and testing of a proof-of-principle compact superconducting crab cavity, at 750 MHz, for the future electron-ion collider, currently under design at Jefferson Lab. In addition to the design and validation of the cavity prototype, we present the analysis of the first order beam dynamics and the integration of the

  2. Liquid alkali metals and alkali-based alloys as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1981-06-01

    The article reviews the theory of thermodynamic and structural properties of liquid alkali metals and alkali-based alloys, within the framework of linear screening theory for the electron-ion interactions. (author)

  3. D2-H2 equilibration over γ-irradiated zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, J.; Wichterlova, B.

    1987-01-01

    D 2 -H 2 equilibration was studied at 77 and 298 K over HY, AlHY, HZSM-5 and Alsub(x)Osub(y)HZSM-5 zeolites which had been γ-irradiated at 77 and/or 298 K. The exchange rate was found to be higher at the lower temperature regardless of the temperature of irradiation. Moreover, at 77 K the exchange rates were similar and more stable over the individual zeolites than at 298 K, thus indicating a common reaction path at 77 K. The exchange rate at 298 K depended on the zeolite type: it was more stable and higher over HZSM-5 than over HY, and extra-lattice Al increased both these properties on HY as well as on HZSM-5. The reaction mechanism is discussed in connection with the nature of defects generated by γ-irradiation. (author)

  4. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  5. A redox equilibrator for the preparation of cytochrome oxidase of mixed valence states and intermediate compounds for x-ray synchrotron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, B.; Moore, J.; Powers, L.; Ching, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A redox titrator for the preparation of small volumes of highly concentrated biological samples of X-ray synchrotron studies provides for the redox equilibration at temperatures of 40 to -30 0 C. Anaerobic transfer directly to the X-ray sample chamber and mixing of an additional reagent just prior to freeze-trapping of the redox-equilibrated sample are provided

  6. Time dependent black holes and thermal equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Karch, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We study aspects of a recently proposed exact time dependent black hole solution of IIB string theory using the AdS/CFT correspondence. The dual field theory is a thermal system in which initially a vacuum density for a non-conserved operator is turned on. We can see that in agreement with general thermal field theory expectation the system equilibrates: the expectation value of the non-conserved operator goes to zero exponentially and the entropy increases. In the field theory the process can be described quantitatively in terms of a thermofield state and exact agreement with the gravity answers is found

  7. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafrouni, Hanna.

    1979-01-01

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values [fr

  8. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Wortman, Warner A

    2011-01-01

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  9. Fine structures of atomic excited states: precision atomic spectroscopy and electron-ion collision process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Cheng Cheng; Li Jiaming

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research fields for future energies such as inertial confinement fusion researches and astrophysics studies especially with satellite observatories advance into stages of precision physics. The relevant atomic data are not only enormous but also of accuracy according to requirements, especially for both energy levels and the collision data. The fine structure of high excited states of atoms and ions can be measured by precision spectroscopy. Such precision measurements can provide not only knowledge about detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions but also a bench mark examination of the accuracy of electron-ion collision data, especially incorporating theoretical computations. We illustrate that by using theoretical calculation methods which can treat the bound states and the adjacent continua on equal footing. The precision spectroscopic measurements of excited fine structures can be served as stringent tests of electron-ion collision data. (authors)

  10. New electron-ion-plasma equipment for modification of materials and products surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Electron-ion-plasma treatment of materials and products, including surface clearing and activation, formation surface layers with changed chemical and phase structure, increased hardness and corrosion resistance; deposition of various functional coatings, has received a wide distribution in a science and industry. Widespread methods of ion-plasma modification of material and product surfaces are ion etching and activation, ion-plasma nitriding, arc or magnetron deposition of functional coatings, including nanostructured. The combination of above methods of surface modification allows essentially to improve exploitation properties of treated products and to optimize the characteristics of modified surfaces for concrete final requirements. For the purpose of a combination of various methods of ion-plasma treatment in a single work cycle at Institute of High Current Electronics of SB RAS (IHCE SB RAS) specialized technological equipment 'DUET', 'TRIO' and 'QUADRO' and 'KVINTA' have been developed. This equipment allow generating uniform low-temperature gas plasma at pressures of (0.1-1) Pa with concentration of (10 9 -10 11 ) cm -3 in volume of (0.1-1) m 3 . In the installations consistent realization of several various operations of materials and products treatment in a single work cycle is possible. The operations are preliminary heating and degassing, ion clearing, etching and activation of materials and products surface by plasma of arc discharges; chemicothermal treatment (nitriding) for formation of diffusion layer on a surface of treated sample using plasma of nonself-sustained low-pressure arc discharge; deposition of single- or multilayered superhard (≥40 GPa) nanocrystalline coatings on the basis of pure metals or their compounds (nitrides, carbides, carbonitrides) by the arc plasma-assisted method. For realization of the modes all installations are equipped by original sources of gas and metal plasma. Besides, in

  11. Elliptic flow and incomplete equilibration at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, R S; Borghini, N; Ollitrault, Jean Yves

    2005-01-01

    We argue that RHIC data, in particular those on the anisotropic flow coefficients v_2 and v_4, suggest that the matter produced in the early stages of nucleus-nucleus collisions is incompletely thermalized. We interpret the parameter (1/S)(dN/dy), where S is the transverse area of the collision zone and dN/dy the multiplicity density, as an indicator of the number of collisions per particle at the time when elliptic flow is established, and hence as a measure of the degree of equilibration. This number serves as a control parameter which can be varied experimentally by changing the system size, the centrality or the beam energy. We provide predictions for Cu-Cu collisions at RHIC as well as for Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC.

  12. Equilibration: Developing the Hard Core of the Piagetian Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that the status of the concept of equilibration is classified by considering Piagetian theory as a research program in the sense elaborated in 1974 by Lakatos. A pilot study was made to examine the precision and testability of equilibration in Piaget's 1977 model.(Author/RH)

  13. Concept for an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) detector built around the BaBar solenoid

    OpenAIRE

    PHENIX Collaboration; Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.

    2014-01-01

    The PHENIX collaboration presents here a concept for a detector at a future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC detector proposed here, referred to as ePHENIX, will have excellent performance for a broad range of exciting EIC physics measurements, providing powerful investigations not currently available that will dramatically advance our understanding of how quantum chromodynamics binds the proton and forms nuclear matter.

  14. The structural design and the electron optics of a hybrid electron-ion gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bas, E.B.; Gisler, E.; Stucki, F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of a particle gun called the hybrid gun. It is able to deliver a finely focused electron or ion beam simply by reversing the polarity of the acceleration voltage. The detailed design features of the gun are given and the electron-ion optical properties are discussed. (author)

  15. Experimental determination of the electron-avalanche and the electron-ion recombination coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, G.J.; Boer, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-ion recombination coefficient γ and the avalanche coefficient δ = (α − a) · vd, where α and a are the ionizat ion and attachment coefficients respectively and vd the drift velocity of the electrons, have been experimentally determined in a self-sustained CO2-laser system (1:1:3 mixture)

  16. Separation of electron ion ring components (computational simulation and experimental results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, V.S.; Dolbilov, G.V.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.; Mironov, V.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Shevtsov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of the available polarization value of electron-ion rings in the regime of acceleration and separation of its components at the final stage of acceleration are studied. The results of computational simulation by use of the macroparticle method and experiments on the ring acceleration and separation are given. The comparison of calculation results with experiment is presented

  17. A new apparatus for electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Pruemper, G.; Liu, X.-J.; Lischke, T.; Ueda, K.; Tamenori, Y.; Oura, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Suzuki, I.H.; Saito, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new experimental apparatus for the electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy in order to obtain the angular distributions of vibration-resolved photoelectrons from molecules fixed in space. The apparatus consists of a four-stage molecular supersonic jet and a spectrometer analyzing three-dimensional momenta of fragment ions and electrons in coincidence

  18. Are we ready to test QED in two-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolaev, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The great improvement on the accuracy of the measured transition intervals in two-electron ions achieved recently is discussed with reference to reports of Berry (ANL) and Silver (Oxford) on the precision determination of the 2s 3 S 1 - 2p 3 P/sub J/, J = 0, and 2, intervals in the ions with intermediate Z

  19. Exclusive processes in electron-ion collisions in the dipole formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, Jd. Eldorado, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900 Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We compare the predictions of two saturation models for production of vector mesons and of photons in electron-ion collisions. The models considered are the b-CGC and the rcBK. The calculations were made in the kinematical range of the LHeC and of the future eRHIC.

  20. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keegan, Liam; Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; Schee, Wilke van der; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  1. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, Liam [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Kurkela, Aleksi [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Stavanger,4036 Stavanger (Norway); Romatschke, Paul [Department of Physics, 390 UCB, University of Colorado at Boulder,Boulder, CO (United States); Center for Theory of Quantum Matter, University of Colorado,Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Schee, Wilke van der [Center for Theoretical Physics, MIT,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhu, Yan [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics,P.O. Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-04-06

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  2. Enhanced electron/fuel-ion equilibration through impurity ions: Studies applicable to NIF and Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Simpson, R.; Parker, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Casey, D.; Grabowski, P.; Graziani, F.; Taitano, W.; Le, A.; Chacon, L.; Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Simakov, A.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Betti, R.; Srinivasan, B.; Mancini, R.

    2017-10-01

    In shock-driven exploding-pushers, a platform used extensively to study multi-species and kinetic effects, electrons and fuel ions are far out of equilibrium, as reflected by very different temperatures. However, impurity ions, even in small quantities, can couple effectively to the electrons, because of a Z2 dependence, and in turn, impurity ions can then strongly couple to the fuel ions. Through this mechanism, electrons and fuel-ions can equilibrate much faster than they otherwise would. This is a quantitative issue, depending upon the amount and Z of the impurity. For NIF and Omega, we consider the role of this process. Coupled non-linear equations, reflecting the temperatures of the three species, are solved for a range of conditions. Consideration is also given to ablatively driven implosions, since impurities can similarly affect the equilibration. This work was supported in part by DOE/NNSA DE-NA0002949 and DE-NA0002726.

  3. Pressure equilibration in the penguin middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadé, Jacob; Handrich, Yves; Bernheim, Joelle; Cohen, David

    2008-01-01

    King penguins have a venous structure in the form of a corpus cavernosum (CC) in their middle ear (ME) submucosa. The CC may be viewed as a special organelle that can change ME volume for pressure equilibration during deep-sea diving it is a pressure regulating organelle (PRO). A similar CC and muscles also surround the external ear (EE) and may constrict it, isolating the tympanic membrane from the outside. A CC was previously found also in the ME of marine diving mammals and can be expected to exist in other deep diving animals, such as marine turtles. Marine animals require equalization of middle ear (ME) pressure when diving hundreds or thousands of meters to catch prey. We investigated what mechanism enables king penguins to protect their ME when they dive to great depths. Biopsies and serial sections of the ME and the EE of the deep diving king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) were examined microscopically. It was demonstrated that the penguin ME has an extensive network of small and large submucosal venous sinuses. This venous formation, a corpus cavernosum, can expand and potentially 'flood' the ME almost completely on diving, thus elevating ME pressure and reducing the ME space. The EE has a similar protective mechanism.

  4. Rapid spatial equilibration of a particle in a box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabarba, Artur S L; Linden, Noah; Short, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    We study the equilibration behavior of a quantum particle in a one-dimensional box, with respect to a coarse-grained position measurement (whether it lies in a certain spatial window or not). We show that equilibration in this context indeed takes place and does so very rapidly, in a time comparable to the time for the initial wave packet to reach the edges of the box. We also show that, for this situation, the equilibration behavior is relatively insensitive to the precise choice of position measurements or initial condition.

  5. Effects of external field on elastic electron-ion collision in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sang-Chul; Jung, Young-Dae

    2008-01-01

    The field effects on elastic electron-ion collision are investigated in a plasma with the presence of the external field. The eikonal method and effective interaction potential including the far-field term caused by the external field is employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the field strength, external frequency, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy and Debye length. The result shows that the effect of the external field on the eikonal cross section is given by the second-order eikonal phase. In addition, the external field effects suppress the eikonal cross section as well as eikonal phase for the elastic electron-ion collision. The eikonal phase and cross section are found to be increased with an increase of the frequency of the external field. It is also shown that the eikonal cross section increases with an increase of the thermal energy and Debye length.

  6. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almási, Gábor András, E-mail: g.almasi@gsi.de [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wolf, György, E-mail: wolf.gyorgy@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1–7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20–40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff–Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  7. Effect of electron-ion treatment on fermentative activity of food yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, I.N.; Ostapenkov, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Investigation into effect of electron-ion treatment (EIT) on fermentative activity (FA) of Sacch cerevisial type yeasts of 12 breed was conducted. It is shown that even within the limits of one and the same type different treatment regimes are meded. This is obviously connected with physiologic peculiarities of different yeast breeds. Therefore an individual optimal treatment regime should be determined in each particular case during EIT of different breeds

  8. A cold cathode of a gas-discharge electron-ion gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A cold cathode of a gas-discharge electron-ion gun is constructed in order to continuously replace the eroded material by feeding a wire or a set of coaxial cylinders in the spot where the ions hit the cathode. In this way, the form of the cathode and the electric-field configuration is preserved which guarantees the conservation of a sharp narrow electron beam profile

  9. Para hydrogen equilibration in the atmospheres of the outer planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrath, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets is strongly dependent on the extent to which local thermal equilibration of the ortho and para states of molecular hydrogen is achieved. Voyager IRIS data from Jupiter imply substantial departures of the para hydrogen fraction from equilibrium in the upper troposphere at low latitudes, but with values approaching equilibrium at higher latitudes. Data from Saturn are less sensitive to the orth-para ratio, but suggest para hydrogen fractions near the equilibrium value. Above approximately the 200 K temperature level, para hydrogen conversion can enhance the efficiency of convection, resulting in a substantial increase in overturning times on all of the outer planets. Currently available data cannot definitively establish the ortho-para ratios in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune, but suggest values closer to local equilibrium than to the 3.1 normal ratio. Modeling of sub-millimeter wavelength measurements of these planets suggest thermal structures with frozen equilibrium lapse rates in their convective regions

  10. Determination of delta sub(18) in water from delta sub(18) in equilibrated CO2: influence of changes in experimental parameters on the equilibration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestler, V.; Arora, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The result of an isotopic exchange reaction is expressed in terms of the isotopic abundance ratios, the fractionation factor and the atom number ratio of the reactants. The general formula is applied to the CO 2 -H 2 O system and simplified by neglecting terms small in relation to the experimental error. The influence of variations in the experimental parameters on the equilibrium is discussed. It is found that changes in temperature as well as atom number ratio will influence the equilibration process appreciably [pt

  11. The investigation of electron-ion radiative and dielectronic recombination in high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    (1) The unified description of radiative and dielectronic recombination, which the authors have developed to provide corrections to the conventional independent-processes approximation, has been generalized to self-consistently incorporate the effects of charged-particle collisions and plasma electric fields. (2) The K α model for the dielectronic satellite spectra of highly-charged Fe ions, which the authors have developed based on the conventional theory of dielectronic satellite line intensities, has been incorporated into the multi-ion-species transport code MIST. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the simulated spectra and the observed Fe K α spectra from PLT and TFTR. (3) A detailed investigation has been completed on the dielectronic recombination satellite spectra in the presence of a distribution of plasma electric microfields. The calculations have been carried out for the lowest-lying n=2 satellites, which are affected by the electric fields only in high-density laser-produced plasma. For application to the lower-density conditions in tokamak plasmas, in which the electron density is about ten orders of magnitude smaller, a number of alternatives are under consideration for evaluating the recombination rates associated with the Rydberg autoionizing sates corresponding to large values of n. (3) A manuscript entitled ''Observation of Density-Enhanced Dielectronic Satellite Spectra Produced During Subpicosecond Laser-Matter Interactions'' has been submitted for publication in the Physical Review A. This work provides a convincing experimental verification of the theoretical predictions on the density sensitivity of diagnostically-important dielectronic satellite spectra in dense plasmas

  12. Ionospheric Electron/Ion Densities Temperatures on CD-ROM and WWW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Papitashvili, Natasha; Schar, Bill; Grebowsky, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    As part of this project a large volume of ionospheric satellite insitu data from the sixties, seventies and early eighties were made accessible online in ASCII format for public use. This includes 14 data sets from the BE-B, Alouette 2, DME-A, AE-B, ISIS-1, ISIS-2, OGO-6, DE-2, AEROS-A, AE-C, AE-D, AE-E, and Hinotori satellites. The original data existed in various machine-specific, highly compressed, binary encoding on 7-, or 9-track magnetic tapes. The data were decoded and converted to a common ASCII data format, solar and magnetic indices were added, and some quality control measures were taken. The original intent of producing CD-ROMs with these data was overtaken by the rapid development of the Internet. Most users now prefer to obtain the data directly online and greatly value WWW-interfaces to browse, plot and subset the data. Accordingly the data were made available online on the anonymous ftp site of NASA's National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft data/ and on NSSDC's ATMOWeb (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmoweb/), a WWW-interface for plotting, subsetting, and downloading the data. Several new features were implemented into ATMOWeb as part of this project including a filtering and scatter plot capability. The availability of this new database and WWW system was announced through several electronic mailer (AGU, CEDAR, IRI, etc) and through talks and posters during scientific meetings.

  13. Flavour equilibration studies of quark-gluon plasma with non-zero ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Flavour equilibration for a thermally equilibrated but chemically non- equilibrated quark-gluon plasma is presented. Flavour equilibration is studied enforcing baryon number conservation. In addition to the usual processes like single additional gluon production gg ⇌ ggg and its reverse and quark–antiquark pair ...

  14. Fermi level equilibration between colloidal lead and silver particles in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henglein, A.; Holzwarth, A.; Mulvaney, P.

    1992-01-01

    Colloidal solutions of lead and silver were mixed under the exclusion of air. The equilibration of the Fermi levels in the two different types of metal particles took place over a few days at room temperature. The equilibration took place by the transfer of lead atoms from lead to silver particles until the latter carried a lead mantle of one to two monolayers. This could be concluded from the observed changes in the optical spectrum of the silver particles. The results are discussed in terms of two mechanisms: (1) Pb atom transfer following heterocoagulation of the lead and silver particles and (2) electron transfer during Brownian encounters, followed by Pb 2+ desorption from the lead particles and subsequent Pb 2+ reductor on the silver particles carrying the transferred electrons. Traces of methylviologen, MV 2+ , in the solution drastically increase the rate of equilibration; this is explained by a relay mechanism in which electrons in the lead particles are first picked up by MV 2+ and are then transferred from MV + to the silver particles. 2 refs., 4 figs

  15. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Measurement of Engine... temperature-equilibrated and temperature-monitored calibration salt solutions in containers that seal...

  16. Theoretical progress in studying the characteristic x-ray emission from heavy few-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surzhykov, Andrey; Stohlker, Thomas; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kabachnik, Nikolai M

    2009-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in the study of the x-ray characteristic emission from highly-charged, few-electron ions is reviewed. These investigations show that the bound-state radiative transitions in high-Z ions provide a unique tool for better understanding the interplay between the structural and dynamical properties of heavy ions. In order to illustrate such an interplay, detailed calculations are presented for the K α1 decay of the helium-like uranium ions U 90+ following radiative electron capture, Coulomb excitation and dielectronic recombination processes.

  17. Effects of Crab Cavities' Multipole Content in an Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, Todd J.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Delayen, Jean R.; Castillo, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    The impact on the beam dynamics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Colider (MEIC) due to the multipole content of the 750 MHz crab cavity was studied using thin multipole elements for 6D phase space particle tracking in ELEGANT. Target values of the sextupole component for the cavity's field expansion were used to perform preliminary studies on the proton beam stability when compared to the case of pure dipole content of the rf kicks. Finally, important effects on the beam sizes due to non-linear components of the crab cavities' fields were identified, and some criteria for their future study were proposed.

  18. Weakly nonlinear electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion positron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzato, F.B.; Schneider, R.S.; Dillenburg, D.

    1987-01-01

    The modulation of a high-frequency electromagnetic wave which is circulary polarized and propagates in a plasma made up of electrons, ions and positrons is investigated. The coefficient of the cubic nonlinear term in the Schroedinger equation may change sign as the relative particle concentrations vary, and consequently a marginal state of modulation instability may exist. To described the system in the neighbourhood of this state an appropriate equation is derived. Particular stationary solutions of this equation are envelope solitary waves, envelope Kinks and envelope hole solitary waves. The dependence of the amplitude of the solutions on the propagation velocity and the particle concentrations is discussed. (author) [pt

  19. Ion-acoustic envelope modes in a degenerate relativistic electron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKerr, M.; Kourakis, I. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    A self-consistent relativistic two-fluid model is proposed for one-dimensional electron-ion plasma dynamics. A multiple scales perturbation technique is employed, leading to an evolution equation for the wave envelope, in the form of a nonlinear Schrödinger type equation (NLSE). The inclusion of relativistic effects is shown to introduce density-dependent factors, not present in the non-relativistic case—in the conditions for modulational instability. The role of relativistic effects on the linear dispersion laws and on envelope soliton solutions of the NLSE is discussed.

  20. Effects of Crab Cavities' Multipole Content in an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, Todd J. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Castillo, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The impact on the beam dynamics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Colider (MEIC) due to the multipole content of the 750 MHz crab cavity was studied using thin multipole elements for 6D phase space particle tracking in ELEGANT. Target values of the sextupole component for the cavity’s field expansion were used to perform preliminary studies on the proton beam stability when compared to the case of pure dipole content of the rf kicks. Finally, important effects on the beam sizes due to non-linear components of the crab cavities’ fields were identified, and some criteria for their future study were proposed.

  1. Electron, ion and atomic beams interaction with solid high-molecular dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milyavskij, V V; Skvortsov, V A [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). High Energy Density Research Center

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model was constructed and numerical investigation performed of the interaction between intense electron, ion and atomic beams and solid high-molecular dielectrics under various boundary conditions. The model is based on equations of the mechanics of continuum, electrodynamics and kinetics, describing the accumulation and relaxation of space charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. A semi-empirical procedure is proposed for the calculation of energy deposition by electron beam in a target in the presence of a non-uniform electric field. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  2. Probing sea quarks and gluons: the electron-ion collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, T.

    2014-01-01

    A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would be the world's first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world's first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. (authors)

  3. Effects of nuclear elastic scattering and modifications of ion-electron equilibration power on advanced-fuel burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of Nuclear Elastic Scattering (NES) of fusion products and modifications of the ion-electron equilibration power on D-T and D-based advanced-fuel fusion plasmas are presented here. The processes causing the modifications to the equilibration power included here are: (1) depletion of low-energy electrons by Coulomb collisions with the ions; and (2) magnetic field effects on the energy transfer between the ions and the electrons. Both NES and the equilibration modifications affect the flow of power to the plasma ions, which is an important factor in the analysis of advanced-fuels. A Hot Ion Mode (HIM) analysis was used to investigate the changes in the minimum ignition requirements for Cat-D and D- 3 He plasmas, due to the changes in the allowable T/sub i/T/sub e/ for ignition from NES and equilibration modifications. Both of these effects have the strongest influence on the ignition requirements for high temperature (>50 keV), low beta (<15%) plasmas, where the cyclotron radiation power loss from the electrons (which is particularly sensitive to changes in the electron temperature) is large

  4. Equilibration and hydrodynamics at strong and weak coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schee, Wilke

    2017-11-01

    We give an updated overview of both weak and strong coupling methods to describe the approach to a plasma described by viscous hydrodynamics, a process now called hydrodynamisation. At weak coupling the very first moments after a heavy ion collision is described by the colour-glass condensate framework, but quickly thereafter the mean free path is long enough for kinetic theory to become applicable. Recent simulations indicate thermalization in a time t ∼ 40(η / s) 4 / 3 / T [L. Keegan, A. Kurkela, P. Romatschke, W. van der Schee, Y. Zhu, Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories, JHEP 04 (2016) 031. arxiv:arXiv:1512.05347, doi:10.1007/JHEP04(2016)031], with T the temperature at that time and η / s the shear viscosity divided by the entropy density. At (infinitely) strong coupling it is possible to mimic heavy ion collisions by using holography, which leads to a dual description of colliding gravitational shock waves. The plasma formed hydrodynamises within a time of 0.41/T recent extension found corrections to this result for finite values of the coupling, when η / s is bigger than the canonical value of 1/4π, which leads to t ∼ (0.41 + 1.6 (η / s - 1 / 4 π)) / T [S. Grozdanov, W. van der Schee, Coupling constant corrections in holographic heavy ion collisions, arxiv:arXiv:1610.08976]. Future improvements include the inclusion of the effects of the running coupling constant in QCD.

  5. PARTON SATURATION, PRODUCTION, AND EQUILIBRATION IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    1999-01-01

    Deeply inelastic scattering of electrons off nuclei can determine whether parton distributions saturate at HERA energies. If so, this phenomenon will also tell us a great deal about how particles are produced, and whether they equilibrate, in high energy nuclear collisions

  6. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  7. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeyratne, S.; Accardi, A.; Ahmed, S.; Barber, D.; Bisognano, J.; Bogacz, A.; Castilla, A.; Chevtsov, P.; Corneliussen, S.; Deconinck, W.; Degtiarenko, P.; Delayen, J.; Derbenev, Ya.; DeSilva, S.; Douglas, D.; Dudnikov, V.; Ent, R.; Erdelyi, B.; Evtushenko, P.; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Guzey, V.; Horn, T.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Johnson, R.; Kim, Y.; Klein, F.; Kondratenko, A.; Kondratenko, M.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Lin, F.; Manikonda, S.; Marhauser, F.; McKeown, R.; Morozov, V.; Dadel-Turonski, P.; Nissen, E.; Ostroumov, P.; Pivi, M.; Pilat, F.; Poelker, M.; Prokudin, A.; Rimmer, R.; Satogata, T.; Sayed, H.; Spata, M.; Sullivan, M.; Tennant, C.; Terzic, B.; Tiefenback, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, S.; Weiss, C.; Yunn, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  8. Study of device of electron-ion treatment of mother baking yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapenkov, A.M.; Merinov, N.S.; Nazarov, V.N.; Balan, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Devices for electron- ion treatment of mother baking yeasts are considered and classified by the way of aerions removal from the ionization zone: the first ones - by means of the electric field, the other - by air directed flux. Devices of the first type require high voltage - 20-60 kV. Electrodynamic ion generator has been applied as a device of the second type; considered is its construction, principal of operation, given are diagrams of ion flux dependence. The methods of process calculations in the generator and experimental results are presented. The main advantage of the generator of the second type is operation at low (3-5 kV) voltages. It is shown, that the yeast growth module can achieve 36% at essential increase of biomass when using these yeasts as sowing. The device can be used for biostimulation and antisepting of food raw materials

  9. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  10. Laser-induced electron--ion recombination used to study enhanced spontaneous recombination during electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, U.; Wolf, A.; Schuess ler, T.; Habs, D.; Schwalm, D.; Uwira, O.; Linkemann, J.; Mueller, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous recombination of highly charged ions with free electrons in merged velocity matched electron and ion beams has been observed in earlier experiments to occur at rates significantly higher than predicted by theoretical estimates. To study this enhanced spontaneous recombination, laser induced recombination spectra were measured both in velocity matched beams and in beams with well defined relative velocities, corresponding to relative electron-ion detuning energies ranging from 1 meV up to 6.5 meV where the spontaneous recombination enhancement was found to be strongly reduced. Based on a comparison with simplified calculations, the development of the recombination spectra for decreasing detuning energies indicates additional contributions at matched velocities which could be related to the energy distribution of electrons causing the spontaneous recombination rate enhancement

  11. Experimental efforts at NIST towards one-electron ions in circular Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Joseph N; Guise, Nicholas D; Brewer, Samuel M

    2011-01-01

    Experimental effort is underway at NIST to enable tests of theory with one-electron ions synthesized in circular Rydberg states from captured bare nuclei. Problematic effects that limit the accuracy of predicted energy levels for low-lying states are vanishingly small for high-angular-momentum (high-L) states; in particular, the nuclear size correction for high-L states is completely negligible for any foreseeable improvement of measurement precision. As an initial step towards realizing such states, highly charged ions are extracted from the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) and steered through the electrodes of a Penning trap. The goal is to capture bare nuclei in the Penning trap for experiments to make one-electron atoms in circular Rydberg states with dipole (E1) transitions in the optical domain accessible to a frequency comb.

  12. Hyperpolarizabilities of one and two electron ions under strongly coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Subhrangsu; Mandal, Puspajit; Kumar Mukherjee, Prasanta; Fricke, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Systematic investigations on the hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogen and helium like ions up to nuclear charge Z = 7 under strongly coupled plasma environment have been performed. Variation perturbation theory has been adopted to evaluate such properties for the one and two electron systems. For the two electron systems coupled Hartree-Fock theory, which takes care of partial electron correlation effects, has been utilised. Ion sphere model of the strongly coupled plasma, valid for ionic systems only, has been adopted for estimating the effect of plasma environment on the hyperpolarizability. The calculated free ion hyperpolarizability for all the systems is in good agreement with the existing data. Under confinement hyperpolarizabilities of one and two electron ions show interesting trend with respect to plasma coupling strength.

  13. Feedback scheme for kink instability in ERL based electron ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kink instability presents one of the limiting factors from achieving higher luminosity in ERL based electron ion collider (EIC). However, we can take advantage of the flexibility of the linac and design a feedback system to cure the instability. This scheme raises the threshold of kink instability dramatically and provides opportunity for higher luminosity. We studied the effectiveness of this system and its dependence on the amplitude and phase of the feedback. In this paper we present results of theses studies of this scheme and describe its theoretical and practical limitations. The main advantage of an energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron ion collider (EIC) over a ring-ring type counterpart is the higher achievable luminosity. In ERL-based version, one electron beam collides with the opposing ion beam only once so that the beam-beam parameter can largely exceed the usual limitation in an electron collider ring, while the beam-beam parameter for the ion beam remains small values. The resulting luminosity may be enhanced by one order of magnitude. The beam dynamics related challenges also arise as the luminosity boost in ERL based EIC due to the significant beam-beam effect on the electron beam. The effects on the electron beam include the additional large beam-beam tune shift and nonlinear emittance growth, which are discussed. The ion beam may develop a head-tail type instability, referred as 'kink instability', through the interaction with the electron beam. In this paper, we discuss the feasibility of an active feedback system to mitigate the kink instability, by taking advantage of the flexibility of ERL. Throughout the paper, we will discuss the collision between proton and electron beam. Any other ion species can be scaled by its charge Z and ion mass A.

  14. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed

  15. "Electron/Ion Sponge"-Like V-Based Polyoxometalate: Toward High-Performance Cathode for Rechargeable Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jilei; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Shi; Zhang, Bowei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Huanhuan; Tian, Bingbing; Chen, Minghua; Fan, Xiaofeng; Huang, Yizhong; Sum, Tze Chien; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2017-07-25

    One key challenge facing room temperature Na-ion batteries lies in identifying earth-abundant, environmentally friendly and safe materials that can provide efficient Na + storage sites in Na-ion batteries. Herein, we report such a material, polyoxometalate Na 2 H 8 [MnV 13 O 38 ] (NMV), with entirely different composition and structure from those cathode compounds reported before. Ex-situ XPS and FTIR analyses reveal that NMV cathode behaves like an "electron/Na-ion sponge", with 11 electrons/Na + acceptability per mole, which has a decisive contribution to the high capacity. The extraordinary structural features, evidenced by X-ray crystallographic analysis, of Na 2 H 8 [MnV 13 O 38 ] with a flexible 2D lamellar network and 1D open channels provide diverse Na ion migration pathways, yielding good rate capability. First-principle calculations demonstrate that a super-reduced state, [MnV 13 O 38 ] 20- , is formed with slightly expanded size (ca. 7.5%) upon Na + insertion compared to the original [MnV 13 O 38 ] 9- . This "ion sponge" feature ensures the good cycling stability. Consequently, benefiting from the combinations of "electron/ion sponge" with diverse Na + diffusion channels, when revealed as the cathode materials for Na-ion batteries, Na 2 H 8 [MnV 13 O 38 ]/G exhibits a high specific capacity (ca. 190 mA h/g at 0.1 C), associates with a good rate capability (130 mA h/g at 1 C), and a good capacity retention (81% at 0.2 C). Our results promote better understanding of the storage mechanism in polyoxometalate host, enrich the existing rechargeable SIBs cathode chemistry, and enlighten an exciting direction for exploring promising cathode materials for Na-ion batteries.

  16. Theoretical analysis of the multiple resonances for many-level spin systems. The four-level spin system of s electron ions subjected to strong microwave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, F.F.; Marica, F.

    1994-01-01

    The analytic steady state solutions of master equation for the density matrix of a multilevel spin system in dilute paramagnetic crystals at high temperature, subjected to strong microwave fields, are discussed. These solutions enable to obtain the populations of the levels, and the microwave powers absorbed or emitted by the crystal, in the presence of one, two or more microwave fields. A detailed theoretical study of the maser effects for s electron ions with nuclear spin one-half is carried out. In the case of three frequency correlated strong fields, when 'the spectroscopic' bridge conditions are fulfilled, sensitive detections, or high efficient generations of microwaves of frequency higher than those of the pumping fields are predicted. (author) 16 figs., 16 refs

  17. A consequence of local equilibration and heterogeneity in glassy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, Ludovic

    2003-01-01

    The existence of a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem observed in simulations and experiments performed in various glassy materials is related to the concepts of local equilibration and heterogeneity in space. Assuming the existence of a dynamic coherence length scale up to which the system is locally equilibrated, we extend previous generalizations of the FDT relating static to dynamic quantities to the physically relevant domain where asymptotic limits of large times and sizes are not reached. The formulation relies on a simple scaling argument and thus does not have the character of a theorem. Extensive numerical simulations support this proposition. Our results quite generally apply to systems with slow dynamics, independently of the space dimensionality, the chosen dynamics or the presence of disorder

  18. Revisiting M&M with Taxes: An Alternative Equilibrating Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Kopecky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modigliani and Miller present an equity-quantity shifting equilibrating process to achieve an optimal firm value in the presence of corporate taxes. However, in the era in which they derived their various propositions regarding the relation between a firm’s value and its capital structure, well-capitalized takeover specialists including private equity firms and sovereign funds did not exist, at least by today’s standards. In this paper we develop a simple arbitrage strategy, made viable by the presence of takeover firms, which presents an alternative equilibrating process to achieve the same optimal firm value. This alternative process is markedly different from that of the Modigliani and Miller theorem in terms of its predictions for debt use and restores the prospect of capital structure irrelevancy despite the existence of corporate taxes.

  19. Interpretation of Fermion system equilibration by energy fluid motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.

    1990-01-01

    We study the equilibration of fermion system with the help of both linear and non-linear master equations which are originated from the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation of motion. We show how the non-linear master equation for nucleon occupation number transforms into the Navier-Stokes type of one dimensional equation for non-stationary flow of a compressible and viscous fluid. Physical consequences of these equations are investigated by providing illustrative examples

  20. Molybdenum Cluster Chalcogenides: In Situ X-Ray Studies on the Formation of Cu xMo 6S 8 via Electron/Ion Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C.; Gocke, E.; Stege, U.; Schöllhorn, R.

    1993-01-01

    Systematic structural investigation have been performed on the formation of the ternary Chevrel phase system CuxMo6S8 by topotactic intercalation of copper into Mo6S8 via electron/ion transfer reactions. In high-temperature synthesis the homogeneity range of CuxMo6S8 formation corresponds to 1.8 ≤ x ≤ 3.66, while by galvanostatic or potentiostatic reduction of binary Mo6S8 at ambiet temperature in aqueous CuSO4 or aprotic CuCl/Ch3CN electrolyte the terminal rhombohedral phase Cu4Mo6S8 with the maximum number of electrons per Mo6 cluster can be obtained. The phase range 1 ≤ x ≤ 4 of CuxMo6S8 as obtained by galvanostatic reduction of Mo6S8 in aqueous CuSO4 electrolyte has been determined by in situ X-ray experiments. Warburg oxygen manometry has proved to be a new and powerful analytical tool for examination of the Cu content of ternary phase CuxMo6S8. Thermodiffractometry and 63 Cu NMR studies of Cu2Mo6S8 (high-temperature phase) reveal a phase-transition rhombohedral/triclinic in a broad temperature range between 285 and 200 K. Superconducting properties (temperature-dependent ac susceptibility) of high temperature and electrochemically prepared Cu phases are reported.

  1. Voltage equilibration for reactive atomistic simulations of electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We introduce electrochemical dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom (EChemDID), a model to describe electrochemical driving force in reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The method describes the equilibration of external electrochemical potentials (voltage) within metallic structures and their effect on the self-consistent partial atomic charges used in reactive molecular dynamics. An additional variable assigned to each atom denotes the local potential in its vicinity and we use fictitious, but computationally convenient, dynamics to describe its equilibration within connected metallic structures on-the-fly during the molecular dynamics simulation. This local electrostatic potential is used to dynamically modify the atomic electronegativities used to compute partial atomic changes via charge equilibration. Validation tests show that the method provides an accurate description of the electric fields generated by the applied voltage and the driving force for electrochemical reactions. We demonstrate EChemDID via simulations of the operation of electrochemical metallization cells. The simulations predict the switching of the device between a high-resistance to a low-resistance state as a conductive metallic bridge is formed and resistive currents that can be compared with experimental measurements. In addition to applications in nanoelectronics, EChemDID could be useful to model electrochemical energy conversion devices

  2. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Powell, Brian A.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  3. Equilibration in the reaction of 175 and 252 MeV 20Ne with 197Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, J.B.

    1978-06-01

    The highly inelastic nuclear reaction of 197 Au with 20 Ne at 175 and 252 MeV laboratory energies is studied. Energy-, elemental-, and angular- distributions for atomic numbers 5 to 30 (175 MeV) or 34 (252 MeV) are presented. The means and widths of the kinetic energy spectra for detected elements are compared with a theoretical calculation. The calculation postulates thermalization of the incident projectile kinetic energy, and includes one sha(e-vibrational degree of freedom and rigid rotation of the reaction complex. The effect of particle evaporation is considered. Good agreement of the expurimental mean energies with the theory is obtained. Poorer agreement of the kinetic energy widths with the theory may be due to a low-temperature quantal effect. The relative elemental yields are analyzed for their degree of equilibration, based on a model of diffusive nucleon exchange as described by the master equation. A similar degree of equilibration is observed for both reaction energies. The absolute elemental yields are reproduced qualitatively by employing an advanced diffusion code, coupled with calculation of the subsequent fission of heavy reaction products, including the compound nucleus. The angular distributions are analyzed with a simple model, to estimate the reaction lifetime of selected elements

  4. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  5. Testing of multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for Electron Ion Collider Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hannah; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Despite decades of research on the subject, some details of the spin structure of the nucleon continues to be unknown. To improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure, the construction of a new collider is needed. This is one of the primary goals of the proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Planned EIC spectrometers will require good particle identification. This can be provided by time of flight (TOF) detectors with excellent timing resolutions of 10 ps. A potential TOF detector that could meet this requirement is a glass multigap resistive plate chamber (mRPC). These mRPCs can provide excellent timing resolution at a low cost. The current glass mRPC prototypes have a total of twenty 0.1 mm thick gas gaps. In order to test the feasibility of this design, a cosmic test stand was assembled. This stand used the coincidence of scintillators as a trigger, and contains fast electronics. The construction, the method of testing, and the test results of the mRPCs will be presented.

  6. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  7. Electron-Ion Intensity Dropouts in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events during Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lun C.

    2017-09-01

    Since the field-line mixing model of Giacalone et al. suggests that ion dropouts cannot happen in the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event because of the large size of the particle source region in the event, the observational evidence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event should challenge the model. We have searched for the presence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event during solar cycle 23. From 10 SEP events the synchronized occurrence of ion and electron dropouts is identified in 12 periods. Our main observational facts, including the mean width of electron-ion dropout periods being consistent with the solar wind correlation scale, during the dropout period the dominance of the slab turbulence component and the enhanced turbulence power parallel to the mean magnetic field, and the ion gyroradius dependence of the edge steepness in dropout periods, are all in support of the solar wind turbulence origin of dropout events. Also, our observation indicates that a wide longitude distribution of SEP events could be due to the increase of slab turbulence fraction with the increased longitude distance from the flare-associated active region.

  8. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  9. Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier - Understanding the glue that binds us all

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A.; Anselmino, M.; Armesto, N.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Bacchetta, A.; Boer, D.; Brooks, W.K.; Burton, T.; Chang, N.B.; Deng, W.T.; Deshpande, A.; Diehl, M.; Dumitru, A.; Dupré, R.; Ent, R.; Fazio, S.; Gao, H.; Guzey, V.; Hakobyan, H.; Hao, Y.; Hasch, D.; Holt, R.; Horn, T.; Huang, M.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Klein, S.; Kopeliovich, B.; Kovchegov, Y.; Kumar, K.; Kumerički, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Lappi, T.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, Y.; Levin, E.M.; Lin, F.L.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T.W.; Marquet, C.; Meziani, Z.E.; McKeown, R.; Metz, A.; Milner, R.; Morozov, V.S.; Mueller, A.H.; Müller, B.; Müller, Dieter; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Paukkunen, H.; Prokudin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qian, X.; Qiu, J.W.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Roser, T.; Sabatié, F.; Sassot, R.; Schnell, G.; Schweitzer, P.; Sichtermann, E.; Stratmann, M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Taneja, S.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S.; Vogelsang, W.; Weiss, C.; Xiao, B.W.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, Y.H.; Zheng, L.

    2016-01-01

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to prope...

  10. Electron-Ion Collider: The next QCD frontier. Understanding the glue that binds us all

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardi, A. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Albacete, J.L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Anselmino, M. [Torino University (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Armesto, N. [University of Santiago de Campostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aschenauer, E.C.; Burton, T.; Fazio, S.; Hao, Y.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T.W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qiu, J.W.; Roser, T.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bacchetta, A. [University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Boer, D. [University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brooks, W.K.; Hakobyan, H.; Kopeliovich, B. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Chang, N.B.; Huang, M. [Shandong University, Shandong (China); Deng, W.T. [Frankfurt University, FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany); Shandong University, Shandong (China); Deshpande, A.; Kumar, K. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, M. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dumitru, A.; Jalilian-Marian, J. [Baruch College, CUNY, New York, NY (United States); Dupre, R.; Sabatie, F. [Centre de Saclay, CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.L.; McKeown, R.; Morozov, V.S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Prokudin, A.; Weiss, C.; Zhang, Y.H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gao, H. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hasch, D. [INFN, LNF, Frascati (Italy); Holt, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Horn, T. [The Catholic University of America, N.E. Washington, DC (United States); Hyde, C. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, S.; Sichtermann, E.; Yuan, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kovchegov, Y. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Kumericki, K. [University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Lappi, T.; Paukkunen, H. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Levin, E.M. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Marquet, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Meziani, Z.E.; Metz, A. [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Milner, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Mueller, A.H. [Columbia University, New York, NY (US); Mueller, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Duke University, Durham, NC (US); Mueller, D. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (DE); Qian, X. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (US); Ramsey-Musolf, M. [University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA (US); Sassot, R. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (AR); Schnell, G. [University of Basque Country, Bilbao (ES); Schweitzer, P. [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (US); Stratmann, M.; Vogelsang, W. [University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (DE); Strikman, M. [Pennsylvania State University, Philadelphia, PA (US); Sullivan, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US); Taneja, S. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (CA); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (US); Xiao, B.W. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (CN); Zheng, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (CN)

    2016-09-15

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics over the past decades and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on ''Gluons and quark sea at high energies'' at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them. It has been benefited profoundly from inputs by the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the US, established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier. (orig.)

  11. Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution/Fragmentation Functions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Avakian, H.; Boer, D.; Bradamante, F.; Burkardt, M.; Chen, J.P.; Cisbani, E.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Dutta, D.; Gamberg, L.; Gao, H.; Hasch, D.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Kang, Z.; Keppel, C.; Laskaris, G.; Liang, Z.-T.; Liu, M.X.; Makins, N.; Mckeown, R.D.; Metz, A.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Musch, B.; Peng, J.-C.; Prokudin, A.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, J.W.; Rossi, P.; Schweitzer, P.; Soffer, J.; Sulkosky, V.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B.; Ye, Q.; Ye, Q.-J.; Yuan, F.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, W.; Zhou, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a summary of a recent workshop held at Duke University on Partonic Transverse Momentum in Hadrons: Quark Spin-Orbit Correlations and Quark-Gluon Interactions. The transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, and multi-parton correlation functions, were discussed extensively at the Duke workshop. In this paper, we summarize first the theoretical issues concerning the study of partonic structure of hadrons at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with emphasis on the TMDs. We then present simulation results on experimental studies of TMDs through measurements of single spin asymmetries (SSA) from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes with an EIC, and discuss the requirement of the detector for SIDIS measurements. The dynamics of parton correlations in the nucleon is further explored via a study of SSA in D ((bar D)) production at large transverse momenta with the aim of accessing the unexplored tri-gluon correlation functions. The workshop participants identified the SSA measurements in SIDIS as a golden program to study TMDs in both the sea and valence quark regions and to study the role of gluons, with the Sivers asymmetry measurements as examples. Such measurements will lead to major advancement in our understanding of TMDs in the valence quark region, and more importantly also allow for the investigation of TMDs in the sea quark region along with a study of their evolution.

  12. Fluid aspects of electron streaming instability in electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, C.-S.; Hau, L.-N.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons streaming in a background electron and ion plasma may lead to the formation of electrostatic solitary wave (ESW) and hole structure which have been observed in various space plasma environments. Past studies on the formation of ESW are mostly based on the particle simulations due to the necessity of incorporating particle's trapping effects. In this study, the fluid aspects and thermodynamics of streaming instabilities in electron-ion plasmas including bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities are addressed based on the comparison between fluid theory and the results from particle-in-cell simulations. The energy closure adopted in the fluid model is the polytropic law of d(pρ −γ )/dt=0 with γ being a free parameter. Two unstable modes are identified for the bump-on-tail instability and the growth rates as well as the dispersion relation of the streaming instabilities derived from the linear theory are found to be in good agreement with the particle simulations for both bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities. At the nonlinear saturation, 70% of the electrons are trapped inside the potential well for the drift velocity being 20 times of the thermal velocity and the pρ −γ value is significantly increased. Effects of ion to electron mass ratio on the linear fluid theory and nonlinear simulations are also examined

  13. High-performance DIRC detector for the future Electron Ion Collider experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicy, G.; Allison, L.; Cao, T.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Hartlove, T.; Horn, T.; Hyde, C.; Ilieva, Y.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Peters, K.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Stevens, J.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.

    2018-04-01

    Excellent particle identification (PID) is an essential requirement for a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) detector. Identification of the hadrons in the final state is critical to study how different quark flavors contribute to nucleon properties. A detector based on the Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) principle, with a radial size of only a few cm, is a perfect solution for those requirements. The R&D process performed by the EIC PID consortium (eRD14) is focused on designing a high-performance DIRC that would extend the momentum coverage well beyond the state-of-the-art, allowing 3 standard deviations or more separation of π/K up to 6 GeV/c, e/π up to 1.8 GeV/c, and p/K up to 10 GeV/c. A key component to reach such a performance is a special 3-layer compound lens. This article describes the status of the High-Performance DIRC R&D for the EIC detector, with a focus on the detailed Monte Carlo simulation results and performance tests of the 3-layer lens.

  14. Wavelength dependent photoelectron circular dichroism of limonene studied by femtosecond multiphoton laser ionization and electron-ion coincidence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Fanood, Mohammad M.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomers of the monoterpene limonene have been investigated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron circular dichroism employing tuneable, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Electron imaging detection provides 3D momentum measurement while electron-ion coincidence detection can be used to mass-tag individual electrons. Additional filtering, by accepting only parent ion tagged electrons, can be then used to provide discrimination against higher energy dissociative ionization mechanisms where more than three photons are absorbed to better delineate the two photon resonant, one photon ionization pathway. The promotion of different vibrational levels and, tentatively, different electronic ion core configurations in the intermediate Rydberg states can be achieved with different laser excitation wavelengths (420 nm, 412 nm, and 392 nm), in turn producing different state distributions in the resulting cations. Strong chiral asymmetries in the lab frame photoelectron angular distributions are quantified, and a comparison made with a single photon (synchrotron radiation) measurement at an equivalent photon energy.

  15. Quantum screening effects on the electron-ion occurrence scattering time advance in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Jung, Young-Dae

    2003-01-01

    Quantum screening effects on the occurrence scattering time advance for elastic electron-ion collisions in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas are investigated using the second-order eikonal analysis. The electron-ion interaction in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas is obtained by the pseudopotential model taking into account the plasma screening and quantum effects. It is found that the quantum-mechanical effects significantly reduce the occurrence scattering time advance. It is also found that the occurrence scattering time advance increases with increasing Debye length. It is quite interesting to note that the domain of the maximum occurrence time advance is localized for the forward scattering case. The region of the scaled thermal de Broglie wave length (λ-bar) for the maximum occurrence time advance is found to be 0.4≤λ-bar≤1.4

  16. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  17. Combinations of glycerol percent, glycerol equilibration time, and thawing rate upon freezability of bull spermatozoa in plastic straws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggin, H B; Almquist, J O

    1975-03-01

    Twelve ejaculates were used in a central composite experiment to test 15 combinations of glycerol (7, 9, 11, 13, or 15%), glycerol equilibration times (1, 2, 4, 8, or 16 h) and thawing rates (water at 35 C for 15 s, 50 C for 13 s, 65 C for 11 s, 80 C for 9 s, or 95 C for 7 s). Semen was diluted in heated skim milk-glycerol, packaged in .3-ml. Continental U.S. straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. Based on post-thaw progressive sperm motility after storage at -196 C for 9 to 11 days, estimated optima from multiple regression were 10.7% for glycerol, 2.0 h for glycerol equilibration time, and 76 C for thawing bath temperature. Only the linear effect for each variable was significant. Much faster thawing rates and shorter glycerol equilibration times than those for freezing bull spermatozoa in glass ampules should be used for maximum post-thaw sperm motility in straws.

  18. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-[ 3 H]ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-[ 3 H]ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO 2 , and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment

  19. Studies of the surface of titanium dioxide. IV. The hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, T.; Katsuta, K.; Miura, M.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen with the surface of titanium dioxide has been studied in connection with the hydrogen-reduction mechanism of titanium dioxide, by means of such measurements as weight decrease, magnetic susceptibility, hydrogen uptake, and electrical conductance. It was postulated in the previous study that the rate-determining step of the hydrogen-reduction reaction may be the formation of surface hydroxyl groups, followed by the rapid removal of water molecules from the surface. In this study, the interactions between hydrogen and the surface of titanium dioxide were investigated by measuring the hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction, H 2 + D 2 = 2HD, at temperatures above 200 0 C on both surfaces before and after hydrogen reduction to compare the differences in the reactivities

  20. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  1. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzic, Balsa; Zhang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF SATISFACTION IN PERITONEAL EQUILIBRATION TEST: A STUDY ON THE VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF THE PERITONEAL EQUILIBRATION SATISFACTION SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eylem TOPBAŞ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study has been designed to develop an assessment tool to be used in determining the patients’ satisfaction level with the peritoneal equilibration test (PET procedure. Materials and Methods: The development and validation of the peritoneal equilibration test Satisfaction Scale (PETSS was completed in two phases. Phase I focused on instrument construction and included item development and establishment of concurrent validity. Phase II included the factor analysis and psychometric assessment of the scale. In statistical evaluation of the data descriptive statistics and non-paratmetric tests were used. Results: The first version of the scale that has 3.62 Content Validity Index value was composed of 20 items. It was found that the latest version of the scale that has 14 items explained 46% of the variance. It was found that the Cronbach alfa value of this scale, which has 0.52-0.89 coefficient of item-total correlation was 0.96. Psychometric assessment of the scale revealed that except for type of the PET application, none of the demographic and clinical characteristics effect patients level of satisfaction during the PET application. Conclusion: This preliminary study showed that PETSS was a valid and reliable scale that can be used for determining satisfaction level of patients during PET application.

  3. Measurements of the total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost in low-pressure inductive argon, helium, oxygen and nitrogen discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Kwang; Ku, Ju-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost, ε T , were performed in a low-pressure inductive atomic gases (Ar, He) and molecular gases (O 2 , N 2 ) discharge. The value of ε T was determined from a power balance based on the electropositive global (volume-averaged) model. A floating harmonic method was employed to measure ion fluxes and electron temperatures at the discharge wall. In the pressure range 5-50 mTorr, it was found that the measured ε T ranged from about 70 to 150 V for atomic gases, but from about 180 to 1300 V for molecular gases. This difference between atomic and molecular discharge is caused by additional collisional energy losses of molecular gases. For argon discharge, the stepwise ionization effect on ε T was observed at relatively high pressures. For different gases, the measured ε T was evaluated with respect to the electron temperature, and then compared with the calculation results, which were derived from collisional and kinetic energy loss. The measured ε T and their calculations showed reasonable agreement.

  4. Dynamical equilibration in strongly-interacting parton-hadron matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenstein M.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton-hadron matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach, which is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons matched to reproduce lattice-QCD results – including the partonic equation of state – in thermodynamic equilibrium. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different baryon density (or chemical potential and energy density. The transition from initially pure partonic matter to hadronic degrees of freedom (or vice versa occurs dynamically by interactions. Different thermody-namical distributions of the strongly-interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP are addressed and discussed.

  5. Crossover from equilibration to aging: Nonequilibrium theory versus simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Méndez, P; Lázaro-Lázaro, E; Sánchez-Díaz, L E; Ramírez-González, P E; Pérez-Ángel, G; Medina-Noyola, M

    2017-08-01

    Understanding glasses and the glass transition requires comprehending the nature of the crossover from the ergodic (or equilibrium) regime, in which the stationary properties of the system have no history dependence, to the mysterious glass transition region, where the measured properties are nonstationary and depend on the protocol of preparation. In this work we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to test the main features of the crossover predicted by the molecular version of the recently developed multicomponent nonequilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory. According to this theory, the glass transition involves the abrupt passage from the ordinary pattern of full equilibration to the aging scenario characteristic of glass-forming liquids. The same theory explains that this abrupt transition will always be observed as a blurred crossover due to the unavoidable finiteness of the time window of any experimental observation. We find that within their finite waiting-time window, the simulations confirm the general trends predicted by the theory.

  6. Strangeness chemical equilibration in a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2007-01-01

    We study, in the dynamically evolving quark-gluon plasma (QGP) fireball formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the growth of strangeness yield toward and beyond the chemical equilibrium. We account for the contribution of the direct strangeness production and evaluate the thermal-QCD strangeness production mechanisms. The specific yield of strangeness per entropy, s/S, is the primary target variable. We explore the effect of collision impact parameter, i.e., fireball size, on kinetic strangeness chemical equilibration in QGP. Insights gained in studying the RHIC data with regard to the dynamics of the fireball are applied to the study of strangeness production at the LHC. We use these results and consider the strange hadron relative particle yields at RHIC and LHC in a systematic fashion. We consider both the dependence on s/S and the direct dependence on the participant number

  7. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos : accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...of quantum chaos Igor Bray CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 01/20/2017 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos : accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos

  8. Electron-Ion Dynamics with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Towards Predictive Solar Cell Modeling: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa [Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This project investigates the accuracy of currently-used functionals in time-dependent density functional theory, which is today routinely used to predict and design materials and computationally model processes in solar energy conversion. The rigorously-based electron-ion dynamics method developed here sheds light on traditional methods and overcomes challenges those methods have. The fundamental research undertaken here is important for building reliable and practical methods for materials discovery. The ultimate goal is to use these tools for the computational design of new materials for solar cell devices of high efficiency.

  9. Equilibration of matter near the QCD critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravina, L V; Arsene, I; Nilsson, M S; Tywoniuk, K; Zabrodin, E E

    2006-01-01

    The relaxation of hot and dense nuclear matter to local equilibrium in the central zone of heavy-ion collisions at energies around 40 A GeV is studied within the microscopic transport model. Dynamical calculations performed for the central cell in the reaction are compared to the predictions of the thermal statistical model. It is found that kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrations of the expanding hadronic matter are nearly approached for the period of 10-18 fm/c. Within this time, the matter in the cell expands almost isentropically. It is quite interesting that in the T-μ B plane the system crosses the critical point predicted by lattice QCD calculations. Similar to the cells studied at lower (AGS) and higher (SPS, RHIC) energies, the central cell at 40 A GeV possesses negative (though small) net strangeness. Several peculiarities are observed as well. These features can be attributed to the transition from baryon-dominated to meson-dominated matter, discussed recently

  10. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  11. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  12. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector and other instruments from the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in the Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-02 to 2016-04-18 (NCEI Accession 0158483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected in the Pacific ocean on the R/V...

  13. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector and other instruments from 3 trans-Pacific crossings onboard container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-13 to 2016-09-13 (NCEI Accession 0158484)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters that were collected during 3 trans-Pacific...

  14. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2014-02-01 to 2014-11-26 (NCEI Accession 0132047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 6 trans-Pacific crossings...

  15. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from container ship Cap Vilano in the Pacific Ocean from 2013-02-01 to 2013-06-06 (NCEI Accession 0132054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 3 trans-Pacific crossings...

  16. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from 4 trans-Pacific crossings onboard container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2015-03-28 to 2015-12-04 (NCEI Accession 0141304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected during 4 trans-Pacific crossings in...

  17. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10 33 -10 34 cm -2 sec -1 range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high-luminosity eRHIC. In it

  18. Maintenance of lettuce seed viability and counter-action of radiation damage by moisture equilibration-drying treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, Bina; Basu, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    Lettuce seeds were subjected to X- and gamma-radiation after moisture equilibration-drying or they were equilibrated with a saturated atmosphere for 24 hrs immediately after irradiation followed by drying back to the original weight. Results showed that moisture-equilibration drying treatment either before or after irradiation counteracts the adverse effects of irradiation. (M.G.B.)

  19. Maintenance of lettuce seed viability and counter-action of radiation damage by moisture equilibration-drying treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, B; Basu, R N

    1982-10-01

    Lettuce seeds were subjected to X- and gamma-radiation after moisture equilibration-drying or they were equilibrated with a saturated atmosphere for 24 hrs immediately after irradiation followed by drying back to the original weight. Results showed that moisture-equilibration drying treatment either before or after irradiation counteracts the adverse effects of irradiation. (M.G.B.). 14 refs.

  20. Photon production in an expanding and chemically equilibrating gluon-enriched plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, B.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Pavlenko, O.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1993-12-01

    Photon production in a longitudinally and transversely expanding gluon plasma with initially little quark admixture is considered. Chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons is followed by rate equations. The yields of hard photons with E ≥ 2 GeV are insensitive to chemical equilibration and depend mainly on the initial thermalized state. Medium-energy photons with E ∼ 1 GeV are more frequently produced in case of faster equilibration, despite of faster cooling. For an assumed fast equilibration we follow the evolution of matter through mixed and hadron phases. The transverse momentum kick, due to transverse expansion, of photons from hadron matter is shown to be reduced for an equation of state with reduced latent heat. The photon yield in the region E > 1 GeV from deconfined matter dominates for conditions, estimated to be achieved at RHIC, in case of a weakly first-order confinement transition. (orig.)

  1. An energy resolved electron-ion coincidence study near the S 2p thresholds of the SF6 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivimaeki, A; Ruiz, J Alvarez; Erman, P; Hatherly, P; Garcia, E Melero; Rachlew, E; Rius i Riu, J; Stankiewicz, M

    2003-01-01

    The fragmentation dynamics of the SF 6 molecule following the excitations of S 2p electrons into unoccupied molecular orbitals has been studied using the energy-resolved electron-ion coincidence technique. Fragmentation patterns were found to depend on the particular excitation and on the electronic state of the molecular ion. The spectator resonant Auger decay at the 2p → 6a 1g resonance induces changes in the ion distributions as compared to direct photoionization. Furthermore, coincidence spectra related to the same Auger structure display different ion abundances at the 2t 2g and 4e g shape resonances. Differences were also found in the Auger decay spectra. These findings give further support for the previously suggested many-electron character of the 4e g shape resonance

  2. Electronic transport coefficients in plasmas using an effective energy-dependent electron-ion collision-frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Decoster, A.; Videau, L.

    2017-10-01

    We present a model to calculate the electrical and thermal electronic conductivities in plasmas using the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach coupled with the Kramers approximation. The divergence in photon energy at low values is eliminated using a regularization scheme with an effective energy-dependent electron-ion collision-frequency. Doing so, we interpolate smoothly between the Drude-like and the Spitzer-like regularizations. The model still satisfies the well-known sum rule over the electrical conductivity. Such kind of approximation is also naturally extended to the average-atom model. A particular attention is paid to the Lorenz number. Its nondegenerate and degenerate limits are given and the transition towards the Drude-like limit is proved in the Kramers approximation.

  3. Facet-controlled phase separation in supersaturated Au-Ni nanoparticles upon shape equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, A., E-mail: andreas.herz@tu-ilmenau.de, E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Rossberg, D.; Hentschel, M.; Theska, F.; Wang, D., E-mail: andreas.herz@tu-ilmenau.de, E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Schaaf, P. [Department of Materials for Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Friák, M. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC MU, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Holec, D. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Šob, M. [Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC MU, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, CZ-611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Schneeweiss, O. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-17

    Solid-state dewetting is used to fabricate supersaturated, submicron-sized Au-Ni solid solution particles out of thin Au/Ni bilayers by means of a rapid thermal annealing technique. Phase separation in such particles is studied with respect to their equilibrium crystal (or Wulff) shape by subsequent annealing at elevated temperature. It is found that (100) faceting planes of the equilibrated particles are enriched with Ni and (111) faces with Au. Both phases are considered by quantum-mechanical calculations in combination with an error-reduction scheme that was developed to compensate for a missing exchange-correlation potential that would reliably describe both Au and Ni. The observed phase configuration is then related to the minimization of strongly anisotropic elastic energies of Au- and Ni-rich phases and results in a rather unique nanoparticle composite state that is characterized by nearly uniform value of elastic response to epitaxial strains all over the faceted surface. The same conclusion is yielded also by evaluating bi-axial elastic moduli when employing interpolated experimental elastic constants. This work demonstrates a useful route for studying features of physical metallurgy at the mesoscale.

  4. A critical evaluation of multistage equilibration technique for preconcentration by ion-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Capabilities of the method of preconcentration of heavy metal ions from aqueous samples by Chelex 100 using a successive equilibration technique has been evaluated. The process of successive equilibrations may be looked upon in one of the two ways: one of equilibrating a given amount of resin with n successive aliquots so that sample size increases n-fold. Alternatively one may consider this as dividing a large-sized sample into n equal aliquots and carrying out the equilibrations with a smaller amount of resin maintaining the v/m ratio. Expressions have been derived for overall recovery, percentage recovery and decontamination factor for the successive equilibration technique. The validity of the expressions has been checked with experimental data. The values for recovery and decontamination factor have been compared with those for a single equilibration using the whole sample. Finally the factors which affect the value of recovery have been examined and their effect on the recovery has been evaluated. (author). 12 refs., 4 tabs., 1 appendix

  5. Dynamic electron-ion collisions and nuclear quantum effects in quantum simulation of warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongdong; Dai, Jiayu

    2018-02-01

    The structural, thermodynamic and transport properties of warm dense matter (WDM) are crucial to the fields of astrophysics and planet science, as well as inertial confinement fusion. WDM refers to the states of matter in a regime of temperature and density between cold condensed matter and hot ideal plasmas, where the density is from near-solid up to ten times solid density, and the temperature between 0.1 and 100 eV. In the WDM regime, matter exhibits moderately or strongly coupled, partially degenerate properties. Therefore, the methods used to deal with condensed matter and isolated atoms need to be properly validated for WDM. It is therefore a big challenge to understand WDM within a unified theoretical description with reliable accuracy. Here, we review the progress in the theoretical study of WDM with state-of-the-art simulations, i.e. quantum Langevin molecular dynamics and first principles path integral molecular dynamics. The related applications for WDM are also included.

  6. Energy loss, equilibration, and thermodynamics of a baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougemont, Romulo [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1371, Butantã, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ficnar, Andrej [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Finazzo, Stefano I. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1371, Butantã, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado de São Paulo, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, CEP 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Noronha, Jorge [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1371, Butantã, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Lattice data for the QCD equation of state and the baryon susceptibility near the crossover phase transition (at zero baryon density) are used to determine the input parameters of a 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model that provides a consistent holographic framework to study both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium properties of a hot and baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We compare our holographic equation of state computed at nonzero baryon chemical potential, μ{sub B}, with recent lattice calculations and find quantitative agreement for the pressure and the speed of sound for μ{sub B}≤400 MeV. This holographic model is used to obtain holographic predictions for the temperature and μ{sub B} dependence of the drag force and the Langevin diffusion coefficients associated with heavy quark jet propagation as well as the jet quenching parameter q̂ and the shooting string energy loss of light quarks in the baryon dense plasma. We find that the energy loss of heavy and light quarks generally displays a nontrivial, fast-varying behavior as a function of the temperature near the crossover. Moreover, energy loss is also found to generally increase due to nonzero baryon density effects even though this strongly coupled liquid cannot be described in terms of well defined quasiparticle excitations. Furthermore, to get a glimpse of how thermalization occurs in a hot and baryon dense QGP, we study how the lowest quasinormal mode of an external massless scalar disturbance in the bulk is affected by a nonzero baryon charge. We find that the equilibration time associated with the lowest quasinormal mode decreases in a dense medium.

  7. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E

    2014-10-14

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation.

  8. Equilibrating high-molecular-weight symmetric and miscible polymer blends with hierarchical back-mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuma, Takahiro; Kremer, Kurt; Daoulas, Kostas

    2018-05-01

    Understanding properties of polymer alloys with computer simulations frequently requires equilibration of samples comprised of microscopically described long molecules. We present the extension of an efficient hierarchical backmapping strategy, initially developed for homopolymer melts, to equilibrate high-molecular-weight binary blends. These mixtures present significant interest for practical applications and fundamental polymer physics. In our approach, the blend is coarse-grained into models representing polymers as chains of soft blobs. Each blob stands for a subchain with N b microscopic monomers. A hierarchy of blob-based models with different resolution is obtained by varying N b. First the model with the largest N b is used to obtain an equilibrated blend. This configuration is sequentially fine-grained, reinserting at each step the degrees of freedom of the next in the hierarchy blob-based model. Once the blob-based description is sufficiently detailed, the microscopic monomers are reinserted. The hard excluded volume is recovered through a push-off procedure and the sample is re-equilibrated with molecular dynamics (MD), requiring relaxation on the order of the entanglement time. For the initial method development we focus on miscible blends described on microscopic level through a generic bead-spring model, which reproduces hard excluded volume, strong covalent bonds, and realistic liquid density. The blended homopolymers are symmetric with respect to molecular architecture and liquid structure. To parameterize the blob-based models and validate equilibration of backmapped samples, we obtain reference data from independent hybrid simulations combining MD and identity exchange Monte Carlo moves, taking advantage of the symmetry of the blends. The potential of the backmapping strategy is demonstrated by equilibrating blend samples with different degree of miscibility, containing 500 chains with 1000 monomers each. Equilibration is verified by comparing

  9. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Ivanov, M. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.; Audouin, L.; Khan, E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aumann, T.; Beller, P.; Boretzky, K.; Dolinskii, A.; Egelhof, P.; Emling, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kester, O.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.; Scheidenberger, Ch.; Simon, H.; Steck, M.; Weick, H.; Enders, J.; Pietralla, N.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Zilges, A.; Distler, M. O.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Junghans, A. R.; Lenske, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Suda, T.; Kato, S.; Adachi, T.; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Woertche, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Koop, I. A.; Logatchov, P. V.; Otboev, A. V.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Shatunov, P. Y.; Shatunov, Y. M.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Shvartz, D. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Chulkov, L. V.; Danilin, B. V.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Volkov, V. A.; Grishkin, Y.; Lisin, V. P.; Mushkarenkov, A. N.; Nedorezov, V.; Polonski, A. L.; Rudnev, N. V.; Turinge, A. A.; Artukh, A.; Avdeichikov, V.; Ershov, S. N.; Fomichev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L.; Klygin, S.; Krupko, S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rodin, A.; Sereda, Y.; Seleznev, I.; Sidorchuk, S.; Syresin, E.; Stepantsov, S.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Teterev, Y.; Vorontsov, A. N.; Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Litvinova, E. V.; Karataglidis, S.; Alvarez Rodriguez, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Ramirez, C. Fernandez; Garrido, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Vignote, J. R.; Fraile Prieto, L. M.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Udias-Moinelo, J.; Amaro Soriano, J. E.; Rojo, A. M. Lallena; Caballero, J. A.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Zhukov, M.; Golubev, P.; Rudolph, D.; Hencken, K.; Jourdan, J.; Krusche, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kiselev, D.; Trautmann, D.; Al-Khalili, J.; Catford, W.; Johnson, R.; Stevenson, P. D.; Barton, C.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, R.; Chartier, M.; Cullen, D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Heinz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the

  10. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Ivanov, M.V. [Grupo de Physica Nuclear, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Kadrev, D.N. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux-Gradingnan (CENBG) (France); Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S. [CEA Saclay (France); Farget, F.; Schmitt, C. [GANIL Caen (France)

    2011-05-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  11. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K.; Ivanov, M.V.; Kadrev, D.N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  12. Defect production rates by electrons, ions and neutrons in cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, P.; Nielsen, B.R.; Andersen, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an interlaboratory program to study low temperature damage rates in dilute alloys of 300 ppM Zr in vanadium, niobium and molybdenum with electrons, light ions, fission neutrons and high energy neutrons are summarized. Additional experiments and literature data supplied complete sets of data also for the fcc metals Al, Cu and Pt. From the initial damage rates, displacement functions for each material were derived which give the number of stable defects produced by a recoil event of a certain knock-on energy. The low and high energy part of the displacement function was determined from the results of the electron and neutron irradiations, respectively, while the light ion data supplied information on the intermediate energy range. The displacement function allows the reliable calculation of atomic displacement rates also for particles and/or energies not employed in this program. For all metals the displacement rates for high energy neutrons scaled reasonably with the minimum displacement energies. This allows to estimate neutron damage rates also for those cubic metals where no high energy neutron results are available. For stainless steel, e.g., an average displacement energy of about 120 eV is deduced. The results are suggested to find practical use in defect calculations for fusion reactor first wall technology and in correlating the corresponding simulation experiments

  13. Quench of non-Markovian coherence in the deep sub-Ohmic spin–boson model: A unitary equilibration scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The deep sub-Ohmic spin–boson model shows a longstanding non-Markovian coherence at low temperature. Motivating to quench this robust coherence, the thermal effect is unitarily incorporated into the time evolution of the model, which is calculated by the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group algorithm combined with the orthogonal polynomials theory. Via introducing a unitary heating operator to the bosonic bath, the bath is heated up so that a majority portion of the bosonic excited states is occupied. It is found in this situation the coherence of the spin is quickly quenched even in the coherent regime, in which the non-Markovian feature dominates. With this finding we come up with a novel way to implement the unitary equilibration, the essential term of the eigenstate-thermalization hypothesis, through a short-time evolution of the model

  14. Measurement of plant and soil water isotope composition by direct equilibration methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, C. M.

    1995-11-01

    Water contained in plant and soil samples can be analysed for 2H and 18O content by direct equilibration while contained within the sample matrix. Methods for this are described and compared with the commonly used azeotropic distillation of samples before isotope analysis. For δ18O, direct equilibration with CO 2 gives results in good agreement with azeotropic distillation, i.e. within 0.5%o at natural abundance. Direct equilibration is a practical method for individual twig samples containing less than 0.5 ml of water, and offers significant operator time savings compared with azeotropic distillation. Batches of up to 100 samples can be prepared in less time than required for a single azeotropic distillation, and analysis by automated continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry after equilibration for 3 days again requires a minimum of operator time. Complete equilibration of plant water with H 2 for δ2H measurement occurs only after the plant material has been heated to 100°C under vacuum. The method described here is barely precise enough for natural abundance measurements ( δ 2H ± 15‰ ) but is well suited to field tracer studies with deuterium oxide.

  15. R&D of a high-performance DIRC detector for a future electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Staceu L. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is proposed as the next big scientific facility to be built in the United States, costing over $1 billion in design and construction. Each detector concept for the electron/ion beam interaction point is integrated into a large solenoidal magnet. The necessity for excellent hadronic particle identification (pion/kaon/proton) in the barrel region of the solenoid has pushed research and development (R&D) towards a new, high-performance Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) detector design. The passage of a high energy charged particle through a fused silica bar of the DIRC generates optical Cherenkov radiation. A large fraction of this light propagates by total internal reflection to the end of the bar, where the photon trajectories expand in a large volume before reaching a highly segmented photo-detector array. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Cherenkov light at the photo-detector array allows one to reconstruct the angle of emission of the light relative to the incident charged particle track. In order to reach the desired performance of 3sigma pi/K separation at 6 GeV/c particle momentum a new 3-layer spherical lens focusing optic with a lanthanum crown glass central layer was designed to have a nearly at focal plane. In order to validate the EIC DIRC simulation package, a synergistic test beam campaign was carried out in 2015 at the CERN PS with the PANDA Barrel DIRC group using a prototype DIRC detector. Along with the analysis of the CERN test beam data, measurements of the focal plane of the 3-layer lens were performed using a custom-built laser setup at Old Dominion University. Radiation hardness of the lanthanum crown glass was tested using a 160 keV X-ray source and a monochromator at the Catholic University of America. Results of these test-bench experiments and the analysis of the 2015 CERN test beam data are presented here.

  16. R&D of a High-Performance DIRC Detector for a Future Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stacey Lee

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is proposed as the next big scientific facility to be built in the United States, costing over $1 billion in design and construction. Each detector concept for the electron/ion beam interaction point is integrated into a large solenoidal magnet. The necessity for excellent hadronic particle identification (pion/kaon/proton) in the barrel region of the solenoid has pushed research and development (R&D) towards a new, high-performance Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) detector design. The passage of a high energy charged particle through a fused silica bar of the DIRC generates optical Cherenkov radiation. A large fraction of this light propagates by total internal reflection to the end of the bar, where the photon trajectories expand in a large volume before reaching a highly segmented photo-detector array. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Cherenkov light at the photo-detector array allows one to reconstruct the angle of emission of the light relative to the incident charged particle track. In order to reach the desired performance of 3sigma pi/K separation at 6 GeV/c particle momentum a new 3-layer spherical lens focusing optic with a lanthanum crown glass central layer was designed to have a nearly flat focal plane. In order to validate the EIC DIRC simulation package, a synergistic test beam campaign was carried out in 2015 at the CERN PS with the PANDA Barrel DIRC group using a prototype DIRC detector. Along with the analysis of the CERN test beam data, measurements of the focal plane of the 3-layer lens were performed using a custom-built laser setup at Old Dominion University. Radiation hardness of the lanthanum crown glass was tested using a 160 keV X-ray source and a monochromator at the Catholic University of America. Results of these test-bench experiments and the analysis of the 2015 CERN test beam data are presented here.

  17. Achieving swift equilibration of a Brownian particle using flow-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Ayoti; Jarzynski, Christopher

    Can a system be driven to a targeted equilibrium state on a timescale that is much shorter than its natural equilibration time? In a recent experiment, the swift equilibration of an overdamped Brownian particle was achieved by use of an appropriately designed, time-dependent optical trap potential. Motivated by these results, we develop a general theoretical approach for guiding an ensemble of Brownian particles to track the instantaneous equilibrium distribution of a desired potential U (q , t) . In our approach, we use flow-fields associated with the parametric evolution of the targeted equilibrium state to construct an auxiliary potential U (q , t) , such that dynamics under the composite potential U (t) + U (t) achieves the desired evolution. Our results establish a close connection between the swift equilibration of Brownian particles, quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity, and the dissipationless driving of a classical, Hamiltonian system.

  18. Validity of the independent-processes approximation for resonance structures in electron-ion scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badnell, N.R.; Pindzola, M.S.; Griffin, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The total inelastic cross section for electron-ion scattering may be found in the independent-processes approximation by adding the resonant cross section to the nonresonant background cross section. We study the validity of this approximation for electron excitation of multiply charged ions. The resonant-excitation cross section is calculated independently using distorted waves for various Li-like and Na-like ions using (N+1)-electron atomic-structure methods previously developed for the calculation of dielectronic-recombination cross sections. To check the effects of interference between the two scattering processes, we also carry out detailed close-coupling calculations for the same atomic ions using the R-matrix method. For low ionization stages, interference effects manifest themselves sometimes as strong window features in the close-coupling cross section, which are not present in the independent-processes cross section. For higher ionization stages, however, the resonance features found in the independent-processes approximation are found to be in good agreement with the close-coupling results

  19. A compact CMA spectrometer with axially integrated hybrid electron-ion gun for ISS, AES and sputter depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, E.; Bas, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, the combined application of electrons and ions in surface analysis required two separate sources for electrons and ions with different incidence angles. The newly developed hybrid electron-ion gun, however, allows bombardment of the same sample area both with noble gas ions and with electrons coming from the same direction. By integrating such a hybrid gun axially in a cylindrical mirror energy analyser (CMA) a sensitive compact single flange spectrometer obtains for ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and sputtering all within normal beam incidence. This concept makes accurate beam centering very easy. Additionally, the bombardment from the same direction both for sputtering and for surface analysis brings advantages in depth profiling. The scattering angle for ISS has a constant value of about 138 0 . The hybrid gun delivers typically an electron beam current of -20μA at 3keV for AES, and an ion beam current of +40 nA and +1.2μA at 2 keV for ISS and sputtering respectively. The switching time between ISS, AES, and sputtering mode is about 0.1 s. So this system is best suited for automatically controlled depth profile analysis. The design and operation of this new system will be described and some applications will be discussed. (author)

  20. A Harmonic Kicker Scheme for the Circulator Cooler Ring in the Proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Edward W.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Kimber, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    The current electron cooler design for the proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab utilizes a circulator ring for reuse of the cooling electron bunch up to 100 times to cool the ion beams. This cooler requires a fast kicker system for injecting and extracting individual bunches in the circulator ring. Such a kicker must work at a high repetition rate, up to 7.5 to 75 MHz depending on the number of turns in the recirculator ring. It also must have a very short rise and fall time (of order of 1 ns) such that it will kick an individual bunch without disturbing the others in the ring. Both requirements are orders of magnitude beyond the present state-of-the-art as well as the goals of other on-going kicker R&D programs such as that for the ILC damping rings. In this paper we report a scheme of creating this fast, high repetition rate kicker by combining RF waveforms at multiple frequencies to create a kicker waveform that will, for example, kick every eleventh bunch while leaving the other ten unperturbed. We also present a possible implementation of this scheme as well as discuss its limitations.

  1. Harmonic Kicker RF Cavity for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider EM Simulation, Modification, and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Sarah; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-09-01

    An important step in the conceptual design for the future Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is the development of supporting technologies for the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Electron Cooling Facility. The Harmonic Radiofrequency (RF) kicker cavity is one such device that is responsible for switching electron bunches in and out of the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) from and to the ERL, which is a critical part of the ion cooling process. Last year, a half scale prototype of the JLEIC harmonic RF kicker model was designed with resonant frequencies to support the summation of 5 odd harmonics (95.26 MHz, 285.78 MHz, 476.30 MHz, 666.82 MHz, and 857.35 MHz); however, the asymmetry of the kicker cavity gives rise to multipole components of the electric field at the electron-beam axis of the cavity. Previous attempts to symmetrize the electric field of this asymmetrical RF cavity have been unsuccessful. The aim of this study is to modify the existing prototype for a uniform electric field across the beam pathway so that the electron bunches will experience nearly zero beam current loading. In addition to this, we have driven the unmodified cavity with the harmonic sum and used the wire stretching method for an analysis of the multipole electric field components.

  2. Structure of very heavy few-electron ions - new results from the heavy ion storage ring, ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.; Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Moshammer, R.; Rymuza, P.; Bosch, F.; Kandler, T.

    1993-08-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron/storage ring facility at GSI, SIS/ESR, provides intense beams of cooled, highly-charged ions up to naked uranium (U 92+ ). By electron capture during ion-atom collisions in the gas target of the ESR or by recombination at ion-electron encounters in the ''electron cooler'' excited states are populated. The detailed structure of very heavy one-, two- and three-electron ions is studied. The different mechanisms leading to the excited states are described, as well as the new experimental tools now available for a detailed spectroscopy of these interesting systems. Special emphasis is given to X-ray transitions to the groundstates in H- and He-like systems. For the heaviest species the groundstate Lambshift can now be probed on an accuracy level of better than 10% using solid-state X-ray detectors. Applying dispersive X-ray analyzing techniques, this accuracy will certainly be improved in future. However, utilizing the dielectronic resonances for a spectroscopy, the structure in Li-like heavy ions can already be probed now on the sub eV level. (orig.)

  3. Equilibration of metabolic CO2 with preformed CO2 and bicarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hems, R.; Saez, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Entry of metabolic 14 CO 2 into urea is shown to occur more readily than it equilibrates with the general pool of cellular plus extracellular bicarbonate plus CO 2 . Since the sites of CO 2 production (pyruvate dehydrogenase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) and of fixation (carbamoylphosphate synthetase) are intramitochondrial, it is likely that the fixation of CO 2 is also more rapid than its equilibration with the cytoplasmic pool of bicarbonate plus CO 2 . This observation may point to a more general problem concerning the interpretation of isotope data, with compartmentation or proximity of sites of production and utilisation of metabolites may result in the isotope following a preferred pathway. (Auth.)

  4. Determination of equilibration kinetics of oxide electrode materials using a manometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwal, S.P.S.; Jiang, S.P.; Love, J.; Nowotny, J.; Rekas, M.

    1998-01-01

    The gas/solid equilibration kinetics for electrode oxide materials, such as (La 0.8 Sr 0.2 )MnO 3 , using a manometric method, was determined. The reaction kinetics between oxygen and the oxide material was monitored using the measurements of the P(O 2 ) changes during isothermic experiments of oxidation and reduction. The procedure of the determination will be described and relevant kinetic equations was derived. The equilibration kinetic data obtained can be used to determine the chemical diffusion coefficient. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  5. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Knittle, Elise; Williams, Quentin

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  6. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Knittle, E.; Williams, Q.

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions

  7. Neuchatel ne gardera pas le Palais de l'equilibre apres Expo.02

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "La ville de Neuchatel ne souhaite pas conserver le Palais de l'equilibre apres Expo.02. Par 24 voix contre 7, le Conseil general a rejete le plan special du Conseil communal qui proposait de transformer l'edifice en un centre de congres" (1/2 page).

  8. An open loop equilibrator for continuous monitoring of radon at the groundwater-surface water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil Yong Lee; Yoon Yeol Yoon; Soo Young Cho; Eunhee Lee; Sang-Ho Moon; Dong-Chan Koh; Kyoochul Ha; Yongcheol Kim; Kyung-Seok Ko

    2015-01-01

    A continuous monitoring system (CMS) using an open loop equilibrator for assessment of 222 Rn at the groundwater-surface water interface was developed and tested. For the characterization and validation of the system, three air loops (open loop, closed loop, and open bubble loop) were tested in relation to high and precise count rates, rapid response, and equilibration of radon. The water and air stream is fed to the equilibrator by an experimental setup with a commercial submersible water pump and the internal pump with built-in radon-in-air detector. Efficiency calibration of the CMS is done by simultaneous determination of a groundwater sample using liquid scintillation counting, and the RAD7 accessories RAD-H 2 O, BigBottle RAD-H 2 O. The higher count rates are provided by the closed loop. However, the open loop with bubbler (open bubble loop) provides the best precision count rates, rapid response, and equilibration time. The CMS allows radon determination in discrete water samples as well as continuous water streams. (author)

  9. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  10. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  11. Equilibration, thermalisation, and the emergence of statistical mechanics in closed quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We review selected advances in the theoretical understanding of complex quantum many-body systems with regard to emergent notions of quantum statistical mechanics. We cover topics such as equilibration and thermalisation in pure state statistical mechanics, the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, the equivalence of ensembles, non-equilibration dynamics following global and local quenches as well as ramps. We also address initial state independence, absence of thermalisation, and many-body localisation. We elucidate the role played by key concepts for these phenomena, such as Lieb-Robinson bounds, entanglement growth, typicality arguments, quantum maximum entropy principles and the generalised Gibbs ensembles, and quantum (non-)integrability. We put emphasis on rigorous approaches and present the most important results in a unified language.

  12. Comparison of /sup 133/Xe washout curves after bolus inhalation, perfusion, and equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devos, P; Demedts, M; Vandecruys, A; Cosemans, J; De Roo, M

    1978-01-01

    In 6 healthy subjects and 13 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, /sup 133/Xe washout curves after bolus inhalation, perfusion and equilibration were compared, using a gamma camera and computerized data handling. In healthy subjects the washout after equilibration was significantly slower than after the two other procedures. As this phenomenon occurred at the basal zones, it was attributed to the presence of airway closure in some units. In patients, the three washouts were significantly different from each other. This indicated the existence of intraregional inhomogeneity in ventilation, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion ratio. Our conclusion is that comparison of these different washout methods yields valuable information not only on absolute values of pulmonary function but also on the intraregional distribution, which cannot be obtained by other examinations.

  13. Black hole spectra in holography: Consequences for equilibration of dual gauge theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Buchel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For a closed system to equilibrate from a given initial condition there must exist an equilibrium state with the energy equal to the initial one. Equilibrium states of a strongly coupled gauge theory with a gravitational holographic dual are represented by black holes. We study the spectrum of black holes in Pilch–Warner geometry. These black holes are holographically dual to equilibrium states of strongly coupled SU(N N=2⁎ gauge theory plasma on S3 in the planar limit. We find that there is no energy gap in the black hole spectrum. Thus, there is a priori no obstruction for equilibration of arbitrary low-energy states in the theory via a small black hole gravitational collapse. The latter is contrasted with phenomenological examples of holography with dual four-dimensional CFTs having non-equal central charges in the stress–energy tensor trace anomaly.

  14. The first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre arrives at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Jean-Luc Baldy, Head of CERN civil engineering; Heiner Rieder, from the company appointed by the Swiss Confederation; Thomas B chi, wood-engineer from the Charpente-Concept SA; Carlo Wyss, CERN director for accelerators, and Hervé Dessinoz, the architect, in front of the keystone of the Palais de l'Equilibre.This was given to CERN by the Swiss Confederation to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of CERN and renamed the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  15. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget's theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel Alejandro; Barandiaran, Xabier E; Beaton, Michael; Buhrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the "laws" of sensorimotor contingencies (SMCs). In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget's theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget's theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level.

  16. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget's theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Alejandro Di Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning to perceive faces a classical paradox: if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the ‘laws’ of sensorimotor contingencies. In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget’s theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget’s theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level.

  17. Dynamical Equilibration Across a Quenched Phase Transition in a Trapped Quantum Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, I. -K.; Donadello, S.; Lamporesi, G.; Ferrari, G.; Gou, S. -C.; Dalfovo, F.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of an equilibrium quantum state from an uncorrelated thermal one through the dynamical crossing of a phase transition is a central question of non-equilibrium many-body physics. During such crossing, the system breaks its symmetry by establishing numerous uncorrelated regions separated by spontaneously-generated defects, whose emergence obeys a universal scaling law with the quench duration. Much less is known about the ensuing re-equilibrating or "coarse-graining" stage, which ...

  18. Effect of long-term equilibration on the toxicity of molybdenum to soil organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; McGrath, Steve P.; Smolders, Erik; Diez Ortiz, Maria; Borgman, Eef; Verweij, Rudo A.; Buekers, Jurgen; Oorts, Koen

    2012-01-01

    To determine if long-term equilibration may alleviate molybdenum toxicity, earthworms, enchytraeids, collembolans and four plant species were exposed to three soils freshly spiked with Na 2 MoO 4 .2H 2 O and equilibrated for 6 or 11 months in the field with free drainage. Total Mo concentrations in soil decreased by leaching, most (up to 98%) in sandy soil and less (54–62%) in silty and clayey soils. Changes in residual Mo toxicity with time were inconclusive in sandy soil. In the other two soils, toxicity of residual total Mo was significantly reduced after 11 months equilibration with a median 5.5-fold increase in ED50s. Mo fixation in soil, i.e. the decrease of soil solution Mo concentrations at equivalent residual total soil Mo, was maximally a factor of 2.1 only. This experiment shows natural attenuation of molybdate ecotoxicity under field conditions is related to leaching of excess Mo and other ions as well as to slow ageing reactions. - Highlights: ► Three molybdate-spiked soils were equilibrated for 6 and 11 months outdoors. ► Mo chronic toxicity to earthworms, enchytraeids, Collembola and four plant species was assessed. ► Mo concentrations in all soils decreased due to leaching. ► Based on actual total Mo remaining in the soil, Mo toxicity decreased by a median factor of 5.5. ► Decreased Mo toxicity was due to leaching as well as slow ageing reactions. - Natural attenuation under field conditions is more related to leaching of excess molybdate than to slow ageing reactions

  19. High yield expression and purification of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 7 (ENT7) from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Christopher; Arutyunova, Elena; Syed, Maria; Traub, Michaela; Möhlmann, Torsten; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-09-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) facilitate the import of nucleosides and their analogs into cells in a bidirectional, non-concentrative manner. However, in contrast to their name, most characterized plant ENTs act in a concentrative manner. A direct characterization of any ENT protein has been hindered due to difficulties in overexpression and obtaining pure recombinant protein. The equilibrative nucleoside transporter 7 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtENT7) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess mechanism of substrate uptake. Recombinant protein fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in Pichia pastoris to characterize its oligomeric state by gel filtration and substrate binding by microscale thermophoresis (MST). AtENT7 expressed in X. laevis oocytes works as a classic equilibrative transporter. The expression of AtENT7-eGFP in the P. pastoris system yielded milligram amounts of pure protein that exists as stable homodimers. The concentration dependent binding of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides to the purified recombinant protein, assessed by MST, confirmed that AtENT7-eGFP is properly folded. For the first time the binding of nucleobases was observed for AtENT7. The availability of pure recombinant AtENT7 will permit detailed kinetic and structural studies of this unique member of the ENT family and, given the functional similarity to mammalian ENTs, will serve as a good model for understanding the structural basis of translocation mechanism for the family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during increased permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The initial equilibration of 125 I-labelled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw heel skin of anesthetized rabbits. Bradykinin (0.3 μg/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery. A second group of rabbits served as control. Following bradykinin, prenodal popliteal lymph flow was 4 times control flow. The lymph-to-plasma concentration ratios for total protein and albumin were, respectively, 60% and 50% larger than control. Tissue albumin concentration was twice control. After reaching a steady, elevated lymph flow, tracer albumin was infused to maintain plasma activity constant for 3 hrs. The plasma volume in tissue samples was measured using 131 I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity was 3 times greater than control. In the control group, plasma albumin equilibrated more rapidly with lymph than with tissue (p < 0.05). Following bradykinin, extravascular specific activity was 4 times control, resulting in lymph and tissue equilibrating with plasma at similar rates. Thus, increasing capillary permeability causes the extravascular albumin mass to behave as if distributed in a single compartment

  1. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during vasodilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The initial equilibration of 125 I-labeled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw skin of 6 anesthetized rabbits. Papavarine (200 ug/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery of one limb with the contralateral limb as a control. There was a 1.2-fold increase in lymph flow (p 131 I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity relative to plasma was significantly greater in the vasodilated hindlimb (0.30 +/- 0.07 vs 0.13 +/- 0.05; mean +/- SE; p < 0.01). Extravascular specific activity relative to plasma was greater in the vasodilated limb (0.13 +/- 0.02 vs 0.09 +/- 0.02; p < 0.05). Thus, vasodilation increased the rates at which lymph and tissue equilibrate with plasma. Also, the difference between lymph and tissue equilibration was greater in the vasodilated hindlimb

  2. LOAD EQUILIBRATION OF WORKING PLACES ARRANGED ON CONVEYORS USED FOR FOOTWEAR UPPERS MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARNAGEA Florentina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper there is presented how to achieve a load equilibration of workstations for a conveyor with imposed pace, in the case of manufacturing uppers for a women boots model. Equilibration of work charging is done by switching worker’s operations in order to use at full time each worker placed in the technological flow process. In the manufacruring process of shoe uppers of the considered model, there have been established the operative time and production rates per operation. Thus there has been calculated the work necessary amount Nci for accomplishing different production rates: Q=600,650, 700, 750... 900pairs/ 8 h and the necessary amount of work Nai was adopted. A technology line of manufacturing a footwear item is used at its optimum capacity when the number of work vacancy is minimum, 0.013 corresponding to a flow production of 700pairs / 8h the highest labor productivity being obtained, ie 17.5 pairs / worker • 8h. By equilibrating the work charge for each operation, it is obtained, for a daily production of 700pairs / 8h, a reduction of the number of workspaces from 40 to 36 workers and hence a labor productivity of 19.44 pairs / worker • 8h.

  3. Kinetics of bacterial potentiometric titrations: the effect of equilibration time on buffering capacity of Pantoea agglomerans suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2011-07-15

    Several recent studies have made use of continuous acid-base titration data to describe the surface chemistry of bacterial cells as a basis for accurately modelling metal adsorption to bacteria and other biomaterials of potential industrial importance. These studies do not share a common protocol; rather they titrate in different pH ranges and they use different stability criteria to define equilibration time during titration. In the present study we investigate the kinetics of bacterial titrations and test the effect they have on the derivation of functional group concentrations and acidity constants. We titrated suspensions of Pantoea agglomerans by varying the equilibration time between successive titrant additions until stability of 0.1 or 0.001 mV s(-1) was attained. We show that under longer equilibration times, titration results are less reproducible and suspensions exhibit marginally higher buffering. Fluorescence images suggest that cell lysis is not responsible for these effects. Rather, high DOC values and titration reversibility hysterisis after long equilibration times suggest that variability in buffering is due to the presence of bacterial exudates, as demonstrated by titrating supernatants separated from suspensions of different equilibration times. It is recommended that an optimal equilibration time is always determined with variable stability control and preliminary reversibility titration experiments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maxima and minima of the orientation phenomena for direct 1s→2p+-1 electron-ion collisional excitations in weakly coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon Jung-Sik; Jung Young-Dae

    1999-01-01

    Orientation phenomena for direct 1s→2p +-1 electron-ion collisional excitations in weakly coupled plasma are investigated using the semiclassical trajectory method including the close-encounter effects. In weakly coupled plasmas, the electron-ion interaction potential is given by the classical nonspherical Debye-Hueckel model. The semiclassical screened hyperbolic-orbit trajectory method is applied to describe the motion of the projectile electron in order to investigate the variation of the orientation parameter as a function of the impact parameter, projectile energy, and Debye length. A comparison is also given for the hyperbolic-orbit and straight-line trajectory methods. The results show that the orientation parameters obtained by the hyperbolic-orbit trajectory method have maxima and minima for small impact parameter regions. In other words, there are complete 1s→2p +1 (maxima) and complete 1s→2p -1 (minima) transitions for certain impact parameters. These maxima cannot be found using the straight-line trajectory method. The variation of the propensity of the 1s→2p -1 transitions due to the plasma screening effects on the atomic wave functions is also discussed

  5. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: distribution and rates of equilibration between nucleus and cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeds, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid nuclear isolation technique was adapted in order to examine the question of DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells. By using this method a reproducible proportion of the cellular nucleotides remained associated with the isolated nuclei. Examination, at several different cell densities, of exponentially growing HeLa cells showed that the nuclei contained a constant but distinct proportion of each dNTP. The nuclear dATP and dTTP concentrations were equal at all densities examined even though the dTTP pool was 150% of the dATP whole-cell pool. The nuclear portion of the whole-cell pools was roughly equal to the volume occupied by the nucleus. The nuclear-cytoplasmic dNTP pool distribution did not change throughout the cell cycle of synchronized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rates at which either radiolabeled cytidine or deoxycytidine equilibrated with the nuclear and whole-cell dCTP pools of G1 and S phase CHO cells were compared. Experiments comparing the labeling kinetics of 3 H-thymidine in G1, S phase, and exponentially growing cells revealed that the S phase dTTP pool equilibrated with exogenously added thymidine faster than the G1 phase pool. The rate of equilibration in exponentially growing cells appeared to be a combination of that seen in G1 and S phases. A linear rate of 3 H-thymidine incorporation into DNA occurred at the same rate in S phase and exponentially growing cells

  6. Continuous high-frequency dissolved O2/Ar measurements by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Nicolas; Barnett, Bruce A; Bender, Michael L; Kaiser, Jan; Hamme, Roberta C; Tilbrook, Bronte

    2009-03-01

    The oxygen (O(2)) concentration in the surface ocean is influenced by biological and physical processes. With concurrent measurements of argon (Ar), which has similar solubility properties as oxygen, we can remove the physical contribution to O(2) supersaturation and determine the biological oxygen supersaturation. Biological O(2) supersaturation in the surface ocean reflects the net metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration, i.e., the net community productivity (NCP). We present a new method for continuous shipboard measurements of O(2)/Ar by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry (EIMS). From these measurements and an appropriate gas exchange parametrization, NCP can be estimated at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the EIMS configuration, seawater from the ship's continuous intake flows through a cartridge enclosing a gas-permeable microporous membrane contactor. Gases in the headspace of the cartridge equilibrate with dissolved gases in the flowing seawater. A fused-silica capillary continuously samples headspace gases, and the O(2)/Ar ratio is measured by mass spectrometry. The ion current measurements on the mass spectrometer reflect the partial pressures of dissolved gases in the water flowing through the equilibrator. Calibration of the O(2)/Ar ion current ratio (32/40) is performed automatically every 2 h by sampling ambient air through a second capillary. A conceptual model demonstrates that the ratio of gases reaching the mass spectrometer is dependent on several parameters, such as the differences in molecular diffusivities and solubilities of the gases. Laboratory experiments and field observations performed by EIMS are discussed. We also present preliminary evidence that other gas measurements, such as N(2)/Ar and pCO(2) measurements, may potentially be performed with EIMS. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the EIMS with the previously described membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) approach.

  7. Impact of equilibrating time on phosphate adsorption and desorption behaviour in some selected saline sodic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Q.U.; HAN; Khan, M.J.; Rehman, S.; Khan, S.U.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of equilibrating time on phosphate adsorption and desorption on saline sodic soils a study was carried using three soil series from Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan) district, namely Zindani, Tikken and Gishkori. These soils are alkaline calcareous in nature with greater Electrical Conductivity (EC) and Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) values which classify them as saline sodic soils. The equilibrating time for the adsorption study was 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 48 and 72 hours for two levels (5 mg L/sup -1/ and 100 mg L/sup -1/). For desorption study 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours after 24 hours for low and high dilution. Adsorption and desorption isotherms of phosphate were developed for these soils. The Gishkori soil showed the greatest rate of adsorption as compared with the other two soils. Applying Langmuir and Freundlich models to P adsorption data revealed that Freundlich equation (R2 = 0.99) showed a better fit over the Langmuir equation (R2 =0. 97) in the three soils. The desorption curves varied similarly from each other. The amount of P adsorbed was different from that released back to the soil solution. The amount of adsorption increased with the time. Statistical analysis showed that the rate of adsorption for both 5 and 100 mg P L/sup -1/ was significantly different at P<0.05 at 16 and 20 hours and at P<0.01 beyond 20 hours. However, the rate of desorption was not significantly influenced by the equilibrating time as compared with the theoretical values of the three series. As the P - desorption curve did not coincide the P - adsorption curve, hence the availability of P to plant was adversely affected on its application. (author)

  8. Equilibration and analysis of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William; Gygi, François

    2018-03-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations based on density functional theory are becoming increasingly popular for the description of liquids. In view of the high computational cost of these simulations, the choice of an appropriate equilibration protocol is critical. We assess two methods of estimation of equilibration times using a large dataset of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of water. The Gelman-Rubin potential scale reduction factor [A. Gelman and D. B. Rubin, Stat. Sci. 7, 457 (1992)] and the marginal standard error rule heuristic proposed by White [Simulation 69, 323 (1997)] are evaluated on a set of 32 independent 64-molecule simulations of 58 ps each, amounting to a combined cumulative time of 1.85 ns. The availability of multiple independent simulations also allows for an estimation of the variance of averaged quantities, both within MD runs and between runs. We analyze atomic trajectories, focusing on correlations of the Kohn-Sham energy, pair correlation functions, number of hydrogen bonds, and diffusion coefficient. The observed variability across samples provides a measure of the uncertainty associated with these quantities, thus facilitating meaningful comparisons of different approximations used in the simulations. We find that the computed diffusion coefficient and average number of hydrogen bonds are affected by a significant uncertainty in spite of the large size of the dataset used. A comparison with classical simulations using the TIP4P/2005 model confirms that the variability of the diffusivity is also observed after long equilibration times. Complete atomic trajectories and simulation output files are available online for further analysis.

  9. Reduction by metals dissolved in liquid ammonia of keto steroids. Equilibration of the alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroud, A.M.

    1970-01-01

    Reducing a ketone by dissolved metals involves two electrons; we may consider as intermediate a radical-anion, then a di-anion or a carbo-anion. The radical-anion may also split and give pinacols away. In order to discuss the reduction proceeds, we had to know the respective stabilities of the alcohols, which lead us to effectuate equilibration. The first chapter is devoted to the method of preparing the androstanone-II and the androstanols-IIα and II-β. We further establish the impossibility of using our methods for reaching a conclusion about the alcohols relative stability by experimental equilibration. Last we describe the methods for reducing the ketone by alkaline and earth-alkaline metals, dissolved in liquid ammonia, either in contact with a protons donor or with a later added protons donor. The resulting mixture of the two alcohols shows a prevailing quantity of the stable equatorial isomer α. In a second chapter, we study the action of selenic acid and hydroperoxide on cholestanone-3, which leads us to study the preparation and stereochemistry of the A-nor cholestane derivates. We further describe the preparation of the A-nor cholestanols-2α and 2β, and the corresponding acetates. Equilibration of the alcohols by chemical methods shows the 2 α-alcohol more stable than the 2β, which is mathematically confirmed. Last, the reduction of the A-nor cholestanone-2 by dissolved metals consistently leads to the less stable 2 β epimer, with associated pinacols. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the androstanone-17 reductions, and the relative stabilities of the 17α and 17β alcohols. Whichever operating methods is used, we predominantly obtain the more stable 17β alcohol. In all cases, a pinacol production is observed. Summing up, we note that, in all cases, we predominantly obtain the equatorial epimer, whether it should be the more stable or the less stable. (author) [fr

  10. Centrifugal Separation and Equilibration Dynamics in an Electron-Antiproton Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Cesar, C. L.; Friesen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  11. THE IMPACT OF SYSTEM OF BUDGET EQUILIBRATION ON MACROECONOMIC INDEXES OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Peshina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical regulations of basic conceptions of budget equilibration are considered in the article and the position of budget deficit/proficit in a system of socioeconomics relations is grounded. Estimation of control mechanism of budget deficit and proficit in the system of socioeconomics relations was conducted. This estimation confirmed an analysis inference about large discontinuity and fragmentation, that is outboard, first of all in respect of strategy of financial policy, sum-total of using, at present, principles, methods and regulations of budgetary management. The article contains a description of basic directions of budgetary policy about optimization of budget deficit/proficit in Russian Federation.

  12. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  13. Ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (13)C NMR study of the rearrangement and dynamic aspects of rapidly equilibrating tertiary carbocations, C6H13(+) and C7H15(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Rasul, Golam

    2016-01-05

    The rearrangement pathways of the equilibrating tertiary carbocations, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butyl cation (C6H13(+), 1), 2,3,3-trimethyl-2-butyl cation (C7H15(+), 5) and 2,3-dimethyl-2-pentyl cation (C7H15(+), 8 and 9) were investigated using the ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (13)C NMR method. Comparing the calculated and experimental (13)C NMR chemical shifts of a series of carbocations indicates that excellent prediction of δ(13)C could be achieved through scaling. In the case of symmetrical equilibrating cations (1 and 5) the Wagner-Meerwein 1,2-hydride and 1,2-methide shifts, respectively, produce the same structure. This indicates that the overall (13)C NMR chemical shifts are conserved and independent of temperature. However, in the case of unsymmetrical equilibrating cations (8 and 9) the Wagner-Meerwein shift produces different tertiary structures, which have slightly different thermodynamic stabilities and, thus, different spectra. At the MP4(SDTQ)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ + ZPE level structure 8 is only 90 calories/mol more stable than structure 9. Based on computed (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations, mole fractions of these isomers were determined by assuming the observed chemical shifts are due to the weighted average of the chemical shifts of the static ions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Equilibration in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach probed with the Wigner distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebl, N.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2011-01-01

    By calculating the Wigner distribution function in the reaction plane, we are able to probe the phase-space behavior in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock scheme during a heavy-ion collision in a consistent framework. Various expectation values of operators are calculated by evaluating the corresponding integrals over the Wigner function. In this approach, it is straightforward to define and analyze quantities even locally. We compare the Wigner distribution function with the smoothed Husimi distribution function. Different reaction scenarios are presented by analyzing central and noncentral 16 O + 16 O and 96 Zr + 132 Sn collisions. Although we observe strong dissipation in the time evolution of global observables, there is no evidence for complete equilibration in the local analysis of the Wigner function. Because the initial phase-space volumes of the fragments barely merge and mean values of the observables are conserved in fusion reactions over thousands of fm/c, we conclude that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method provides a good description of the early stage of a heavy-ion collision but does not provide a mechanism to change the phase-space structure in a dramatic way necessary to obtain complete equilibration.

  15. Tolerance of brown bear spermatozoa to conditions of pre-freezing cooling rate and equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Urueña, E; Alvarez, M; Gomes-Alves, S; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Borragan, S; Anel-López, L; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2014-06-01

    Specific protocols for the cryopreservation of endangered Cantabrian brown bear spermatozoa are critical to create a genetic resource bank. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cooling rates and equilibration time before freezing on post-thawed brown bear spermatozoa quality. Electroejaculates from 11 mature bears were extended to 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL in a TES-Tris-Fructose-based extender, cryopreserved following performance of the respective cooling/equilibration protocol each sample was assigned to, and stored at -196 °C for further assessment. Before freezing, after thawing, and after 1 hour's incubation post-thawing at 37 °C (thermal stress test), the quality of the samples was assessed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis, and for viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate /propidium iodide), and sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by flow cytometry. In experiment 1, three cooling rates (0.25 °C/min, 1 °C/min, and 4 °C/min) to 5 °C were assessed. After thawing, total motility (%TM) was higher and percentage of damaged acrosomes (%dACR) was lower (P bear sperm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Peritoneal dialysis adequacy in pediatrics. From the peritoneal equilibration test to the aquaporins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Lillian; Cano, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of the characteristics of peritoneal solute and water transport is essential to assess the suitability of prescribing dialysis in patients suffering from chronic renal disease. There are currently a series of models to perform this evaluation. The peritoneal equilibration test (PET) evaluates the peritoneal transport capacity, classifying the patients into four transport categories: high, high-average, low-average, and low. The short PET enables the same evaluation to be made in only 2hours, and has been validated in paediatric patients. On the other hand, the MiniPET provides additional information by evaluating the free water transport capacity by the ultra-small pores, and the Accelerated Peritoneal Examination Time (APEX) evaluates the time when the glucose and urea equilibration curves cross, and has been proposed as the optimum dwell time to achieve adequate ultrafiltration. An analysis is presented on the current information on these diagnostic methods as regards free water transport via aquaporins, which could be an important tool in optimising solute and water transport in patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis, particularly as regards the cardiovascular prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L.; Latour, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  18. Sixth-order Douglas-Kroll: two-component reference data for one-electron ions from 1s12 through 4f72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuellen, Christoph van

    2005-01-01

    Quasirelativistic Douglas-Kroll calculations including spin-orbit interaction have been performed for hydrogen-like (one-electron) ions. The Douglas-Kroll operators have been implemented up to the sixth order, and a huge even-tempered basis set has been applied that gives results to microhartree accuracy for the energy levels 1s 12 through 4f 72 for all ions with nuclear charge from Z=1 up to Z=100. Besides providing reference data for other implementations, these results can be used to analyse the performance of the Douglas-Kroll method. Such an analysis is presented for the 1s energy levels and the spin-orbit splitting of the 2p shell. The leading order of the error of the Douglas-Kroll result is different for 2s and 2p 12 although these levels are degenerate both at nonrelativistic and Dirac level

  19. Electron acceleration during the decay of nonlinear Whistler waves in low-beta electron-ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic electron acceleration through dissipation of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave in low-beta plasma is investigated by utilizing a one-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability which enhances electrostatic ion acoustic waves and electromagnetic whistler waves. These waves satisfy the condition of three-wave coupling. Through the decay instability, the energy of electron bulk velocity supporting the parent wave is converted to the thermal energy perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Increase of the perpendicular temperature triggers the electron temperature anisotropy instability which generates broadband whistler waves and heats electrons in the parallel direction. The broadband whistler waves are inverse-cascaded during the relaxation of the electron temperature anisotropy. In lower-beta conditions, electrons with a pitch angle of about 90° are successively accelerated by inverse-cascaded whistler waves, and selected electrons are accelerated to over a Lorentz factor of 10. The result implies that the nonlinear dissipation of a finite-amplitude and short-wavelength whistler wave plays an important role in producing relativistic nonthermal electrons over a few MeV especially at lower beta plasmas.

  20. Quantum chaos in multicharged ions and statistical approach to the calculation of electron-ion resonant radiative recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribakin, G.F.; Gribakina, A.A.; Flambaum, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    We show that the spectrum and eigenstates of open-shell multicharged atomic ions near the ionisation threshold are chaotic, as a result of extremely high level densities of multiply excited electron states (10 3 eV -1 in Au 24+ ) and strong configuration mixing. This complexity enables one to use statistical methods to analyse the system. We examine the dependence of the orbital occupation numbers and single-particle energies on the excitation energy of the system, and show that the occupation numbers are described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution, and the temperature and chemical potential can be introduced. The Fermi-Dirac temperature is close to the temperature defined through the canonical distribution. Using a statistical approach we estimate the contribution of multielectron resonant states to the radiative capture of low-energy electrons by Au 25+ and demonstrate that this mechanism fully accounts for the 10 2 times enhancement of the recombination over the direct radiative recombination, in agreement with recent experimental observations. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Australia

  1. Preliminary studies on the closed cycle magneto aerodynamic converter; Etudes preliminaires sur les convertisseurs magnetohydrodynamiques fonctionnant hors d'equilibre thermodynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricateau, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    electron heating in argon-potassium can be achieved by magnetic fields from 1 to 2 Ts. Plans are being made to build an important facility which will work on the principle of hot shots. The gas generator will deliver cesium-seeded helium shots at a temperature of 2100 deg. K. The shot will last 1/ 10 s and the instantaneous thermal power will reach 1 MW. (author) [French] A cote des convertisseurs magnetoaerodynamiques a cycle ouvert qui transforment l'energie thermique contenue dans les gaz de combustion on etudie tres attentivement le convertisseur a cycle ferme qui peut tirer son energie de toute source de chaleur a haute temperature et tout particulierement des sources nucleaires. Avant une etude pratique de l'ensemble de la centrale les performances du convertisseur lui-meme doivent etre bien delimitees. Ces performances sont largement fonction de la conductivite du gaz utilise. Mais cette conductivite ne doit pas etre payee par une temperature techniquement inadmissible pour l'echangeur de chaleur. Dans le fluide de conversion on est amene a associer un gaz porteur, helium ou argon, et une semence facilement ionisable cesium ou potassium. L'ionisation purement thermique n'est efficace qu'a partir de 2500 deg. K, par contre le champ electrique developpe par induction dans le convertisseur peut, sous certaines conditions, accroitre la temperature electronique et developper une ionisation bien superieure a la valeur d'equilibre. Il devient alors possible d'ioniser le gaz a temperature moderee. Des travaux en cours ont pour but de preciser les conditions permettant de creer cette ionisation hors d'equilibre dans les gaz rares ensemenses. Des mesures ont ete faites a l'aide d'un plasmatron triphase do 500 kVA alimente a l'argon ensemence de potassium. On a fait debiter cet appareil dans une cellule permettant de mesurer les composantes tensorielles de la conductivite en presence de champ magnetique. Les valeurs trouvees dans les conditions d'equilibre thermodynamique

  2. A neural-network potential through charge equilibration for WS2: From clusters to sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Roohollah; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Hashemifar, S. Javad; Akbarzadeh, Hadi

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, we use a machine learning method to construct a high-dimensional potential for tungsten disulfide using a charge equilibration neural-network technique. A training set of stoichiometric WS2 clusters is prepared in the framework of density functional theory. After training the neural-network potential, the reliability and transferability of the potential are verified by performing a crystal structure search on bulk phases of WS2 and by plotting energy-area curves of two different monolayers. Then, we use the potential to investigate various triangular nano-clusters and nanotubes of WS2. In the case of nano-structures, we argue that 2H atomic configurations with sulfur rich edges are thermodynamically more stable than the other investigated configurations. We also studied a number of WS2 nanotubes which revealed that 1T tubes with armchair chirality exhibit lower bending stiffness.

  3. Correlations in plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium; Les correlations dans un plasma en equilibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    This paper treats of a fully, ionized plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium. An attempt is made at reviewing the calculation of spatial correlations in such a plasma. The equation of recurrence and the principle of superposition are used. The linear approximation is first treated. The next higher approximation is studied in the case of a neutral homogeneous and isotropic plasma. (author) [French] Un plasma completement ionise est en equilibre thermodynamique. On tente une mise au point du calcul des correlations de position dans ce plasma. On utilise les equations de recurrence et le principe de superposition. On expose d'abord l'approximation lineaire. Dans le cas d'un plasma neutre homogene et isotrope l'etude est poursuivie a l'approximation suivante. (auteur)

  4. Unusual equilibration of a particle in a potential with a thermal wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Deepak; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Kundu, Anupam; Dhar, Abhishek

    2017-11-01

    We consider a particle in a one-dimensional box of length L, with a Maxwell bath at one end and a reflecting wall at the other end. Using a renewal approach, as well as directly solving the master equation, we show that the system exhibits a slow power law relaxation, with a logarithmic correction, towards the final equilibrium state. We extend the renewal approach to a class of confining potentials of the form U(x) \\propto x^α , x>0 , where we find that the relaxation is ∼ t-(α+2)/(α-2) for α >2 , with a logarithmic correction when (α+2)/(α-2) is an integer. For α <2 the relaxation is exponential. Interestingly for α=2 (harmonic potential) the localised bath cannot equilibrate the particle.

  5. Universality in the equilibration of quantum systems after a small quench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    A sudden change in the Hamiltonian parameter drives a quantum system out of equilibrium. For a finite-size system, expectations of observables start fluctuating in time without converging to a precise limit. A new equilibrium state emerges only in the probabilistic sense, when the probability distribution for the observable expectations over long times concentrates around their mean value. In this paper we study the full statistic of generic observables after a small quench. When the quench is performed around a regular (i.e., noncritical) point of the phase diagram, generic observables are expected to be characterized by Gaussian distribution functions ('good equilibration'). Instead, when quenching around a critical point a new, universal, double-peaked distribution function emerges for relevant perturbations. Our analytic predictions are numerically checked for a nonintegrable extension of the quantum Ising model.

  6. Mechanisms of submicron inclusion re-equilibration during host mineral deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Both brittle and ductile deformation can facilitate re-equilibration of mineral inclusions. The presence of inclusions also influences stress and strain distribution in the host. The processes governing feedbacks between brittle deformation, ductile deformation, and inclusion re-equilibration have been studied using unique microstructures in Permian meta-pegmatite garnets from the Koralpe, Eastern Alps, Austria. Sampled almandine-spessartine garnets contain highly abundant submicron-sized inclusions, which originated during or subsequent to magmatic garnet growth. The Permian magmatic assemblages were affected by eclogite facies metamorphism during the Cretaceous tectono-metamorphic event. The meta-pegmatite garnet deformed crystal-plastically at this metamorphic stage (Bestmann et al. 2008) and the host-inclusion system was affected by partial recrystallization. Trails of coarser inclusions (1-10µm diameter) crosscut the magmatic submicron inclusion density zoning in the garnet, defining curviplanar geometrical surfaces in 3D. In 10-40µm broad 'bleaching zones' flanking inclusion trails, the original ≤1µm sized inclusions are not seen in the optical microscope or SEM, however inclusions <100nm are still abundant in TEM foils from these areas. From their microstructural characteristics it is inferred that the trails formed at sites of healed brittle cracks. FEG-microprobe data showed that inclusion-trails and associated bleaching zones can be formed isochemically, although some trails showed non-isochemical coarsening. In both cases no change in garnet major element composition was observed. EBSD mapping revealed two phenomena that were investigated by cutting targeted TEM foils. Firstly, bleaching zones are associated with systematic very low angle (ca. 0.5°) garnet lattice orientation changes along discrete boundaries. TEM foils transecting such a boundary show a lower concentration of dislocations than expected for the lattice rotation inferred from EBSD

  7. Experimental studies of N/Z equilibration in peripheral collisions using fragment yield ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keksis, A. L.; May, L. W.; Kohley, Z.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Shetty, D. V.; Tripathi, R.; Li, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral collisions of 40 Ca and 48 Ca projectiles at 32 MeV/nucleon on 112 Sn and 124 Sn targets were studied in this work. The fragments of the projectile-like source (quasiprojectile) were collected with a charged-particle multidetector array. The average value of the neutron-to-proton ratio N/Z of the quasiprojectiles formed in the reactions was determined with two approaches. The first is a direct reconstruction approach using isotopically resolved fragments and is hindered by undetected neutrons leading to lower N/Z values. The second approach, based on the assumption of early fragment formation, employs yield ratios of fragment isobars and is not hindered by undetected neutrons. Using this approach, the amount of N/Z mixing that occurred in the quasiprojectiles (compared to a fully N/Z equilibrated system) was found to be approximately 53%. The experimental results were compared with model calculations. First, the phenomenological DIT (deep inelastic transfer) model was used, followed by the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). The results of these calculations are in close agreement with the data and indicate that the mean number of undetected neutrons increases with the N/Z of the composite system, accounting for the difference observed between the two approaches of quasiprojectile N/Z determination. Second, the microscopic transport model IBUU (isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck) was employed, providing preliminary results in reasonable agreement with the data. The determination of the degree of N/Z equilibration employing the present fragment yield ratio approach may provide a valuable probe to study the isospin part of the nuclear equation of state in conjunction with detailed microscopic models of the collisions in the Fermi energy regime.

  8. The dynamics of carbon dioxide equilibration after alterations in the respiratory rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, Sarah; Jensen, Marie C; Gottlieb, Dominik; Eckle, Daniel; Szczyrba, Marc; Schumann, Stefan; Guttmann, Josef; Lozano-Zahonero, Sara; Moeller, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Manual or automated control of mechanical ventilation can be realized as an open or closed-loop system for which the regulation of the ventilation parameters ideally is tuned to the dynamics and equilibration time of the biological system. We investigated the dynamic, transient state and equilibration time (t eq ) of the CO 2 partial pressure (PCO 2 ) after changes in the respiratory rate (ΔRR). In 17 anaesthetized patients without known history of lung disease, respiratory rate was alternately increased and decreased and end-tidal CO 2 partial pressures (PetCO 2 ) were measured. Linear relations were found between ΔRR and PetCO 2 changes (ΔPetCO 2 = 0.3 − 1.1 · ΔRR) and between ΔRR and t eq for increasing and decreasing RR (t eq(hypervent) = 0.5 · |ΔRR|, t eq(hypovent) = 0.7 · |ΔRR|). Extrapolation of the transition between two PCO 2 steady-states allowed for the prediction of the new PCO 2 steady-state as early as 0.5 · t eq with an error <4 mmHg. At bedside or in automated ventilation systems, the linear dependencies between ΔRR and ΔPCO 2 and between ΔRR and t eq as well as early steady-state prediction of PCO 2 could be used as a guidance towards a timing and step size regulation of RR that is well adapted to the biological system. (paper)

  9. Changes of peritoneal transport parameters with time on dialysis: assessment with sequential peritoneal equilibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2017-10-27

    Sequential peritoneal equilibration test (sPET) is based on the consecutive performance of the peritoneal equilibration test (PET, 4-hour, glucose 2.27%) and the mini-PET (1-hour, glucose 3.86%), and the estimation of peritoneal transport parameters with the 2-pore model. It enables the assessment of the functional transport barrier for fluid and small solutes. The objective of this study was to check whether the estimated model parameters can serve as better and earlier indicators of the changes in the peritoneal transport characteristics than directly measured transport indices that depend on several transport processes. 17 patients were examined using sPET twice with the interval of about 8 months (230 ± 60 days). There was no difference between the observational parameters measured in the 2 examinations. The indices for solute transport, but not net UF, were well correlated between the examinations. Among the estimated parameters, a significant decrease between the 2 examinations was found only for hydraulic permeability LpS, and osmotic conductance for glucose, whereas the other parameters remained unchanged. These fluid transport parameters did not correlate with D/P for creatinine, although the decrease in LpS values between the examinations was observed mostly for patients with low D/P for creatinine. We conclude that changes in fluid transport parameters, hydraulic permeability and osmotic conductance for glucose, as assessed by the pore model, may precede the changes in small solute transport. The systematic assessment of fluid transport status needs specific clinical and mathematical tools beside the standard PET tests.

  10. Extrinsic labelling of staple food crops with isotopic iron does not consistently result in full equilibration: Revisiting the methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method is based on the assumption that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via use of in...

  11. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D L (0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D L (0)/D eq from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D eq is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm 3 thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E in /E or E out /E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD eq was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose ratios changed with beam aperture and

  12. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D{sub eq} is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E{sub in}/E or E{sub out}/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD{sub eq} was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose

  13. Development of a Bunched Beam Electron Cooler based on ERL and Circulator Ring Technology for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hannon, Fay E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of designing an electron ion collider with unprecedented luminosity at a 45 GeV center-of-mass energy. This luminosity relies on ion cooling in both the booster and the storage ring of the accelerator complex. The cooling in the booster will use a conventional DC cooler similar to the one at COSY. The high-energy storage ring, operating at a momentum of up to 100 GeV/nucleon, requires novel use of bunched-beam cooling. There are two designs for such a cooler. The first uses a conventional Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a magnetized beam while the second uses a circulating ring to enhance both peak and average currents experienced by the ion beam. This presentation will describe the design of both the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) design and that of the backup option using the stand-alone ERL operated at lower charge but higher repetition rate than the ERL injector required by the CCR-based design.

  14. VUV photoionization of acetamide studied by electron/ion coincidence spectroscopy in the 8–24 eV photon energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwell, Martin; Bénilan, Yves; Fray, Nicolas; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Es-Sebbar, Et.; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Champion, Norbert; Leach, Sydney

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the VUV photoionization of acetamide in the 8–24 eV photon energy range. ► Electron/ion coincidence measurements are performed using synchrotron radiation. ► The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide is determined by TPEPICO measurements. ► VUV induced fragmentation pathways of acetamide are assigned and discussed. - Abstract: A VUV photoionization study of acetamide was carried out over the 8–24 eV photon energy range using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron/photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy. Threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) measurements were also made. Photoion yield curves and branching ratios were measured for the parent ion and six fragment ions. The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide was determined as I.E. (1 2 A′) = (9.71 ± 0.02) eV, in agreement with an earlier reported photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) value. The adiabatic energy of the first excited state of the ion, 1 2 A″, was determined to be ≈10.1 eV. Assignments of the fragment ions and the pathways of their formation by dissociative photoionization were made. The neutral species lost in the principal dissociative photoionization processes are CH 3 , NH 2 , NH 3 , CO, HCCO and NH 2 CO. Heats of formation are derived for all ions detected and are compared with literature values. Some astrophysical implications of these results are discussed.

  15. Hot nuclei, limiting temperatures and excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.

    1986-09-01

    Hot fusion nuclei are produced in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies (20-100 MeV/U). Information on the maximum excitation energy per nucleon -and temperatures- indicated by the experimental data is compared to the predictions of static and dynamical calculations. Temperatures around 5-6 MeV are reached and seem to be the limit of formation of thermally equilibrated fusion nuclei

  16. Equilibration in long-range quantum spin systems from a BBGKY perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paškauskas, Rytis; Kastner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The time evolution of l-spin reduced density operators is studied for a class of Heisenberg-type quantum spin models with long-range interactions. In the framework of the quantum Bogoliubov–Born–Green–Kirkwood–Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy, we introduce an unconventional representation, different from the usual cluster expansion, which casts the hierarchy into the form of a second-order recursion. This structure suggests a scaling of the expansion coefficients and the corresponding time scales in powers of N 1/2 with the system size N, implying a separation of time scales in the large-system limit. For special parameter values and initial conditions, we can show analytically that closing the BBGKY hierarchy by neglecting l-spin correlations never leads to equilibration, but gives rise to quasi-periodic time evolution with at most l/2 independent frequencies. Moreover, for the same special parameter values and in the large-N limit, we solve the complete recursion relation (the full BBGKY hierarchy), observing a superexponential decay to equilibrium in rescaled time τ = tN −1/2

  17. Chemical-Petrographic Types and Shock Metamorphism of 184 Grove Mountains Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deqiu Dai

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We reported the petrography and mineral chemistry of 184 equilibrated ordinary chondrites collected from Grove Mountains, Antarctica. The chemical-petrographic types and shock metamorphism degrees of these chondrites were assigned. They were classified into 46 H groups (22 H4, 20 H5, and four H6, 133 L groups (eight L4, 75 L5, and 50 L6, and five LL groups (four LL4 and one LL5. Some of these chondrites could be paired; however, both H and L group meteorites were affected. Further studies such as terrestrial ages and thermal luminescence are required in order to confirm the pairings. The relative abundances of H, L, and LL are different in Grove Mountain meteorites, when compared to those in Transcontinental Ridge meteorites. Based on the shock effects, the shock metamorphism degrees of these chondrites were assigned. Compared to previous studies, the heavily shocked samples of S4 and S5 have a higher fraction (59 out of 184 in Grove Mountain ordinary chondrites. The L group (54 out of 59 is the dominant chemical group in the heavily shocked chondrites, except for five meteorites which belong to the H group. The shock metamorphism degrees of the H and L groups are distinct, which may indicate different surface properties in their parent bodies. In addition, the petrologic types and shock degrees are probably closely related, with the most heavily shocked chondrites observed in types 5 and 6.

  18. Balance Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Evaluating Test-Retest Reliability of the Equilibrate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Mitchell J; Lee, Young M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Apple, Rachel P; Germanos, Theodore; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the test-retest reliability of a novel computer-based, portable balance assessment tool, the Equilibrate System (ES), used to diagnose sports-related concussion. Twenty-seven students participated in ES testing consisting of three sessions over 4 weeks. The modified Balance Error Scoring System was performed. For each participant, test-retest reliability was established using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ES test-retest reliability from baseline to week 2 produced an ICC value of 0.495 (95% CI, 0.123-0.745). Week 2 testing produced ICC values of 0.602 (95% CI, 0.279-0.803) and 0.610 (95% CI, 0.299-0.804), respectively. All other single measures test-retest reliability values produced poor ICC values. Same-day ES testing showed fair to good test-retest reliability while interweek measures displayed poor to fair test-retest reliability. Testing conditions should be controlled when using computerized balance assessment methods. ES testing should only be used as a part of a comprehensive assessment.

  19. Analytical treatment of neutrino asymmetry equilibration from flavor oscillations in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yvonne Y.

    2002-07-01

    A recent numerical study by A. D. Dolgov, S. H. Hansen, S. Pastor, S. T. Petcov, G. G. Raffelt, and D. V. Semikoz (DHPPRS) [Nucl. Phys. B632, 363 (2002)] found that complete or partial equilibrium between all active neutrino flavors can be achieved before the big bang nucleosynthesis epoch via flavor oscillations, if the oscillation parameters are those inferred from the atmospheric and solar neutrino data, and, in some cases, if θ13 is also sizable. As such, cosmological constraints on the electron neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry are now applicable in all three neutrino sectors. In the present work, we provide an analytical treatment of the scenarios considered in DHPPRS, and demonstrate that their results are stable even for very large initial asymmetries. The equilibration mechanism can be understood in terms of a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein-like effect for a maximally mixed and effectively monochromatic system. We also comment on the DHPPRS's choices of mixing parameters, and their handling of collisional effects, both of which could impinge on the extent of flavor equilibrium.

  20. High-temperature peridotites - lithospheric or asthenospheric?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hops, J.J.; Gurney, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    High-temperature peridotites by definition yield equilibration temperatures greater than 1100 degrees C. On the basis of temperature and pressure calculations, these high-temperature peridotites are amongst the deepest samples entrained by kimberlites on route to the surface. Conflicting models proposing either a lithospheric or asthenospheric origin for the high-temperature peridotites have been suggested. A detailed study of these xenoliths from a single locality, the Jagersfontein kimberlite in the Orange Free State, has been completed as a means of resolving this controversy. 10 refs., 2 figs

  1. Effects of an extension of the equilibration period up to 96 hours on the characteristics of cryopreserved bull semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisch, A; Malama, E; Witschi, U; Leiding, C; Siuda, M; Janett, F; Bollwein, H

    2017-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of an equilibration period up to 96 hours and three extenders (AndroMed, OPTIXcell, and Triladyl) on the quality of cryopreserved bull semen and to evaluate, whether an extension of the equilibration time to 72 hours does affect fertility in the field. One ejaculate of 17 bulls was collected and divided into three equal aliquots and diluted, respectively, with the three extenders. Each aliquot was again divided into five parts and equilibrated for 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours before freezing in an automatic freezer. Sperm motility, plasma membrane and acrosome integrity (PMAI), and DNA fragmentation index (% DFI) were measured during equilibration. In addition to the parameters measured during equilibration, the percentage of viable sperm cells with high mitochondrial membrane potential (HMMP) was measured immediately after thawing, and after 3 hours of incubation at 37 °C. Sperm motility was assessed using CASA, and PMAI, HMMP, and % DFI were measured using flow cytometry. Equilibration time did affect all parameters before freezing (P semen characteristics during 3 hours of incubation were also dependent on the equilibration time and the extender used in all parameters (P semen of nine bulls was collected thrice weekly, processed using Triladyl egg yolk extender, and frozen in 0.25 mL straws with 15 × 10 6 spermatozoa per straw. In total, the nonreturn rates on Day 90 after insemination (NRR90) of 263,816 inseminations in two periods were evaluated. Whereas semen collected on Mondays and Wednesdays was equilibrated for 24 hours in both periods, semen collected on Fridays was equilibrated for 4 hours in period one and equilibrated for 72 hours in period 2. No differences in NRR90 could be found (P > 0.05). In conclusion, extension of the equilibration time from 4 hours to 24-72 hours can improve motility and viability of cryopreserved semen after thawing. The extent of improvement in semen quality

  2. Gas phase 1H NMR studies and kinetic modeling of dihydrogen isotope equilibration catalyzed by Ru-nanoparticles under normal conditions: dissociative vs. associative exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Pery, Tal; Rothermel, Niels; Chaudret, Bruno; Gutmann, Torsten; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2018-04-25

    The equilibration of H2, HD and D2 between the gas phase and surface hydrides of solid organic-ligand-stabilized Ru metal nanoparticles has been studied by gas phase 1H NMR spectroscopy using closed NMR tubes as batch reactors at room temperature and 800 mbar. When two different nanoparticle systems, Ru/PVP (PVP ≡ polyvinylpyrrolidone) and Ru/HDA (HDA ≡ hexadecylamine) were exposed to D2 gas, only the release of HD from the hydride containing surface could be detected in the initial stages of the reaction, but no H2. In the case of Ru/HDA also the reverse experiment was performed where surface deuterated nanoparticles were exposed to H2. In that case, the conversion of H2 into gaseous HD was detected. In order to analyze the experimental kinetic and spectroscopic data, we explored two different mechanisms taking into account potential kinetic and equilibrium H/D isotope effects. Firstly, we explored the dissociative exchange mechanism consisting of dissociative adsorption of dihydrogen, fast hydride surface diffusion and associative desorption of dihydrogen. It is shown that if D2 is the reaction partner, only H2 will be released in the beginning of the reaction, and HD only in later reaction stages. The second mechanism, dubbed here associative exchange consists of the binding of dihydrogen to Ru surface atoms, followed by a H-transfer to or by H-exchange with an adjacent hydride site, and finally of the associative desorption of dihydrogen. In that case, in the exchange with D2, only HD will be released in the beginning of the reaction. Our experimental results are not compatible with the dissociative exchange but can be explained in terms of the associative exchange. Whereas the former will dominate at low temperatures and pressures, the latter will prevail around room temperature and normal pressures where transition metal nanoparticles are generally used as reaction catalysts.

  3. Computer simulations of the restricted primitive model at very low temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeriani, Chantal; Camp, Philip J; Zwanikken, Jos W; Van Roij, Rene; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2010-01-01

    The problem of successfully simulating ionic fluids at low temperature and low density states is well known in the simulation literature: using conventional methods, the system is not able to equilibrate rapidly due to the presence of strongly associated cation-anion pairs. In this paper we present a numerical method for speeding up computer simulations of the restricted primitive model (RPM) at low temperatures (around the critical temperature) and at very low densities (down to 10 -10 σ -3 , where σ is the ion diameter). Experimentally, this regime corresponds to typical concentrations of electrolytes in nonaqueous solvents. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that the RPM has been equilibrated at such extremely low concentrations. More generally, this method could be used to equilibrate other systems that form aggregates at low concentrations.

  4. Descriptions of the equilibration process of the intrinsic degrees of freedom and dissipative process of the nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Renfa; Zhang Jingshang; Ma Zhongyu; Wu Xizhen; Zhuo Yizhong

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the Hamiltonian model is used for studying the nuclear dynamics by taking both the one-body and two-body interaction mechanisms into account. On the basis of the Von Neuman equation the coupling between the collective motion and the single particle degrees of freedom is discussed. Thus, the equations obtained are physically transparent and easy for numerical computations. They may be useful for describing the dissipative process of the nuclear collective motion as well as the equilibration process of the intrinsic degrees of freedom. (Author)

  5. Physical aging of molecular glasses studied by a device allowing for rapid thermal equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Olsen, Niels Boye; Niss, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    that controls the dielectric properties. (2) There are no so-called expansion gaps between the long-time limits of the relaxation rates following up and down jumps to the same temperature. (3) At long times, the structural relaxation appears to follow a simple exponential decay. (4) For small temperature steps...

  6. Equilibration-Based Preconcentrating Minicolumn Sensors for Trace Level Monitoring of Radionuclides and Metal Ions in Water without Consumable Reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Grate, Jay W.

    2006-01-01

    A sensor technique is described that captures analyte species on a preconcentrating minicolumn containing a selective solid phase sorbent. In this approach, the sample is pumped through the column until the sorbent phase is fully equilibrated with the sample concentration, and the exit concentration equals the inlet concentration. On-column detection of the captured analytes using radiometric and spectroscopic methods are demonstrated. In trace level detection applications, this sensor provides a steady state signal that is proportional to sample analyte concentration and is reversible. The method is demonstrated for the detection of Tc-99 using anion exchange beads mixed with scintillating beads and light detection; Sr-90 using SuperLig 620 beads mixed with scintillating beads and light detection; and hexavalent chromium detection using anion exchange beads with spectroscopic detection. Theory has been developed to describe the signal at equilibration, and to describe analyte uptake as a function of volume and concentration, using parameters and concepts from frontal chromatography. It is shown that experimental sensor behavior closely matches theoretical predictions and that effective sensors can be prepared using low plate number columns. This sensor modality has many desirable characteristics for in situ sensors for trace-level contaminant long-term monitoring where the use of consumable reagents for sensor regeneration would be undesirable. Initial experiments in groundwater matrixes demonstrated the detection of Tc-99 at drinking water level standards (activity of 0.033 Bq/mL) and detection of hexavalent chromium to levels below drinking water standards of 50 ppb

  7. Chemical kinetics studies at high temperatures using shock tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakumar, B; Anandraj, D; Reddy, KPJ; Arunan, E

    2002-01-01

    Shock tube is an unique facility to create temperature gradients exceeding million degrees Kelvin per second. We have established two shock tubes for measuring the kinetic reaction rates at high temperatures with two different but complementary detection techniques. The first one is a single pulse shock tube, in which the reflected shock is used to heat the molecules. The equilibrated products are analyzed by gas chromatograph and infrared spectrometer. The second one uses laser-schlieren sys...

  8. The measurement of plasma temperature by height scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzenstein, J.

    1976-04-01

    One of the most accurate methods for the determination of the electron and ion temperature of a plasma is the measurement of the spectrum of the light scattered from a monoshromatic laser beam by the plasma electrons. The simple case of uncorrelated electrons is treated in detail showing the scattered spectrum to be a simple Gaussian whose half-breadth is proportional to the mean electron thermal velocity hence the square root of electron temperature. The results of a more general treatment are also reviewed which takes into account electron-ion correlations. Experimental requirements on the laser, the spetral instrumentation, and the data analysis are discussed. (author)

  9. Reduction by metals dissolved in liquid ammonia of keto steroids. Equilibration of the alcohols; Reduction par les metaux dissous dans l'ammoniac liquide de cetones en serie steroide. Equilibration des alcools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroud, A M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    Reducing a ketone by dissolved metals involves two electrons; we may consider as intermediate a radical-anion, then a di-anion or a carbo-anion. The radical-anion may also split and give pinacols away. In order to discuss the reduction proceeds, we had to know the respective stabilities of the alcohols, which lead us to effectuate equilibration. The first chapter is devoted to the method of preparing the androstanone-II and the androstanols-II{alpha} and II-{beta}. We further establish the impossibility of using our methods for reaching a conclusion about the alcohols relative stability by experimental equilibration. Last we describe the methods for reducing the ketone by alkaline and earth-alkaline metals, dissolved in liquid ammonia, either in contact with a protons donor or with a later added protons donor. The resulting mixture of the two alcohols shows a prevailing quantity of the stable equatorial isomer {alpha}. In a second chapter, we study the action of selenic acid and hydroperoxide on cholestanone-3, which leads us to study the preparation and stereochemistry of the A-nor cholestane derivates. We further describe the preparation of the A-nor cholestanols-2{alpha} and 2{beta}, and the corresponding acetates. Equilibration of the alcohols by chemical methods shows the 2 {alpha}-alcohol more stable than the 2{beta}, which is mathematically confirmed. Last, the reduction of the A-nor cholestanone-2 by dissolved metals consistently leads to the less stable 2 {beta} epimer, with associated pinacols. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the androstanone-17 reductions, and the relative stabilities of the 17{alpha} and 17{beta} alcohols. Whichever operating methods is used, we predominantly obtain the more stable 17{beta} alcohol. In all cases, a pinacol production is observed. Summing up, we note that, in all cases, we predominantly obtain the equatorial epimer, whether it should be the more stable or the less stable. (author) [French] La reduction d

  10. Reduction by metals dissolved in liquid ammonia of keto steroids. Equilibration of the alcohols; Reduction par les metaux dissous dans l'ammoniac liquide de cetones en serie steroide. Equilibration des alcools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroud, A.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    Reducing a ketone by dissolved metals involves two electrons; we may consider as intermediate a radical-anion, then a di-anion or a carbo-anion. The radical-anion may also split and give pinacols away. In order to discuss the reduction proceeds, we had to know the respective stabilities of the alcohols, which lead us to effectuate equilibration. The first chapter is devoted to the method of preparing the androstanone-II and the androstanols-II{alpha} and II-{beta}. We further establish the impossibility of using our methods for reaching a conclusion about the alcohols relative stability by experimental equilibration. Last we describe the methods for reducing the ketone by alkaline and earth-alkaline metals, dissolved in liquid ammonia, either in contact with a protons donor or with a later added protons donor. The resulting mixture of the two alcohols shows a prevailing quantity of the stable equatorial isomer {alpha}. In a second chapter, we study the action of selenic acid and hydroperoxide on cholestanone-3, which leads us to study the preparation and stereochemistry of the A-nor cholestane derivates. We further describe the preparation of the A-nor cholestanols-2{alpha} and 2{beta}, and the corresponding acetates. Equilibration of the alcohols by chemical methods shows the 2 {alpha}-alcohol more stable than the 2{beta}, which is mathematically confirmed. Last, the reduction of the A-nor cholestanone-2 by dissolved metals consistently leads to the less stable 2 {beta} epimer, with associated pinacols. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the androstanone-17 reductions, and the relative stabilities of the 17{alpha} and 17{beta} alcohols. Whichever operating methods is used, we predominantly obtain the more stable 17{beta} alcohol. In all cases, a pinacol production is observed. Summing up, we note that, in all cases, we predominantly obtain the equatorial epimer, whether it should be the more stable or the less stable. (author) [French] La reduction d

  11. Thin-film culturing technique allowing rapid gas-liquid equilibration (6 sec) with no toxicity to mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for inoculating mammalian cells onto the central area of glass petri dishes. The medium depth above the cells is only 100 μm for an added medium volume of 1 ml and increases linearly and rapidly with additional medium. The theoretical time constant for equilibration of the medium with the gas is related to the square of the medium depth. The experimental time constant was measured in two different ways for large and small medium depths, giving excellent agreement with the theoretical values. Although the time constant is only 6 sec for the case of 1 ml of added medium, there is no drying out of the medium or toxicity to the cells because of a large reservoir of medium in the meniscus at the periphery of the dish

  12. Particle-particle correlations and lifetimes of composite nuclei: New tests for the evaporation model and for statistical equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeYoung, P.A.; Gelderloos, C.J.; Kortering, D.; Sarafa, J.; Zienert, K.; Gordon, M.S.; Fineman, B.J.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Lu, X.; McGrath, R.L.; de Castro Rizzo, D.M.; Alexander, J.M.; Auger, G.; Kox, S.; Vaz, L.C.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Vineyard, M.F.; Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794; Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439)

    1990-01-01

    We present data for small-angle particle-particle correlations from the reactions 80, 140, 215, and 250 MeV 16 O+ 27 Al→p-p or p-d. The main features of these data are anticorrelations for small relative momenta (≤25 MeV/c) that strengthen with increasing bombarding energy. Statistical model calculations have been performed to predict the mean lifetimes for each step of evaporative decay, and then simulate the trajectories of the particle pairs and the resulting particle correlations. This simulation accounts very well for the trends of the data and can provide an important new test for the hypothesis of equilibration on which the model is built

  13. Carbon potential measurement on the Mo-MoC0.47 system by methane - hydrogen equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthasivan, K.; Kaliappan, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Mathews, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    Uranium plutonium mixed carbides are potential candidate fuel materials for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors. The carbon potential of the fuel is an important thermochemical property which strongly influences the carbon transport between the clad and the fuel. The carbon potential of the fuel is altered during irradiation of the fuel in the reactor. This is due to the formation of various fission products and their binary and ternary carbides. Molybdenum is a fission product with a high yield which can alter the carbon potential of the fuel. The present work forms part of our studies on the carbon potential measurements in the U - Mo - C ternary system. The carbon potential of the Mo-Mo 2 C couple measured by the methane hydrogen gas equilibration technique is presented here and the results are compared with the values cited in the literature. (author)

  14. Statistical and off-equilibrium production of fragments in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies; Production statistique et hors-equilibre de fragments dans les collisions d`ions lourdes aux energies intermediaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocage, Frederic [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-12-15

    The study of reaction products, fragments and light charged particles, emitted during heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies has shown the dominant binary dissipative character of the reaction, which is persisting for almost all impact parameters. However, in comparison with this purely binary process, an excess of nuclear matter is observed in-between the quasi-projectile and the quasi-target. To understand the mechanisms producing such an excess, this work studies more precisely the breakup in two fragments of the quasi-projectile formed in Xe+Sn, from 25 to 50 MeV/u, and Gd+C and Gd+U at 36 MeV/u. The data were obtained during the first INDRA experiment at GANIL. The angular distributions of the two fragments show the competition between statistical fission and non-equilibrated breakup of the quasi-projectile. In the second case, the two fragments are aligned along the separation axis of the two primary partners. The comparison of the fission directions and probabilities with statistical models allows us to measure the fission time, as well as the angular momentum, temperature and size of the fissioning residue. The relative velocities are compatible with Coulomb and thermal effects in the case of statistical fission and are found much higher for the breakup of a non-equilibrated quasi-projectile, which indicates that the projectile was deformed during interaction with the target. Such deformations should be compared with dynamical calculations in order to constrain the viscosity of nuclear matter and the parameters of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, (author) 148 refs., 77 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Do nuclear collisions create a locally equilibrated quark-gluon plasma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romatschke, P. [University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Physics, 390 UCB, Boulder, CO (United States); University of Colorado, Center for Theory of Quantum Matter, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Experimental results on azimuthal correlations in high energy nuclear collisions (nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus, and proton-proton) seem to be well described by viscous hydrodynamics. It is often argued that this agreement implies either local thermal equilibrium or at least local isotropy. In this note, I present arguments why this is not the case. Neither local near-equilibrium nor near-isotropy are required in order for hydrodynamics to offer a successful and accurate description of experimental results. However, I predict the breakdown of hydrodynamics at momenta of order seven times the temperature, corresponding to a smallest possible QCD liquid drop size of 0.15 fm. (orig.)

  16. Impact of pre-equilibration and diffusion limited release kinetics on effluent concentration in column leaching tests: Insights from numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Michael; Grathwohl, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Column leaching tests have become a standard method for assessing leaching of pollutants from materials used, e.g., for road and railway constructions and in landscaping measures. Column tests showed to be practical in laboratories yielding robust and reproducible results. However, considerable uncertainty still exists related particularly to the degree of equilibration of the pore water with the solids during preparation (pre-equilibration) and percolation of the column. We analyse equilibration time scales and sensitivity of concentrations in column leachate with respect to initial conditions in a series of numerical experiments covering a broad spectrum of material and solute properties. Slow release of pollutants from solid materials is described by a spherical diffusion model of kinetic sorption accounting for multiple grain size fractions and sorption capacities. Results show that the cumulative concentrations are rather independent of the pre-equilibration level for a broad spectrum of parameter settings, e.g. if intra-particle porosity is high, grain size is small, or if the sorption coefficient is large. Sensitivity increases with decreasing liquid solid ratios and contact time during percolation. Significant variations with initial column conditions are to be expected for material and compound properties leading to slow release kinetics. In these cases, sensitivity to initial conditions may have to be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An automated technique for measuring deltaD and delta18O values of porewater by direct CO2 and H2 equilibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, G; Wassenaar, L I; Hendry, M J

    2000-11-15

    The stable-oxygen and -hydrogen isotopic values (deltaD, delta18O) of porewater in geologic media are commonly determined on water obtained by extraction techniques such as centrifugation, mechanical squeezing, vacuum heating and cryogenic microdistillation, and azeotropic distillation. Each of these techniques may cause isotopic fractionation as part the extraction process and each is laborious. Here we demonstrate a new approach to obtain automated, high-precision deltaD and delta18O measurements of porewater in geologic sediments by direct H2- and CO2-porewater equilibration using a modified commercial CO2-water equilibrator. This technique provides an important and cost-effective improvement over current extraction methods, because many samples can be rapidly analyzed with minimal handling, thereby reducing errors and potential for isotopic fractionation. The precision and accuracy of direct H2- and CO2-porewater equilibration is comparable to or better than current porewater extraction methods. Finally, the direct equilibration technique allows investigators to obtain high-resolution (cm scale) porewater deltaD and delta18O profiles using cores from individual boreholes, eliminating the need for costly piezometers or conventional porewater extractions.

  18. Computer simulations of the restricted primitive model at very low temperature and density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valeriani, C.; Camp, P. J.; Zwanikken, J.W.; Van Roij, R.; Dijkstra, M.

    2010-01-01

    The problem of successfully simulating ionic fluids at low temperature and low density states is well known in the simulation literature: using conventional methods, the system is not able to equilibrate rapidly due to the presence of strongly associated cation–anion pairs. In this paper we present

  19. A randomized prospective study of desflurane versus isoflurane in minimal flow anesthesia using “equilibration time” as the change-over point to minimal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Tanuja; Aneja, S; Tope, R; Muralidhar, V

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the administration of minimal flow anesthesia, traditionally a fixed time period of high flow has been used before changing over to minimal flow. However, newer studies have used “equilibration time” of a volatile anesthetic agent as the change-over point. Materials and Methods: A randomized prospective study was conducted on 60 patients, who were divided into two groups of 30 patients each. Two volatile inhalational anesthetic agents were compared. Group I received desflurane (n = 30) and group II isoflurane (n = 30). Both the groups received an initial high flow till equilibration between inspired (Fi) and expired (Fe) agent concentration were achieved, which was defined as Fe/Fi = 0.8. The mean (SD) equilibration time was obtained for both the agent. Then, a drift in end-tidal agent concentration during the minimal flow anesthesia and recovery profile was noted. Results: The mean equilibration time obtained for desflurane and isoflurane were 4.96 ± 1.60 and 16.96 ± 9.64 min (P < 0.001). The drift in end-tidal agent concentration over time was minimal in the desflurane group (P = 0.065). Recovery time was 5.70 ± 2.78 min in the desflurane group and 8.06 ± 31 min in the isoflurane group (P = 0.004). Conclusion: Use of equilibration time of the volatile anesthetic agent as a change-over point, from high flow to minimal flow, can help us use minimal flow anesthesia, in a more efficient way. PMID:23225926

  20. Equilibration of a strongly interacting plasma: holographic analysis of local and nonlocal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellantuono Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation of a strongly coupled plasma towards the hydrodynamic regime is studied by analyzing the evolution of local and nonlocal observables in the holographic approach. The system is driven in an initial anisotropic and far-from equilibrium state through an impulsive time-dependent deformation (quench of the boundary spacetime geometry. Effective temperature and entropy density are related to the position and area of a black hole horizon, which has formed as a consequence of the distortion. The behavior of stress-energy tensor, equal-time correlation functions and Wilson loops of different shapes is examined, and a hierarchy among their thermalization times emerges: probes involving shorter length scales thermalize faster.

  1. Intrauterine temperature during intrapartum amnioinfusion: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, T M; Schaecher, C; Sadovsky, Y; Gross, G

    2012-07-01

    To determine the influence of routine intrapartum amnioinfusion (AI) on intrauterine temperature. Prospective observational study. Maternity unit, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, MO, USA. Forty women with singleton gestations and an indication for intrapartum intrauterine pressure catheter placement. Using a temperature probe, we digitally recorded intrauterine temperature every 10 minutes during labour. Amnioinfusion was administered according to a standard protocol using saline equilibrated to the ambient temperature. Mean intrauterine temperature during labour. Participants were monitored for a mean of 280 minutes (range 20-820). A total of 164 intrauterine temperature readings in the AI cohort were compared with 797 control measurements. When compared with controls, we observed a lower intrauterine temperature in the AI cohort (36.4 versus 37.4°C, P<0.01). More measurements in the AI cohort were recorded in the presence of intrapartum fever (40% versus 30%). A subgroup analysis of measurements recorded in afebrile parturients revealed an even greater effect of AI (1.5°C decrease, 37.3 versus 35.8°C, P<0.01). Routine intrapartum AI using saline equilibrated to a mean ambient temperature of 25.0°C reduces intrauterine temperature and may thereby affect fetal core temperature. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  2. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 knockdown tunes cellular mechanics through epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonju Lee

    Full Text Available We report cell mechanical changes in response to alteration of expression of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1, a most abundant and widely distributed plasma membrane nucleoside transporter in human cells and/or tissues. Modulation of hENT1 expression level altered the stiffness of pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and Panc 03.27 cells, which was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM and correlated to microfluidic platform. The hENT1 knockdown induced reduction of cellular stiffness in both of cells up to 70%. In addition, cellular phenotypic changes such as cell morphology, migration, and expression level of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers were observed after hENT1 knockdown. Cells with suppressed hENT1 became elongated, migrated faster, and had reduced E-cadherin and elevated N-cadherin compared to parental cells which are consistent with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Those cellular phenotypic changes closely correlated with changes in cellular stiffness. This study suggests that hENT1 expression level affects cellular phenotype and cell elastic behavior can be a physical biomarker for quantify hENT1 expression and detect phenotypic shift. Furthermore, cell mechanics can be a critical tool in detecting disease progression and response to therapy.

  3. Water Saturation Relations and Their Diffusion-Limited Equilibration in Gas Shale: Implications for Gas Flow in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Shen, Weijun; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhang, Yingqi; Finsterle, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of water are used for hydraulic fracturing of low permeability shale reservoirs to stimulate gas production, with most of the water remaining unrecovered and distributed in a poorly understood manner within stimulated regions. Because water partitioning into shale pores controls gas release, we measured the water saturation dependence on relative humidity (rh) and capillary pressure (Pc) for imbibition (adsorption) as well as drainage (desorption) on samples of Woodford Shale. Experiments and modeling of water vapor adsorption into shale laminae at rh = 0.31 demonstrated that long times are needed to characterize equilibrium in larger (5 mm thick) pieces of shales, and yielded effective diffusion coefficients from 9 × 10-9 to 3 × 10-8 m2 s-1, similar in magnitude to the literature values for typical low porosity and low permeability rocks. Most of the experiments, conducted at 50°C on crushed shale grains in order to facilitate rapid equilibration, showed significant saturation hysteresis, and that very large Pc (˜1 MPa) are required to drain the shales. These results quantify the severity of the water blocking problem, and suggest that gas production from unconventional reservoirs is largely associated with stimulated regions that have had little or no exposure to injected water. Gravity drainage of water from fractures residing above horizontal wells reconciles gas production in the presence of largely unrecovered injected water, and is discussed in the broader context of unsaturated flow in fractures.

  4. Ergopeptines bromocriptine and ergovaline and the dopamine type-2 receptor inhibitor domperidone inhibit bovine equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Edwena D; Xue, Yan; Strickland, James R; Boling, James A; Matthews, James C

    2011-09-14

    Neotyphodium coenophialum-infected tall fescue contains ergopeptines. Except for interactions with biogenic amine receptors (e.g., dopamine type-2 receptor, D2R), little is known about how ergopeptines affect animal metabolism. The effect of ergopeptines on bovine nucleoside transporters (NT) was evaluated using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Equilibrative NT1 (ENT1)-like activity accounted for 94% of total NT activity. Inhibitory competition (IC(50)) experiments found that this activity was inhibited by both bromocriptine (a synthetic model ergopeptine and D2R agonist) and ergovaline (a predominant ergopeptine of tall fescue). Kinetic inhibition analysis indicated that bromocriptine inhibited ENT1-like activity through a competitive and noncompetitive mechanism. Domperidone (a D2R antagonist) inhibited ENT1 activity more in the presence than in the absence of bromocriptine and displayed an IC(50) value lower than that of bromocriptine or ergovaline, suggesting that inhibition was not through D2R-mediated events. These novel mechanistic findings imply that cattle consuming endophyte-infected tall fescue have reduced ENT1 activity and, thus, impaired nucleoside metabolism.

  5. Temperature dependent structural and vibrational properties of liquid indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the temperature effect on both the structure factor and the phonon dispersion relation of liquid indium have been investigated by means of pseudopotential theory. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere reference system is applied to describe the structural calculation. The effective electron-ion interaction is explained by using modified empty core potential due to Hasegawa et al. along with a local field correction function due to Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU). The temperature dependence of pair potential needed at higher temperatures was achieved by multiplying the damping factor exp(- π/kBT2k F r ) in the pair potential. Very close agreement of static structure factor, particularly, at elevated temperatures confirms the validity of the local potential. A positive dispersion is found in low-q region and the correct trend of phonon dispersion branches like the experimental; shows all broad features of collective excitations in liquid metals.

  6. Symmetry-Free, p-Robust Equilibrated Error Indication for the hp-Version of the FEMin Nearly Incompressible Linear Elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dörsek, Philipp; Melenk, Jens M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the extension of the p-robust equilibrated error estimator due to Braess, Pillwein and Schöberl to linear elasticity. We derive a formulation where the local mixed auxiliary problems do not require symmetry of the stresses. The resulting error estimator is p-robust, and the reliability estimate is also robust in the incompressible limit if quadratics are included in the approximation space. Extensions to other systems of linear second-order partial differential equations are discu...

  7. Sorption, dissolution and pH determine the long-term equilibration and toxicity of coated and uncoated ZnO nanoparticles in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Diez Ortiz, Maria; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2013-07-01

    To assess the effect of long-term dissolution on bioavailability and toxicity, triethoxyoctylsilane coated and uncoated zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP), non-nano ZnO and ZnCl2 were equilibrated in natural soil for up to twelve months. Zn concentrations in pore water increased with time for all ZnO forms but peaked at intermediate concentrations of ZnO-NP and non-nano ZnO, while for coated ZnO-NP such a clear peak only was seen after 12 months. Dose-related increases in soil pH may explain decreased soluble Zn levels due to fixation of Zn released from ZnO at higher soil concentrations. At T = 0 uncoated ZnO-NP and non-nano ZnO were equally toxic to the springtail Folsomia candida, but not as toxic as coated ZnO-NP, and ZnCl2 being most toxic. After three months equilibration toxicity to F. candida was already reduced for all Zn forms, except for coated ZnO-NP which showed reduced toxicity only after 12 months equilibration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater: expression differences in tumour histotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Perrone

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 is the major means by which gemcitabine enters human cells; recent evidence exists that hENT1 is expressed in carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and that it should be considered as a molecular prognostic marker for patients with resected ampullary cancer. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the variations of hENT1 expression in ampullary carcinomas and to correlate such variations with histological subtypes and clinicopathological parameters. Forty-one ampullary carcinomas were histologically classified into intestinal, pancreaticobiliary and unusual types. hENT1 and Ki67 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and apoptotic cells were identified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL method. hENT1 overexpression was detected in 63.4% ampullary carcinomas. A significant difference in terms of hENT1 and Ki67 expression was found between intestinal vs. pancreaticobiliary types (P=0.03 and P=0.009 respectively. Moreover, a significant statistical positive correlation was found between apoptotic and proliferative Index (P=0.036, while no significant correlation was found between hENT1 and apoptosis. Our results on hENT1 expression suggest that classification of ampullary carcinoma by morphological subtypes may represent an additional tool in prospective clinical trials aimed at examining treatment efficacy; in addition, data obtained from Ki67 and TUNEL suggest a key role of hENT1 in tumour growth of ampullary carcinoma.

  9. Comparison of peritoneal equilibration test(PET) with Tc99m-DTPA excretion in the assessment of peritoneal permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Senthilnathan, M.S.; Pradhan, P.K.; Jeloka, T.K.; Nagabhushan, S.; Sharma, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Assessment of peritoneal permeability is necessary for successful management of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients by Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD). Twardowski in 1987 described for the first time a method know as Peritoneal Equilibration Test (PET ) to determine peritoneal membrane characteristics. However, this test is not only cumbersome but is associated with several limitations. The objective of this study was to develop an alternative method of assessing the peritoneal permeability and compare this method with the conventional PET. Method: Twenty patients under going regular CAPD were included in this study. Before starting the peritoneal dialysis 370 MBq (10 mCi) 99mTc-DTPA was injected intravenously in the same standard precondition as for PET evaluation. A standard dose of same quantity was kept and used later for calculations. At the end of four hours a dialysate fluid sample (1 ml) was collected and the total dialysis effluent fluid volume was measured. Excretion of 99mTc-DTPA into the dialysate fluid as percentage of injected dose was calculated. Simultaneously standard PET values were recorded for comparison. Results: Peritoneal excretion of 99mTc-DTPA ranged from 8 % to 16 % of the injected dose depending upon the peritoneal membrane permeability. Depending upon the DTPA excretion the patients were divided into 4 groups: High Transporter (15% and above; High Average (12 to 15 %); Low Average (10 to 12%); Low Average (10% and less). When the results were compared with the conventional PET values, a good correlation (r=0.79) could be found. Conclusion: Determining the excretion of 99mTc-DTPA in the dialysate fluid after 4 hrs as percentage of the injected dose is a simple and convenient method to assess the peritoneal membrane permeability and can be used as an alternative technique to conventional PET which is very cumbersome and associated with many limitations

  10. Constraints on the timing of multiple thermal events and re-equilibration recorded by high-U zircon and xenotime: Case study of pegmatite from Piława Górna (Góry Sowie Block, SW Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyń, Bartosz; Sláma, Jiří; Kozub-Budzyń, Gabriela A.; Konečný, Patrik; Holický, Ivan; Rzepa, Grzegorz; Jastrzębski, Mirosław

    2018-06-01

    The application of zircon and xenotime geochronometers requires knowledge of their potential and limitations related to possible disturbance of the age record. The alteration of the intergrown zircon and xenotime in pegmatite from the Góry Sowie Block (SW Poland) was studied using the electron microprobe analysis, X-ray WDS compositional mapping, micro-Raman analysis, and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of zircon and xenotime, as well as the U-Th-total Pb dating of uraninite. These microanalytical techniques were applied to understand the formation mechanisms of the secondary textures related to post-magmatic processes in the zircon and xenotime intergrowth, and to constrain their timing. Textural and compositional features combined with U-Pb data indicate that the pegmatite-related crystallization of the zircon and xenotime intergrowth occurred ca. 2.09 Ga (2086 ± 35 Ma for zircon and 2093 ± 52 Ma for xenotime), followed by the re-equilibration of zircon and xenotime ca. 370 Ma (373 ± 18 Ma and 368 ± 6 Ma, respectively) during the formation of the younger pegmatite. The zircon and xenotime were most likely derived from Precambrian basement rocks and emplaced in the pegmatite as a restite. The zircon preserved textures related to diffusion-reaction processes that affected its high-U core (up to ca. 9.6 wt% UO2), which underwent further metamictization and amorphization due to self-radiation damage. The zircon rim and xenotime were affected by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation processes that resulted in patchy zoning, age disturbance and sponge-like textures. Xenotime was also partially replaced by fluorapatite or hingganite-(Y) and Y-enriched allanite-(Ce). The termination of the low-temperature alteration was constrained by the U-Th-total Pb age of the uraninite inclusions that crystallized in zircon at 281 ± 2 Ma, which is consistent with the age of 278 ± 15 Ma obtained from the youngest cluster of U-Pb ages in the re-equilibrated high-U zircon domains. This study

  11. Carbon dioxide degassing at the groundwater-stream-atmosphere interface: isotopic equilibration and hydrological mass balance in a sandy watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deirmendjian, Loris; Abril, Gwenaël

    2018-03-01

    Streams and rivers emit significant amounts of CO2 and constitute a preferential pathway of carbon transport from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. However, the estimation of CO2 degassing based on the water-air CO2 gradient, gas transfer velocity and stream surface area is subject to large uncertainties. Furthermore, the stable isotope signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) in streams is strongly impacted by gas exchange, which makes it a useful tracer of CO2 degassing under specific conditions. For this study, we characterized the annual transfers of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) along the groundwater-stream-river continuum based on DIC concentrations, stable isotope composition and measurements of stream discharges. We selected a homogeneous, forested and sandy lowland watershed as a study site, where the hydrology occurs almost exclusively through drainage of shallow groundwater (no surface runoff). We observed the first general spatial pattern of decreases in pCO2 and DIC and an increase in δ13C-DIC from groundwater to stream orders 1 and 2, which was due to the experimentally verified faster degassing of groundwater 12C-DIC compared to 13C-DIC. This downstream enrichment in 13C-DIC could be modelled by simply considering the isotopic equilibration of groundwater-derived DIC with the atmosphere during CO2 degassing. A second spatial pattern occurred between stream orders 2 and 4, consisting of an increase in the proportion of carbonate alkalinity to the DIC accompanied by the enrichment of 13C in the stream DIC, which was due to the occurrence of carbonate rock weathering downstream. We could separate the contribution of these two processes (gas exchange and carbonate weathering) in the stable isotope budget of the river network. Thereafter, we built a hydrological mass balance based on drainages and the relative contribution of groundwater in streams of increasing order. After combining with the dissolved CO2 concentrations, we

  12. Rapid, Real-time Methane Detection in Ground Water Using a New Gas-Water Equilibrator Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruybal, C. J.; DiGiulio, D. C.; Wilkin, R. T.; Hargrove, K. D.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent increases in unconventional gas development have been accompanied by public concern for methane contamination in drinking water wells near production areas. Although not a regulated pollutant, methane may be a marker contaminant for others that are less mobile in groundwater and thus may be detected later, or at a location closer to the source. In addition, methane poses an explosion hazard if exsolved concentrations reach 5 - 15% volume in air. Methods for determining dissolved gases, such as methane, have evolved over 60 years. However, the response time of these methods is insufficient to monitor trends in methane concentration in real-time. To enable rapid, real-time monitoring of aqueous methane concentrations during ground water purging, a new gas-water equilibrator (GWE) was designed that increases gas-water mass exchange rates of methane for measurement. Monitoring of concentration trends allows a comparison of temporal trends between sampling events and comparison of baseline conditions with potential post-impact conditions. These trends may be a result of removal of stored casing water, pre-purge ambient borehole flow, formation physical and chemical heterogeneity, or flow outside of well casing due to inadequate seals. Real-time information in the field can help focus an investigation, aid in determining when to collect a sample, save money by limiting costs (e.g. analytical, sample transport and storage), and provide an immediate assessment of local methane concentrations. Four domestic water wells, one municipal water well, and one agricultural water well were sampled for traditional laboratory analysis and compared to the field GWE results. Aqueous concentrations measured on the GWE ranged from non-detect to 1,470 μg/L methane. Some trends in aqueous methane concentrations measured on the GWE were observed during purging. Applying a paired t-test comparing the new GWE method and traditional laboratory analysis yielded a p-value 0

  13. Electron-ion recombination at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    The work is based on results obtained with a merged-beams experiment. A beam of electronics with a well characterized density and energy distribution was merged with a fast, monoenergetic ion beam. Results have been obtained for radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination at low relative energies (0 to ∼70eV). The obtained energy resolution was improved by about a factor of 30. High vacuum technology was used to suppress interactions with electrons from the environments. The velocity distribution of the electron beam was determined. State-selective dielectronic-recombination measurements were performable. Recombination processes were studied. The theoretical background for radiative recombination and Kramers' theory are reviewed. The quantum mechanical result and its relation to the semiclassical theory is discussed. Radiative recombination was also measured with several different non-bare ions, and the applicability of the semiclassical theory to non-bare ions was investigated. The use of an effective charge is discussed. For dielectronic recombination, the standard theoretical approach in the isolated resonance and independent-processes approximation is debated. The applicability of this method was tested. The theory was able to reproduce most of the experimental data except when the recombination process was sensitive to couplings between different electronic configurations. The influence of external perturbing electrostatic fields is discussed. (AB) (31 refs.)

  14. Electron-ion recombination in merged beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Habs, D.; Lampert, A.; Neumann, R.; Schramm, U.; Schuessler, T.; Schwalm, D.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed studies of recombination processes between electrons and highly charged ions have become possible by recent improvements of merged-beams experiments. We discuss in particular measurements with stored cooled ion beams at the Test Storage Ring (TSR) in Heidelberg. The cross section of dielectronic recombination was measured with high energy resolution for few-electron systems up to the nuclear charge of Cu at a relative energy up to 2.6 keV. At low energy (∼0.1 eV) total recombination rates of several ions were measured and compared with calculated radiative recombination rates. Laser-stimulated recombination of protons and of C 6+ ions was investigated as a function of the photon energy using visible radiation. Both the total recombination rates and the stimulated recombination spectra indicate that in spite of the short interaction time in merged beams, also collisional capture of electrons into weakly bound levels (related to three-body recombination) could be important

  15. Magnetized relativistic electron-ion plasma expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of relativistic laser-produced plasma expansion across a transverse magnetic field is investigated. Based on a one dimensional two-fluid model that includes pressure, enthalpy, and rest mass energy, the expansion is studied in the limit of λD (Debye length) ≤RL (Larmor radius) for magnetized electrons and ions. Numerical investigation conducted for a quasi-neutral plasma showed that the σ parameter describing the initial plasma magnetization, and the plasma β parameter, which is the ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure are the key parameters governing the expansion dynamics. For σ ≪ 1, ion's front shows oscillations associated to the break-down of quasi-neutrality. This is due to the strong constraining effect and confinement of the magnetic field, which acts as a retarding medium slowing the plasma expansion.

  16. Gaseous odd- and even-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.; Heimbach, H.; Levsen, K.

    1980-01-01

    The principal collision-induced fragmentations of simple protonated ketones, aldehydes, ethers, amines, sulphides, alcohols, acids, nitriles and halides are discussed. These protonated molecules decompose mainly by loss of alkane, alkene and RX (R = alkyl, H; X = OH, SH, NH 2 , Br, I). Substantial radical losses are only observed for small protonated molecules. Deuterium-labelling demonstrates that the X-H bond is particularly strong. The fragmentation of (MH) + ions is compared with that of the corresponding (M) + sup(.) ions is compared with that of the corresponding (M) + sup(.) ions. The spectra of the (M) + sup(.) ions are dominated by direct bond cleavages, in particular α-cleavages, as a result of both the stability of the ionic fragment and the loose transition state. In (MH) + ions direct bond cleavages lead to energetically less favourable products. Thus rearrangement reactions play a more important role in the decomposition of these ions. (MH) + ions are more stable relative to fragmentation than (M) + sup(.) ions. (orig.)

  17. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  18. Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow Injection Solid-Phase Absorptiometry to Equilibration-Based Preconcentrating Minicolumn Sensors with Radiometric Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Devol, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The development of in situ sensors for ultratrace detection applications in process control and environmental monitoring remains a significant challenge. Such sensors must meet difficult detection limit requirements while selectively detecting the analyte of interest in complex or otherwise challenging sample matrixes. Nowhere are these requirements more daunting than in the field of radionuclide sensing. The detection limit requirements can be extremely low. Nevertheless, a promising approach to radionuclide sensing based on preconcentrating minicolumn sensors has been developed. In addition, a method of operating such sensors, which we call equilibration-based sensing, has been developed that provides substantial preconcentration and a signal that is proportional to analyte concentration, while eliminating the need for reagents to regenerate the sorbent medium following each measurement. While this equilibration-based sensing method was developed for radionuclide sensing, it can be applied to nonradioactive species as well, given a suitable on-column detection system. By replacing costly sampling and laboratory analysis procedures, in situ sensors could have a significant impact on monitoring and long term stewardship applications. The aim of this review is to cover radionuclide sensors that combine some form of selective sorption with a radiometric detection method, and, as a primary aim, to comprehensively review preconcentrating minicolumn sensors for radionuclide detection. As a secondary aim, we will cover radionuclide sensors that combine sorption and scintillation in formats other than minicolumn sensors. We are particularly concerned with the detection of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides, which present particular challenges for measurements in liquid media

  19. Radioactive equilibrium of uranium-bearing ores in some problems of applied geology; Les equilibres radioactifs des menerais uraniferes dans quelques problemes de geologie appliquee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, R; Girard, Ph; Goldsztein, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The state of equilibrium between several nuclides in radioactive relationship is determined with accuracy by the fundamental equations of radioactivity. It can be measured physically and expressed in suitable and internationally adopted units; Equilibrium - disequilibrium of uranium-bearing ores is a fairly complex phenomenon but the problem can be much simplified by well-chosen approximations in various practical field cases. The results of radiometric and radiochemical measurements lead to the interpretation of geochemical anomalies and may be used in the qualitative and quantitative estimation of uranium bearing deposits. (authors) [French] L'etat d'equilibre entre plusieurs radioelements en filiation se definit avec precision par les equations fondamentales de la radioactivite et peut etre determine par des mesures physiques dans des systemes d'unites commodes et internationalement adoptes. Le probleme general equilibre-desequilibre des minerais uraniferes est relativement complexe, mais peut se simplifier largement par des approximations judicieuses dans de nombreux cas particuliers rencontres concretement sur le terrain. Les resultats des mesures radiometriques et radiochimiques permettent l'interpretation des anomalies geochimiques et peuvent servir a l'estimation qualitative et quantitative des gisements de minerais uraniferes. (auteurs)

  20. Global warming: Temperature estimation in annealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sampling from a Boltzmann distribution is NP-hard and so requires heuristic approaches. Quantum annealing is one promising candidate. The failure of annealing dynamics to equilibrate on practical time scales is a well understood limitation, but does not always prevent a heuristically useful distribution from being generated. In this paper we evaluate several methods for determining a useful operational temperature range for annealers. We show that, even where distributions deviate from the Boltzmann distribution due to ergodicity breaking, these estimates can be useful. We introduce the concepts of local and global temperatures that are captured by different estimation methods. We argue that for practical application it often makes sense to analyze annealers that are subject to post-processing in order to isolate the macroscopic distribution deviations that are a practical barrier to their application.

  1. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}Se and H{sub 2}Te; Etude des constantes des equilibres isotopiques du deuterium entre l'eau et les hydrures des metalloides de la deuxieme famille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-11-15

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SHD + OH{sub 2}; SeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SeHD + OH{sub 2}; TeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} TeHD + OH{sub 2}. In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z{sub OHD} x Z{sub RH{sub 2}})/(Z{sub OH{sub 2}} x Z{sub RHD}) x e{sup W/T} (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [French] Nous avons determine experimentalement la constante K de chacun des equilibres isotopiques suivants: SH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SHD + OH{sub 2}; SeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SeHD + OH{sub 2}; TeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} TeHD + OH{sub 2}. En phase gazeuse, la thermodynamique donne l'expression: K = (Z{sub OHD} x Z{sub RH{sub 2}})/(Z{sub OH{sub 2}} x Z{sub RHD}) x e{sup W/T} (R representant un atome de soufre, selenium ou tellure). Les fonctions de partition Z de chacune des molecules ont ete calculees et, grace a nos resultats experimentaux, nous avons determine la constante W. Connaissant W, la constante d'equilibre K a pu etre tabulee en fonction de la temperature. (auteur)

  2. Electron temperature determination in LTE and non-LTE plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    This article discusses how most experimental investigations assume a type of ''thermal equilibrium'' in which the excited levels are assumed to be populated according to the electron kinetic temperature, in the determination of electron temperature in LTE and non-LTE plasmas. This is justified on the basis that electron collisions dominate the equilibration of adjacent excited levels as shown by Byron, Stabler and Boartz. The comparison of temperature values calculated by various common methods as a check for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTDE) or local thermal equilibrium (LTE) of the upper excited levels and the free electrons has been shown to indicate the excitation temperature in all cases utilized. Thomas shows that the source function of the first excited level may be dominated by non-local radiation, which would usually result in a different population than local collisional excitation would provide. Ionization from upper levels is by collisional means. The result may yield different valued excitation and electron temperatures

  3. Temperature Gradients on the Cell Wall in the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the diverging susceptibility delta rho/delta Tau near the liquid-vapor critical point, temperature gradients must be kept small to maintain adequate sample homogeneity. In our Science Requirements Document we paid particular attention to radial density gradients caused by equilibration of the xenon sample. Axial density gradients were addressed through the requirement that the cell's copper wall have a gradient less than 22 microK/m. This report re-examines the cell wall's temperature distribution in more detail by estimating all known significant contributions to temperature differences on the cell's wall.

  4. Electrostatic fluctuations measured in low temperature helical plasmas with low collisionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Ikeda, R.; Ito, T.; Toi, K.; Suzuki, C.; Matsunaga, G.

    2004-01-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations have been measured by Langmuir probes from edge to core plasma region in low temperature helical plasmas which are produced by 2.45 GHz microwaves at very low field less than 0.1 T. The principal dimensionless parameters of the plasmas, that is, the normalized electron-ion collision frequency ν ei , and averaged plasma β φ and others are in the same range of them in high temperature plasmas, except the normalized gyro radius ρ s . The data on fluctuation characteristics from the dimensionally similar low temperature plasmas may give an important insight into the understanding of turbulent transport in high temperature plasmas. Dependences of fluctuation amplitudes on the radial electric field shear, ρ s and ν ei are investigated. Electrostatic fluctuations propagating in electron-diamagnetic drift direction have been observed in the plasma edge region and in ion-diamagnetic drift direction in the plasma core region. (authors)

  5. Invasive submerged freshwater macrophytes are more plastic in their response to light intensity than to the availability of free CO2 in air-equilibrated water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Franziska; Alnoee, Anette B.; Boderskov, Teis

    2015-01-01

    1. The future increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration is likely to affect the growth and performance of submerged freshwater macrophytes because of higher concentrations of free CO2 in the water at air equilibrium. We measured the plastic responses to free CO2 and light for several traits...... in all four species. 4. As the growth and photosynthesis of the four invasive bicarbonate users were only slightly affected by the CO2 availability in air-equilibrated water, the future rise in atmospheric CO2 is unlikely to exacerbate their invasive behaviour and may even reduce their competitiveness...... compensation point, and with higher concentrations of photosynthetic pigments and quantum yield. The bicarbonate uptake capacity was generally highest at the high light intensity and high concentrations of free CO2. Plasticity indices for light intensity were consistently higher than for CO2 availability...

  6. Differential equilibration and intergranular diffusion of trace elements during rapid regional metamorphism: constraints from LA-ICP-MS mapping of a garnet population

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, F. R.; Gaidies, F.

    2017-12-01

    Trace element zoning contained within a metapelitic garnet population yields information pertaining to a more complex prograde reaction history than is evident in major element zoning patterns and other conventional analyses. In particular, while trace elements may not act as a rate-limiting component for garnet crystallization, their incorporation into garnet growth surfaces provides a nuanced insight into the crystallization history of the population, and the extent of equilibration of trace elements in the matrix. In this study, we present LA-ICP-MS raster maps of trace element concentrations from several population-representative, centrally sectioned garnets from a garnet-grade metapelite of the Sikkim Himalaya, India. Equilibrium forward modeling of garnet crystallization and simulation of diffusional modification indicates that the garnet population crystallized rapidly over <1 Myr between 515 °C/4.5 kbar and 565 °C/5.5 kbar, as a consequence of high heating rates during regional amphibolite-facies metamorphism. While the rate of diffusional homogenization of major divalent cations is interpreted to have exceeded the rate of interfacial advance (yielding simple prograde growth zoning), trace element distributions record a more complex transport history. In particular, yttrium and the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) document a transition from an overprinted sigmoidal core to concentric repeated HREE and yttrium annuli in all crystals. This suggests that there was a discrete increase in the length scale of equilibration along the advancing garnet interface at some point in the growth history. However, there is no evidence for a coeval change in HREE transport thorough the intergranular network. Conversely, spiral core-to-rim zoning of chromium indicates the element remains almost completely immobile in the matrix over the duration of garnet growth.

  7. Electron-beam sustained glow discharge in a N{sub 2}+CO gas mixture at cryogenic temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azharonok, V V; Filatova, I I; Chubrik, N I; Shimanovich, V D [Belarussian Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus). Inst. of Molecular and Atomic Physics; Gurashvili, V A; Kuzmin, V N; Turkin, N G; Vaselenok, A A [Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A quasi-continuum electron-beam sustained glow discharge in a flow of N{sub 2} + CO gas mixture at cryogenic temperature was studied by emission spectroscopy. The effective values of electron-ion recombination and rate of electron adhesion to electronegative molecules (Fe(CO){sub 5}, Ni(CO){sub 4}, H{sub 2}O) present in the discharge were determined in dependence on the reduced electric field strength E/N. (author). 1 tab., 2 figs., 5 refs.

  8. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the rate of solvent equilibration in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlis, William W.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The principles of the hanging-drop method of crystal growth are discussed, and the rate of water evaporation in a water droplet (containing protein, buffer, and a precipitating agent) suspended above a well containing a double concentration of precipitating agent is investigated theoretically. It is shown that, on earth, the rate of evaporation may be determined from diffusion theory and the colligative properties of solutions. The parameters affecting the rate of evaporation include the temperature, the vapor pressure of water, the ionization constant of the salt, the volume of the drop, the contact angle between the droplet and the coverslip, the number of moles of salt in the droplet, the number of moles of water and salt in the well, the molar volumes of water and salt, the distance from the droplet to the well, and the coefficient of diffusion of water vapor through air. To test the theoretical equations, hanging-drop experiments were conducted using various reagent concentrations in 25-microliter droplets and measuring the evaporation times at 4 C and 25 C. The results showed good agreement with the theory.

  9. Batch test equilibration studies examining the removal of Cs, Sr, and Tc from supernatants from ORNL underground storage tanks by selected ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Anderson, K.K.; Chase, C.W.; Bell, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    Bench-scale batch equilibration tests have been conducted with supernatants from two underground tanks at the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the effectiveness of selected ion exchangers in removing cesium, strontium, and technetium. Seven sorbents were evaluated for cesium removal, nine for strontium removal, and four for technetium removal. The results indicate that granular potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate was the most effective of the exchangers evaluated for removing cesium from the supernatants. The powdered forms of sodium titanate (NaTiO) and cystalline silicotitanate (CST) were superior in removing the strontium; however, for the sorbents of suitable particle size for column use, titanium monohydrogen phosphate (TiHP φ), sodium titanate/polyacrylonitrile (NaTiO-PAN), and titanium monohydrogen phosphate/polyacrylonitrile (TiP-PAN) gave the best results and were about equally effective. Reillex trademark 402 was the most effective exchanger in removing the technetium; however, it was only slightly more satisfactory than Reillex trademark HPQ

  10. Expression, purification and functional characterization of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1 (hENT1) protein from Sf9 insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Shahid; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-10-01

    Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) is the major plasma membrane transporter involved in transportation of natural nucleosides as well as nucleoside analog drugs, used in anti-cancer and anti-viral therapies. Despite extensive biochemical and pharmacological studies, little is known about the structure-function relationship of this protein. The major obstacles to purification include a low endogenous expression level, the lack of an efficient expression and purification protocol, and the hydrophobic nature of the protein. Here, we report protein expression, purification and functional characterization of hENT1 from Sf9 insect cells. hENT1 expressed by Sf9 cells is functionally active as demonstrated by saturation binding with a Kd of 1.2±0.2nM and Bmax of 110±5pmol/mg for [(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR). We also demonstrate purification of hENT1 using FLAG antibody affinity resin in lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol detergent with a Kd of 4.3±0.7nM. The yield of hENT1 from Sf9 cells was ∼0.5mg active transporter per liter of culture. The purified protein is functionally active, stable, homogenous and appropriate for further biophysical and structural studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. C.E.B.A.S., a closed equilibrated biological aquatic system as a possible precursor for a long-term life support system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüm, V.

    C.E.B.A.S.-AQUARACK is a long-term multi-generation experimental device for aquatic organisms which is disposed for utlizitation in a space station. It results from the basic idea of a space aquarium for maintaining aquatic animals for longer periods integrated in a AQUARACK which consists of a modular animal holding tank, a semi-biological/physical water recycling system and an electronical control unit. The basic idea to replace a part of the water recycling system by a continuous culture of unicellular algae primarily leads to a second system for experiments with algae, a botanical AQUARACK consisting of an algal reactor, a water recycling and the electronical control unit. The combination of the zoological part, and the botanical part with a common control system in the AQUARACK, however, results in a ``Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System'' (C.E.B.A.S.) representing an closed artificial ecosystem. Although this is disposed primarily as an experimental device for basic zoological, botanical and interdisciplinary research it opens the theoretical possibility to adapt it for combined production of animal and plant biomass on ground or in space. The paper explains the basic conception of the hardware construction of the zoological part of the system, the corresponding scientific frame program including the choice of the experimental animals and gives some selected examples of the hardware-related resrearch. It furtheron discusses the practical and economical relevance of the system in the development of a controlled aquatical life support system in general.

  12. Effects of particle size and dry matter content of a total mixed ration on intraruminal equilibration and net portal flux of volatile fatty acids in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Adam Christian; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2010-01-01

    Effects of physical changes in consistency of ruminal contents on intraruminal equilibration and net portal fluxes of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in dairy cows were studied. Four Danish Holstein cows (121 ± 17 d in milk, 591 ± 24 kg of body weight, mean ± SD) surgically fitted with a ruminal cannula...... and permanent indwelling catheters in the major splanchnic blood vessels were used. The experimental design was a 4 × 4 Latin square with a 2 × 2 factorial design of treatments. Treatments differed in forage (grass hay) particle size (FPS; 3.0 and 30 mm) and feed dry matter (DM) content of the total mixed...... ration (44.3 and 53.8%). The feed DM did not affect chewing time, ruminal variables, or net portal flux of VFA. However, decreasing the FPS decreased the overall chewing and rumination times by 151 ± 55 and 135 ± 29 min/d, respectively. No effect of the reduced chewing time was observed on ruminal p...

  13. The strontium-90 equilibrium parameters in Saclay soil; Les parametres d'equilibre du strontium 90 dans le sol de Saclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P; Gailledreau, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The equilibrium parameters of {sup 90}Sr in the presence of the following elements: Ca, Na, K, NH{sub 4} are measured in the soil at Saclay for each of the pairs Sr-Ca, Sr-Na, Sr-K, Sr-NH{sub 4}. The adsorption mechanism for Sr is studied in comparison with a synthetic resin which is a pure ion-exchanger. A preliminary study of a three component system; one being a tracer, is outlined. (author) [French] Les parametres d'equilibre du {sup 90}Sr en presence des elements suivants: Ca, Na, K, NH{sub 4} sont mesures sur le sol de Saclay pour chacun des couples Sr-Ca, Sr-Na, Sr-K, Sr-NH{sub 4}. Le mecanisme d'adsorption du Sr est etudie par comparaison avec une resine synthetique qui est un echangeur d'ions pur. Une etude preliminaire d'un systeme a trois composants, dont l'un est un traceur, est exposee. (auteur)

  14. Phase equilibria at low temperature for light hydrocarbons-methanol-water-acid gases mixtures: measurements and modelling; Equilibres de phases a basse temperature de systemes complexes CO{sub 2} - hydrocarbures legers - methanol - eau: mesures et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffine, L.

    2005-10-15

    The need to develop and improve natural gas treatment processes is real. The petroleum industry usually uses separation processes which require phase equilibrium phenomena. Yet, the complexity of the phase equilibria involved results in a lack of data, which in turn limits the development of thermodynamic models. The first part of this work is devoted to experimental investigations for systems containing light hydrocarbons, methanol, water and acid gases. We present a new apparatus that was developed to measure vapor-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria. It allowed us to obtain new phase composition data for the methanol-ethane binary system and different mixtures, and also to determine a part of the three phases equilibrium envelope of the same systems. In the second part of this work, we have developed a thermodynamic model based on the CPA equation of state. This choice may be justified by the presence of associating components like methanol, hydrogen sulfide and water in the systems. Such model is necessary for the design of gas treatment plants. Our model provides good results for phase equilibrium calculations for binaries systems without binary interaction parameter in many cases, and describes correctly the vapour-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria for complex mixtures. (author)

  15. Equilibres de phases dans les systèmes fluides petroliers-eau Phase Equilibria in Oil-Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peneloux A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nous présentons quelques résultats obtenus à partir du logiciel FHYD qui permet le traitement des mélanges eau-fluides pétroliers, avec la détermination de la nature des phases (huile-gaz-eau-hydrate thermodynamiquement stables dans des conditions données de température et de pression, ainsi que de la quantité, de la composition de ces différentes phases et de leurs propriétés. Ce logiciel permet le tracé automatique des diagrammes de phases et nous présentons des exemples, depuis les systèmes binaires (eau-éthane, ternaires (eau-méthane-propane jusqu'aux fluides les plus complexes. La présence de sels (chlorure de sodium dissous est envisagée, ainsi que le calcul des conditions de dépôt du sel solide. Des exemples de problèmes pétroliers sont cités (gaz de séparateur saturé en eau, huile saturée en eau dans les conditions de gisement, huile en présence d'eau salée. Les estimations sur les quantités d'hydrate formées et leurs compositions sont comparées à des données expérimentales et aux résultats obtenus par d'autres logiciels. Le programme FHYD pourrait permettre une représentation plus réaliste de l'évolution des fluides pétroliers et des propriétés de transport de leurs différentes phases dans les modèles de simulation des conduites polyphasiques. This article presents a selection of results obtained with the FHYD program. This software allows simulation of mixtures composed of petroleum fluids and water, with determination of the nature of thermodynamically stable phases (oil-gas-water-hydrate under given conditions of temperature and pressure, along with the quantity, composition and properties of these different phases. Additionally, the program can automatically produce phase diagrams. Several examples of these have been included here, ranging from binary systems (water-ethane and ternary systems (water-methane-propane to the most complex petroleum fluids. The presence of dissolved salts

  16. Ion temperature gradient mode driven solitons and shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, U.; Adnan, Muhammad; Haque, Q.; Qamar, Anisa; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven solitons and shocks are studied in a plasma having gradients in the equilibrium number density and equilibrium ion temperature. In the linear regime, it is found that the ion temperature and the ratio of the gradient scale lengths, ηi=Ln/LT , affect both the real frequency and the growth rate of the ITG driven wave instability. In the nonlinear regime, for the first time we derive a Korteweg de Vries-type equation for the ITG mode, which admits solitary wave solution. It is found that the ITG mode supports only compressive solitons. Further, it is noticed that the soliton amplitude and width are sensitive to the parameter ηi=Ln/LT . Second, in the presence of dissipation in the system, we obtain a Burger type equation, which admits the shock wave solution. This work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma having density and ion temperature gradients. For illustration, the model has been applied to tokamak plasma.

  17. Comparison of an in-helmet temperature monitor system to rectal temperature during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, P Jason; Buresh, Robert J; Tis, Laurie L; Collins, Mitchell A; Jacobs, Robert D; Bell, Marla M

    2012-01-01

    Body temperature monitoring is crucial in helping to decrease the amount and severity of heat illnesses; however, a practical method of monitoring temperature is lacking. In response to the lack of a practical method of monitoring the temperature of athletes, Hothead Technologies developed a device (HOT), which continuously monitors an athlete's fluctuations in body temperature. HOT measures forehead temperature inside helmets. The purpose of this study was to compare HOT against rectal temperature (Trec). Male volunteers (n = 29, age = 23.5 ± 4.5 years, weight = 83.8 ± 10.4 kg, height = 180.1 ± 5.8 cm, body fat = 12.3 ± 4.5%) exercised on a treadmill at an intensity of 60-75% heart rate reserve (HRR) (wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT] = 28.7° C) until Trec reached 38.7° C. The correlation between Trec and HOT was 0.801 (R = 0.64, standard error of the estimate (SEE) = 0.25, p = 0.00). One reason for this relatively high correlation is the microclimate that HOT is monitoring. HOT is not affected by the external climate greatly because of its location in the helmet. Therefore, factors such as evaporation do not alter HOT temperature to a great degree. HOT was compared with Trec in a controlled setting, and the exercise used in this study was moderate aerobic exercise, very unlike that used in football. In a controlled laboratory setting, the relationship between HOT and Trec showed favorable correlations. However, in applied settings, helmets are repeatedly removed and replaced forcing HOT to equilibrate to forehead temperature every time the helmet is replaced. Therefore, future studies are needed to mimic how HOT will be used in field situations.

  18. Animal protein production modules in biological life support systems: Novel combined aquaculture techniques based on the closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (C.E.B.A.S.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüm, V.; Andriske, M.; Kreuzberg, K.; Schreibman, M. P.

    Based on the experiences made with the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (C.E.B.A.S.) which was primarily deveoloped for long-term and multi-generation experiments with aquatic animals and plants in a space station highly effective fresh water recycling modules were elaborated utilizing a combination of ammonia oxidizing bacteria filters and higher plants. These exhibit a high effectivity to eliminate phosphate and anorganic nitrogen compounds and arc. in addidition. able to contribute to the oxygen supply of the aquatic animals. The C.E.B.A.S. filter system is able to keep a closed artificial aquatic ecosystem containing teleost fishes and water snails biologically stable for several month and to eliminate waste products deriving from degraded dead fishes without a decrease of the oxygen concentration down to less than 3.5 mg/l at 25 °C. More advanced C.E.B.A.S. filter systems, the BIOCURE filters, were also developed for utilization in semiintensive and intensive aquaculture systems for fishes. In fact such combined animal-plant aquaculture systems represent highly effective productions sites for human food if proper plant and fish species are selected The present papers elucidates ways to novel aquaculture systems in which herbivorous fishes are raised by feeding them with plant biomass produced in the BIOCURE filters and presents the scheme of a modification which utilizes a plant species suitable also for human nutrition. Special attention is paid to the benefits of closed aquaculture system modules which may be integrated into bioregenerative life support systems of a higher complexity for, e. g.. lunar or planetary bases including some psychologiccal aspects of the introduction of animal protein production into plant-based life support systems. Moreover, the basic reproductive biological problems of aquatic animal breeding under reduced gravity are explained leading to a disposition of essential research programs in this context.

  19. Modulation of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter1 (hENT1) activity by IL-4 and PMA in B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Calotti, Paula; Galmarini, Carlos María; Cañones, Cristian; Gamberale, Romina; Saénz, Daniel; Avalos, Julio Sánchez; Chianelli, Mónica; Rosenstein, Ruth; Giordano, Mirta

    2008-02-15

    Nucleoside transporters (NTs) are essential for the uptake of therapeutic nucleoside analogs, broadly used in cancer treatment. The mechanisms responsible for NT regulation are largely unknown. IL-4 is a pro-survival signal for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells and has been shown to confer resistance to nucleoside analogs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether IL-4 is able to modulate the expression and function of the human equilibrative NT1 (hENT1) in primary cultures of CLL cells and, consequently, to affect cytotoxicity induced by therapeutic nucleosides analogs. We found that treatment with IL-4 (20 ng/ml for 24 h) increased mRNA hENT1 expression in CLL cells without affecting that of normal B cells. Given that the enhanced mRNA levels of hENT1 in CLL cells did not result in increased transport activity, we examined the possibility that hENT1 induced by IL-4 may require post-translational modifications to become active. We found that the acute stimulation of PKC in IL-4-treated CLL cells by short-term incubation with PMA significantly increased hENT1 transport activity and favoured fludarabine-induced apoptosis. By contrast, and in line with previous reports, IL-4 plus PMA protected CLL cells from a variety of cytotoxic agents. Our findings indicate that the combined treatment with IL-4 and PMA enhances hENT1 activity and specifically sensitizes CLL cells to undergo apoptosis induced by fludarabine.

  20. Novel aquatic modules for bioregenerative life-support systems based on the closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (c.e.b.a.s.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluem, Volker; Paris, Frank

    2002-06-01

    The closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (C.E.B.A.S) is a man-made aquatic ecosystem which consists of four subcomponents: an aquatic animal habitat, an aquatic plant bioreactor, an ammonia oxidizing bacteria filter and a data acquisition/control unit. It is a precursor for different types of fish and aquatic plant production sites which are disposed for the integration into bioregenerative life-support systems. The results of two successful spaceflights of a miniaturized C.E.B.A.S version (the C.E.B.A.S. MINI MODULE) allow the optimization of aquatic food production systems which are already developed in the ground laboratory and open new aspects for their utilization as aquatic modules in space bioregenerative life support systems. The total disposition offers different stages of complexity of such aquatic modules starting with simple but efficient aquatic plant cultivators which can be implemented into water recycling systems and ending up in combined plant/fish aquaculture in connection with reproduction modules and hydroponics applications for higher land plants. In principle, aquaculture of fishes and/or other aquatic animals edible for humans offers optimal animal protein production under lowered gravity conditions without the tremendous waste management problems connected with tetrapod breeding and maintenance. The paper presents details of conducted experimental work and of future dispositions which demonstrate clearly that aquaculture is an additional possibility to combine efficient and simple food production in space with water recycling utilizing safe and performable biotechnologies. Moreover, it explains how these systems may contribute to more variable diets to fulfill the needs of multicultural crews.

  1. Evolution from increased cardiac mechanical function towards cardiomyopathy in the obese rat due to unbalanced high fat and abundant equilibrated diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourmoura Evangelia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to know whether high dietary energy intake (HDEI with equilibrated and unbalanced diets in term of lipid composition modify the fatty acid profile of cardiac phospholipids and function of various cardiac cells and to know if the changes in membrane lipid composition can explain the modifications of cellular activity. Wistar rats were fed either a control or high-fat (HF diet for 12 weeks and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats as well as their lean littermate (ZL a control diet between week 7 to 11 of their life. Energy intake and abdominal obesity was increased in HF-fed and ZDF rats. Circulating lipids were also augmented in both strains although hyperglycemia was noticed only in ZDF rats. HDEI induced a decrease in linoleate and increase in arachidonate in membrane phospholipids which was more pronounced in the ZDF rats compared to the HF-fed rats. In vivo cardiac function (CF was improved in HF-fed rats whereas ex vivo cardiac function was unchanged, suggesting that environmental factors such as catecholamines stimulated the in vivo CF. The unchanged ex vivo CF was associated with an increased cardiac mass which indicated development of fibrosis and/or hypertrophy. The increased in vivo CF was sustained by an augmented coronary reserve which was related to the cyclooxygenase pathway and accumulation of arachidonate in membrane phospholipids. In conclusion, before triggering a diabetic cardiomyopathy, HDEI stimulated the CF. The development of cardiomyopathy seems to result from fibrosis and/or hypertrophy which augments myocardial stiffness and decreases contractility.

  2. Mineralogy and geothermometry of high-temperature rhyolites from the central and western Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, N.; Bonnichsen, B.; Leeman, W.P.; Stormer, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Voluminous mid-Miocene rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and lava flows are exposed along the northern and southern margins of the central and western Snake River Plain. These rhyolites are essentially anhydrous with the general mineral assemblage of plagioclase ??sanidine ?? quartz + augite + pigeonite ?? hypersthene ?? fayalitic olivine + Fe-Ti oxides + apatite + zircon which provides an opportunity to compare feldspar, pyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide equilibration temperatures for the same rocks. Estimated pyroxene equilibration temperatures (based on the geothermometers of Lindsley and coworkers) range from 850 to 1000??C, and these are well correlated with whole-rock compositions. With the exception of one sample, agreement between the two-pyroxene thermometers tested is well within 50??C. Fe-Ti oxide geothermometers applied to fresh magnetite and ilmenite generally yield temperatures about 50 to 100??C lower than the pyroxene temperatures, and erratic results are obtained if these minerals exhibit effects of subsolidus oxidation and exsolution. Results of feldspar thermometry are more complicated, and reflect uncertainties in the thermometer calibrations as well as in the degree of attainment of equilibrium between plagioclase and sanidine. In general, temperatures obtained using the Ghiorso (1984) and Green and Usdansky (1986) feldspar thermometers agree with the pyroxene temperatures within the respective uncertainties. However, uncertainties in the feldspar temperatures are the larger of the two (and exceed ??60??C for many samples). The feldspar thermometer of Fuhrman and Lindsley (1988) produces systematically lower temperatures for many of the samples studied. The estimated pyroxene temperatures are considered most representative of actual magmatic temperatures for these rhyolites. This range of temperatures is significantly higher than those for rhyolites from many other suites, and is consistent with the hypothesis that the Snake River Plain rhyolitic magmas formed

  3. Temperature Pill

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Ingestible Thermal Monitoring System was developed at Johns Hopkins University as means of getting internal temperature readings for treatments of such emergency conditions as dangerously low (hypothermia) and dangerously high (hyperthermia) body temperatures. ITMS's accuracy is off no more than one hundredth of a degree and provides the only means of obtaining deep body temperature. System has additional applicability in fertility monitoring and some aspects of surgery, critical care obstetrics, metabolic disease treatment, gerontology (aging) and food processing research. Three-quarter inch silicone capsule contains telemetry system, micro battery, and a quartz crystal temperature sensor inserted vaginally, rectally, or swallowed.

  4. Kinetic Investigation of Homogeneous H(2)-D(2) Equilibration Catalyzed by Pt-Au Cluster Compounds. Characterization of the Cluster [(H)Pt(AuPPh(3))(9)](NO(3))(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Leon I.; Pignolet, Louis H.

    1996-11-06

    The new Pt-Au hydrido cluster compound [(H)Pt(AuPPh(3))(9)](NO(3))(2) (3) has been synthesized and characterized by NMR, FABMS, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction [triclinic, P&onemacr;, a = 17.0452(1) Å, b = 17.4045(2) Å, c = 55.2353(1) Å, alpha = 89.891(1) degrees, beta = 85.287(1) degrees, gamma = 75.173(1) degrees, V = 15784.0(2) Å(3), Z = 4 (two molecules in asymmetric unit), residual R = 0.089 for 45 929 observed reflections and 3367 variables, Mo Kalpha radiation]. The Pt(AuP)(9) core geometry is a distorted icosahedron with three vertices vacant. The Pt-Au, Au-Au, and Au-P distances are within the normal ranges observed in other Pt-Au clusters. This cluster is a catalyst for H(2)-D(2) equilibration in homogeneous solution phase and has been used in a general mechanistic study of this reaction catalyzed by Pt-Au clusters. We previously proposed that a key step in the mechanism for catalytic H(2)-D(2) equilibration is the dissociation of a PPh(3) ligand to give a cluster with an open Au site for bonding of H(2) or D(2). This was based on qualitative observations that PPh(3) inhibited the rate of HD production with [Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2) (1) as catalyst. In order to test this hypothesis, phosphine inhibition (on the rate of HD production) and phosphine ligand exchange kinetic experiments were carried out with [(H)(PPh(3))Pt(AuPPh(3))(7)](NO(3))(2) (2) and 3. In this paper we show that the rate constant for phosphine dissociation determined from the PPh(3) inhibition rate study of H(2)-D(2) equilibration with cluster 2 is nearly identical to the rate constant for dissociative phosphine ligand exchange. The slower rate for H(2)-D(2) equilibration observed with 3 compared with 2 (5.5 x 10(-3) vs 7.7 x 10(-2) turnover s(-1)) is explained by its smaller rate constant for phosphine dissociation (2.8 x 10(-5) vs 2.9 x 10(-4) s(-1)). The fact that clusters 2 and 3 show similar kinetic behaviors suggests that the PPh(3) dissociation step in the catalytic H(2

  5. Equilibrated anti-Monge Matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 335, - (2001), s. 151-156 ISSN 0024-3795 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/98/0222 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : Monge matrix * anti-Monge matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.423, year: 2001

  6. Temperature relaxation in collisional non equilibrium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potapenko, I.F.; Bobylev, A.V.; Azevedo, C.A.; Assis, A.S. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. We study the relaxation of a space uniform plasma composed of electrons and one species of ions. To simplified the consideration, standard approach is usually accepted: the distribution functions are considered to be a Maxwellian with time dependent electron T{sub e}(t) and ion T{sub i}(t) temperatures. This approach imposes a severe restriction on the electron/ion distributions that could be very far from the equilibrium. In the present work the problem is investigated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic Fokker - Planck equation, which is widely used for the description of collisional plasmas. This equation has many applications in plasma physics as an intrinsic part of physical models, both analytical and numerical. A new detailed description of this classical problem of the collisional plasma kinetic theory is given. A deeper examination of the problem shows that the unusual perturbation theory can not be used. The part of the perturbation of the electron distribution has the character of a boundary layer in the neighborhood of small velocities. In this work the boundary layer is thoroughly studied. The correct distribution electron function is given. Nonmonotonic character of the distribution relaxation in the tail region is observed. The corrected formula for temperature equalization is obtained. The comparison of the calculation results with the asymptotic approach is made. We should stress the important role of the completely conservative different scheme used here, which keeps the symmetric properties of the nonlinear exact equation. This allows us to make calculations without numerical error accumulations, except for machine errors. (author)

  7. Note: A dual temperature closed loop batch reactor for determining the partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Oliver; Rochelle, Christopher A; Masters, Andrew J; Ballentine, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    An experimental approach is presented which can be used to determine partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems. The key advantages of this system are (1) The system can be isolated with no external exchange, making it ideal for experiments with conservative tracers. (2) Both phases can be sampled concurrently to give an accurate composition at each phase at any given time. (3) Use of a lower temperature flow loop outside of the reactor removes contamination and facilitates sampling. (4) Rapid equilibration at given pressure/temperature conditions is significantly aided by stirring and circulating the water phase using a magnetic stirrer and high-pressure liquid chromatography pump, respectively.

  8. A Recipe for implementing the Arrhenius-Shock-Temperature State Sensitive WSD (AWSD) model, with parameters for PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    A reactive ow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. The equation of state for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model7,8. Thus, modifying an existing WSD model in a hydrocode should be rather straightforward.

  9. Reply to ''Comment on 'Thermocouple temperature measurements in shock-compressed solids' ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, D.D.; Sheffield, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    We disagree with the interpretation offered in the above comment. The suggestion was made that the anomalously fast response of thin-foil thermocouples reported previously is the result of strain dependence of the thermocouple response and not shock enhanced thermal equilibration. Although the emplacement geometry has a profound effect on the response of embedded thin-foil temperature gauges as noted in the above comment, the evidence presented, along with recent results discussed in this reply, do not support the conclusions presented in the above comment

  10. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  11. Phase-Transfer Energetics of Small-Molecule Alcohols Across the Water-Hexane Interface: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Using Charge Equilibration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A.; Zhong, Yang; Meninger, David J.; Davis, Joseph E.; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We study the water-hexane interface using molecular dynamics (MD) and polarizable charge equilibration (CHEQ) force fields. Bulk densities for TIP4P-FQ water and hexane, 1.0086±0.0002 g/cm3 and 0.6378±0.0001 g/cm3, demonstrate excellent agreement with experiment. Interfacial width and interfacial tension are consistent with previously reported values. The in-plane component of the dielectric permittivity (ε∥) for water is shown to decrease from 81.7±0.04 to unity, transitioning longitudinally from bulk water to bulk hexane. ε∥ for hexane reaches a maximum in the interface, but this term represents only a small contribution to the total dielectric constant (as expected for a non-polar species). Structurally, net orientations of the molecules arise in the interfacial region such that hexane lies slightly parallel to the interface and water reorients to maximize hydrogen bonding. Interfacial potentials due to contributions of the water and hexane are calculated to be -567.9±0.13mV and 198.7±0.01mV, respectively, giving rise to a total potential in agreement with the range of values reported from previous simulations of similar systems. Potentials of mean force (PMF) calculated for methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol for the transfer from water to hexane indicate an interfacial free energy minimum, corresponding to the amphiphilic nature of the molecules. The magnitudes of transfer free energies were further characterized from the solvation free energies of alcohols in water and hexane using thermodynamic integration. This analysis shows that solvation free energies for alcohols in hexane are 0.2-0.3 kcal/mol too unfavorable, whereas solvation of alcohols in water is approximately 1 kcal/mol too favorable. For the pure hexane-water interfacial simulations, we observe a monotonic decrease of the water dipole moment to near-vacuum values. This suggests that the electrostatic component of the desolvation free energy is not as severe for polarizable models than

  12. Sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitalas, R.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning is discussed. The complexity of the sensitivity is due to the different equilibration time-scales of the constituents of the p-p chain and CN cycle and the dependence of their abundances and time-scales on temperature. The time-scale of the temperature perturbation, compared to the equilibrium time-scale of a constituent, determines whether the constituent is in equilibrium and affects the sensitivity. The temperature sensitivity of the p-p chain for different values of hydrogen abundance, when different constituents come into equilibrium is presented, as well as its variation with 3 He abundance. The temperature sensitivity is drastically different from n 11 , the temperature sensitivity of the proton-proton reaction, unless the time-scale of temperature perturbation is long enough for 3 He to remain in equilibrium. Even in this case the sensitivity of the p-p chain differs significantly from n 11 , unless the temperature is so low that PP II and PP III chains can be neglected. The variation of the sensitivity of CN energy generation is small for different time-scales of temperature variation, because the temperature sensitivities of individual reactions are so similar. The combined sensitivity to temperature of energy generation by hydrogen burning is presented and shown to have a maximum of 16.4 at T 6 = 24.5. For T 6 > 25 the temperature sensitivity is given by the sensitivity of 14 N + p reaction. (author)

  13. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction under fluctuating light in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Isik; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    for photosynthetic induction. Gas exchange measurements were used to investigate the rate of induction and the opening of stomata. It was determined that induction equilibrium for C. morifolium at varying temperatures under dynamic light conditions was reached within 15 to 45 minutes except at saturating light...... intensity. For the same photon irradiance, the momentary state of induction equilibrated was higher approximately at 30° C and it decreased as temperature increased. The interaction effect of irradiance and temperature on induction equilibrium was not significant. The rate of photosynthetic induction...... and the time that it reached its 90% value (t90) was influenced by irradiance significantly. The light history of a leaf had a significant effect on t90, which indicated that an equilibrium state of induction will not always be reached within the same time. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction...

  14. Temperature metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J.; Fellmuth, B.

    2005-05-01

    The majority of the processes used by the manufacturing industry depend upon the accurate measurement and control of temperature. Thermal metrology is also a key factor affecting the efficiency and environmental impact of many high-energy industrial processes, the development of innovative products and the health and safety of the general population. Applications range from the processing, storage and shipment of perishable foodstuffs and biological materials to the development of more efficient and less environmentally polluting combustion processes for steel-making. Accurate measurement and control of temperature is, for instance, also important in areas such as the characterization of new materials used in the automotive, aerospace and semiconductor industries. This paper reviews the current status of temperature metrology. It starts with the determination of thermodynamic temperatures required on principle because temperature is an intensive quantity. Methods to determine thermodynamic temperatures are reviewed in detail to introduce the underlying physical basis. As these methods cannot usually be applied for practical measurements the need for a practical temperature scale for day-to-day work is motivated. The International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Provisional Low Temperature Scale PLTS-2000 are described as important parts of the International System of Units to support science and technology. Its main importance becomes obvious in connection with industrial development and international markets. Every country is strongly interested in unique measures, in order to guarantee quality, reproducibility and functionability of products. The eventual realization of an international system, however, is only possible within the well-functioning organization of metrological laboratories. In developed countries the government established scientific institutes have certain metrological duties, as, for instance, the maintenance and dissemination of national

  15. Temperature metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J; Fellmuth, B

    2005-01-01

    The majority of the processes used by the manufacturing industry depend upon the accurate measurement and control of temperature. Thermal metrology is also a key factor affecting the efficiency and environmental impact of many high-energy industrial processes, the development of innovative products and the health and safety of the general population. Applications range from the processing, storage and shipment of perishable foodstuffs and biological materials to the development of more efficient and less environmentally polluting combustion processes for steel-making. Accurate measurement and control of temperature is, for instance, also important in areas such as the characterization of new materials used in the automotive, aerospace and semiconductor industries. This paper reviews the current status of temperature metrology. It starts with the determination of thermodynamic temperatures required on principle because temperature is an intensive quantity. Methods to determine thermodynamic temperatures are reviewed in detail to introduce the underlying physical basis. As these methods cannot usually be applied for practical measurements the need for a practical temperature scale for day-to-day work is motivated. The International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Provisional Low Temperature Scale PLTS-2000 are described as important parts of the International System of Units to support science and technology. Its main importance becomes obvious in connection with industrial development and international markets. Every country is strongly interested in unique measures, in order to guarantee quality, reproducibility and functionability of products. The eventual realization of an international system, however, is only possible within the well-functioning organization of metrological laboratories. In developed countries the government established scientific institutes have certain metrological duties, as, for instance, the maintenance and dissemination of national

  16. Aging and temperature effects on DOC and elemental release from a metal contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, C.E.; Jacobson, A.R.; McBride, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    Increased aging and temperatures may affect DOC element complexes and their release. - The combined effect of time and temperature on elemental release and speciation from a metal contaminated soil (Master Old Site, MOS) was investigated. The soil was equilibrated at 10, 28, 45, 70 and 90 deg. C for 2 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months in the laboratory. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total soluble elements (by ICP), and labile metals (by DPASV) were determined in the filtered (0.22 μm) supernatants. For the samples equilibrated at 90 deg. C, DOC fractions were size fractionated by filtration and centrifugation; a subsample was only centrifuged while another was also filtered through a 0.45 μm filter. Analyses of the supernatants (ICP, DPASV, DOC) were performed on all size fraction subsamples. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased both with temperature and incubation time; however, metal behavior was not as uniform. In general, total soluble metal release (ICP) paralleled the behavior of DOC, increasing with both time and temperature, and confirming the importance of soil organic matter (SOM) in metal retention. Voltammetric analysis (dpasv) of Cu and Zn showed that very little of these metals remains labile in solution due, presumably, to complexation with dissolved organic matter. Labile concentrations of Cd, on the other hand, constituted a significant portion (50%) of total soluble Cd. Copper and Al increased in solution with time (up to 2 months) and temperature up to 70 deg. C; however, at 90 deg. C the soluble concentration declined sharply. The same behavior was observed after equilibration for longer periods of time (550 days) at lower temperatures (23 and 70 deg. C). While concentrations of labile Cu and total soluble Cu and Al increased in the unfiltered samples, the trend remained the same. DPASV analysis showing shifts in labile Cu complexes with temperature and time, together with the results from the unfiltered samples, lead to the hypothesis that Cu

  17. Effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract and pre-freezing equilibration time on the post-thawing quality of ram semen cryopreserved in a soybean lecithin-based extender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, Mahdieh; Daghigh Kia, Hossein; Najafi, Abouzar; Vaseghi Dodaran, Hossein; García-Álvarez, Olga

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Camellia sinensis extract as antioxidant supplement and pre-freezing equilibration times in a soybean lecithin extender for freezing ram semen. In this study, a total of 20 ejaculates were collected from four Ghezel rams and diluted with extenders (1.5% soybean lecithin, 7% glycerol) containing no supplements (control) and Camellia sinensis extract (5, 10, and 15 mg/L) and cryopreserved, immediately after thermal equilibrium was reached at 5 °C (0 h), or 4 h after equilibration. Sperm motility characteristics, membrane integrity, abnormal morphology, mitochondria activity, apoptotic status, MDA and antioxidant activities (GPx, SOD and total antioxidant capacity (TAC)) were evaluated following freeze-thawing. Camellia sinensis extract at level 10 mg/L led to the highest total and progressive motilities percentages, in comparison to other treatments (P extract at level of 5 and 10 mg/L led to higher plasma membrane integrity, mitochondria activity and Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in comparison to the level of 15 mg/L and control group (P extract at 10 mg/L level produced the highest percentage of live spermatozoa and the lowest apoptotic spermatozoa in comparison to all treatments (P concentration, 10 mg/L, compared to all treatments (P  0.05) were observed between equilibration times (0 h vs. 4 h) for sperm samples incubated with or without different concentrations of Camellia sinensis extract. In conclusion, addition of Camellia sinensis extract at level of 10 mg/L can improve post-thawing quality of ram semen cryopreserved in a soybean lecithin extender. However, further research is needed to standardize the process of Camellia sinensis extraction and specially for identifying which compounds are responsible of its beneficial effect on ram sperm cryopreservation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radial Distribution Functions of Strongly Coupled Two-Temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    We present tests of three theoretical models for the radial distribution functions (RDFs) in two-temperature strongly coupled plasmas. RDFs are useful in extending plasma thermodynamics and kinetic theory to strong coupling, but they are usually known only for thermal equilibrium or for approximate one-component model plasmas. Accurate two-component modeling is necessary to understand the impact of strong coupling on inter-species transport, e.g., ambipolar diffusion and electron-ion temperature relaxation. We demonstrate that the Seuferling-Vogel-Toeppfer (SVT) extension of the hypernetted chain equations not only gives accurate RDFs (as compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations), but also has a simple connection with the Yukawa OCP model. This connection gives a practical means to recover the structure of the electron background from knowledge of the ion-ion RDF alone. Using the model RDFs in Effective Potential Theory, we report the first predictions of inter-species transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas far from equilibrium. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1453736, AFSOR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0221, and used XSEDE computational resources.

  19. Quantum effects on the temperature relaxation in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Aono, Osamu.

    1979-03-01

    This work was carried out under the collaborating Research Program at Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University. Further communication about this report is to be sent to the Research Information Center, Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464, Japan. The rate of equilibration of difference between the ion and electron temperatures is obtained on the basis of the unified theory, in which the collective and binary interactions are both treated properly. The electrons obey the Fermi distribution of arbitrary degeneracy. The rate decreases owing to the degeneracy. Even in the nondegenerated case, the quantum effect appeares in the argument of the Coulomb logarithm. When the de Broglie wave length of the electron is much longer than the radius of close collision, the results agree with those obtained on the Born approximation. In the opposite limit, the classical theory applies. For other cases, graphical examples are given. (author)

  20. Time required for partial pressure of arterial oxygen equilibration during mechanical ventilation after a step change in fractional inspired oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, N; Tuŏrul, M; Demirarslan, A; Nahum, A; Adams, A; Akýncý, O; Esen, F; Telci, L

    2001-04-01

    To determine the time required for the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) to reach equilibrium after a 0.20 increment or decrement in fractional inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2) during mechanical ventilation. A multi-disciplinary ICU in a university hospital. Twenty-five adult, non-COPD patients with stable blood gas values (PaO2/FIO2 > or = 180 on the day of the study) on pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). Following a baseline PaO2 (PaO2b) measurement at FIO2 = 0.35, the FIO2 was increased to 0.55 for 30 min and then decreased to 0.35 without any other change in ventilatory parameters. Sequential blood gas measurements were performed at 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 20, 25 and 30 min in both periods. The PaO2 values measured at the 30th min after a step change in FIO2 (FIO2 = 0.55, PaO2[55] and FIO2 = 0.35, PaO2[35]) were accepted as representative of the equilibrium values for PaO2. Each patient's rise and fall in PaO2 over time, PaO2(t), were fitted to the following respective exponential equations: PaO2b + (PaO2[55]-PaO2b)(1-e-kt) and PaO2[55] + (PaO2[35]-PaO2[55])(e-kt) where "t" refers to time, PaO2[55] and PaO2[35] are the final PaO2 values obtained at a new FIO2 of 0.55 and 0.35, after a 0.20 increment and decrement in FIO2, respectively. Time constant "k" was determined by a non-linear fitting curve and 90% oxygenation times were defined as the time required to reach 90% of the final equilibrated PaO2 calculated by using the non-linear fitting curves. Time constant values for the rise and fall periods were 1.01 +/- 0.71 min-1, 0.69 +/- 0.42 min-1, respectively, and 90% oxygenation times for rises and falls in PaO2 periods were 4.2 +/- 4.1 min-1 and 5.5 +/- 4.8 min-1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the rise and fall periods for the two parameters (p > 0.05). We conclude that in stable patients ventilated with PCV, after a step change in FIO2 of 0.20, 5-10 min will be adequate for obtaining a blood gas sample to measure a Pa

  1. Limiting Temperatures, Caloric Curves and Phase Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Hagel, K.; Ma, Y.; Murray, M.; Natowitz, J.; Wada, R.; Kowalski, S.; Materna, T.; Keksis, A.; Makeev, A.; Martin, E.; Qin, L.; Veselsky, M.; Ruangma, A.; Shetty, D.V.; Souliotis, G.; Winchester, E.M.; Yennello, S.J. [Cyclotron Institute, TAMU, College Station (TX) (United States); Cinausero, M.; Prete, E.G.; Fioretton, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Nebbia, G.; Rizzi, V.; Viesti, G. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Majka, Z.; Cibor, J.; Staszel, P. [Jagellonian University, M Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Martinez-Davalos, R.A.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Alfarro, R. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico); Keutgen, T.; El Masri, Y. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, FNRS and IPN, Louvain-Neuve (Belgium)

    2003-07-01

    A status report on some experiments designed to probe the dynamic evolution, the degree of equilibration and disassembly modes of hot composite nuclei produced in Fermi energy heavy ion collisions is presented. (authors)

  2. Detection of radiation transitions between 4d9(D5/3,3/2)5s2nl and 4d105p(2P1/2,3/20)nl of self-ionized states of cadmium atom at electron-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomonaj, A.N.; Imre, A.I.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation transitions between 4d 9 ( 2 D 5/2,3/2 )5s 2 nl and 4d 10 5p( 2 P 1/2,3/2 0 )nl self-ionized states of Cd atom being dielectron satellites of λ325.0 nm (4d 9 5s 22 D 3/2 →4d 10 5p 2 P 1/2 0 ) and λ353.6 nm (4d 9 5s 22 D 3/2 → 4d 10 5p 2 P 3/2 0 ) laser lines of Cd + ion were detected for the first time at electron-ion collisions. One studied energy dependences of the effective cross sections of electron excitation of the satellite lines within 7-10 eV energy range. The effective cross sections of excitation of dielectron satellites constitutes ∼ 10 -17 cm 2 that is comparable with the efficiency of excitation of the laser lines [ru

  3. temperature overspecification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different finite difference schemes for solving the two-dimensional parabolic inverse problem with temperature overspecification are considered. These schemes are developed for indentifying the control parameter which produces, at any given time, a desired temperature distribution at a given point in the spatial domain. The numerical methods discussed, are based on the (3,3 alternating direction implicit (ADI finite difference scheme and the (3,9 alternating direction implicit formula. These schemes are unconditionally stable. The basis of analysis of the finite difference equation considered here is the modified equivalent partial differential equation approach, developed from the 1974 work of Warming and Hyett [17]. This allows direct and simple comparison of the errors associated with the equations as well as providing a means to develop more accurate finite difference schemes. These schemes use less central processor times than the fully implicit schemes for two-dimensional diffusion with temperature overspecification. The alternating direction implicit schemes developed in this report use more CPU times than the fully explicit finite difference schemes, but their unconditional stability is significant. The results of numerical experiments are presented, and accuracy and the Central Processor (CPU times needed for each of the methods are discussed. We also give error estimates in the maximum norm for each of these methods.

  4. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor, acoustic modes, and equation of state of two-temperature warm dense aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, L.; Förster, G. D.; Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2018-04-01

    The ion-ion dynamical structure factor and the equation of state of warm dense aluminum in a two-temperature quasiequilibrium state, with the electron temperature higher than the ion temperature, are investigated using molecular-dynamics simulations based on ion-ion pair potentials constructed from a neutral pseudoatom model. Such pair potentials based on density functional theory are parameter-free and depend directly on the electron temperature and indirectly on the ion temperature, enabling efficient computation of two-temperature properties. Comparison with ab initio simulations and with other average-atom calculations for equilibrium aluminum shows good agreement, justifying a study of quasiequilibrium situations. Analyzing the van Hove function, we find that ion-ion correlations vanish in a time significantly smaller than the electron-ion relaxation time so that dynamical properties have a physical meaning for the quasiequilibrium state. A significant increase in the speed of sound is predicted from the modification of the dispersion relation of the ion acoustic mode as the electron temperature is increased. The two-temperature equation of state including the free energy, internal energy, and pressure is also presented.

  5. Osmotic tolerance of avian spermatozoa: Influence of time, temperature, cryoprotectant and membrane ion pump function on sperm viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, J.M.; Long, J.A.; Gee, G.; Donoghue, A.M.; Wildt, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Potential factors influencing sperm survival under hypertonic conditions were evaluated in the Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) and turkey (Meleagridis gallopavo). Sperm osmotolerance (300-3000 mOsm/kg) was evaluated after: (1) equilibration times of 2, 10, 45 and 60 min at 4 ?C versus 21 ?C; (2) pre-equilibrating with dimethylacetamide (DMA) or dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO) at either 4 ?C or 21 ?C; and (3) inhibition of the Na+/K+ and the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane ionic pumps. Sperm viability was assessed using the eosin-nigrosin live/dead stain. Species-specific differences occurred in response to hypertonic conditions with crane sperm remaining viable under extreme hypertonicity (3000 mOsm/kg), whereas turkey sperm viability was compromised with only slightly hypertonic (500 mOsm/kg) conditions. The timing of spermolysis under hypertonic conditions was also species-specific, with a shorter interval for turkey (2 min) than crane (10 min) sperm. Turkey sperm osmotolerance was slightly improved by lowering the incubation temperature from 21 to 4 ?C. Pre-equilibrating sperm with DMA reduced the incidence of hypertonic spermolysis only in the crane, at both room and refrigeration temperature. Inhibiting the Na+/K+ and the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane ion pumps did not impair resistance of crane and turkey spermatozoa to hypertonic stress; pump inhibition actually increased turkey sperm survival compared to control sperm. Results demonstrate marked species specificity in osmotolerance between crane and turkey sperm, as well as in the way temperature and time of exposure affect sperm survival under hypertonic conditions. Differences are independent of the role of osmotic pumps in these species.

  6. Cook and Chill: Effect of Temperature on the Performance of Nonequilibrated Blood Glucose Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Sherine; Steele, Dominic; Clarke, Sarah; Gribben, Cathryn; Bexley, Anne-Marie; Laan, Remmert; Kerr, David

    2015-08-20

    Exposure to extreme temperature can affect the performance of blood glucose monitoring systems. The aim was to determine the non-equilibrated performance of these systems at extreme high and low temperatures that can occur in daily life. The performances of 5 test systems, (1) Abbott FreeStyle Freedom Lite, (2) Roche AccuChek Aviva, (3) Bayer Contour, (4) LifeScan OneTouch Verio, and (5) Sanofi BG Star, were compared after "cooking" (50°C for 1 hour) or "chilling" (-5°C for 1 hour) with room temperature controls (23°C) using whole blood with glucose concentrations of 50, 100, and 200 mg/dl. The equilibration period (time from the end of incubation to when the test system is operational) was between 1 and 8 minutes, and each test system took between 15 and 30 minutes after incubation to obtain stable measurements at room temperature. Incubating the strips at -5°C or 50°C had little effect on the glucose measurement, whereas incubating the meters introduced bias in performance between 0 and 15 minutes but not subsequently, compared to room temperature controls and at all 3 glucose levels. Compensating technologies embedded within blood glucose monitoring systems studied here perform well at extreme temperatures. People with diabetes need to be alerted to this feature to avoid perceptions of malperformance of their devices and the possible inability to get blood glucose readings on short notice (eg, during time of suspected rapid change or before an unplanned meal). © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Hydration of Rhyolitic Glasses: Comparison Between High- and Low-Temperature Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, L.; Fayek, M.; Cole, D. R.; Carter, T.

    2012-12-01

    While a great deal is known about the interaction between water and rhyolitic glasses and melts at temperatures above the glass transition, the nature of this interaction at lower temperatures is more obscure. Comparisons between high- and low-temperature diffusive studies suggest that several factors play an important role under lower-temperatures conditions that are not significant at higher temperatures. Surface concentrations, which equilibrate quickly at high temperature, change far more slowly as temperatures decrease, and may not equilibrate at room temperature for hundreds or thousands of years. Coupled with temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients this complicates calculation of diffusion profiles as a function of time. A key factor in this process appears to be the inability of "self-stress", caused by the in-diffusing species, to relax at lower temperatures, a result expected below the glass transition. Regions of the glass hydrated at low temperatures are strongly optically anisotropic, and preliminary calculations suggest that the magnitude of stress involved may be very high. On the microstuctural scale, extrapolations of high-temperature FTIR data to lower temperatures suggests there should be little or no hydroxyl present in glasses "hydrated" at low temperatures. Analyses of both block and powder samples suggest that this is generally true in the bulk of the hydrated glass, excluding hydroxyl groups that formed during the initial cooling of the melt. However, hydroxyl do groups appear to be present at the glass surface, where both SIMS and neutron reflectometry data suggest hydration levels may be higher than projected from the bulk of the glass. Isotopic exchange experiments also suggest that bonding is relatively weak, as hydration water exchanges readily with the enviroment. All of these observations lead to the conclusion that the observed stress is due to the presence of interstructural, rather than bonded, water. This likely explains the

  8. Shock temperature dependent rate law for plastic bonded explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq D.

    2018-04-01

    A reactive flow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% polymeric binder Kel-F 800) is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. Specifically, sensitivity changes to the initial explosive temperature are accounted for naturally and with a single set of parameters. The equation of state forms for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration, are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model [Wescott et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005) and "Modeling detonation diffraction and dead zones in PBX-9502," in Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Detonation Symposium (2006)]. This newly devised model, with Arrhenius state dependence on the shock temperature, based on the WSD equation of states, is denoted by AWSD. Modifying an existing implementation of the WSD model to the AWSD model in a hydrocode is a rather straightforward procedure.

  9. Mars: destruction of the tropical belt and building up extra tropics is a physical requirement of angular momentum equilibration between zones with different distances to the rotation axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-t ropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun (Fig. 6) compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon [1-3]. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different lat itudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (Fig. 1) (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable cheaper launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou in the French Guyana is better than Baikonur in Kazakhstan). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a total rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature (well known pygmioidness process). Ext ratropical belts, on the contrary, tend to add material and increase radius. Thus, a body tends to be like a cucumber but mighty gravity always makes it globular. According to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with opposing tendencies also begin to act. However, traces of this cosmic "struggle" very often are seen on surfaces of heavenly bodies as structurally distinguished tropical and extra-t ropical zones (Fig. 1, 6) [1-3]. At Mars the widespread "enigmatic" chaotic and fretted terrains at the highland-lowland boundary could be considered as traces of the crust destruction along the wide tropical belt (Fig. 2-4). A system of hillocks and their relics, mesas, ridges, cliffs and separating them depressions or plains (deep up to 1-2 km) is controlled by a crosscutting

  10. Sorption Studies of Chromium(VI and Mercury(II by High Temperature Activated Carbon from Syzygium Jambolanum Nut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sophie Beulah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature activated Syzygium Jambolanum nut carbon (HSJC has been effectively used for the removal of Cr(VI and Hg(II from aqueous solution by batch experiments. Effect of pH, carbon dose and equilibration time were determined. Adsorption followed Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Kinetic studies indicated that the removal process followed reversible first order equation. Desorption of Cr(VI was done with 1 M NaOH and 10% H2O2 mixture and Hg(II with 2% Na2S in 1% NaOH. The performance of HSJC was compared with a commercial activated carbon (CAC.

  11. The effect of temperature on the sorption of technetium, uranium, neptunium and curium on bentonite, tuff and granodiorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the sorption of the radioelements technetium; uranium; neptunium; and curium onto geological materials has been carried out as part of the PNC program to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. Batch sorption experiments have been performed in order to study the sorption of the radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water under strongly-reducing conditions at both room temperature and at 60 C. Mathematical modelling using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database has been undertaken in order to interpret the experimental results

  12. Considerations for the measurement of core, skin and mean body temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Tipton, Michael J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-12-01

    Despite previous reviews and commentaries, significant misconceptions remain concerning deep-body (core) and skin temperature measurement in humans. Therefore, the authors have assembled the pertinent Laws of Thermodynamics and other first principles that govern physical and physiological heat exchanges. The resulting review is aimed at providing theoretical and empirical justifications for collecting and interpreting these data. The primary emphasis is upon deep-body temperatures, with discussions of intramuscular, subcutaneous, transcutaneous and skin temperatures included. These are all turnover indices resulting from variations in local metabolism, tissue conduction and blood flow. Consequently, inter-site differences and similarities may have no mechanistic relationship unless those sites have similar metabolic rates, are in close proximity and are perfused by the same blood vessels. Therefore, it is proposed that a gold standard deep-body temperature does not exist. Instead, the validity of each measurement must be evaluated relative to one's research objectives, whilst satisfying equilibration and positioning requirements. When using thermometric computations of heat storage, the establishment of steady-state conditions is essential, but for clinically relevant states, targeted temperature monitoring becomes paramount. However, when investigating temperature regulation, the response characteristics of each temperature measurement must match the forcing function applied during experimentation. Thus, during dynamic phases, deep-body temperatures must be measured from sites that track temperature changes in the central blood volume. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The uniquely high-temperature character of Cullinan diamonds: A signature of the Bushveld mantle plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, N. M.; Kopylova, M.; Bussweiler, Y.; Pearson, D. G.; Gurney, J.; Davidson, J.

    2018-04-01

    The mantle beneath the Cullinan kimberlite (formerly known as "Premier") is a unique occurrence of diamondiferous cratonic mantle where diamonds were generated contemporaneously and shortly following a mantle upwelling that led to the formation of a Large Igneous Province that produced the world's largest igneous intrusion - the 2056 Ma Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC). We studied 332 diamond inclusions from 202 Cullinan diamonds to investigate mantle thermal effects imposed by the formation of the BIC. The overwhelming majority of diamonds come from three parageneses: (1) lithospheric eclogitic (69%), (2) lithospheric peridotitic (21%), and (3) sublithospheric mafic (9%). The lithospheric eclogitic paragenesis is represented by clinopyroxene, garnet, coesite and kyanite. Main minerals of the lithospheric peridotitic paragenesis are forsterite, enstatite, Cr-pyrope, Cr-augite and spinel; the sublithospheric mafic association includes majorite, CaSiO3 phases and omphacite. Diamond formation conditions were calculated using an Al-in-olivine thermometer, a garnet-clinopyroxene thermometer, as well as majorite and Raman barometers. The Cullinan diamonds may be unique on the global stage in recording a cold geotherm of 40 mW/m2 in cratonic lithosphere that was in contact with underlying convecting mantle at temperatures of 1450-1550 °C. The studied Cullinan diamonds contain a high proportion of inclusions equilibrated at temperatures exceeding the ambient 1327 °C adiabat, i.e. 54% of eclogitic diamonds and 41% of peridotitic diamonds. By contrast, ≤ 1% of peridotitic diamond inclusions globally yield equally high temperatures. We propose that the Cullinan diamond inclusions recorded transient, slow-dissipating thermal perturbations associated with the plume-related formation of the 2 Ga Bushveld igneous province. The presence of inclusions in diamond from the mantle transition zone at 300-650 km supports this view. Cullinan xenoliths indicative of the thermal state of

  14. Fitting phase shifts to electron-ion elastic scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Per, M.C.; Dickinson, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    We have derived non-Coulomb phase shifts from measured differential cross sections for electron scattering by the ions Na + , Cs + , N 3+ , Ar 8+ and Xe 6+ at energies below the inelastic threshold. Values of the scaled squared deviation between the observed and fitted differential cross sections, χ 2 , for the best-fit phase shifts were typically in the range 3-6 per degree of freedom. Generally good agreement with experiment is obtained, except for wide-angle scattering by Ar 8+ and Xe 6+ . Current measurements do not define phase shifts to better than approx. 0.1 rad even in the most favourable circumstances and uncertainties can be much larger. (author)

  15. Electron-Ion Beam Coupling Through Collective Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wheelock, Adrian; Cooke, David L; Gatsonis, Nikolaos A

    2006-01-01

    .... It is shown that Coulomb collisions, which can act to match velocities through strong ion-electron collisions between particles with low relative velocities, are far too slow to explain the phenomenon...

  16. Coherent electromagnetic radiation of a combined electron-ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, S G; Samoshenkov, Yu K [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Optiko-Fizicheskikh Izmerenij, Moscow (USSR)

    1977-07-01

    The intensity of coherent electromagnetic radiation due to interaction of a modulated electron beam with a modulated ion beam is calculated. It is shown that the radiation intensity has a sharp maximum at the frequency equal to the difference of the modulation frequency of the electron and ion beams. The results obtained are compared with those corresponding to the scattering of a modulated electron beam on randomly distributed gas ions.

  17. Modelling of the evolution of ground waters in a granite system at low temperature: the Stripa ground waters, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaud, D.; Michard, G.; Beaucaire, C.

    1990-01-01

    From chemical data on the Stripa ground waters we have tried to model the evolution of the chemical composition of a ground water in a granitic system at low temperature. The existence of two end-member ground water compositions made it possible first, to test the conventional model of a geothermal system according to which an overall equilibrium between the waters and a given mineral assemblage can be defined, and then to show that such a model could be extended to low temperatures (10 o C). Conversely, if we know the mineral assemblage, the equilibration temperature and the charge of the mobile ions (in this case, Cl), the composition of the solution is entirely fixed. In our model of the Stripa ground waters, the existence of two end-member ground water compositions can be explained by an evolution from a ''kaolinite-albite-laumontite'' equilibrium to a ''prehnite-albite-laumontite'' equilibrium, the latter requiring less Al than the former. We have also emphasized the importance of the Cl ion concentrations of the ground waters, because they can be considered as indicators of the degree of reaction progress between rock and water, thus determining the degree of equilibration of the system. (author)

  18. Observational study of ion-electron equilibration and of cloud evaporation in supernova remnants under the HEAO-2 guest investigator program. Final project report, 1 June 1985-30 September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    Observations of three selected supernovae remnants (Cygnus Loop, IC 443, and Puppis A) were made in the forbidden coronal iron lines (Fe X) lambda 6374 and (Fe XIV) lambda 5303. The resulting data was compared quantitatively with Einstein images of the same objects, and an attempt was made to determine (a) the process by which ion and electron energies are equilibrated behind the shock front in the ISM and (b) whether cloud evaporation occurs within the hot remnant interiors. Spatially-resolved x-ray emission were modeled for Sedov-Taylor blast wave models of supernovae remnants (SNR) under conditions of non-equlibrium ionization. The computations are intended to provide results that can be directly compared with Einstein high resolution image (HRI) and imaging proportional counter (IPS) data. The computer program for predicting the spatial distribution of HRI and IPS counting rates was completed, and final testing of it had begun

  19. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Katz, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, a Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D"3He, and T"3He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences, and measurements of T_i(t) and T_e(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.

  20. Average-atom model for two-temperature states and ionic transport properties of aluminum in the warm dense matter regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Fu, Yongsheng; Bredow, Richard; Kang, Dongdong; Redmer, Ronald; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    The average-atom model combined with the hyper-netted chain approximation is an efficient tool for electronic and ionic structure calculations for warm dense matter. Here we generalize this method in order to describe non-equilibrium states with different electron and ion temperature as produced in laser-matter interactions on ultra-short time scales. In particular, the electron-ion and ion-ion correlation effects are considered when calculating the electron structure. We derive an effective ion-ion pair-potential using the electron densities in the framework of temperature-depended density functional theory. Using this ion-ion potential we perform molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the ionic transport properties such as the ionic diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity through the ionic velocity autocorrelation functions.

  1. Solution-Mediated Annealing of Polymer Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Woyessa, Getinet; Janting, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the response of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) after immersion inmethanol/water solutions at room temperature. As the glass transition temperature of solution-equilibrated PMMA differs from the one...... of solvent-free PMMA, different concentrations of methanol and water lead to various degrees of frozen-in stress relaxation in the fiber. After solvent evaporation, we observe a permanent blue-shift in the grating resonance wavelength. The main contribution in the resonance wavelength shift arises from...... a permanent change in the size of the fiber. The results are compared with conventional annealing. The proposed methodology is cost-effective as it does not require a climate chamber. Furthermore, it enables an easy-to-control tuning of the resonance wavelength of POFBGs....

  2. Spatial glass transition temperature variations in polymer glass: application to a maltodextrin-water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sleeuwen, Rutger M T; Zhang, Suying; Normand, Valéry

    2012-03-12

    A model was developed to predict spatial glass transition temperature (T(g)) distributions in glassy maltodextrin particles during transient moisture sorption. The simulation employed a numerical mass transfer model with a concentration dependent apparent diffusion coefficient (D(app)) measured using Dynamic Vapor Sorption. The mass average moisture content increase and the associated decrease in T(g) were successfully modeled over time. Large spatial T(g) variations were predicted in the particle, resulting in a temporary broadening of the T(g) region. Temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the variation in T(g) in nonequilibrated samples was larger than in equilibrated samples. This experimental broadening was characterized by an almost doubling of the T(g) breadth compared to the start of the experiment. Upon reaching equilibrium, both the experimental and predicted T(g) breadth contracted back to their initial value.

  3. Temperature gradient method for lipid phase diagram construction using time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, M.; Hing, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    A method that enables temperature-composition phase diagram construction at unprecedented rates is described and evaluated. The method involves establishing a known temperature gradient along the length of a metal rod. Samples of different compositions contained in long, thin-walled capillaries are positioned lengthwise on the rod and equilibrated such that the temperature gradient is communicated into the sample. The sample is then moved through a focused, monochromatic synchrotron-derived x-ray beam and the image-intensified diffraction pattern from the sample is recorded on videotape continuously in live-time as a function of position and, thus, temperature. The temperature at which the diffraction pattern changes corresponds to a phase boundary, and the phase(s) existing (coexisting) on either side of the boundary can be identified on the basis of the diffraction pattern. Repeating the measurement on samples covering the entire composition range completes the phase diagram. These additional samples can be conveniently placed at different locations around the perimeter of the cylindrical rod and rotated into position for diffraction measurement. Temperature-composition phase diagrams for the fully hydrated binary mixtures, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE)/DPPC, have been constructed using the new temperature gradient method. They agree well with and extend the results obtained by other techniques. In the DPPE/DPPC system structural parameters as a function of temperature in the various phases including the subgel phase are reported. The potential limitations of this steady-state method are discussed

  4. Damage-spreading and out-of-equilibrium dynamics in the low-temperature regime of the two-dimensional ± J Edwards–Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio Puzzo, M L; Romá, F; Bustingorry, S; Gleiser, P M

    2010-01-01

    We present results showing the correlation between the out-of-equilibrium dynamics and the equilibrium damage-spreading process in the two-dimensional ± J Edwards–Anderson model at low temperatures. A key ingredient in our analysis is the projection of finite temperature spin configurations onto the ground state topology of the system. In particular, through numerical simulations we correlate ground state information with the out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We also analyse how the propagation of a small perturbation in equilibrated systems is related to the ground state topology. This damage-spreading study unveils the presence of rigid clusters of spins. We claim that these clusters give rise to the slow out-of-equilibrium dynamics observed in the temperature range between the glass temperature T g = 0 of the two-dimensional ± J Edwards–Anderson model and the critical temperature T c of the pure ferromagnetic Ising model

  5. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  6. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  7. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  8. Net carbon allocation in soybean seedlings as influenced by soil water stress at two soil temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, E.L.; Boersma, L.; Ekasingh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of water stress at two soil temperatures on allocation of net photoassimilated carbon in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) was investigated using compartmental analysis. The experimental phase employed classical 14 C labeling methodology with plants equilibrated at soil water potentials of -0.04, -0.25 and -0.50 MPa; and soil temperatures of 25 and 10C. Carbon immobilization in the shoot apex generally followed leaf elongation rates with decreases in both parameters at increasing water stress at both soil temperatures. However, where moderate water stress resulted in dramatic declines in leaf elongation rates, carbon immobilization rates were sharply decreased only at severe water stress levels. Carbon immobilization was decreased in the roots and nodules of the nonwater stressed treatment by the lower soil temperature. This relation was reversed with severe water stress, and carbon immobilization in the roots and nodules was increased at the lower soil temperature. Apparently, the increased demand for growth and/or carbon storage in these tissues with increased water stress overcame the low soil temperature limitations. Both carbon pool sizes and partitioning of carbon to the sink tissues increased with moderate water stress at 25C soil temperature. Increased pool sizes were consistent with whole plant osmotic adjustment at moderate water stress. Increased partitioning to the sinks was consistent with carbon translocation processes being less severely influenced by water stress than is photosynthesis

  9. Effective temperatures and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation for particle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I; Pérez-Madrid, A

    2015-09-14

    The short- and long-time breakdown of the classical Stokes-Einstein relation for colloidal suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions is explained here by examining the role that confinement and attractive interactions play in the intra- and inter-cage dynamics executed by the colloidal particles. We show that the measured short-time diffusion coefficient is larger than the one predicted by the classical Stokes-Einstein relation due to a non-equilibrated energy transfer between kinetic and configuration degrees of freedom. This transfer can be incorporated in an effective kinetic temperature that is higher than the temperature of the heat bath. We propose a Generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER) in which the effective temperature replaces the temperature of the heat bath. This relation then allows to obtain the diffusion coefficient once the viscosity and the effective temperature are known. On the other hand, the temporary cluster formation induced by confinement and attractive interactions of hydrodynamic nature makes the long-time diffusion coefficient to be smaller than the corresponding one obtained from the classical Stokes-Einstein relation. Then, the use of the GSER allows to obtain an effective temperature that is smaller than the temperature of the heat bath. Additionally, we provide a simple expression based on a differential effective medium theory that allows to calculate the diffusion coefficient at short and long times. Comparison of our results with experiments and simulations for suspensions of hard and porous spheres shows an excellent agreement in all cases.

  10. Microbial impacts on geothermometry temperature predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiko Fujita; David W. Reed; Kaitlyn R. Nowak; Vicki S. Thompson; Travis L. McLing; Robert W. Smith

    2013-02-01

    Conventional geothermometry approaches assume that the composition of a collected water sample originating in a deep geothermal reservoir still reflects chemical equilibration of the water with the deep reservoir rocks. However, for geothermal prospecting samples whose temperatures have dropped to <120°C, temperature predictions may be skewed by the activity of microorganisms; microbial metabolism can drastically and rapidly change the water’s chemistry. We hypothesize that knowledge of microbial impacts on exploration sample geochemistry can be used to constrain input into geothermometry models and thereby improve the reliability of reservoir temperature predictions. To evaluate this hypothesis we have chosen to focus on sulfur cycling, because of the significant changes in redox state and pH associated with sulfur chemistry. Redox and pH are critical factors in defining the mineral-fluid equilibria that form the basis of solute geothermometry approaches. Initially we are developing assays to detect the process of sulfate reduction, using knowledge of genes specific to sulfate reducing microorganisms. The assays rely on a common molecular biological technique known as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which allows estimation of the number of target organisms in a particular sample by enumerating genes specific to the organisms rather than actually retrieving and characterizing the organisms themselves. For quantitation of sulfate reducing genes using qPCR, we constructed a plasmid (a piece of DNA) containing portions of two genes (known as dsrA and dsrB) that are directly involved with sulfate reduction and unique to sulfate reducing microorganisms. Using the plasmid as well as DNA from other microorganisms known to be sulfate reducers or non-sulfate reducers, we developed qPCR protocols and showed the assay’s specificity to sulfate reducers and that a qPCR standard curve using the plasmid was linear over >5 orders of magnitude. As a first test

  11. Subsurface temperatures and geothermal gradients on the north slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Magoon, L.B.

    1993-01-01

    On the North Slope of Alaska, geothermal gradient data are available from high-resolution, equilibrated well-bore surveys and from estimates based on well-log identification of the base of ice-bearing permafrost. A total of 46 North Slope wells, considered to be in or near thermal equilibrium, have been surveyed with high-resolution temperatures devices and geothermal gradients can be interpreted directly from these recorded temperature profiles. To augment the limited North Slope temperature data base, a new method of evaluating local geothermal gradients has been developed. In this method, a series of well-log picks for the base of the ice-bearing permafrost from 102 wells have been used, along with regional temperature constants derived from the high-resolution stabilized well-bore temperature surveys, to project geothermal gradients. Geothermal gradients calculated from the high-resolution temperature surveys generally agree with those projected from known ice-bearing permafrost depths over most of the North Slope. Values in the ice-bearing permafrost range from ??? 1.5??C 100 m in the Prudhoe Bay area to ??? 4.5??C 100 m in the east-central portion of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. Geothermal gradients below the ice-bearing permafrost sequence range from ??? 1.6??C 100 m to ??? 5.2??C 100 m. ?? 1993.

  12. Some dynamic aspects of the thyroid function studied by a method of isotopic balance; Quelques aspects dynamiques de la fonction thyroidienne etudies par une methode d''equilibre isotopique'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Claude

    1958-06-15

    This report addresses the use of a method which aims at directly measuring quantities of steady iodine involved by the thyroid metabolism in specific physiological conditions. The experiment is based on the use of male rats weighting 180 to 200 g which received an almost iodine-free diet. The daily dose of iodine is administered to each experimental group through beverage under the form of potassium iodide. After a delay, the usual beverage is replaced by a marked one. Iodine renewal by thyroid is monitored in vivo by external detection of radiations emitted by iodine 131. At the end of the experiment, rats are killed, and their blood is collected on heparin, centrifuged and processed to separate mineral iodine and hormonal iodine. Radioactivity is then measured with a scintillator and compared with that of a beverage sample [French] Le but de la methode utilisee est de mesurer directement les quantites d'iode stable mises en jeu par le metabolisme thyroidien dans des conditions physiologiques precises. Les travaux anterieurs ne permettent d'atteindre ces quantites que par des microdosages chimiques longs et delicats. En nous basant sur le principe du renouvellement d'un pool en etat dynamique stationnaire, nous decrivons une cinetique et mesurons en valeur absolue les differents parametres de ce systeme en equilibre.

  13. CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D-QSAR studies on S(6)-(4-nitrobenzyl)mercaptopurine riboside (NBMPR) analogs as inhibitors of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Amol; Buolamwini, John K

    2009-01-15

    3D-QSAR (CoMFA and CoMSIA) studies were performed on human equlibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1) inhibitors displaying K(i) values ranging from 10,000 to 0.7nM. Both CoMFA and CoMSIA analysis gave reliable models with q2 values >0.50 and r2 values >0.92. The models have been validated for their stability and robustness using group validation and bootstrapping techniques and for their predictive abilities using an external test set of nine compounds. The high predictive r2 values of the test set (0.72 for CoMFA model and 0.74 for CoMSIA model) reveals that the models can prove to be a useful tool for activity prediction of newly designed nucleoside transporter inhibitors. The CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps identify features important for exhibiting good binding affinities at the transporter, and can thus serve as a useful guide for the design of potential equilibrative nucleoside transporter inhibitors.

  14. Role of Exchange Equilibria in Structural Chemistry; Role des Equilibres d'Echange en Chimie Structurale; Rol' ravnovesiya obmena v strukturnoj khimii; Papel de los Equilibrios de Intercambio en Quimica Estructural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wazer, J. R.; Moedritzer, K. [Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MI (United States)

    1965-10-15

    Although much of the past effort on the study of exchange reactions has been devoted to the scrambling of monofunctional substituents on a polyfunctional atom or moiety, complicated molecules may also undergo exchange of parts so as to give an equilibrium distribution of various molecular sizes and shapes. The use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in investigating such equilibrated mixtures of compounds has been described in a number of 1964 and 1965 papers from the Monsanto Co. laboratory (see Refs [1-34] at the end of the abstracts). The systems thus studied include several new families of compounds; and the amounts and kinds of products resulting from the exchange reactions have been quantitatively described in terms of a small number of equilibrium constants. A new mathematical approach - that of stochastic graph theory [6] - has been employed to establish the form and the minimum number of equilibrium constants relating the non-cyclic structures and parts of molecular structures to each other. In addition, the equilibria between the cyclic and non-cyclic structures have been treated quantitatively. The emphasis in structural chemistry on the compounds of carbon (as evidenced by the division of descriptive chemistry into the organic and inorganic categories) is attributed to the fact that exchange reactions involving C-C bonds or bonds from carbon to any atom not exhibiting low-lying vacant bonding orbitals (e.g. Si, Ge, N, P, As. O, S, Se, F, Cl, Br) are exceedingly slow. On the other hand, there are vast areas of inorganic chemistry which have not previously been described because the molecules undergo such rapid exchange reactions that they cannot be separated. However, they can be identified and quantitatively assayed by means of physical methods (such as NMR) having short time constants, when the resulting data receive proper mathematical treatment - a procedure which is sufficiently involved to demand the use of a high-speed computer [6

  15. Foundations of low-temperature plasma enhanced materials synthesis and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP)-based synthesis of advanced materials has played a transformational role in multiple industries, including the semiconductor industry, liquid crystal displays, coatings and renewable energy. Similarly, the plasma-based transfer of lithographically defined resist patterns into other materials, e.g. silicon, SiO2, Si3N4 and other electronic materials, has led to the production of nanometer scale devices that are the basis of the information technology, microsystems, and many other technologies based on patterned films or substrates. In this article we review the scientific foundations of both LTP-based materials synthesis at low substrate temperature and LTP-based isotropic and directional etching used to transfer lithographically produced resist patterns into underlying materials. We cover the fundamental principles that are the basis of successful application of the LTP techniques to technological uses and provide an understanding of technological factors that may control or limit material synthesis or surface processing with the use of LTP. We precede these sections with a general discussion of plasma surface interactions, the LTP-generated particle fluxes including electrons, ions, radicals, excited neutrals and photons that simultaneously contact and modify surfaces. The surfaces can be in the line of sight of the discharge or hidden from direct interaction for structured substrates. All parts of the article are extensively referenced, which is intended to help the reader study the topics discussed here in more detail.

  16. Two-temperature hydrodynamics of laser-generated ultrashort shock waves in elasto-plastic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilnitsky, Denis K; Migdal, Kirill P; Khokhlov, Viktor A; Inogamov, Nail A; Petrov, Yurii V; Anisimov, Sergey I; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2014-01-01

    Shock-wave generation by ultrashort laser pulses opens new doors for study of hidden processes in materials happened at an atomic-scale spatiotemporal scales. The poorly explored mechanism of shock generation is started from a short-living two-temperature (2T) state of solid in a thin surface layer where laser energy is deposited. Such 2T state represents a highly non-equilibrium warm dense matter having cold ions and hot electrons with temperatures of 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the melting point. Here for the first time we present results obtained by our new hybrid hydrodynamics code combining detailed description of 2T states with a model of elasticity together with a wide-range equation of state of solid. New hydro-code has higher accuracy in the 2T stage than molecular dynamics method, because it includes electron related phenomena including thermal conduction, electron-ion collisions and energy transfer, and electron pressure. From the other hand the new code significantly improves our previous version of 2T hydrodynamics model, because now it is capable of reproducing the elastic compression waves, which may have an imprint of supersonic melting like as in MD simulations. With help of the new code we have solved a difficult problem of thermal and dynamic coupling of a molten layer with an uniaxially compressed elastic solid. This approach allows us to describe the recent femtosecond laser experiments.

  17. Body temperature norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal body temperature; Temperature - normal ... Morrison SF. Regulation of body temperature. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 59. Sajadi MM, Mackowiak ...

  18. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Taeho [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Wolfson, Johanna; Nelson, Keith A., E-mail: kanelson@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Kandyla, Maria [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens 116-35 (Greece)

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation.

  19. Relaxation dynamics and transformation kinetics of deeply supercooled water: Temperature, pressure, doping, and proton/deuteron isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sonja; Handle, Philip H; Plaga, Lucie J; Stern, Josef N; Seidl, Markus; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Köster, Karsten W; Gainaru, Catalin; Loerting, Thomas; Böhmer, Roland

    2017-07-21

    Above its glass transition, the equilibrated high-density amorphous ice (HDA) transforms to the low-density pendant (LDA). The temperature dependence of the transformation is monitored at ambient pressure using dielectric spectroscopy and at elevated pressures using dilatometry. It is found that near the glass transition temperature of deuterated samples, the transformation kinetics is 300 times slower than the structural relaxation, while for protonated samples, the time scale separation is at least 30 000 and insensitive to doping. The kinetics of the HDA to LDA transformation lacks a proton/deuteron isotope effect, revealing that this process is dominated by the restructuring of the oxygen network. The x-ray diffraction experiments performed on samples at intermediate transition stages reflect a linear combination of the LDA and HDA patterns implying a macroscopic phase separation, instead of a local intermixing of the two amorphous states.

  20. Relaxation dynamics and transformation kinetics of deeply supercooled water: Temperature, pressure, doping, and proton/deuteron isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sonja; Handle, Philip H.; Plaga, Lucie J.; Stern, Josef N.; Seidl, Markus; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Köster, Karsten W.; Gainaru, Catalin; Loerting, Thomas; Böhmer, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Above its glass transition, the equilibrated high-density amorphous ice (HDA) transforms to the low-density pendant (LDA). The temperature dependence of the transformation is monitored at ambient pressure using dielectric spectroscopy and at elevated pressures using dilatometry. It is found that near the glass transition temperature of deuterated samples, the transformation kinetics is 300 times slower than the structural relaxation, while for protonated samples, the time scale separation is at least 30 000 and insensitive to doping. The kinetics of the HDA to LDA transformation lacks a proton/deuteron isotope effect, revealing that this process is dominated by the restructuring of the oxygen network. The x-ray diffraction experiments performed on samples at intermediate transition stages reflect a linear combination of the LDA and HDA patterns implying a macroscopic phase separation, instead of a local intermixing of the two amorphous states.

  1. The uranium dioxide-uranium system at high temperature; Le systeme uranium-dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinet, Ph.; Vaugoyeau, H.; Blum, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The liquidus curve has been determined by a saturation method in which the thermal gradient was cancelled upon cooling, and the solidus curve by analyzing the deposits in equilibrium with the liquid at each temperature. The diagram, of a displaced eutectic type, presents a liquid immiscibility domain between 47 and 59 mol per cent of dioxide and a substoichiometry range UO{sub 2x}, the minimum O/U ratio being 1,6 at 3470 {+-} 30 C. The monotectic composition was found by chemical analysis to be 59 mol per cent of dioxide and the reaction temperature 2470 {+-} 30 C. (author) [French] La courbe liquidus a ete determinee par une methode de saturation en annulant le gradient thermique au cours du refroidissement, la courbe solidus par analyse des depots en equilibre avec le liquide a chaque temperature. Le diagramme du type a eutectique deporte comporte un domaine d'immiscibilite liquide entre 47 et 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde, ainsi qu'un domaine d'existence du compose sous stoechiometrique UO{sub 2x}, le rapport O/U minimum etant egal a 1,6 a 2470 {+-} 30 C. La composition du monotectique, obtenue par analyse chimique, est de 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde et la temperature de la reaction a ete trouvee egale a 2470 {+-} 30 C. (auteur)

  2. Generalized study of the return to equilibrium of a particle in a plasma (Fokker-Planck formalism) (1961); Etude generale du retour a l'equilibre d'une particule au sein d'un plasma (formalisme de Fokker-Planck) (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Faculte des Sciences de Caen, 14 (France)

    1961-07-01

    The author examines the problem of the return to equilibrium of a particle in a plasma and completely explains Fokker-Planck equation. After that, he studies the possibility of interpreting the return of the test particle to Maxwellian distribution, using the development - which is obtained. He discusses the validity limits of the Rosenbluth, MacDonald and Judd approximation. (author) [French] Examinant le probleme du retour a l'equilibre d'une particule test au sein d'un plasma en equilibre, l'auteur cherche a expliciter completement l'expression de l'operateur de Fokker-Planck. Il etudie ensuite les conditions de coherence, c'est-a-dire la possibilite pour le developpement obtenu de traduire le retour de la particule test a l'etat maxwellien et discute des limites de validite de la formule de 'Rosenbluth, Mac Donald et Judd'. (auteur)

  3. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  4. Rapid pH and PO2 changes in the tissue recording chamber during stoppage of a gas-equilibrated perfusate: effects on calcium currents in ventral horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, K P; Brownstone, R M

    2006-09-01

    In vitro studies often use bicarbonate-buffered saline solutions to mimic the normal extracellular environment of tissues. These solutions are typically equilibrated with gaseous O2 and CO2, the latter interacting with bicarbonate ions to maintain a physiological pH. In vitro tissue chambers, like those used for electrophysiology, are usually continually perfused with the gassed buffer, but stopping the perfusion to add expensive chemicals or acquire imaging data is a common practice. The present study demonstrates that this procedure leads to rapid (PO2 of the detained solution in the tissue chamber. During the first 200 s, pH increased by 0.4 units and resulted in a 25% PO2 reduction of the detained solution. The rates of these changes were dependent on the volume of solution in the chamber. In experiments using acute transverse slices from the lumbar spinal cord of neonatal (postnatal day 0-10) mice, perfusion stoppage of the same duration was accompanied by a 34.7% enhancement of the peak voltage-gated calcium current recorded from ventral horn neurons. In these cells both low voltage-activated and high voltage-activated currents were affected. These currents were unaffected by decreasing PO2 when a CO2-independent buffer was used, suggesting that changes in pH were responsible for the observed effects. It is concluded that the procedure of stopping a bicarbonate/CO2-buffered perfusate results in rapid changes in pH and PO2 of the solution detained in the tissue chamber, and that these changes have the potential to covertly influence experimental results.

  5. EQUILIBRE GLYCEMIQUE ET COMPLICATIONS MACROANGIOPATHIQUES DU DIABETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyse BORDIER

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available La question de l’efficacité d’un équilibre glycémique optimal dans la prévention des complications macroangiopathiques du diabète a fait l’objet d’une récente polémique. Si les faits sont clairs pour la microangiopathie notamment au cours du diabète de type 1, ils paraissent moins certains pour les complications cardiovasculaires du diabète de type 2. Cette constatation vient de l’intrication des autres facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires qui sont très fréquents chez ces patients. Cependant, les études de suivi sur une longue durée s’inscrivent en faveur de l’intérêt d’un bon équilibre glycémique sur les complications macroangiopathiques. Les résultats négatifs sur la mortalité de l’étude ACCORD et les inquiétudes concernant la rosiglitazone ont conduit à la mise en place d’études sur la sécurité d’utilisation des nouvelles molécules. Tous ces travaux ont abouti à la démonstration de l’absence de risque des iDPP-4 et de l’effet très positif de certaines molécules de la classe des analogues du GLP-1 et des iSGLT2.Il reste à espérer que la récente mise au point de l’Académie de Médecine soulignant que les complications du diabète de type 2 exigent une prévention multifactorielle qui passe obligatoirement par un contrôle optimisé de l'équilibre glycémique mette fin à une polémique inutile et dangereuse pour nos malades.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations to calculate glass transition temperature and elastic constants of novel polyethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Reddy, Sreekantha T; Sikder, Arun K

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations studies are carried out on hydroxyl terminated polyethers that are useful in energetic polymeric binder applications. Energetic polymers derived from oxetanes with heterocyclic side chains with different energetic substituents are designed and simulated under the ensembles of constant particle number, pressure, temperature (NPT) and constant particle number, volume, temperature (NVT). Specific volume of different amorphous polymeric models is predicted using NPT-MD simulations as a function of temperature. Plots of specific volume versus temperature exhibited a characteristic change in slope when amorphous systems change from glassy to rubbery state. Several material properties such as Young's, shear, and bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc. are predicted from equilibrated structures and established the structure-property relations among designed polymers. Energetic performance parameters of these polymers are calculated and results reveal that the performance of the designed polymers is comparable to the benchmark energetic polymers like polyNIMMO, polyAMMO and polyBAMO. Overall, it is worthy remark that this molecular simulations study on novel energetic polyethers provides a good guidance on mastering the design principles and allows us to design novel polymers of tailored properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature indicating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, J.P.; Salt, D.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature indicating device comprises a plurality of planar elements some undergoing a reversible change in appearance at a given temperature the remainder undergoing an irreversible change in appearance at a given temperature. The device is useful in indicating the temperature which an object has achieved as well as its actual temperature. The reversible change is produced by liquid crystal devices. The irreversible change is produced by an absorbent surface carrying substances e.g. waxes which melt at predetermined temperatures and are absorbed by the surface; alternatively paints may be used. The device is used for monitoring processes of encapsulation of radio active waste. (author)

  8. Absorption of CO2 laser light by a dense, high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, N.J.; Forrest, M.J.; Morgan, P.D.; Offenberger, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The interaction between a pulsed, CO 2 laser beam and the plasma produced in a plasma focus device is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The CO 2 laser radiation, directed orthogonal to the pinch axis and along the density gradient only weakly perturbs the focus since the radiation density of 30 J cm -3 (allowing for the Airy enhancement factor near the critical layer), is still less than the plasma thermal energy >=1 kJ cm -3 . On the contrary, the CO 2 laser beam is grossly affected by the plasma and absorption during the compressed pinch phase when the plasma frequency is much more complete than can be predicted by classical resistivity. Density fluctuations at the Langmuir frequency are measured directly for forward scattering from a probe, ruby laser beam. Since the wave numbers correspond to approximately 0.1 the Langmuir waves should appear as electron 'lines' in the scattered spectrum shifted by 427 A from the ruby laser wavelength. At low CO 2 laser pump intensity the electron wave intensity is close to the thermal level. As the pump is increased beyond a threshold of approximately 3x10 9 W/cm -2 (in vacuo) enhanced scattering is observed, reaching a factor of 30 above thermal. A WKB treatment of the electron-ion decay instability which takes into account the linear growth of waves at equal electron and ion temperatures and their convection in an inhomogeneous plasma is reasonably consistent with the observations

  9. Temperature fluctuations superimposed on background temperature change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, James; Roberts, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Proxy data allows the temperature of the Earth to be mapped over long periods of time. In this work the temperature fluctuations for over 200 proxy data sets were examined and from this set 50 sets were analyzed to test for periodic and quasi-periodic fluctuations in the data sets. Temperature reconstructions over 4 different time scales were analyzed to see if patterns emerged. Data were put into four time intervals; 4,000 years, 14,000 years, 1,000,000 years, and 3,000,000 years and analyzed with a goal to understanding periodic and quasi-periodic patterns in global temperature change superimposed on a “background” average temperature change. Quasi-periodic signatures were identified that predate the Industrial Revolution, during much of which direct data on temperature are not available. These data indicate that Earth temperatures have undergone a number of periodic and quasi-periodic intervals that contain both global warming and global cooling cycles. The fluctuations are superimposed on a background of temperature change that has a declining slope during the two periods, pre-ice age and post ice age with a transition about 12,000 BCE. The data are divided into “events” that span the time periods 3,000,000 BCE to “0” CE, 1,000,000 BCE to “0” CE, 12,000 BCE to 2,000 CE and 2,000 BCE to 2,000 CE. An equation using a quasi-periodic (frequency modulated sine waves) patterns was developed to analyze the date sets for quasi-periodic patterns. “Periodicities” which show reasonable agreement with the predictions of Milankovitch and other investigators were found in the data sets.

  10. Maine River Temperature Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We collect seasonal and annual temperature measurements on an hourly or quarter hourly basis to monitor habitat suitability for ATS and other species. Temperature...

  11. GISS Surface Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GISTEMP dataset is a global 2x2 gridded temperature anomaly dataset. Temperature data is updated around the middle of every month using current data files from...

  12. Supersymmetry at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Kaku, M.

    1978-01-01

    We investigate the properties of Green's functions in a spontaneously broken supersymmetric model at high temperatures. We show that, even at high temperatures, we do not get restoration of supersymmetry, at least in the one-loop approximation

  13. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  14. Room temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleight, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    If the Holy Grail of room temperature superconductivity could be achieved, the impact on could be enormous. However, a useful room temperature superconductor for most applications must possess a T c somewhat above room temperature and must be capable of sustaining superconductivity in the presence of magnetic fields while carrying a significant current load. The authors will return to the subject of just what characteristics one might seek for a compound to be a room temperature superconductor. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. A dielectric approach to high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, J.; Das, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The dielectric response of an electron-ion system to the presence of a pair of charges is investigated. From the nature of the dielectric function, it is shown that a strong attractive pair formation is possible depending on the dispersion of the ion branches. The latter brings a reduction to the sound velocity which is used as a criterion for the superconductivity. By solving the BCS equation with the above dielectric function, we obtain a reasonable value of T/sub c/. 17 refs., 1 fig

  16. Digital temperature meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, S

    1982-01-01

    Digital temperature meter for precise temperature measurements is presented. Its parts such as thermostat, voltage-frequency converter and digital frequency meter are described. Its technical parameters such as temperature range 50degC-700degC, measurement precision 1degC, measurement error +-1degC are given. (A.S.).

  17. Rescaling Temperature and Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, John, III

    2010-01-01

    Temperature and entropy traditionally are expressed in units of kelvin and joule/kelvin. These units obscure some important aspects of the natures of these thermodynamic quantities. Defining a rescaled temperature using the Boltzmann constant, T' = k[subscript B]T, expresses temperature in energy units, thereby emphasizing the close relationship…

  18. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses development in oxide materials with high superconducting transition temperature. Systems with Tc well above liquid nitrogen temperature are already a reality and higher Tc's are anticipated. The author discusses how the idea of a room-temperature superconductor appears to be a distinctly possible outcome of materials research

  19. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  20. Locality of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliesch, M.; Gogolin, C.; Kastoryano, M. J.; Riera, A.; Eisert, J.

    2014-07-01

    This work is concerned with thermal quantum states of Hamiltonians on spin- and fermionic-lattice systems with short-range interactions. We provide results leading to a local definition of temperature, thereby extending the notion of "intensivity of temperature" to interacting quantum models. More precisely, we derive a perturbation formula for thermal states. The influence of the perturbation is exactly given in terms of a generalized covariance. For this covariance, we prove exponential clustering of correlations above a universal critical temperature that upper bounds physical critical temperatures such as the Curie temperature. As a corollary, we obtain that above the critical temperature, thermal states are stable against distant Hamiltonian perturbations. Moreover, our results imply that above the critical temperature, local expectation values can be approximated efficiently in the error and the system size.

  1. Measurement of solid-liquid interfacial energy in the In-Bi eutectic alloy at low melting temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marasli, N; Akbulut, S; Ocak, Y; Keslioglu, K; Boeyuek, U; Kaya, H; Cadirli, E

    2007-01-01

    The Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy of the solid In solution in equilibrium with In Bi eutectic liquid have been determined to be (1.46 ± 0.07) x 10 -7 K m and (40.4 ± 4.0) x 10 -3 J m -2 by observing the equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes. The grain boundary energy of the solid In solution phase has been calculated to be (79.0 ± 8.7) x 10 -3 J m -2 by considering force balance at the grain boundary grooves. The thermal conductivities of the In-12.4 at.% Bi eutectic liquid phase and the solid In solution phase and their ratio at the eutectic melting temperature (72 deg. C) have also been measured with radial heat flow apparatus and Bridgman-type growth apparatus

  2. Empirical High-Temperature Calibration for the Carbonate Clumped Isotopes Paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Jourdan, A.; Davis, S.; Crawshaw, J.

    2013-12-01

    The clumped isotope paleothermometer is being used in a wide range of applications related to carbonate mineral formation, focusing on temperature and fluid δ18O reconstruction. Whereas the range of typical Earth surface temperatures has been the focus of several studies based on laboratory experiments and biogenic carbonates of known growth temperatures, the clumped isotope-temperature relationship above 70 °C has not been assessed by direct precipitation of carbonates. We investigated the clumped isotope-temperature relationship by precipitating carbonates between 20 and 200°C in the laboratory. The setup consists of a pressurized vessel in which carbonate minerals are precipitated from the mixture of two solutions (CaCl2, NaHCO3). Both solutions are thermally and isotopically equilibrated before injection in the pressure vessel. Minerals precipitated in this setup generally consist of calcite. Samples were reacted with 105% orthophosphoric acid for 10 min at 90°C. The evolved CO2 was continuously collected and subsequently purified with a Porapak trap held at -35°C. Measurements were performed on a MAT 253 using the protocol of Huntington et al. (2009) and Dennis et al. (2011). Clumped isotope values from 20-90°C are consistent with carbonates that were precipitated from a CaCO3 super-saturated solution using the method of McCrea (1950). This demonstrates that the experimental setup does not induce any kinetic fractionation, and can be used for high-temperature carbonate precipitation. The new clumped isotope calibration at high temperature follows the theoretical calculations of Schauble et al. (2006) adjusted for phosphoric acid digestion at 90°C. We gratefully acknowledge funding from Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  3. Potential hydrothermal resource temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanashayam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Cody J. Cannon; Trevor A. Atkinson; Travis L. McLing; Thomas R. Wood; Patrick F. Dobson; Mark E. Conrad

    2016-02-01

    The Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in southern Idaho is a region of high heat flow. Sustained volcanic activities in the wake of the passage of the Yellowstone Hotspot have turned this region into an area with great potential for geothermal resources as evidenced by numerous hot springs scattered along the margins of the plain and several hot-water producing wells and hot springs within the plain. Despite these thermal expressions, it is hypothesized that the pervasive presence of an overlying groundwater aquifer in the region effectively masks thermal signatures of deep-seated geothermal resources. The dilution of deeper thermal water and re-equilibration at lower temperature are significant challenges for the evaluation of potential resource areas in the ESRP. Over the past several years, we collected approximately 100 water samples from springs/wells for chemical analysis as well as assembled existing water chemistry data from literature. We applied several geothermometric and geochemical modeling tools to these chemical compositions of ESRP water samples. Geothermometric calculations based on principles of multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry with inverse geochemical modeling capability (e.g., Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) have been useful for the evaluation of reservoir temperatures. RTEst geothermometric calculations of ESRP thermal water samples indicated numerous potential geothermal areas with elevated reservoir temperatures. Specifically, areas around southern/southwestern side of the Bennett Hills and within the Camas Prairies in the western-northwestern regions of the ESRP and its margins suggest temperatures in the range of 140-200°C. In the northeastern portions of the ESRP, Lidy Hot Springs, Ashton, Newdale, and areas east of Idaho Falls have expected reservoir temperature =140 °C. In the southern ERSP, areas near Buhl and Twin Falls are found to have elevated temperatures as high as 160 °C. These areas are likely to host

  4. Plasma temperature during methylene blue/light treatment influences virus inactivation capacity and product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemann, U; Handke, W; Sumian, C; Alvarez, I; Reichenberg, S; Müller, T H; Seltsam, A

    2018-02-27

    Photodynamic treatment using methylene blue (MB) and visible light is in routine use for pathogen inactivation of human plasma in different countries. Ambient and product temperature conditions for human plasma during production may vary between production sites. The influence of different temperature conditions on virus inactivation capacity and plasma quality of the THERAFLEX MB-Plasma procedure was investigated in this study. Plasma units equilibrated to 5 ± 2°C, room temperature (22 ± 2°C) or 30 ± 2°C were treated with MB/light and comparatively assessed for the inactivation capacity for three different viruses, concentrations of MB and its photoproducts, activity of various plasma coagulation factors and clotting time. Reduced solubility of the MB pill was observed at 5 ± 2°C. Photocatalytic degradation of MB increased with increasing temperature, and the greatest formation of photoproducts (mainly azure B) occurred at 30 ± 2°C. Inactivation of suid herpesvirus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and vesicular stomatitis virus was significantly lower at 5 ± 2°C than at higher temperatures. MB/light treatment affected clotting times and the activity of almost all investigated plasma proteins. Factor VIII (-17·7 ± 8·3%, 22 ± 2°C) and fibrinogen (-14·4 ± 16·4%, 22 ± 2°C) showed the highest decreases in activity. Increasing plasma temperatures resulted in greater changes in clotting time and higher losses of plasma coagulation factor activity. Temperature conditions for THERAFLEX MB-Plasma treatment must be carefully controlled to assure uniform quality of pathogen-reduced plasma in routine production. Inactivation of cooled plasma is not recommended. © 2018 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  6. Chapter 6: Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hauer, F. Richard; F. Richard Hauer,; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Stream temperature has direct and indirect effects on stream ecology and is critical in determining both abiotic and biotic system responses across a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales. Temperature variation is primarily driven by solar radiation, while landscape topography, geology, and stream reach scale ecosystem processes contribute to local variability. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in freshwater ecosystems influences habitat distributions, physiological functions, and phenology of all aquatic organisms. In this chapter we provide an overview of methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. Recent advances in temperature monitoring allow for more comprehensive studies of the underlying processes influencing annual variation of temperatures and how thermal variability may impact aquatic organisms at individual, population, and community based scales. Likewise, the development of spatially explicit predictive models provide a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes which is integral for sustainable management of freshwater systems.

  7. High temperature refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator is described which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle the working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot

  8. Temperature control in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1986-01-01

    The patent concerns a method for controlling the temperature of silicon wafers (or samples), during ion beam treatment of the wafers, in a vacuum. The apparatus and method are described for irradiation and temperature control of the samples. The wafers are mounted on a drum which is rotated through the ion beam, and are additionally heated by infra-red lamps to achieve the desired temperature. (U.K.)

  9. Low temperature carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, A A

    1934-01-10

    A process is described in which coal is passed through a distillation chamber in one retort at a comparatively low temperature, then passing the coal through a distillation chamber of a second retort subjected to a higher temperature, thence passing the coal through the distillation chamber of a third retort at a still higher temperature and separately collecting the liquid and vapors produced from each retort.

  10. Temperature measurement and control

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, JR

    1988-01-01

    This book treats the theory and practice of temperature measurement and control and important related topics such as energy management and air pollution. There are no specific prerequisites for the book although a knowledge of elementary control theory could be useful. The first half of the book is an application oriented survey of temperature measurement techniques and devices. The second half is concerned mainly with temperature control in both simple and complex situations.

  11. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  12. Neutron ion temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.

    1986-11-01

    One important use of fusion product diagnostics is in the determination of the deuterium ion temperature from the magnitude of the 2.5 MeV d(d,n) 3 He neutron emission. The detectors, calibration methods, and limitations of this technique are reviewed here with emphasis on procedures used at PPPL. In most tokamaks, the ion temperature deduced from neutrons is in reasonable agreement with the ion temperature deduced by other techniques

  13. Rovibrational coupling in molecular nitrogen at high temperature: An atomic-level study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Paolo, E-mail: vale0142@umn.edu; Norman, Paul, E-mail: norma198@umn.edu; Zhang, Chonglin, E-mail: zhang993@umn.edu; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E., E-mail: schwart@aem.umn.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, College of Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    This article contains an atomic-level numerical investigation of rovibrational relaxation in molecular nitrogen at high temperature (>4000 K), neglecting dissociation. We conduct our study with the use of pure Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Classical Trajectory Calculations (CTC) Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), verified to produce statistically identical results at the conditions of interest here. MD and CTC DSMC solely rely on the specification of a potential energy surface: in this work, the site-site Ling-Rigby potential. Additionally, dissociation is prevented by modeling the N–N bond either as a harmonic or an anharmonic spring. The selected molecular model was shown to (i) recover the shear viscosity (obtained from equilibrium pure MD Green-Kubo calculations) of molecular nitrogen over a wide range of temperatures, up to dissociation; (ii) predict well the near-equilibrium rotational relaxation behavior of N{sub 2}; (iii) reproduce vibrational relaxation times in excellent accordance with the Millikan-White correlation and previous semi-classical trajectory calculations in the low temperature range, i.e., between 4000 K and 10 000 K. By simulating isothermal relaxations in a periodic box, we found that the traditional two-temperature model assumptions become invalid at high temperatures (>10 000 K), due to a significant coupling between rotational and vibrational modes for bound states. This led us to add a modification to both the Jeans and the Landau-Teller equations to include a coupling term, essentially described by an additional relaxation time for internal energy equilibration. The degree of anharmonicity of the N{sub 2} bond determines the strength of the rovibrational coupling. Although neglecting N{sub 2} dissociation only provides a partial description of a nitrogen system at very high temperatures, high-energy trends for bound-bound transitions are essential to understand nonequilibrium gas flows, with possible implications on rovibration

  14. Rovibrational coupling in molecular nitrogen at high temperature: An atomic-level study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Norman, Paul; Zhang, Chonglin; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This article contains an atomic-level numerical investigation of rovibrational relaxation in molecular nitrogen at high temperature (>4000 K), neglecting dissociation. We conduct our study with the use of pure Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Classical Trajectory Calculations (CTC) Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), verified to produce statistically identical results at the conditions of interest here. MD and CTC DSMC solely rely on the specification of a potential energy surface: in this work, the site-site Ling-Rigby potential. Additionally, dissociation is prevented by modeling the N–N bond either as a harmonic or an anharmonic spring. The selected molecular model was shown to (i) recover the shear viscosity (obtained from equilibrium pure MD Green-Kubo calculations) of molecular nitrogen over a wide range of temperatures, up to dissociation; (ii) predict well the near-equilibrium rotational relaxation behavior of N 2 ; (iii) reproduce vibrational relaxation times in excellent accordance with the Millikan-White correlation and previous semi-classical trajectory calculations in the low temperature range, i.e., between 4000 K and 10 000 K. By simulating isothermal relaxations in a periodic box, we found that the traditional two-temperature model assumptions become invalid at high temperatures (>10 000 K), due to a significant coupling between rotational and vibrational modes for bound states. This led us to add a modification to both the Jeans and the Landau-Teller equations to include a coupling term, essentially described by an additional relaxation time for internal energy equilibration. The degree of anharmonicity of the N 2 bond determines the strength of the rovibrational coupling. Although neglecting N 2 dissociation only provides a partial description of a nitrogen system at very high temperatures, high-energy trends for bound-bound transitions are essential to understand nonequilibrium gas flows, with possible implications on rovibration

  15. Estimating radiative feedbacks from stochastic fluctuations in surface temperature and energy imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proistosescu, C.; Donohoe, A.; Armour, K.; Roe, G.; Stuecker, M. F.; Bitz, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Joint observations of global surface temperature and energy imbalance provide for a unique opportunity to empirically constrain radiative feedbacks. However, the satellite record of Earth's radiative imbalance is relatively short and dominated by stochastic fluctuations. Estimates of radiative feedbacks obtained by regressing energy imbalance against surface temperature depend strongly on sampling choices and on assumptions about whether the stochastic fluctuations are primarily forced by atmospheric or oceanic variability (e.g. Murphy and Forster 2010, Dessler 2011, Spencer and Braswell 2011, Forster 2016). We develop a framework around a stochastic energy balance model that allows us to parse the different contributions of atmospheric and oceanic forcing based on their differing impacts on the covariance structure - or lagged regression - of temperature and radiative imbalance. We validate the framework in a hierarchy of general circulation models: the impact of atmospheric forcing is examined in unforced control simulations of fixed sea-surface temperature and slab ocean model versions; the impact of oceanic forcing is examined in coupled simulations with prescribed ENSO variability. With the impact of atmospheric and oceanic forcing constrained, we are able to predict the relationship between temperature and radiative imbalance in a fully coupled control simulation, finding that both forcing sources are needed to explain the structure of the lagged-regression. We further model the dependence of feedback estimates on sampling interval by considering the effects of a finite equilibration time for the atmosphere, and issues of smoothing and aliasing. Finally, we develop a method to fit the stochastic model to the short timeseries of temperature and radiative imbalance by performing a Bayesian inference based on a modified version of the spectral Whittle likelihood. We are thus able to place realistic joint uncertainty estimates on both stochastic forcing and

  16. Balance between automation and human actions in nuclear power plant operation. Results of international cooperation; Equilibre entre automatisation et action humaine dans la conduite des centrale nucleaires, resultats de la cooperation internationale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. d' Analyse de Surete; Bastl, W [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit m.b.H. (GRS), Garching (Germany); Olmstead, R [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, Mississauga (Canada); Oudiz, A [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Jenkinson, J [Nuclear Electric PLC, Gloucester (United Kingdom); Kossilov, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1990-07-01

    'est portee sur le concept de reacteurs 'intrinsequement surs', ce qui pourrait simplifier les equipements de securite, et reduire la complexite des systemes d'information et de controle. La repartition des taches entre homme et machine pourrait bien etre l'une des etapes les plus critiques dans la conception d'une centrale nucleaire et l'un des progres les plus sensibles; de ce fait, elle garantit une approche dans la conception qui est commensurable en qualite avec les hauts niveaux de securite et de qualite de production recherches pour les centrales nucleaires. C'est dans ce climat que l'Agence Internationale pour l'Energie Atomique (AIEA) a constitue en 1989 un groupe de recherche auquel participent les pays membres, lequel groupe possede une experience etendue dans le domaine de l'automatisation des centrales nucleaires. La tache de ce groupe etait d'evaluer ou se situait le juste equilibre entre actions manuelles et automatiques dans la conduite des centrales. Se basant sur des recherches anterieures et sur l'experience de ses membres, le groupe a determine que toute solution unique, totalement deterministe, au probleme de la repartition des taches est impossible. Cependant, dans la mesure ou le role de l'operateur est appele progressivement a se transformer, avec le temps, en un role de gestionnaire du systeme, il est imperatif qu'une procedure systematique de repartition des taches soit utilisee par l'equipe chargee de la conception. Le groupe a propose une methodologie qui s'appuie sur des travaux deja publies, mais il adopte une approche pragmatique, adaptee aux besoins reels des projets. Cette methodologie caracterise un certain nombre de facteurs qui relevent des processus de prise de decision, guide une telle prise de decision, et identifie les secteurs dont il considere qu'ils doivent devenir l'objet de recherches ulterieures. (author)

  17. Plasma-Column Equilibrium in Tokamak-5; L'Equilibre d'une Colonne de Plasma dans l'Installation Tokamak-5; Issledovanie ravnovesiya plazmennogo shnura na ustanovke Tokamak-5; El Equilibrio de una Columna de Plasma en la Instalacion 'Tokamak-5'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhovatov, V. S. [Institut Atomnoj Ehnergii, Im. I.V. Kurchatova, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1966-04-15

    discharge at B{sub z} = 0, a polarized voltage appeared between the upper and lower segments; this was almost one order of magnitude higher than the electron temperature calculated from the average electrical conductivity of the plasma. At the optimum value of B{sub z} the potential difference was close to zero, and changed its sign with further increase in B{sub z}. A similar dependence on B{sub z} was observed for the currents flowing between the segments when they were connected by low resistance. Connecting all the segments together did not lead to any noticeable change in the displacement of the column or in the other characteristics of the discharge. The current measured between the segments remained insufficient to explain the discrepancy mentioned above, the more so since the latter also occurred when the segments were isolated. The possible causes of this discrepancy are discussed, together with the reasons for the high potential difference between the segments. (author) [French] L'etude exposee dans le memoire fait suite aux travaux de Grigorovitch et Moukhovatov sur les conditions d'equilibre d'une colonne de plasma dans l'installation Tokamak-5. Les caracteristiques de cette installation sont les suivantes; enveloppe en cuivre, grand rayon R = 62,5 cm, petit rayon b= 25 cm; petit rayon du revetement interieur - 20 cm; rayon de l'ouverture du diaphragme - 15 cm (le centre de cette ouverture et celui de la coupe de l'enveloppe coiencident); champ magnetique longitudinal B = 6 a 12 kOe, intensite du courant dans le plasma J = 15 a 20 kA. Au cours des experiences, la pression initiale de l'hydrogene etait de 1,8 a 5 * 10{sup -4} Torr. Entre l'enveloppe et le revetement interieur, on avait dispose des conducteurs qui permettaient de creer a l'interieur de la chambre un champ magnetique transversal B{sub z}, dont les variations etaient synchronisees avec celles. du courant de decharge. Grigorovitch et Mouhkovatov ont montre que les resultats des experiences

  18. High temperature materials; Materiaux a hautes temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  19. Temperature controlled 'void' formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, P.; Sharma, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of voids in structural materials during high temperature deformation or irradiation is essentially dependent upon the existence of 'vacancy supersaturation'. The role of temperature dependent diffusion processes in 'void' formation under varying conditions, and the mechanical property changes associated with this microstructure are briefly reviewed. (author)

  20. Disorders of body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Camilo R

    2014-01-01

    The human body generates heat capable of raising body temperature by approximately 1°C per hour. Normally, this heat is dissipated by means of a thermoregulatory system. Disorders resulting from abnormally high or low body temperature result in neurologic dysfunction and pose a threat to life. In response to thermal stress, maintenance of normal body temperature is primarily maintained by convection and evaporation. Hyperthermia results from abnormal temperature regulation, leading to extremely elevated body temperature while fever results from a normal thermoregulatory mechanism operating at a higher set point. The former leads to specific clinical syndromes with inability of the thermoregulatory mechanism to maintain a constant body temperature. Heat related illness encompasses heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, in order of severity. In addition, drugs can induce hyperthermia and produce one of several specific clinical syndromes. Hypothermia is the reduction of body temperature to levels below 35°C from environmental exposure, metabolic disorders, or therapeutic intervention. Management of disorders of body temperature should be carried out decisively and expeditiously, in order to avoid secondary neurologic injury. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High temperature structural silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi 2 -based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi 2 single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi 2 possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi 2 -Si 3 N 4 composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing

  2. Indirect effects of impoundment on migrating fish: temperature gradients in fish ladders slow dam passage by adult Chinook salmon and steelhead.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Caudill

    Full Text Available Thermal layering in reservoirs upstream from hydroelectric dams can create temperature gradients in fishways used by upstream migrating adults. In the Snake River, Washington, federally-protected adult salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp. often encounter relatively cool water in dam tailraces and lower ladder sections and warmer water in the upstream portions of ladders. Using radiotelemetry, we examined relationships between fish passage behavior and the temperature difference between the top and bottom of ladders (∆T at four dams over four years. Some spring Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha experienced ∆T ≥ 0.5 °C. Many summer and fall Chinook salmon and summer steelhead (O. mykiss experienced ∆T ≥ 1.0 °C, and some individuals encountered ΔT > 4.0°C. As ΔT increased, migrants were consistently more likely to move down fish ladders and exit into dam tailraces, resulting in upstream passage delays that ranged from hours to days. Fish body temperatures equilibrated to ladder temperatures and often exceeded 20°C, indicating potential negative physiological and fitness effects. Collectively, the results suggest that gradients in fishway water temperatures present a migration obstacle to many anadromous migrants. Unfavorable temperature gradients may be common at reservoir-fed fish passage facilities, especially those with seasonal thermal layering or stratification. Understanding and managing thermal heterogeneity at such sites may be important for ensuring efficient upstream passage and minimizing stress for migratory, temperature-sensitive species.

  3. Control of supply temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, H; Nielsen, T S; Soegaard, H T

    1996-09-01

    For many district heating systems, e.g. the system in Hoeje Taastrup, it is desirable to minimize the supply temperature from the heat production unit(s). Lower supply temperature implies lower costs in connection with the production and distribution of heat. Factors having impact on the heat demand are for instance solar radiation, wind speed, wind direction and a climate independent part, which is a function of the time of the day/week/year. By applying an optimization strategy, which minimizes the supply temperature, it is assumed that optimal economical operation can be obtained by minimizing the supply temperature and thereby the heat losses in the system. The models and methods described in this report take such aspects into account, and can therefore be used as elements in a more efficient minimization of the supply temperature. The theoretical part of this report describes models and methods for optimal on-line control of the supply temperature in district heating systems. Some of the models and methods have been implemented - or are going to be implemented - in the computer program PRESS which is a tool for optimal control of supply temperature and forecasting of heat demand in district heating systems. The principles for using transfer function models are briefly described. The ordinary generalized predictive control (OGPC) method is reviewed, and several extensions of this method are suggested. New controller, which is called the extended generalized predictive controller (XGPC), is described. (EG) 57 refs.

  4. High temperature pipeline design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenslade, J.G. [Colt Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada). Pipelines Dept.; Nixon, J.F. [Nixon Geotech Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dyck, D.W. [Stress Tech Engineering Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    It is impractical to transport bitumen and heavy oil by pipelines at ambient temperature unless diluents are added to reduce the viscosity. A diluted bitumen pipeline is commonly referred to as a dilbit pipeline. The diluent routinely used is natural gas condensate. Since natural gas condensate is limited in supply, it must be recovered and reused at high cost. This paper presented an alternative to the use of diluent to reduce the viscosity of heavy oil or bitumen. The following two basic design issues for a hot bitumen (hotbit) pipeline were presented: (1) modelling the restart problem, and, (2) establishing the maximum practical operating temperature. The transient behaviour during restart of a high temperature pipeline carrying viscous fluids was modelled using the concept of flow capacity. Although the design conditions were hypothetical, they could be encountered in the Athabasca oilsands. It was shown that environmental disturbances occur when the fluid is cooled during shut down because the ground temperature near the pipeline rises. This can change growing conditions, even near deeply buried insulated pipelines. Axial thermal loads also constrain the design and operation of a buried pipeline as higher operating temperatures are considered. As such, strain based design provides the opportunity to design for higher operating temperature than allowable stress based design methods. Expansion loops can partially relieve the thermal stress at a given temperature. As the design temperature increase, there is a point at which above grade pipelines become attractive options, although the materials and welding procedures must be suitable for low temperature service. 3 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  5. Temperature measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oltman, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Romberg, G.P.; Prepejchal, W.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material is exposed to a known amount of radiation and then exposed to the environment where temperature measurements are to be taken. After a predetermined time period, the TLD material is read in a known manner to determine the amount of radiation energy remaining in the TLD material. The difference between the energy originally stored by irradiation and that remaining after exposure to the temperature ofthe environment is a measure of the average temperature of the environment during the exposure. (U.S.)

  6. Finite temperature field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    1997-01-01

    This book discusses all three formalisms used in the study of finite temperature field theory, namely the imaginary time formalism, the closed time formalism and thermofield dynamics. Applications of the formalisms are worked out in detail. Gauge field theories and symmetry restoration at finite temperature are among the practical examples discussed in depth. The question of gauge dependence of the effective potential and the Nielsen identities are explained. The nonrestoration of some symmetries at high temperature (such as supersymmetry) and theories on nonsimply connected space-times are al

  7. High temperature reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Beno, M.F.; Mulac, W.A.; Bartels, D.

    1985-01-01

    During the last year the dependence of the apparent rate of OD + CO on water pressure was measured at 305, 570, 865 and 1223 K. An explanation was found and tested for the H 2 O dependence of the apparent rate of OH(OD) + CO at high temperatures. The isotope effect for OH(D) with CO was determined over the temperature range 330 K to 1225 K. The reason for the water dependence of the rate of OH(OD) + CO near room temperatures has been investigated but no clear explanation has been found. 1 figure

  8. Microelectronic temperature sensor; silicon temperature sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitner, M.; Kanert, W.; Reichert, H.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a silicon temperature sensor with a sensitivity and a reliability as high and a tolerance as small as possible, for use in measurement and control. By employing the principle of spreading-resistance, using silicon doped by neutron transmutation, and trimming of the single wafer tolerances of resistance less than +- 5% can be obtained; overstress tests yielded a long-term stability better than 0.2%. Some applications show the advantageous use of this sensor. (orig.) [de

  9. Determining pH at elevated pressure and temperature using in situ ¹³C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, J Andrew; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Yanzhe; Hayes, Sophia E; Giammar, Daniel E; Conradi, Mark S

    2015-02-03

    We have developed an approach for determining pH at elevated pressures and temperatures by using (13)C NMR measurements of inorganic carbon species together with a geochemical equilibrium model. The approach can determine in situ pH with precision better than 0.1 pH units at pressures, temperatures, and ionic strengths typical of geologic carbon sequestration systems. A custom-built high pressure NMR probe was used to collect (13)C NMR spectra of (13)C-labeled CO2 reactions with NaOH solutions and Mg(OH)2 suspensions at pressures up to 107 bar and temperatures of 80 °C. The quantitative nature of NMR spectroscopy allows the concentration ratio [CO2]/[HCO3(-)] to be experimentally determined. This ratio is then used with equilibrium constants calculated for the specific pressure and temperature conditions and appropriate activity coefficients for the solutes to calculate the in situ pH. The experimentally determined [CO2]/[HCO3(-)] ratios agree well with the predicted values for experiments performed with three different concentrations of NaOH and equilibration with multiple pressures of CO2. The approach was then applied to experiments with Mg(OH)2 slurries in which the change in pH could track the dissolution of CO2 into solution, rapid initial Mg(OH)2 dissolution, and onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation.

  10. High-temperature experimental and thermodynamic modelling research on the pyrometallurgical processing of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Taufiq; Shishin, Denis; Decterov, Sergei A.; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-01-01

    Uncertainty in the metal price and competition between producers mean that the daily operation of a smelter needs to target high recovery of valuable elements at low operating cost. Options for the improvement of the plant operation can be examined and decision making can be informed based on accurate information from laboratory experimentation coupled with predictions using advanced thermodynamic models. Integrated high-temperature experimental and thermodynamic modelling research on phase equilibria and thermodynamics of copper-containing systems have been undertaken at the Pyrometallurgy Innovation Centre (PYROSEARCH). The experimental phase equilibria studies involve high-temperature equilibration, rapid quenching and direct measurement of phase compositions using electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The thermodynamic modelling deals with the development of accurate thermodynamic database built through critical evaluation of experimental data, selection of solution models, and optimization of models parameters. The database covers the Al-Ca-Cu-Fe-Mg-O-S-Si chemical system. The gas, slag, matte, liquid and solid metal phases, spinel solid solution as well as numerous solid oxide and sulphide phases are included. The database works within the FactSage software environment. Examples of phase equilibria data and thermodynamic models of selected systems, as well as possible implementation of the research outcomes to selected copper making processes are presented.

  11. Compatibility between vandium-base alloys and flowing lithium: Partitioning of hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Chopra, O.K.; Loomis, B.; Smith, D.

    1989-12-01

    A major concern in fusion reactor design is possible hydrogen-isotope-induced embrittlement of structural alloys in the neutron environment expected in these reactors. Hydrogen fractionation occurs between lithium and various refractory metals according to a temperature-dependent distribution coefficient, K H , that is defined as the ration of the hydrogen concentration in the metallic specimen to that in the liquid lithium. In the present work, K H was determined for pure vanadium and several binary and ternary alloys, and the commercial Vanstar 7. Hydrogen distribution studies were performed in an austenitic steel forced-circulation lithium loop. Equilibrium concentrations of hydrogen in vanadium-base alloys exposed to flowing lithium at temperatures of 350 to 550 degree C were measured by inert gas fusion techniques and residual gas analysis. Thermodynamic calculations are consistent with the effect of chromium and titanium in the alloys on the resultant hydrogen fractionation. Experimental and calculated results indicate that K H values are very low; i.e., the hydrogen concentrations in the lithium-equilibrated vanadium-base alloy specimens are about two orders of magnitude lower than those in the lithium. Because of this low distribution coefficient, embrittlement of vanadium alloys by hydrogen in lithium would not be expected. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Light hydrocarbons as redox and temperature indicators in the geothermal field of El Tatio (northern Chile)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassi, F. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Martinez, C. [University Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. of Earth Science; Vaselli, O. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Florence (Italy). National Council of Research; Capaccioni, B. [University of Urbino (Italy). Institute of Volcanology and Geochemistry; Viramonte, J. [National University of Salta (Argentina). Institute GEONORTE and CONICET

    2005-11-15

    El Tatio (northern Chile), one of the largest geothermal fields of South America, is presently undergoing a new program of geothermal exploration, after the failure of the first exploration phase in the early 1970s. The geochemical features of the fluid discharges characterizing this system mainly consist of boiling pools and fumaroles, and represent the result of a complex mixing process involving 3 main components: (i) hydrothermal; (ii) atmospheric; (iii) magmatic. Chemical reactions involving light hydrocarbons equilibrate at higher temperature than those directly measured in the geothermal wells and calculated on the basis of the composition of the inorganic gas species. This suggests that in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system temperatures higher than 300{sup o}C may be achieved. Such results can have a strong impact for the evaluation of the potential resources of this geothermal system. Moreover, the chemical characteristics of the organic gas fraction allow the assessment of the chemical-physical conditions governing the geochemical processes acting on geothermal fluids at depth. (author)

  13. Isotopic dependence of the fragments' internal temperatures determined from multifragment emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, S. R.; Donangelo, R.

    2018-05-01

    The internal temperatures of fragments produced by an excited nuclear source are investigated by using the microcanonical version of the statistical multifragmentation model, with discrete energy. We focus on the fragments' properties at the breakup stage, before they have time to deexcite by particle emission. Since the adopted model provides the excitation energy distribution of these primordial fragments, it allows one to calculate the temperatures of different isotope families and to make inferences about the sensitivity to their isospin composition. It is found that, due to the functional form of the nuclear density of states and the excitation energy distribution of the fragments, proton-rich isotopes are hotter than neutron-rich isotopes. This property has been taken to be an indication of earlier emission of the former from a source that cools down as it expands and emits fragments. Although this scenario is incompatible with the prompt breakup of a thermally equilibrated source, our results reveal that the latter framework also provides the same qualitative features just mentioned. Therefore they suggest that this property cannot be taken as evidence for nonequilibrium emission. We also found that this sensitivity to the isotopic composition of the fragments depends on the isospin composition of the source, and that it is weakened as the excitation energy of the source increases.

  14. Elastic Wave Velocity Measurements on Mantle Peridotite at High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistler, G. W.; Ishikawa, M.; Li, B.

    2002-12-01

    With the success of conducting ultrasonic measurements at high pressure and high temperature in large volume high pressure apparatus with in-situ measurement of the sample length by X-ray imaging, it is now possible to measure elastic wave velocities on aggregate samples with candidate compositions of the mantle to the conditions of the Earth's transition zone in the laboratory. These data can be directly compared with seismic data to distinguish the compositional models in debate. In this work, we carried out velocity measurements on natural peridotite KLB-1 at the conditions of the Earth's upper mantle. Fine powered sample of natural KLB-1 was used as starting material. Specimens for ultrasonic measurements were hot-pressed and equilibrated at various pressure and temperature conditions along geotherm up to the transition zone. The recovered samples were characterized with density measurement, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. Bench top P and S wave velocities of KLB-1 sample sintered at 3-4 GPa and 1400 degree centigrade showed a very good agreement with the VRH average of pyrolite. High pressure and high temperature measurements was conducted up to 7 GPa and 800 degree centigrade using ultrasonic interferometric method in a DIA-type high pressure apparatus in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging. The utilization of X-ray imaging technique provides direct measurements of sample lengths at high pressure and high temperature, ensuring a precise determination of velocities. The results of P and S wave velocities at high pressure and high temperature as well as their comparison with calculated pyrolite model will be presented.

  15. Temperatures of exploding nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfling, V.; Schwarz, C.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Gross, C.; Kleinevoss, U.; Kunze, W.D; Lynen, U.; Mahi, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Odeh, T.; Schnittker, M.; Trautmann, W.; Woerner, A.; Xi, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Bassini, R.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Petruzzelli, F. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Gaff, S.J.; Kunde, G.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Imme, G.; Maddalena, V.; Nociforo, C.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F.P.; Saija, A.; Sfienti, C.; Verde, G. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Moehlenkamp, T.; Seidel, W. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Ocker, B.; Schuettauf, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Pochodzalla, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-01-01

    Breakup temperatures in central collisions of {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at bombarding energies E/A=50 to 200 MeV were determined with two methods. Isotope temperatures, deduced from double ratios of hydrogen, helium, and lithium isotopic yields, increase monotonically with bombarding energy from 5 MeV to 12 MeV, in qualitative agreement with a scenario of chemical freeze-out after adiabatic expansion. Excited-state temperatures, derived from yield ratios of states in {sup 4}He, {sup 5,6}Li, and {sup 8}Be, are about 5 MeV, independent of the projectile energy, and seem to reflect the internal temperature of fragments at their final separation from the system. (orig.)

  16. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  17. Temperature measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Christian; Lions, Noel.

    1975-01-01

    The present invention relates to a temperature measuring system that can be applied in particular to monitoring the temperature of the cooling liquid metal of the outlet of the core assemblies of a fast reactor. Said device combines a long hollow metallic pole, at least partially dipped into the liquid metal and constituting a first thermocouple junction between said pole, and two metallic conductors of different nature, joined at one of their ends to constitute the second thermocouple junction. Said conductors suitably insulated are arranged inside a sheath. Said sheath made of the same metals as the pole extends inside the latter and is connected with the pole through a soldered joint. Said reliable system permits an instantaneous measurement of a quantity representing the variations in the recorded temperature and a measurement of the mean surrounding temperature that can be direcly used as a reference for calibrating the first one [fr

  18. Designing for elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, G.A. de

    1982-01-01

    The reasons for the application of higher process temperatures are explained. The properties of stainless steel are compared with those of other materials such as molybdenum. Factors influencing the choice of the material such as availability of material data at high temperature, controllability, and strength of heat-affected zone are discussed. The process of designing a structure for safe and economic high-temperature application is outlined: design-by-analysis in contrast to the design-by-rule which is general practice for low-temperature applications. The rules laid down in the ASME Pressure Vessel Code Case N47 are explained as well as the procedure for inelastic stress calculations. (author)

  19. Elevated temperature fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics concepts to cracks at elevated temperatures is examined. Particular consideration is given to the characterisation of crack tip stress-strain fields and parameters controlling crack extension under static and cyclic loads. (author)

  20. High temperature battery. Hochtemperaturbatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, M.

    1992-06-04

    To prevent heat losses of a high temperature battery, it is proposed to make the incoming current leads in the area of their penetration through the double-walled insulating housing as thermal throttle, particularly spiral ones.

  1. Ikaite solubility in seawater-derived brines at 1 atm and sub-zero temperatures to 265 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Stathys; Kennedy, Hilary; Kennedy, Paul; Thomas, David N.

    2013-05-01

    The concentration-based (stoichiometric) equilibrium solubility product of ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) in seawater and cryogenic seawater-derived brines was determined at 1 atm total pressure over the temperature range from -1.1 to -7.5 °C and the salinity range from 34 to 124 in temperature-salinity pairs representative of sea ice brines. The solubility measurements were obtained in solutions that were undersaturated and supersaturated with respect to ikaite by equilibration with CO2/N2 gas mixtures of known pCO2 (20-400 μatm). The solutions were then equilibrated with synthetic ikaite (seed) for up to 3 months in a closed system. Arrival of the solid-solution system at a long-term chemical equilibrium was indicated by attainment of constant chemical solution composition with respect to total dissolved calcium, total dissolved inorganic carbon, and total alkalinity. Using these measurements, the stoichiometric equilibrium solubility product of ikaite (Ksp,ikaite∗=[Ca][CO32-], in molkgsolution-2) was determined, with the carbonate ion concentration computed from the measured total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations. The computed carbonate ion concentration and, by extension, the Ksp,ikaite∗ are both contingent on solving the system of equations that describe the parameters of the CO2 system in seawater by extrapolation to the experimental salinity and temperature conditions. The results show that the pKsp,ikaite∗=-logKsp,ikaite∗ in seawater of salinity 34 at -1.1 °C was 5.362 ± 0.004 and that the pKsp,ikaite∗ in sea ice at the freezing point of brines of salinity greater than 34 can be described as a function of temperature (T, in K) by the equation, pKsp,ikaite∗=-15489.09608+623443.70216T-1+2355.14596lnT, in the temperature range of 265.15 K 1 month) approach to chemical equilibrium when incubated without seeding ikaite crystals. Simple modeling indicated that ikaite should not precipitate from sea ice brines evolving under

  2. QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Keiji

    1983-01-01

    The varidity of the perturbation method in the high temperature QCD is discussed. The skeleton expansion method takes account of plasmon effects and eliminates the electric infrared singularity but not the magnetic one. A possibility of eliminating the latter, which was recently proposed, is examined by a gauge invariant skeleton expansion. The magnetic singularity is unable to be eliminated by the perturbation method. This implies that some non-perturbative approaches must be incorporated in the high temperature QCD. (author)

  3. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Temperature measuring device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Sohns, C.W.

    1999-10-19

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  5. Sweating at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaye, H.; Launay, J.P.

    1980-11-01

    Tests of penetration liquids normally used between 10 and 40 0 C have shown that the arrangement of operationaal conditions (penetration and revealing times) was not sufficient to maintain their sensitivity below 10 0 C, thereby confirming that this temperature is a limit below which such products cannot be employed. The results achieved with a penetrant and a tracer specially devised for low temperatures (SHERWIN B 305 + D100) are satisfactory between 0 0 C and 15 0 C [fr

  6. Temperature in the throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Kaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the temperature of extended objects in string theory. Rotating probe D-branes admit horizons and temperatures a la Unruh effect. We find that the induced metrics on slow rotating probe D1-branes in holographic string solutions including warped Calabi–Yau throats have distinct thermal horizons with characteristic Hawking temperatures even if there is no black hole in the bulk Calabi–Yau. Taking the UV/IR limits of the solution, we show that the world volume black hole nucleation depends on the deformation and the warping of the throat. We find that world volume horizons and temperatures of expected features form not in the regular confining IR region but in the singular nonconfining UV solution. In the conformal limit of the UV, we find horizons and temperatures similar to those on rotating probes in the AdS throat found in the literature. In this case, we also find that activating a background gauge field form the U(1 R-symmetry modifies the induced metric with its temperature describing two different classes of black hole solutions.

  7. Temperature Effect on Energy Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Duk [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    We provide various estimates of temperature effect for accommodating seasonality in energy demand, particularly natural gas demand. We exploit temperature response and monthly temperature distribution to estimate the temperature effect on natural gas demand. Both local and global smoothed temperature responses are estimated from empirical relationship between hourly temperature and hourly energy consumption data during the sample period (1990 - 1996). Monthly temperature distribution estimates are obtained by kernel density estimation from temperature dispersion within a month. We integrate temperature response and monthly temperature density over all the temperatures in the sample period to estimate temperature effect on energy demand. Then, estimates of temperature effect are compared between global and local smoothing methods. (author). 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Low temperature distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, J N; Postel, C

    1929-04-09

    To recover gas, oil tars, and coked residues by low temperature distillation from bituminous coals, lignites, oil shales, and the like, the raw material is fed from a hopper into a rotary retort which is zonally heated, the temperature being greatest at the discharge end. The material is heated first to a relatively low temperature, thereby removing the moisture and lighter volatiles which are withdrawn through a pipe by the suction of a pump, while the higher boiling point volatiles and fixed gases are withdrawn by suction through an outlet from the higher temperature zone. The vapors withdrawn from the opposite ends of the retort pass through separate vapor lines and condensers, and the suction in each end of the retort, caused by the pumps, is controlled by valves, which also control the location of the neutral point in the retort formed by said suction. Air and inert gas may be introduced into the retort from pipe and stack respectively through a pipe, and steam may be admitted into the high temperature zone through a pipe.

  9. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  10. Temperature Data Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, David

    2003-01-01

    Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS

  11. Do `negative' temperatures exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    A modification of the second law is required for a system with a bounded density of states and not the introduction of a `negative' temperature scale. The ascending and descending branches of the entropy versus energy curve describe particle and hole states, having thermal equations of state that are given by the Fermi and logistic distributions, respectively. Conservation of energy requires isentropic states to be isothermal. The effect of adiabatically reversing the field is entirely mechanical because the only difference between the two states is their energies. The laws of large and small numbers, leading to the normal and Poisson approximations, characterize statistically the states of infinite and zero temperatures, respectively. Since the heat capacity also vanishes in the state of maximum disorder, the third law can be generalized in systems with a bounded density of states: the entropy tends to a constant as the temperature tends to either zero or infinity.

  12. Estimating plasma temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.K.; Iglesias, C.A.; Chen, M.H.; Rogers, F.J.

    1992-04-01

    Recent laser-produced plasma experiments have relied on spectroscopic comparisons with models to infer plasma temperatures. The models use an experimentally determined value for the matter density as input and treat the temperature as a free parameter to obtain a best fit to the experimental absorption spectrum. However, uncertainties in the ionization balance theories lead to inferred temperatures that are model dependent. We report results of a new approach which combines high=quality atomic data with an ionization balance obtained from systematic expansions of the grand canonical ensemble. The latter avoids the ad hoc cutoffs required in free energy minimization schemes and includes Coulomb corrections usually neglected in other models. Comparisons to experimental spectra show excellent agreement

  13. Temperature-reflection I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGady, David A.

    2017-01-01

    -temperature path integrals for quantum field theories (QFTs) should be T-reflection invariant. Because multi-particle partition functions are equal to Euclidean path integrals for QFTs, we expect them to be T-reflection invariant. Single-particle partition functions though are often not invariant under T......In this paper, we revisit the claim that many partition functions are invariant under reflecting temperatures to negative values (T-reflection). The goal of this paper is to demarcate which partition functions should be invariant under T-reflection, and why. Our main claim is that finite...... that T-reflection is unrelated to time-reversal. Finally, we study the interplay between T-reflection and perturbation theory in the anharmonic harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics and in Yang-Mills in four-dimensions. This is the first in a series of papers on temperature-reflections....

  14. Partition of Ni between olivine and sulfide: the effect of temperature, f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } and f_{{text{S}}_{text{2}} }

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, M. E.; Macrae, N. D.

    1987-03-01

    The experimental distribution coefficient for Ni/ Fe exchange between olivine and monosulfide (KD3) is 35.6±1.1 at 1385° C, f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 8.87} ,f_{{text{S}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 1.02} , and olivine of composition Fo96 to Fo92. These are the physicochemical conditions appropriate to hypothesized sulfur-saturated komatiite magma. The present experiments equilibrated natural olivine grains with sulfide-oxide liquid in the presence of a (Mg, Fe)-alumino-silicate melt. By a variety of different experimental procedures, K D3 is shown to be essentially constant at about 30 to 35 in the temperature range 900 to 1400° C, for olivine of composition Fo97 to FoO, monosulfide composition with up to 70 mol. % NiS, and a wide range of f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } and f_{{text{S}}_{text{2}} }.

  15. Hydrochemistry and geothermometrical modeling of low-temperature Panticosa geothermal system (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P.; Gimeno, Maria J.; Auqué, Luis F.; Gómez, Javier; Acero, Patricia; Lapuente, Pilar

    2012-08-01

    The chemical characteristics of the low-temperature geothermal system of Panticosa (Spain) were investigated in order to determine the water temperature at the reservoir and to identify the main geochemical processes that affect the water composition during the ascent of the thermal waters. In general, the studied waters are similar to other geothermal systems in the Pyrenees, belonging to the group of granite-related alkaline thermal waters (high pH, low total dissolved solids, very low magnesium concentration, and sodium as the dominant cation). According to the alkaline pH of these waters, they have a very low CO2 partial pressure, bicarbonate is the dominant anion and silica is partially ionized as H3SiO4-. The unusually active acid-base pairs (HCO3-/CO32 - and, mainly, H4SiO4/H3SiO4-) act as homogeneous pH buffers and contribute to the total alkalinity in these alkaline waters. On the basis of the study of the conservative elements, a mixing process between a hot and a cold end-member has been identified. Additionally, in order to determinate the water temperature at the reservoir, several geothermometric techniques have been applied, including both geothermometrical modeling and classical geothermometrical calculations. The geothermometrical modeling seems to indicate that thermal waters re-equilibrate with respect to calcite and kaolinite during their ascent to the surface. Modeling results suggest that these thermal waters would be in equilibrium with respect to albite, K-feldspar, quartz, calcite, kaolinite and zoisite at a similar temperature of 90 ± 20 °C in the reservoir, which is in good agreement with the results obtained by applying the classical geothermometers.

  16. ITS Temperature Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Savin, A E; CERN. Geneva; Gerasimov, S F

    1999-01-01

    The results of the R&D done under the ISTC#345 grant are presented for consideration for possible future application. The choice of the temperature sensors is described. Thin-film miniature Pt-sensors were produced and the results of the metrological studies of the manufactured samples are presented. The multi-channel temperature data readout system prototype and results of long-term stability tests are discussed. List of figures: Figure 1 Thin film Pt-thermometer topology Figure 2 Studies of long-term stability of Pt-thermometers Figure 3 DT structural scheme Figures 4 & 5 Output data ADC read operation, Control register ADC write operation

  17. Low temperature destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-07-05

    A process is given and apparatus is described for the destructive distillation at low temperature of coal, oil shale, and the like by subjection to the action of a stream of hot gases or superhearted steam, flowing in a closed circuit. Subsequent treatment of the distillation residues with a gas stream containing oxygen results in combustion of the carbon-containing material therein brings to a high temperature the solid residue, in which the process comprises subsequently contacting the hot solid residue with the fluid stream effecting the distillation.

  18. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich

  19. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-06-15

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich.

  20. Determination of irradiation temperature using SiC temperature monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Onose, Shoji

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a method for detecting the change in length of SiC temperature monitors and a discussion is made on the relationship between irradiation temperature and the recovery in length of SiC temperature monitors. The SiC specimens were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor JOYO' at the irradiation temperatures around 417 to 645degC (design temperature). The change in length of irradiated specimens was detected using a dilatometer with SiO 2 glass push rod in an infrared image furnace. The temperature at which recovery in macroscopic length begins was obtained from the annealing intersection temperature. The results of measurements indicated that a difference between annealing intersection temperature and the design temperature sometimes reached well over ±100degC. A calibration method to obtain accurate irradiation temperature was presented and compared with the design temperature. (author)

  1. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  2. High-temperature uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timusk, T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments reveal that the mechanism responsible for the superconducting properties of cuprate materials is even more mysterious than we thought. Two decades ago, Georg Bednorz and Alex Mueller of IBM's research laboratory in Zurich rocked the world of physics when they discovered a material that lost all resistance to electrical current at the record temperature of 36 K. Until then, superconductivity was thought to be a strictly low-temperature phenomenon that required costly refrigeration. Moreover, the IBM discovery - for which Bednorz and Mueller were awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize for Physics - was made in a ceramic copper-oxide material that nobody expected to be particularly special. Proposed applications for these 'cuprates' abounded. High-temperature superconductivity, particularly if it could be extended to room temperature, offered the promise of levitating trains, ultra-efficient power cables, and even supercomputers based on superconducting quantum interference devices. But these applications have been slow to materialize. Moreover, almost 20 years on, the physics behind this strange state of matter remains a mystery. (U.K.)

  3. Dual temperature concentration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    In a dual temperature isotope exchange system--exemplified by exchange of deuterium and protium between water and hydrogen sulfide gas in hot and cold towers, in which the feed stream (water) containing the desired isotope is passed through a pair of towers maintained at different temperatures wherein it effects isotope exchange with countercurrently circulated auxiliary fluid (H 2 S) and is impoverished in said isotope and then disposed of, e.g. discharged to waste,--the flow of isotope enriched auxiliary fluid between said towers (hot H 2 S saturated with water vapor) is divided and a part thereof is adjusted in its temperature (to cold tower conditions) and then passed to the auxiliary fluid impoverishing (cold) tower, while the remainder of the divided flow of such enriched auxiliary fluid is passed through a subsequent isotope concentration treatment to produce a product more highly enriched in the desired isotope and wherein it is also adjusted in its temperature and is impoverished in said isotope during said subsequent treatment before it is delivered to the said auxiliary fluid impoverishing (cold) tower. Certain provisions are made for returning to the hot tower liquid carried as vapor by the remainder of the divided flow to the subsequent isotope concentration treatment, for recovering sensible and latent heat, and for reducing passage of auxiliary fluid to waste

  4. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  5. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  6. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU...

  7. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also i...

  8. Temperature measurements by thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liermann, J.

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of a temperature (whatever the type of transducer used) raises three problems: the choice of transducer; where it should be placed; how it should be fixed and protected. These are the three main points examined, after a brief description of the most commonly used thermocouples [fr

  9. A temperature profiler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Peshwe, V.B.; Desa, E.

    An instrument developed for measuring temperature profiles at sea in depth or time scales is described. PC-based programming offers flexibility in setting up the instrument for the mode of operation prior to each cast. A real time clock built...

  10. Temperature dependent anomalous statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Panda, S.

    1991-07-01

    We show that the anomalous statistics which arises in 2 + 1 dimensional Chern-Simons gauge theories can become temperature dependent in the most natural way. We analyze and show that a statistic's changing phase transition can happen in these theories only as T → ∞. (author). 14 refs

  11. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats; Une nouvelle methode d'etude du metabolisme de l'iode: la methode d'equilibre isotopique - aspects cinetiques et quantitatifs obtenus chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 {mu}g of {sup 127}I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T{sub 4} and T{sub 3}). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}. The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent {sup 127}I measurements. (author) [French] La methode d'equilibre isotopique, mise au point chez le rat, a permis de mesurer en valeur absolue les principaux parametres du metabolisme de l'iode chez cet animal. Les quantites ou les concentrations d'iode ont ete mesurees pour la thyroide et pour le

  12. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats; Une nouvelle methode d'etude du metabolisme de l'iode: la methode d'equilibre isotopique - aspects cinetiques et quantitatifs obtenus chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 {mu}g of {sup 127}I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T{sub 4} and T{sub 3}). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}. The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent {sup 127}I measurements. (author) [French] La methode d'equilibre isotopique, mise au point chez le rat, a permis de mesurer en valeur absolue les principaux parametres du metabolisme de l'iode chez cet animal. Les quantites ou les concentrations d'iode ont ete mesurees pour la thyroide et pour le plasma avec une

  13. Survival, growth and reproduction of non-indigenous Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus 1758). I. Physiological capabilities in various temperatures and salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Peterson, Mark S.; Lowe, Michael R.; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J.; Slack, William T.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological tolerances of non-native fishes is an integral component of assessing potential invasive risk. Salinity and temperature are environmental variables that limit the spread of many non-native fishes. We hypothesised that combinations of temperature and salinity will interact to affect survival, growth, and reproduction of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, introduced into Mississippi, USA. Tilapia withstood acute transfer from fresh water up to a salinity of 20 and survived gradual transfer up to 60 at typical summertime (30°C) temperatures. However, cold temperature (14°C) reduced survival of fish in saline waters ≥10 and increased the incidence of disease in freshwater controls. Although fish were able to equilibrate to saline waters in warm temperatures, reproductive parameters were reduced at salinities ≥30. These integrated responses suggest that Nile tilapia can invade coastal areas beyond their point of introduction. However, successful invasion is subject to two caveats: (1) wintertime survival depends on finding thermal refugia, and (2) reproduction is hampered in regions where salinities are ≥30. These data are vital to predicting the invasion of non-native fishes into coastal watersheds. This is particularly important given the predicted changes in coastal landscapes due to global climate change and sea-level rise.

  14. Estimation of bare soil surface temperature from air temperature and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil surface temperature has critical influence on climate, agricultural and hydrological activities since it serves as a good indicator of the energy budget of the earth's surface. Two empirical models for estimating soil surface temperature from air temperature and soil depth temperature were developed. The coefficient of ...

  15. Relationship between body temperature and air temperature in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body temperatures of singing male Gryllus bimaculatus were measured for the first time. Body temperatures were strongly correlated with ambient temperature. This indicates that, unlike some other orthopterans, larger crickets are not dependent on an elevated body temperature for efficient calling. Our results confirm that it ...

  16. Astronaut James Lovell checks body temperature with oral temperature probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 7 pilot Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr. has temperature check with oral temperature probe attached to his space suit during final preflight preparations for the Gemini 7 space mission. The temperature probe allows doctors to monitor astronauts body temperature at any time during the mission.

  17. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  18. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsnyai, B. F.

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  19. Effect of water content on the glass transition temperature of mixtures of sugars, polymers, and penetrating cryoprotectants in physiological buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Andrew C; Lee, Youngjoo; Burgess, Emma M; Karlsson, Jens O M; Eroglu, Ali; Higgins, Adam Z

    2018-01-01

    Long-term storage of viable mammalian cells is important for applications ranging from in vitro fertilization to cell therapy. Cryopreservation is currently the most common approach, but storage in liquid nitrogen is relatively costly and the requirement for low temperatures during shipping is inconvenient. Desiccation is an alternative strategy with the potential to enable viable cell preservation at more convenient storage temperatures without the need for liquid nitrogen. To achieve stability during storage in the dried state it is necessary to remove enough water that the remaining matrix forms a non-crystalline glassy solid. Thus, the glass transition temperature is a key parameter for design of cell desiccation procedures. In this study, we have investigated the effects of moisture content on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of mixtures of sugars (trehalose or raffinose), polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone or Ficoll), penetrating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutes. Aqueous solutions were dried to different moisture contents by equilibration with saturated salt solutions, or by baking at 95°C. The glass transition temperatures of the dehydrated samples were then measured by differential scanning calorimetry. As expected, Tg increased with decreasing moisture content. For example, in a desiccation medium containing 0.1 M trehalose in PBS, Tg ranged from about 360 K for a completely dry sample to about 220 K at a water mass fraction of 0.4. Addition of polymers to the solutions increased Tg, while addition of penetrating cryoprotectants decreased Tg. Our results provide insight into the relationship between relative humidity, moisture content and glass transition temperature for cell desiccation solutions containing sugars, polymers and penetrating cryoprotectants.

  20. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  1. High temperature materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  2. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  3. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick; Duffy, Kevin Patrick

    2005-09-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  4. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  5. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  6. Temperature measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.

    1977-01-01

    The temperature measuring device is equipped with an electric resistor installed within a metal shroud tube so as to be insulated from it, the noise voltage of which resistor is fed to a measuring unit. The measuring junctions of one or two thermocouples are connected with the electric resistor and the legs of one or both thermocouples can be connected to the measuring unit by means of a switch. (orig.) [de

  7. Low temperatures - hot topic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Neutrino mass measurements, next-generation double beta experiments, solar neutrino detection, searches for magnetic monopoles and the challenge of discovering what most of the Universe is made of (dark matter), not to mention axions (cosmic and solar), supersymmetric neutral particles and cosmic neutrinos. All this physics could use cryogenic techniques. Thus the second European Workshop on Low Temperature Devices for the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos and Dark Matter, held at LAPP (Annecy) in May, covered an active and promising field.

  8. Low temperatures - hot topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Neutrino mass measurements, next-generation double beta experiments, solar neutrino detection, searches for magnetic monopoles and the challenge of discovering what most of the Universe is made of (dark matter), not to mention axions (cosmic and solar), supersymmetric neutral particles and cosmic neutrinos. All this physics could use cryogenic techniques. Thus the second European Workshop on Low Temperature Devices for the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos and Dark Matter, held at LAPP (Annecy) in May, covered an active and promising field

  9. High temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  10. Temperature responsive track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, H.; Yoshido, M.; Asano, M.; Tamada, H.

    1994-01-01

    A new track membrane was synthesized by introducing polymeric hydrogel to films. Such a monomer as amino acid group containing acryloyl or methacryloyl was either co-polymerized with diethylene glycol-bis-ally carbonate followed by on beam irradiation and chemical etching, or graft co-polymerized onto a particle track membrane of CR-39. The pore size was controlled in water by changing the water temperature. Some films other than CR-39 were also examined. (author). 11 refs, 7 figs

  11. Portable Body Temperature Conditioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    temperature is 36.0o C. The patient complains of severe abdominal pain and intra- abdominal injury is suspected. In this scenario the patient is...hypothermia will shiver, experience pain , and on a whole be really uncomfortable. If they are sufficiently obtunded to require this therapy then they...Convective hyper- hypothermia water blankets/wraps Single-Use Blanket Maxi-Therm Adult Box 5 $127.00 Pediatric Box 5 $90.00 Infant Box 5 $72.00

  12. Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.

    2008-01-01

    An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of -40 C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth. Supercapacitors (also known as double-layer or electrochemical capacitors) offer a high power density (>1,000 W/kg) and moderate energy density (about 5 to 10 Wh/kg) technology for storing energy and delivering power. This combination of properties enables delivery of large currents for pulsed applications, or alternatively, smaller currents for low duty cycle applications. The mechanism of storage of electric charge in a supercapacitor -- at the electrical double-layer formed at a solid-electrode/liquid-electrolyte interface -- differs from that of a primary or secondary electrochemical cell (i.e., a battery) in such a manner as to impart a long cycle life (typically >10(exp 6) charge/discharge cycles).

  13. Low-temperature carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strankmuller, J

    1954-01-01

    The low-temperature carbonization plant at Boehlen in Eastern Germany (the first in which Lurgi type ovens were installed) worked with a throughput of 300 tons of brown-coal briquets per day per oven since 1936, later increased to 365 tons per day. The rising demand for low-temperature tar for hydrogenation purposes led to development of a modified oven of 450 tons throughput. This was achieved by stepping up the flow of the circulating gas and air mixture from 420,000 to 560,000 cubic feet per hour and by additional rows of V-shaped deflectors across the width of the oven chamber, which break up and loosen the charge, thus reducing cooling-gas pressure and allowing a greater flow of scavenging gas. The distance traversed by each briquet is nearly doubled, and the temperature gradient is less. It is claimed that the tar and the coke from modified ovens are of comparable quality. The compressive strength of the briquets was found to have an appreciable effect on the output. Better qts the chemistry, mechanism and thermodynamics of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction and aectromagnetic radiation.

  14. Ion temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Anomalous ion thermal conductivity remains an open physics issue for the present generation of high temperature Tokamaks. It is generally believed to be due to Ion Temperature Gradient Instability (η i mode). However, it has been difficult, if not impossible to identify this instability and study the anomalous transport due to it, directly. Therefore the production and identification of the mode is pursued in the simpler and experimentally convenient configuration of the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM). CLM is a steady state machine which already has all the appropriate parameters, except η i . This parameter is being increased to the appropriate value of the order of 1 by 'feathering' a tungsten screen located between the plasma source and the experimental cell to flatten the density profile and appropriate redesign of heating antennas to steepen the ion temperature profile. Once the instability is produced and identified, a thorough study of the characteristics of the mode can be done via a wide range of variation of all the critical parameters: η i , parallel wavelength, etc

  15. A trial of ignition innovation of gasoline engine by nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Taisuke; Urushihara, Tomonori; Gundersen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma as an ignition technique for automotive gasoline engines, which require a discharge under conditions of high back pressure, has been studied experimentally using a single-cylinder engine. The nanosecond pulsed plasma refers to the transient (non-equilibrated) phase of a plasma before the formation of an arc discharge; it was obtained by applying a high voltage with a nanosecond pulse (FWHM of approximately 80 or 25 ns) between coaxial cylindrical electrodes. It was confirmed that nanosecond pulsed plasma can form a volumetric multi-channel streamer discharge at an energy consumption of 60 mJ cycle -1 under a high back pressure of 1400 kPa. It was found that the initial combustion period was shortened compared with the conventional spark ignition. The initial flame visualization suggested that the nanosecond pulsed plasma ignition results in the formation of a spatially dispersed initial flame kernel at a position of high electric field strength around the central electrode. It was observed that the electric field strength in the air gap between the coaxial cylindrical electrodes was increased further by applying a shorter pulse. It was also clarified that the shorter pulse improved ignitability even further.

  16. A trial of ignition innovation of gasoline engine by nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Taisuke; Urushihara, Tomonori; Gundersen, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma as an ignition technique for automotive gasoline engines, which require a discharge under conditions of high back pressure, has been studied experimentally using a single-cylinder engine. The nanosecond pulsed plasma refers to the transient (non-equilibrated) phase of a plasma before the formation of an arc discharge; it was obtained by applying a high voltage with a nanosecond pulse (FWHM of approximately 80 or 25 ns) between coaxial cylindrical electrodes. It was confirmed that nanosecond pulsed plasma can form a volumetric multi-channel streamer discharge at an energy consumption of 60 mJ cycle-1 under a high back pressure of 1400 kPa. It was found that the initial combustion period was shortened compared with the conventional spark ignition. The initial flame visualization suggested that the nanosecond pulsed plasma ignition results in the formation of a spatially dispersed initial flame kernel at a position of high electric field strength around the central electrode. It was observed that the electric field strength in the air gap between the coaxial cylindrical electrodes was increased further by applying a shorter pulse. It was also clarified that the shorter pulse improved ignitability even further.

  17. A new temperature collection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Wenchuang; Wang Daihua; Zhang Zhijie

    2011-01-01

    According to the characteristics of explosion field temperature testing, a new temperature collection system based on complex programmable logic device (CPLD), single chip microcontroller (SCM) and static ram (SRAM) is proposed. The system adopts the NANMAC E12 type of thermocouple as the temperature sensor, DS600 temperature sensor for cold temperature compensation, with rapid synchronous collection, trigger and working parameters adjustable characteristics. The system used SCM combined with USB communication interface, easy operation and reliable. (authors)

  18. GlobTemperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John; Bruniquel, Jerome; Sardou, Olivier; Trigo, Isabel; Merchant, Chris; Bulgin, Claire; Goettsche, Frank; Olesen, Folke; Prigent, Catherine; Pinnock, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the mean radiative skin temperature of an area of land resulting from the mean balance of solar heating and land-atmosphere cooling fluxes. It is a basic determinant of the terrestrial thermal behaviour, as it controls the effective radiating temperature of the Earth's surface. The sensitivity of LST to soil moisture and vegetation cover means it is an important component in numerous applications. For instance, LST is a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within General Circulation Models. Changes in land-surface cover can affect global climate, and also can be identified by changes in their surface temperatures. With the demand of LST data from Earth Observation currently experiencing considerable growth it is important that the users of this data are appropriately engaged by the LST community. The GlobTemperature project under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013-2017) aims to promote the wider uptake of global-scale satellite LST by the research and operational user communities. As such, the programme of work is focussed on achieving some innovative milestones for LST data which include: detailed global merged geostationary (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data sets with estimates of both clear-sky and under-cloud LST; a first Climate Data Record for LST for the ATSR series of instruments; and the provision of a globally representative and consistent in-situ validation and intercomparison matchup database. Furthermore, the strength of such a venture lies in the coherence and openness of the interactions with the LST and user communities. For instance: detailed user input into the specifications and subsequent testing of the LST data sets; sustained access to data in a user-friendly manner through common data formats; and

  19. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James C. R.; Leijnse, Hidde; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. It has been shown that a straightforward heat transfer model can be employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. The methodology has been applied to Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree

  20. Measuring the temperature dependent thermal diffusivity of geomaterials using high-speed differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Heat diffusion in the Earth's crust is critical to fundamental geological processes, such as the cooling of magma, heat dissipation during and following transient heating events (e.g. during frictional heating along faults), and to the timescales of contact metamorphosis. The complex composition and multiphase nature of geomaterials prohibits the accurate modeling of thermal diffusivities and measurements over a range of temperatures are sparse due to the specialized nature of the equipment and lack of instrument availability. We present a novel method to measure the thermal diffusivity of geomaterials such as minerals and rocks with high precision and accuracy using a commercially available differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). A DSC 404 F1 Pegasus® equipped with a Netzsch high-speed furnace was used to apply a step-heating program to corundum single crystal standards of varying thicknesses. The standards were cylindrical discs of 0.25-1 mm thickness with 5.2-6 mm diameter. Heating between each 50 °C temperature interval was conducted at a rate of 100 °C/min over the temperature range 150-1050 °C. Such large heating rates induces temperature disequilibrium in the samples used. However, isothermal segments of 2 minutes were used during which the temperature variably equilibrated with the furnace between the heating segments and thus the directly-measured heat-flow relaxed to a constant value before the next heating step was applied. A finite-difference 2D conductive heat transfer model was used in cylindrical geometry for which the measured furnace temperature was directly applied as the boundary condition on the sample-cylinder surfaces. The model temperature was averaged over the sample volume per unit time and converted to heat-flow using the well constrained thermal properties for corundum single crystals. By adjusting the thermal diffusivity in the model solution and comparing the resultant heat-flow with the measured values, we obtain a model

  1. High temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  2. Residential Indoor Temperature Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booten, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robertson, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Dane [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heaney, Mike [Arrow Electronics, Centennial, CO (United States); Brown, David [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Norton, Paul [Norton Energy Research and Development, Boulder, CO (United States); Smith, Chris [Ingersoll-Rand Corp., Dublin (Ireland)

    2017-04-07

    In this study, we are adding to the body of knowledge around answering the question: What are good assumptions for HVAC set points in U.S. homes? We collected and analyzed indoor temperature data from US homes using funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America (BA) program, due to the program's reliance on accurate energy simulation of homes. Simulations are used to set Building America goals, predict the impact of new building techniques and technologies, inform research objectives, evaluate home performance, optimize efficiency packages to meet savings goals, customize savings approaches to specific climate zones, and myriad other uses.

  3. High temperature radioisotope capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    A high temperature radioisotope capsule made up of three concentric cylinders, with the isotope fuel located within the innermost cylinder is described. The innermost cylinder has hemispherical ends and is constructed of a tantalum alloy. The intermediate cylinder is made of a molybdenum alloy and is capable of withstanding the pressure generated by the alpha particle decay of the fuel. The outer cylinder is made of a platinum alloy of high resistance to corrosion. A gas separates the innermost cylinder from the intermediate cylinder and the intermediate cylinder from the outer cylinder

  4. Ambient temperature signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigge, Philip A

    2013-10-01

    Plants are exposed to daily and seasonal fluctuations in temperature. Within the 'ambient' temperature range (about 12-27°C for Arabidopsis) temperature differences have large effects on plant growth and development, disease resistance pathways and the circadian clock without activating temperature stress pathways. It is this developmental sensing and response to non-stressful temperatures that will be covered in this review. Recent advances have revealed key players in mediating temperature signals. The bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) has been shown to be a hub for multiple responses to warmer temperature in Arabidopsis, including flowering and hypocotyl elongation. Changes in chromatin state are involved in transmitting temperature signals to the transcriptome. Determining the precise mechanisms of temperature perception represents an exciting goal for the field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adsorption-Desorption of Hexaconazole in Soils with Respect to Soil Properties, Temperature, and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maznah Zainol

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature and pH on adsorption-desorption of fungicide hexaconazole was studied in two Malaysian soil types; namely clay loam and sandy loam. The adsorption-desorption experiment was conducted using the batch equilibration technique and the residues of hexaconazole were analysed using the GC-ECD. The results showed that the adsorption-desorption isotherms of hexaconazole can be described with Freundlich equation. The Freundlich sorption coefficient (Kd values were positively correlated to the clay and organic matter content in the soils. Hexaconazole attained the equilibrium phase within 24 h in both soil types studied. The adsorption coefficient (Kd values obtained for clay loam soil and sandy loam soil were 2.54 mL/g and 2.27 mL/g, respectively, indicating that hexaconazole was weakly sorbed onto the soils due to the low organic content of the soils. Regarding thermodynamic parameters, the Gibb’s free energy change (ΔG analysis showed that hexaconazole adsorption onto soil was spontaneous and exothermic, plus it exhibited positive hysteresis. A strong correlation was observed between the adsorption of hexaconazole and pH of the soil solution. However, temperature was found to have no effect on the adsorption of hexaconazole onto the soils; for the range tested.

  6. Estimation and application of the thermodynamic properties of aqueous phenanthrene and isomers of methylphenanthrene at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Evans, Katy A.; Holman, Alex I.; Jaraula, Caroline M. B.; Grice, Kliti

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of standard molal Gibbs energy (ΔGf°) and enthalpy (ΔHf°) of formation, entropy (S°), heat capacity (CP°) and volume (V°) at 25 °C and 1 bar of aqueous phenanthrene (P) and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- and 9-methylphenanthrene (1-MP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 9-MP) were made by combining reported standard-state properties of the crystalline compounds, solubilities and enthalpies of phenanthrene and 1-MP, and relative Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of aqueous MP isomers from published quantum chemical simulations. The calculated properties are consistent with greater stabilities of the β isomers (2-MP and 3-MP) relative to the α isomers (1-MP and 9-MP) at 25 °C. However, the metastable equilibrium values of the abundance ratios 2-MP/1-MP (MPR) and (2-MP + 3-MP)/(1-MP + 9-MP) (MPI-3) decrease with temperature, becoming Australia) indicates a likely effect of high-temperature equilibration on reported values of MPR and MPI-3, but this finding is contingent on the location within the deposit. If metastable equilibrium holds, a third aromatic maturity ratio, 1.5 × (2-MP + 3-MP)/(P + 1-MP + 9-MP) (MPI-1), can be used as a proxy for oxidation potential. Values of logaH2aq determined from data reported for HYC and for a sequence of deeply buried source rocks are indicative of more reducing conditions at a given temperature than those inferred from data reported for two sets of samples exposed to contact or regional metamorphism. These results are limiting-case scenarios for the modeled systems that do not account for effects of non-ideal mixing or kinetics, or external sources or transport of the organic matter. Nevertheless, quantifying the temperature dependence of equilibrium constants of organic reactions enables the utilization of organic maturity parameters as relative geothermometers at temperatures higher than the nominal limits of the oil window.

  7. Properties of simulated welded joints of Cr-Mo steel following heat treatment in intercritical temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabun, L.B.; Vornovitskij, I.N.; Lukicheva, S.V.; Melamed, S.Eh.

    1975-01-01

    The parameters are determined of the welded joints heat treatment which permit to shorten the holp-up period due to the accelerating the process of the weld-stress release and the diffusion of carbon and alloying elements resulting in the equilibration of the weld metal chemical composition. The properties of an imitated welded joint of the 15KHM steel have been studied after various modes of heat treatment. The critical points are 740 and 875 deg C. The mechanical properties determination and the study of the strain hardening process are carried out with a high-temperature metallography plant. The modes of a low-temperature tempering and incomplete annealing are investigated within an intercritical range at temperatures of 750 to 780 deg C and a hold-up periods of to five minutes with a consecutive cooling in air or with the furnace respectively. The results of the studies have shown that with the decrease in the heat treatment temperature the strength, plasticity and also hardness of the welded joint zones prove to be to the standard of a sample treated conforming to the high tempering mode. In case of an incomplete annealing (770 to 780 deg C) the strength of the welded joint is maintained to the standard of the strength obtained at the high tempering, and the relative elongation value increases considerably at all the hold-up periods investigated. The strain-hardening process for the low-temperature normalizing and high tempering proceeds approximately equally. The fracture occurs at the deformation of 30 to 35% in microvolume, the relative elongation in that case being 12 to 13%

  8. Teaching Temperature with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Michael

    2010-10-01

    In recent years it has become very popular to introduce computational tools and/or simulations into the classroom. While the intention of this classroom addition is often meant to help elucidate a particular physical phenomena, teachers at ALL levels --- whether graduate or undergraduate, secondary- or middle-school --- may miss important teaching moments by either relying upon or struggling with the technology! I will demonstrate this phenomena with a sample teaching module developed at our instiitution that seeks to discover the relationship between temperature and latitude by having students gather data (e.g., average monthly temperature for a chosen city) from various world wide web resources. This task may be very difficult for students and teachers for reasons ranging from slow connection speeds to an inability to plot and interpret data.I will wrap up by demonstarting a simple Maple routine that will produce the graphs easily and discuss ways in which this kind of top-down solution may be the best bet for using and teaching technology at all levels.

  9. The relationship between body and ambient temperature and corneal temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Johnson, Leif; Arvidsson, Henrik Sven

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature.......Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature....

  10. Thermal regime of a continental permafrost associated gas hydrate occurrence a continuous temperature profile record after drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninges, J.; Huenges, E.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    Both the size and the distribution of natural methane hydrate occurrences, as well as the release of gaseous methane through the dissociation of methane hydrate, are affected by the subsurface pressure and temperature conditions. During a field experiment, which was carried out in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada, within the framework of the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program*, the variation of temperature within three 40 m spaced, 1200 m deep wells was measured deploying the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology. An innovative experimental design for the monitoring of spatial and temporal variations of temperature along boreholes was developed and successfully applied under extreme arctic conditions. A special feature is the placement of the fibre-optic sensor cable inside the cement annulus between the casing and the wall of the borehole. Temperature profiles were recorded with a sampling interval of 0.25 m and 5 min, and temperatures can be determined with a resolution of 0.3 °C. The observed variation of temperature over time shows the decay of the thermal disturbances caused by the drilling and construction of the wells. An excellent indicator for the location of the base of the ice-bonded permafrost layer, which stands out as a result of the latent heat of the frozen pore fluid, is a sharp rise in temperature at 604 m depth during the period of equilibration. A similar effect can be detected in the depth interval between 1105 m and 1110 m, which is interpreted as an indicator for the depth to the base of the methane hydrate stability zone. Nine months after the completion of the wells the measured borehole temperatures are close to equilibrium. The mean temperature gradient rises from 9.4 K/km inside the permafrost to 25.4 K/km in the ice-free sediment layers underneath. The zone of the gas hydrate occurrences between 900 m and 1100 m shows distinct variations of the geothermal gradient, which locally rises up to 40 K/km. At the lower

  11. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, A.; Robinson, J.C.R.; Leijnse, H.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Horn, B.K.P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in

  12. Temperature measurement in the sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnamacharyulu, R.J.; Rao, L.V.G.

    The importance of measuring sea temperature is explained and the various methods employed for this purpose are reviewed. Instruments used for spot measurement of water temperature at the sea surface and at discrete depths (bucket thermometer...

  13. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  14. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum chromodynamics; finite temperature; chiral perturbation theory; QCD sum rules. PACS Nos 11.10. ..... at finite temperature. The self-energy diagrams of figure 2 modify it to ..... method of determination at present. Acknowledgement.

  15. Dual reference point temperature interrogating method for distributed temperature sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Xin; Ju, Fang; Chang, Jun; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Zongliang

    2013-01-01

    A novel method based on dual temperature reference points is presented to interrogate the temperature in a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system. This new method is suitable to overcome deficiencies due to the impact of DC offsets and the gain difference in the two signal channels of the sensing system during temperature interrogation. Moreover, this method can in most cases avoid the need to calibrate the gain and DC offsets in the receiver, data acquisition and conversion. An improved temperature interrogation formula is presented and the experimental results show that this method can efficiently estimate the channel amplification and system DC offset, thus improving the system accuracy. (letter)

  16. Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    This year saw the completion of three accelerator improvement projects (AIP) and two capital equipment projects pertaining to the Tevatron cryogenic system. The projects result in the ability to operate the Tevatron at lower temperature, and thus higher energy. Each project improves a subsystem by expanding capabilities (refrigerator controls), ensuring reliability (valve box, subatmospheric hardware, and compressor D), or enhancing performance (cold compressors and coldbox II). In January of 1994, the Tevatron operated at an energy of 975 GeV for the first time. This was the culmination, of many years of R ampersand D, power testing in a sector (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation during the summer of 1993. Although this is a modest increase in energy, the discovery potential for the Top quark is considerably improved

  17. Variable temperature superconducting microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Yeh, W. J.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed and tested a promising type of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope, which can be used to detect vortex motion and can operate in magnetic fields over a large temperature range. The system utilizes a single-loop coupling transformer, consisting of a patterned high Tc superconducting thin film. At one end of the transformer, a 20 μm diam detecting loop is placed close to the sample. At the other end, a large loop is coupled to a NbTi coil, which is connected to a low Tc SQUID sensor. Transformers in a variety of sizes have been tested and calibrated. The results show that the system is capable of detecting the motion of a single vortex. We have used the microscope to study the behavior of moving vortices at various positions in a YBa2Cu3O7 thin film bridge.

  18. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  19. High temperature metallic recuperator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M. E.; Solmon, N. G.; Smeltzer, C. E.

    1981-06-01

    An industrial 4.5 MM Btu/hr axial counterflow recuperator, fabricated to deliver 1600 F combustion air, was designed to handle rapid cyclic loading, a long life, acceptable costs, and a low maintenance requirement. A cost benefit anlysis of a high temperature waste heat recovery system utilizing the recurperator and components capable of 1600 F combustion air preheat shows that this system would have a payback period of less than two years. Fifteen companies and industrial associations were interviewed and expressed great interest in recuperation in large energy consuming industries. Determination of long term environmental effects on candidate recuperator tubing alloys was completed. Alloys found to be acceptable in the 2200 F flue gas environment of a steel billet reheat furnace, were identified.

  20. Does Carbon Dioxide Predict Temperature?

    OpenAIRE

    Mytty, Tuukka

    2013-01-01

    Does carbon dioxide predict temperature? No it does not, in the time period of 1880-2004 with the carbon dioxide and temperature data used in this thesis. According to the Inter Governmental Panel on Climate Change(IPCC) carbon dioxide is the most important factor in raising the global temperature. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that carbon dioxide truly predicts temperature. Because this paper uses observational data it has to be kept in mind that no causality interpretation can be ma...