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Sample records for electron-ion temperature equilibration

  1. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  2. Electron-ion thermal equilibration after spherical shock collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rygg, J R; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Meyerhofer, D D; Stoeckl, C

    2009-08-14

    A comprehensive set of dual nuclear product observations provides a snapshot of imploding inertial confinement fusion capsules at the time of shock collapse, shortly before the final stages of compression. The collapse of strong convergent shocks at the center of spherical capsules filled with D{sub 2} and {sup 3}He gas induces D-D and D-{sup 3}He nuclear production. Temporal and spectral diagnostics of products from both reactions are used to measure shock timing, temperature, and capsule areal density. The density and temperature inferred from these measurements are used to estimate the electron-ion thermal coupling, and demonstrate a lower electron-ion relaxation rate for capsules with lower initial gas density.

  3. Temperature Equilibration Rate with Fermi-Dirac Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Lowell S

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the electron-ion temperature equilibration rate in a fully ionized, weakly to moderately coupled plasma, using an exact treatment of the Fermi-Dirac electrons. The temperature is sufficiently high so that the quantum-mechanical Born approximation to the scattering is valid. At the heart of this calculation lies the method of dimensional continuation, a technique that we borrow from quantum field theory and use in a novel fashion to regulate the kinetic equations in a consistent manner. We can then perform a systematic perturbation expansion and thereby obtain a finite first-principles result to leading and next-to-leading order. Unlike model building, this systematic calculation yields an estimate of its own error and thus prescribes its domain of applicability. The calculational error is small for a weakly to moderately coupled plasma, for which our result is nearly exact. It should also be emphasized that our calculation becomes unreliable for a strongly coupled plasma, where the perturbative e...

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  5. Two-temperature equilibration in warm dense hydrogen measured with x-ray scattering from the LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Sciences Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the properties of warm dense hydrogen plasmas is critical for modeling stellar and planetary interiors, as well as for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Of central importance are the electron-ion collision and equilibration times that determine the microscopic properties in a high energy density state. Spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from fs-laser heated hydrogen have resolved the picosecond evolution and energy relaxation from a two-temperature plasma towards thermodynamic equilibrium in the warm dense matter regime. The interaction of rapidly heated cryogenic hydrogen irradiated by a 400 nm, 5x1017 W/cm2 , 70 fs-laser is visualized with ultra-bright 5.5 kev x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light (LCLS) source in 1 Hz repetition rate pump-probe setting. We demonstrate that the energy relaxation is faster than many classical binary collision theories that use ad hoc cutoff parameters used in the Landau-Spitzer determination of the Coulomb logarithm. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under contract No. SF00515 and supported under FWP 100182 and DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  6. Initial temperature and extent of chemical equilibration of partons in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Chatterjee, Rupa; Mustafa, Munshi G.

    2018-01-01

    We study the consequences of a premise that, if a thermalized and chemically equilibrating quark gluon plasma is formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei, then a knowledge of energy and entropy densities of the plasma fixes the initial temperature and the product of gluon fugacity and formation time uniquely, provided we know the relative fugacities of quarks and gluons. Thus, a smaller formation time would imply a larger fugacity, independent of the initial temperature. Next, we explore the limits of chemical equilibration of partons during the initial stages in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei. Experimentally measured rapidity densities of transverse energy and charged particle multiplicities at RHIC and LHC energies are used to estimate energy and number densities with the assumption of the formation of a kinetically equilibrated plasma that may not be chemically equilibrated for quarks and gluons. The estimates are found to be very sensitive to the correction factor used to multiply the Bjorken energy density to get the initial energy density. The evolution of the chemical equilibration during the quark gluon plasma phase is inferred by solving master equations, including the processes {gg}≤ftrightarrow {ggg} and {gg}≤ftrightarrow q\\overline{q} along with expansion and cooling of the plasma. Possible consequences for the invariant mass distribution of intermediate mass dileptons radiated from the plasma are discussed.

  7. Metal-Silicate Equilibration at Super-Liquidus Temperatures During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Ichikawa, H.; Labrosse, S.; Kameyama, M.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental constraints on the partitioning of moderately siderophile elements between metal and silicates during core formation suggest equilibration temperatures significantly greater than the liquidus of the silicate Earth (e.g., Wade and Wood, 2005). However, because equilibration was considered to occur in a ponded metal at the silicate solidus, such high temperature equilibration was rejected as implausible. Instead, lower temperature equilibration with variable oxygen fugacity was proposed as an alternative, although the plausibility of the physical mechanisms invoked in this scenario is also questionable. We have re-visited the model of metal-silicate separation in large molten pockets following energetic accretion events, and find that silicate-metal equlibration is most rapid when the iron rains out of the magma, and the release of gravitational potential energy by this rain heats the mixture by as much as 1000 K above the liquidus. However, the first drops of iron rain to pond at the base of the molten pocket will equilibrate at lower temperatures, and only the final drops will be subject to the highest temperatures. We model rain fall and heating of the magma by viscous dissipation to calculate the effective pressure-temperature conditions for partitioning in this scenario, and find that effective pressure conditions are smaller than the pressure at the base of the molten pocket. The ponded metal itself is gravitationally stratified (both in composition and temperature), and is not expected to convect or mix until it undergoes subsequent downward transport into the Earth's core. We also suggest that such a process operating during the very largest giant impact events (extending into the deep mantle) may have given rise to a buoyant oxygen-enriched metal layer atop the outer core, as suggested by some seismological models of the present-day Earth (e.g., Helffrich and Kaneshima, 2010). References: Helffrich, G. and S. Kaneshima (2010), Outer

  8. The Effect of Nuclear Elastic Scattering on Temperature Equilibration Rate of Ions in Fusion Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahdavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A plasma with two different particle types and at different temperatures has been considered, so that each type of ion with Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function is in temperature equilibrium with itself. Using the extracted nuclear elastic scattering differential cross-section from experimental data, solving the Boltzmann equation, and also taking into account the mobility of the background particles, temperature equilibration rate between two different ions in a fusion plasma is calculated. The results show that, at higher temperature differences, effect of nuclear elastic scattering is more important in calculating the temperature equilibration rate. The obtained expressions have general form so that they are applicable to each type of particle for background (b and each type for projectile (p. In this paper, for example, an equimolar Deuterium-Hydrogen plasma with density n=5×1025 cm−3 is chosen in which the deuteron is the background particle with temperature (also electron temperature Tb=1 keV (usual conditions for a fusion plasma at the ignition instant and the proton is the projectile with temperature Tp>Tb. These calculations, particularly, are very important for ion fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion concept.

  9. Gaussian equilibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A finite quantum system evolving unitarily equilibrates in a probabilistic fashion. In the general many-body setting the time fluctuations of an observable A are typically exponentially small in the system size. We consider here quasifree Fermi systems where the Hamiltonian and observables are quadratic in the Fermi operators. We first prove a bound on the temporal fluctuations ΔA2 and then map the equilibration dynamics to a generalized classical XY model in the infinite temperature limit. Using this insight, we conjecture that, in most cases, a central limit theorem can be formulated, leading to what we call Gaussian equilibration: observables display a Gaussian distribution with relative error ΔA/A¯=O(L-1/2), where L is the dimension of the single-particle space. The conjecture, corroborated by numerical evidence, is proven analytically under mild assumptions for the magnetization in the quantum XY model and for a class of observables in a tight-binding model. We also show that the variance is discontinuous at the transition between a quasifree model and a nonintegrable one.

  10. BPS Explained II: Calculating the Equilibration Rate in the Extreme Quantum Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Singleton, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    This is the second in a series of two lectures on the technique of dimensional continuation, a new method for analytically calculating certain energy transport quantities in a weakly to moderately coupled plasma. Recently, this method was employed by Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS) to calculate the electron-ion temperature equilibration rate and the charged particle stopping power to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma coupling. In this lecture, I develop the framework further, and then explicitly calculate the electron-ion temperature equilibration rate in the high temperature limit. This method captures all short and long distance physics to second order in the plasma coupling. This analytic perturbative technique is applicable for ignition in inertial confinement fusion and for other processes in hot a weakly coupled plasma.

  11. Electron-ion temperature ratio estimations in the summer polar mesosphere when subject to HF radio wave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M.

    2014-10-01

    We have inferred the electron temperature enhancements above mesospheric altitudes under Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) conditions when the ionosphere is exposed to artificial HF radio wave heating. The proposed method uses the dependence of the radar cross section on the electron-to-ion temperature ratio to infer the heating factor from incoherent scatter radar (ISR) power measurements above 90 km. Model heating temperatures match our ISR estimations between 90 and 130 km with 0.94 Pearson correlation index. The PMSE strength measured by the MORRO MST radar is about 50% weaker during the heater-on period when the modeled electron-to-ion mesospheric temperature is approximately 10 times greater than the unperturbed value. No PMSE weakening is found when the mesospheric temperature enhancement is by a factor of three or less. The PMSE weakening and its absence are consistent with the modeled mesospheric electron temperatures. This consistency supports to the proposed method for estimating mesospheric electron temperatures achieved by independent MST and ISR radar measurements.

  12. Equilibration chronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Alan B.; Jedele, Andrea; Yennello, Sherry J.

    2017-11-01

    We study neutron-proton equilibration in dynamically deformed atomic nuclei created in nuclear collisions. The two ends of the elongated nucleus are initially dissimilar in compositions and equilibrate on a sub-zeptosecond timescale following first-order kinetics. The technique of equilibration chronometry used to obtain this result enables new insight into the nuclear equation of state that governs many nuclear and astrophysical phenomena leading to the origin of the chemical elements.

  13. Time evolution of temperature fluctuation in a non-equilibrated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Samantray, Prasant [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Centre of Astronomy, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India)

    2016-09-15

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for a hot gas of massless particles. Also, specializing to a situation created after a heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation of the medium using its temperature profile. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations in the latter case is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored. (orig.)

  14. Effect of Equilibrated pH and Indigenous Spoilage Microorganisms on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Experimental Meals under Temperature Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Kottapalli, Bala; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a foreseeable biological hazard in prepared refrigerated meals that needs to be addressed in food safety plans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of product composition and storage temperature on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in nine experimental meals (meat, vegetable, or carbohydrate based). Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin in samples stored at 25°C for up to 96 h for phase 1, or at 25°C for 12 h and then transferred to 12.5°C for up to 12 and 6 weeks in phases 1 and 2, respectively. For phase 1, none of the treatments (equilibrated pH 5.8) supported toxin production when stored at 25°C for 48 h, but toxin production was observed in all treatments at 72 h. For the remaining experiments with storage at 12.5°C, toxin production was dependent on equilibrated pH, storage time, and growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms. In phase 1, no gross spoilage and no botulinum toxin was detected for any treatment (pH ≤5.8) stored at 12.5°C for 12 weeks. In phase 2, gross spoilage varied by commodity, with the brussels sprouts meal with pH 6.5 showing the most rapid spoilage within 2 weeks and botulinum toxin detected at 5 and 6 weeks for the control and cultured celery juice treatments, respectively. In contrast, spoilage microbes decreased the pH of a pH 5.9 beef treatment by 1.0 unit, potentially inhibiting C. botulinum through 6 weeks at 12.5°C. None of the other treatments with pH 5.8 or below supported toxin production or spoilage. This study provides validation for preventive controls in refrigerated meals. These include equilibrated product pH and storage temperature and time to inhibit toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum, but the impact of indigenous microflora on safety and interpretation of challenge studies is also highlighted.

  15. Temperature dependent fluorescence in disordered Frenkel chains : Interplay of equilibration and local band-edge level structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bednarz, M.; Malyshev, V.; Knoester, J.

    2003-01-01

    We model the optical dynamics in linear Frenkel exciton systems governed by scattering on static disorder and lattice vibrations and calculate the temperature dependent fluorescence spectrum and lifetime. The fluorescence Stokes shift shows a nonmonotonic behavior with temperature, which derives

  16. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination.

  17. Photoionization and electron-ion recombination of P II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2017-08-01

    A study of the inverse processes of photoionization and electron-ion recombination of P II is reported. Phosphorus, a little studied cosmic element, requires atomic parameters such as those presented here for spectral analysis. The unified method of Nahar and Pradhan, which incorporates two methods of recombination - radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) - and the interference between them, is used to obtain the total electron-ion recombination. This method implements the framework of the {R}-matrix close-coupling approximation. The present results include the partial photoionization cross-sections σPI(Jπ) leaving the residual ion in the ground level and level-specific recombination rate coefficients, αRC(Jπ), of 475 fine-structure levels of P II with n ≤10. In photoionization of the ground and many excited levels, a sharp resonance is found to form at the ionization threshold from couplings of relativistic fine-structure channels. These, with other resonances in the near-threshold energy region, yield a slight curvature, in contrast to typical smooth decay, at a very low temperature of about 330 K in the total recombination rate coefficient αRC. The presence of other Rydberg and Seaton resonances in the photoionization cross-section introduces features in the level-specific recombination rate coefficients and a DR bump at high temperature at 105 K for the total recombination rate coefficient. Considerable interference between RR and DR is noted around 6700 K. The recombination spectrum with respect to photoelectron energy αRC(E) is also presented. The results are expected to provide accurate models for astrophysical plasmas up to ˜1 MK.

  18. Holographic equilibration under external dynamical electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ali-Akbari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The holographic equilibration of a far-from-equilibrium strongly coupled gauge theory is investigated. In particular, the dynamics of a probe D7-brane in an AdS-Vaidya background is studied in the presence of an external time-dependent electric field. Defining the equilibration times teqc and teqj, at which condensation and current relax to their final equilibrated values, receptively, the smallness of transition time kM or kE is enough to observe a universal behaviour for re-scaled equilibration times kMkE(teqc−2 and kMkE(teqj−2. kM(kE is the time interval in which the temperature (electric field increases from zero to finite value. Moreover, regardless of the values for kM and kE, teqc/teqj also behaves universally for large enough value of the ratio of the final electric field to final temperature. Then a simple discussion of the static case reveals that teqc≤teqj. For an out-of-equilibrium process, our numerical results show that, apart from the cases for which kE is small, the static time-ordering, that is teqc≤teqj, persists.

  19. The effect of electron-ion coupling on radiation damage simulations of a pyrochlore waste form.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Ahmed E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Foiles, Stephen Martin; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2009-11-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of cascade damage in the gadolinium pyrochlore Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, comparing results obtained from traditional methodologies that ignore the effect of electron-ion interactions with a 'two-temperature model' in which the electronic subsystem is modeled using a diffusion equation to determine the electronic temperature. We find that the electron-ion interaction friction coefficient {gamma}{sub p} is a significant parameter in determining the behavior of the system following the formation of the primary knock-on atom (here, a U{sup 3+} ion). The mean final U{sup 3+} displacement and the number of defect atoms formed is shown to decrease uniformly with increasing {gamma}{sub p}; however, other properties, such as the final equilibrium temperature and the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function show a more complicated dependence on {gamma}{sub p}.

  20. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  1. Electron-Ion Collider : The next QCD frontier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Accardi, A.; Albacete, J. L.; Anselmino, M.; Armesto, N.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Bacchetta, A.; Boer, D.; Brooks, W. K.; Burton, T.; Chang, N. -B.; Deng, W. -T.; Deshpande, A.; Diehl, M.; Dumitru, A.; Dupre, R.; Ent, R.; Fazio, S.; Guzey, V.; Hakobyan, H.; Hao, Y.; Hasch, D.; Holt, R.; Horn, T.; Huang, M.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Klein, S.; Kopeliovich, B.; Kovchegov, Y.; Kumar, K.; Kumericki, K.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Lappi, T.; Lee, J. -H.; Lee, Y.; Levin, E. M.; Lin, F. -L.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T. W.; Marquet, C.; Meziani, Z. -E.; McKeown, R.; Metz, A.; Milner, R.; Morozov, V. S.; Mueller, A. H.; Muller, B.; Mueller, D.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Paukkunen, H.; Prokudin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qian, X.; Qiu, J. -W.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Roser, T.; Sabatie, F.; Sassot, R.; Schnell, G.; Schweitzer, P.; Sichtermann, E.; Stratmann, M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Taneja, S.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S.; Vogelsang, W.; Weiss, C.; Xiao, B. -W.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zheng, L.

    2016-01-01

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

  2. An Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.W. Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Long term plans for the investigation of the quark and gluon structure of matter have for some time focussed on the possibility of an electron-ion collider, with the nuclear physics communities associated with JLab and BNL being particularly active. We briefly outline the current thinking on this subject at Jefferson lab.

  3. Understanding the nuclear initial state with an electron ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    In these proceedings I describe how a future electron-ion collider will allow us to directly measure the initial spatial distribution of gluons in heavy ions, as well as its variance ("lumpiness") in exclusive diffraction. I show the feasibility of such a measurement by means of simulated data from the novel event generator Sartre.

  4. Electron-ion relaxation in a dense plasma. [supernovae core physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, J. E.; Buchler, J.-R.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic physics of the thermonuclear runaway in highly degenerate carbon-oxygen cores is investigated to determine if and how a detonation wave is generated. An expression for the electron-ion relaxation time is derived under the assumption of large degeneracy and extreme relativity of the electrons in a two-temperature plasma. Since the nuclear burning time proves to be several orders of magnitude shorter than the relaxation time, it is concluded that in studying the structure of the detonation wave the electrons and ions must be treated as separate fluids.

  5. Saturation Physics and the Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Kugeratski, M. S.; Navarra, F. S.

    Using an extension of the Iancu-Itakura-Munier model to nuclear targets we look for saturation effects in electron-ion collisions. In previous publications we have made definite predictions. Here we try to compare our results with already existing experimental data on structure functions and on total and diffractive cross sections. Strictly speaking such a comparison is not well justified because the present data are not yet in the saturation domain. Nevertheless our results agree qualitatively with data and, in some cases, even quantitatively.

  6. Analytical Schwartz density applied to heavy two-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Universidad de Granada (Spain); Koga, Toshikatsu [Muroran Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1997-01-20

    An analytical expression of the electron density function p(r) due to Schwartz for two-electron atomic systems is applied to a detailed study of density-dependent properties of relatively heavy two-electron ions. Comparison of the Schwartz results with those from accurate Hartree-Fock and Hylleraas wave functions shows that despite its simple yet analytical form, the Schwartz density has a quantitative applicability in the density study of two-electron atoms within the nonrelativistic framework. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel, E-mail: ngadams@uga.edu [University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, 101 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants.

  8. Shock Re-equilibration of Fluid Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, M. E. Elwood; Horz, F.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fluid inclusions (microscopic volumes of fluid trapped within minerals as they precipitate) are extremely common in terrestrial minerals formed under a wide range of geological conditions from surface evaporite deposits to kimberlite pipes. While fluid inclusions in terrestrial rocks are nearly ubiquitous, only a few fluid inclusion-bearing meteorites have been documented. The scarcity of fluid inclusions in meteoritic materials may be a result of (a) the absence of fluids when the mineral was formed on the meteorite parent body or (b) the destruction of fluid inclusions originally contained in meteoritic materials by subsequent shock metamorphism. However, the effects of impact events on pre-existing fluid inclusions trapped in target and projectile rocks has received little study. Fluid inclusions trapped prior to the shock event may be altered (re-equilibrated) or destroyed due to the high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates associated with impact events. By examining the effects of shock deformation on fluid inclusion properties and textures we may be able to better constrain the pressure-temperature path experienced by terrestrial and meteoritic shocked materials and also gain a clearer understanding of why fluid inclusions are rarely found in meteorite samples.

  9. INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR THE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; PARKER, B.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at luminosities in the 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range (e-p case), adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accommodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region will be presented.

  10. Novel Plasmonic Photocathodes for Electron-Ion Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaszew, Rosa Alejandra [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Our aim was to explore new photocathode materials and schemes to develop strategies and technologies for next generation nuclear physics accelerator capabilities, particularly for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC). We successfully implemented an experimental setup for light incidence at an acute angle onto metallic photocathodes in UHV, in order to excite surface Plasmon resonance, hence increasing light absorption by the metallic surface and tested the photoemitted current. We successfully tested the setup with a hot cathode as well as Plasmonic silver-MgO samples and obtained excellent results. We extended our studies to shorter wavelengths to help defeat the work function of the metal. We also used oblique incidence thin film deposition onto gratings to achieve optimized Plasmonic excitation leading to stronger EM field and also lower emittance. We tested and used adequate software to model our samples and simulate our experimental results. We incorporated the concept of Fano resonances applied to gratings to better interpret our experimental results.

  11. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  12. Polarized Parton Distributions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We study the potential impact of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data from a future electron-ion collider (EIC) on longitudinally polarized parton distribution (PDFs). We perform a PDF determination using the NNPDF methodology, based on sets of deep-inelastic EIC pseudodata, for different realistic choices of the electron and proton beam energies. We compare the results to our current polarized PDF set, NNPDFpol1.0, based on a fit to fixed-target inclusive DIS data. We show that the uncertainties on the first moments of the polarized quark singlet and gluon distributions are substantially reduced in comparison to NNPDFpol1.0, but also that more measurements may be needed to ultimately pin down the size of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin.

  13. Contrasting melt equilibration conditions across Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mary; Delph, Jonathan; Schleiffarth, W. Kirk; Cosca, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The widespread mafic volcanism, elevated crustal temperatures, and plateau-type topography in Central Anatolia, Turkey, could collectively be the result of lithospheric delamination, mantle upwelling, and tectonic escape in response to Arabian-Anatolian plate collision. We used the results from basalt geochemistry and a passive-source broadband seismic experiment obtained as part of an international collaborative effort (Continental Dynamics - Central Anatolia Tectonics) to investigate the crust-mantle structure and melting conditions associated with the Quaternary Hasandag Monogenic Cluster (HMC) south and west of Hasandag volcano. The HMC is unusually mafic, not only for Central Anatolia but globally, enabling meaningful comparisons between geochemical and seismic interpretations of mantle conditions. HMC basalts are characterized by orogenic signatures that could have originated (1) in mantle wedge that, after stagnating because of collision, was remobilized south and upward as a result of rollback of the African slab or, alternatively (2) by piecemeal foundering of residual mantle lithosphere into convecting upper mantle, producing small-scale convection and associated decompression melting. Melt equilibration conditions for the HMC are hot (TP ˜1335-1250˚ C, assuming 1-4 wt.% H2O) and shallow (P = 1.1 to 1.6 GPa), approaching those for MORB. Shear wave velocities are relatively constant at ˜4.1 km/s between the Moho and a depth of ˜45-50 km (˜1.4 GPa; Fig. 6), below which Vs increases with increasing depth. We infer that a melt-perfused mantle lid could be locally present between 40 and 55 km. In contrast to Central Anatolia, estimated equilibration conditions for Western Anatolia and Eastern Anatolia (east of the Inner Tauride Suture) mantle melts are hotter (by ≥60˚ C) and deeper (mostly by 0.6-1.0 GPa). They also have chemical signatures that, unlike Central Anatolia, are similar to those of intraplate basalts. These differences are likely related

  14. Equilibration Time Scales of Physically Relevant Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pedro García-Pintos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of understanding, from first principles, the conditions under which a quantum system equilibrates rapidly with respect to a concrete observable. On the one hand, previously known general upper bounds on the time scales of equilibration were unrealistically long, with times scaling linearly with the dimension of the Hilbert space. These bounds proved to be tight since particular constructions of observables scaling in this way were found. On the other hand, the computed equilibration time scales for certain classes of typical measurements, or under the evolution of typical Hamiltonians, are unrealistically short. However, most physically relevant situations fall outside these two classes. In this paper, we provide a new upper bound on the equilibration time scales which, under some physically reasonable conditions, give much more realistic results than previously known. In particular, we apply this result to the paradigmatic case of a system interacting with a thermal bath, where we obtain an upper bound for the equilibration time scale independent of the size of the bath. In this way, we find general conditions that single out observables with realistic equilibration times within a physically relevant setup.

  15. New Photocathode materials for electron-ion-colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaszew, Rosa A. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-25

    Our aim has been to explore new photocathode materials and schemes to develop strategies and technologies for next generation nuclear physics accelerator capabilities, particularly for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC). Thus, we investigated thin film deposition and ensuing properties for several adequate magnetic materials applicable to spin-polarized photocathodes. We also implemented a full experimental setup for light incidence at an acute angle onto the photocathode surface in order to excite surface Plasmon resonance hence increasing light absorption by a metallic surface. We successfully tested the setup with a thermionic cathode as well as Plasmonic silver-MgO samples and obtained very encouraging results. Our first results are very encouraging since the photocurrent measured on this preliminary plasmonic Ag-MgO sample under low power (~ 1mW) cw red light from a HeNe laser was 256 pA, thus two orders magnitude larger than that reported by others following also plasmonic approaches. We extended our studies to shorter wavelengths and we also started preliminary work on chemically ordered MnAl thin films –a component of the tertiary Ag-Mn-Al (silmanal) alloy in order to develop spin-polarized photocathodes capable of sustaining surface Plasmon resonance. It is worthwhile mentioning that a graduate student has been directly involved during this project ensuring the training of next generation of scientists in this area of research.

  16. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  17. A New Simulation Framework for the Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, John

    2017-09-01

    Last year, a collaboration between Physics Division and High-Energy Physics at Argonne was formed to enable significantly broader contributions to the development of the Electron-Ion Collider. This includes efforts in accelerator R&D, theory, simulations, and detector R&D. I will give a brief overview of the status of these efforts, with emphasis on the aspects aimed at enabling the community to more easily become involved in evaluation of physics, detectors, and details of spectrometer designs. We have put together a new, easy-to-use simulation framework using flexible software tools. The goal is to enable detailed simulations to evaluate detector performance and compare detector designs. In addition, a common framework capable of providing detailed simulations of different spectrometer designs will allow for fully consistent evaluations of the physics reach of different spectrometer designs or detector systems for a variety of physics channels. In addition, new theory efforts will provide self-consistent models of GPDs (including QCD evolution) and TMDs in nucleons and light nuclei, as well as providing more detailed physics input for the evaluation of some new observables. This material is based upon work supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding from Argonne National Laboratory, provided by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Physics Opportunity with an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Patrizia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the emergence of nucleons and nuclei and their interactions from the properties and dynamics of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is a fundamental and compelling goal of nuclear science. A high-energy, high-luminosity polarized electron-ion collider (EIC) will be needed to explore and advance many aspects of QCD studies in the gluon dominated regions in nucleon and nuclei. The federal Nuclear Science Advisory Committee unanimously approved a high-energy electro-ion collider to explore a new frontier in physics research. In fact, the committee calls the collider the country's next "highest priority" in new facility construction, and is one of four main recommendations contained in its 2015 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. Two proposals for the EIC are being considered in the U.S.: one each at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). An overview of the physics opportunities an EIC presents to the nuclear science community in future decades is presented.

  19. Unitary equilibration after a quantum quench of a thermal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Zanardi, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    In this work we investigate the equilibration dynamics after a sudden Hamiltonian quench of a quantum spin system initially prepared in a thermal state. To characterize the equilibration we evaluate the Loschmidt echo, a global measure for the degree of distinguishability between the initial and time-evolved quenched states. We present general results valid for small quenches and detailed analysis of the quantum XY chain. The result is that quantum criticality manifests, even at small but finite temperatures, in a universal double-peaked form of the echo statistics and poor equilibration for sufficiently relevant perturbations. In addition, for this model we find a tight lower bound on the Loschmidt echo in terms of the purity of the initial state and the more easily evaluated Hilbert-Schmidt inner product between initial and time-evolved quenched states. This bound allows us to relate the time-averaged Loschmidt echo with the purity of the time-averaged state, a quantity that has been shown to provide an upper bound on the variance of observables.

  20. Unitary equilibration after a quantum quench of a thermal state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Venuti, Lorenzo Campos [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI), Viale Settimio Severo 65, I-10133 Torino (Italy); Zanardi, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI), Viale Settimio Severo 65, I-10133 Torino (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    In this work we investigate the equilibration dynamics after a sudden Hamiltonian quench of a quantum spin system initially prepared in a thermal state. To characterize the equilibration we evaluate the Loschmidt echo, a global measure for the degree of distinguishability between the initial and time-evolved quenched states. We present general results valid for small quenches and detailed analysis of the quantum XY chain. The result is that quantum criticality manifests, even at small but finite temperatures, in a universal double-peaked form of the echo statistics and poor equilibration for sufficiently relevant perturbations. In addition, for this model we find a tight lower bound on the Loschmidt echo in terms of the purity of the initial state and the more easily evaluated Hilbert-Schmidt inner product between initial and time-evolved quenched states. This bound allows us to relate the time-averaged Loschmidt echo with the purity of the time-averaged state, a quantity that has been shown to provide an upper bound on the variance of observables.

  1. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    to be computationally effective at each scale. Density fluctuations in the melt structure above the tube scale are minimized through a Monte Carlo simulated annealing of a lattice polymer model. Subsequently the melt structure below the tube scale is equilibrated via the Rouse dynamics of a force-capped Kremer...... of 15.000 monomers. To validate the equilibration process we study the time evolution of bulk, collective, and single-chain observables at the monomeric, mesoscopic, and macroscopic length scales. Extension of the present method to longer, branched, or polydisperse chains, and/or larger system sizes...

  2. Crabbing system for an electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As high energy and nuclear physicists continue to push further the boundaries of knowledge using colliders, there is an imperative need, not only to increase the colliding beams' energies, but also to improve the accuracy of the experiments, and to collect a large quantity of events with good statistical sensitivity. To achieve the latter, it is necessary to collect more data by increasing the rate at which these processes are being produced and detected in the machine. This rate of events depends directly on the machine's luminosity. The luminosity itself is proportional to the frequency at which the beams are being delivered, the number of particles in each beam, and inversely proportional to the cross-sectional size of the colliding beams. There are several approaches that can be considered to increase the events statistics in a collider other than increasing the luminosity, such as running the experiments for a longer time. However, this also elevates the operation expenses, while increasing the frequency at which the beams are delivered implies strong physical changes along the accelerator and the detectors. Therefore, it is preferred to increase the beam intensities and reduce the beams cross-sectional areas to achieve these higher luminosities. In the case where the goal is to push the limits, sometimes even beyond the machines design parameters, one must develop a detailed High Luminosity Scheme. Any high luminosity scheme on a modern collider considers|in one of their versions|the use of crab cavities to correct the geometrical reduction of the luminosity due to the beams crossing angle. In this dissertation, we present the design and testing of a proof-of-principle compact superconducting crab cavity, at 750 MHz, for the future electron-ion collider, currently under design at Jefferson Lab. In addition to the design and validation of the cavity prototype, we present the analysis of the first order beam dynamics and the integration of the

  3. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  4. Quantum ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-ion plasmas: A Sagdeev potential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: shahzad_mahmoodpk@yahoo.com; Mushtaq, A. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-05-05

    Linear and nonlinear ion acoustic waves are studied in unmagnetized electron-ion quantum plasmas. Sagdeev potential approach is employed to describe the nonlinear quantum ion acoustic waves. It is found that density dips structures are formed in the subsonic region in a electron-ion quantum plasma case. The amplitude of the nonlinear structures remains constant and the width is broadened with the increase in the quantization of the system. However, the nonlinear wave amplitude is reduced with the increase in the wave Mach number. The numerical results are also presented.

  5. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-22

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  6. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  7. Quasi-free electron-ion scattering in ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.; Bhalla, C.; Hagmann, S.; Zavodszky, P. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). J.R. MacDonald Lab.

    1999-11-01

    The electron scattering model, ESM, for ion-atom collisions refers to the scattering of a quasi-free (loosely-bound) target electron in the field of a highly charged projectile ion. Many atomic processes have been successfully described by the ESM, which relates a differential scattering cross section for an ion-atom collision process to the cross section for the corresponding pure electron-ion collision process. The following processes have been studied in ion-atom collisions: resonant and non-resonant electron-ion elastic scattering, resonant and non-resonant inelastic electron-ion scattering, and dielectronic recombination. Recently, features have been observed in electron double differential cross sections from ion-atom collisions that have been attributed to ``super elastic`` electron-ion scattering, and intra-atomic double electron scattering in the case of molecular targets. Also, evidence for triply-excited states formed by resonance excitation has been observed. A survey of the results of these studies and the status of this field of research will be presented. (orig.) 31 refs.

  8. Concept for an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) detector built around the BaBar solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Alfred, M; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belmont, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Black, D; Bok, J; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Chujo, T; Citron, Z; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Ding, L; Dion, A; Do, J H; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fokin, S L; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Goto, Y; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guragain, H; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Hill, J C; Hollis, R S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoshino, T; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Johnson, B M; Joo, E; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kihara, K; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E -J; Kim, H -J; Kim, M; Kim, Y K; Kistenev, E; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kofarago, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leitgab, M; Lim, S H; Liu, M X; Lynch, D; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Miller, A; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, T; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J; Oskarsson, A; Ozaki, H; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, S; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Peng, J -C; Perepelitsa, D; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reynolds, R; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, M; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Velkovska, J; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Whitaker, S; Wolin, S; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yoon, I; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A

    2014-01-01

    The PHENIX collaboration presents here a concept for a detector at a future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC detector proposed here, referred to as ePHENIX, will have excellent performance for a broad range of exciting EIC physics measurements, providing powerful investigations not currently available that will dramatically advance our understanding of how quantum chromodynamics binds the proton and forms nuclear matter.

  9. ELECTRON-ION CORRELATION IN LIQUID-METALS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES - LIQUID MG AND LIQUID PI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIJS, GA; PASTORE, G; SELLONI, A; VANDERLUGT, W

    1995-01-01

    We present a theoretical determination of electron-ion pair correlation functions g(ie) in liquid Mg and liquid Bi, two systems with widely different electronic and cohesive properties. Our calculations are based on first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations, which provide an accurate and

  10. Experimental determination of the electron-avalanche and the electron-ion recombination coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, G.J.; Boer, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-ion recombination coefficient γ and the avalanche coefficient δ = (α − a) · vd, where α and a are the ionizat ion and attachment coefficients respectively and vd the drift velocity of the electrons, have been experimentally determined in a self-sustained CO2-laser system (1:1:3 mixture)

  11. The extent of strangeness equilibration in quark gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrodynamic expansion and chemical equilibration. 2.1 Basic equations. We start with the assumption that the system achieves a kinetic equilibrium by the time τi and the chemical equilibration is assumed to proceed via gluon multiplication process. (gg °ggg) and quark production process (gg °q¯q). The expansion of the ...

  12. Re-Equilibration Processes in Fluid Inclusion Assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald J. Bakker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Post-entrapment modifications reduce the reliability of fluid inclusions to determine trapping conditions in rock. Processes that may modify fluid inclusion properties are experimentally identified in this study using synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz with a well-defined composition and density. Modifications are characterized with microthermometry (homogenization and dissolution temperatures and Raman-spectroscopy in binary fluid systems H2O-D2O and H2O-NaCl. Three distinct processes were identified in this study: (1 diffusion of H2O and D2O; (2 crystal-recovery, expulsion of H2O and accumulation of quartz in inclusions (preferential H2O loss; (3 irreversible total volume increase at the α-β quartz transition. Diffusion is caused by H2O fugacity gradients and can be modelled according to classical diffusion models. The variability of re-equilibrated properties in fluid inclusion assemblages depends on time, temperature, diffusion distance and the size of fluid inclusions. Negative pressure gradients (internal under-pressure induce the crystal-recovery process, in which H2O is preferentially extracted from inclusions that simultaneously shrink by the inward growth of quartz. This process reduces the H2O concentration and increases the fluid density by total volume loss. Temperature and time are also controlling factors of this process, which is able to transport H2O against fugacity gradients.

  13. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Keegan, Liam; Romatschke, Paul; van der Schee, Wilke; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  14. Thermodynamic equilibration of the carbon vacancy in 4H-SiC: A lifetime limiting defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Nipoti, R.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.

    2017-07-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prominent defect in as-grown 4H-SiC epitaxial layers for high power bipolar devices. VC is electrically active with several deep levels in the bandgap, and it is an efficient "killer" of the minority carrier lifetime in n-type layers, limiting device performance. In this study, we provide new insight into the equilibration kinetics of the thermodynamic processes governing the VC concentration and how these processes can be tailored. A slow cooling rate after heat treatment at ˜2000 °C, typically employed to activate dopants in 4H-SiC, is shown to yield a strong reduction of the VC concentration relative to that for a fast rate. Further, post-growth heat treatment of epitaxial layers has been conducted over a wide temperature range (800-1600 °C) under C-rich surface conditions. It is found that the thermodynamic equilibration of VC at 1500 °C requires a duration less than 1 h resulting in a VC concentration of only ˜1011 cm-3, which is, indeed, beneficial for high voltage devices. In order to elucidate the physical processes controlling the equilibration of VC, a defect kinetics model is put forward. The model assumes Frenkel pair generation, injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) from the C-rich surface (followed by recombination with VC's), and diffusion of VC's towards the surface as the major processes during the equilibration, and it exhibits good quantitative agreement with experiment.

  15. Relativistic Shear Flow between Electron-Ion and Electron-Positron Plasmas and Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Böttcher, Markus

    2017-10-01

    We present particle-in-cell simulation results of relativistic shear boundary layers between electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas and discuss their potential applications to astrophysics. Specifically, we find that in the case of a fast electron-positron spine surrounded by a slow-moving or stationary electron-ion sheath, lepton acceleration proceeds in a highly anisotropic manner due to electromagnetic fields created at the shear interface. While the highest-energy leptons still produce a beaming pattern (as seen in the quasi-stationary frame of the sheath) of order 1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the spine, for lower-energy particles, the beaming is much less pronounced. This is in stark contrast to the case of pure electron-ion shear layers, in which anisotropic particle acceleration leads to significantly narrower beaming patterns than 1/Γ for the highest-energy particles. In either case, shear-layer acceleration is expected to produce strongly angle-dependent lepton (hence, emanating radiation) spectra, with a significantly harder spectrum in the forward direction than viewed from larger off-axis angles, much beyond the regular Doppler boosting effect from a co-moving isotropic lepton distribution. This may solve the problem of the need for high (and apparently arbitrarily chosen) minimum Lorentz factors of radiating electrons, often plaguing current blazar and GRB jet modeling efforts.

  16. Enhanced electron/fuel-ion equilibration through impurity ions: Studies applicable to NIF and Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Simpson, R.; Parker, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Casey, D.; Grabowski, P.; Graziani, F.; Taitano, W.; Le, A.; Chacon, L.; Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Simakov, A.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Betti, R.; Srinivasan, B.; Mancini, R.

    2017-10-01

    In shock-driven exploding-pushers, a platform used extensively to study multi-species and kinetic effects, electrons and fuel ions are far out of equilibrium, as reflected by very different temperatures. However, impurity ions, even in small quantities, can couple effectively to the electrons, because of a Z2 dependence, and in turn, impurity ions can then strongly couple to the fuel ions. Through this mechanism, electrons and fuel-ions can equilibrate much faster than they otherwise would. This is a quantitative issue, depending upon the amount and Z of the impurity. For NIF and Omega, we consider the role of this process. Coupled non-linear equations, reflecting the temperatures of the three species, are solved for a range of conditions. Consideration is also given to ablatively driven implosions, since impurities can similarly affect the equilibration. This work was supported in part by DOE/NNSA DE-NA0002949 and DE-NA0002726.

  17. 100 kW CW highly-efficient multi-beam klystron for a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    Initial results are presented for the development of a CW highly-efficient RF source needed for operation of a future electron-ion collider. The design of this compact multi-beam klystron yields high efficiency (above 70%) for the power output of 125 kW at 952.6 MHz. The klystron is to work for the RF systems for ion acceleration in the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider as being developed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  18. Equilibration of experimentally determined protein structures for molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Emily B; Vanvliet, Krystyn J

    2006-12-01

    Preceding molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular interactions, the molecule of interest is often equilibrated with respect to an initial configuration. This so-called equilibration stage is required because the input structure is typically not within the equilibrium phase space of the simulation conditions, particularly in systems as complex as proteins, which can lead to artifactual trajectories of protein dynamics. The time at which nonequilibrium effects from the initial configuration are minimized-what we will call the equilibration time-marks the beginning of equilibrium phase-space exploration. Note that the identification of this time does not imply exploration of the entire equilibrium phase space. We have found that current equilibration methodologies contain ambiguities that lead to uncertainty in determining the end of the equilibration stage of the trajectory. This results in equilibration times that are either too long, resulting in wasted computational resources, or too short, resulting in the simulation of molecular trajectories that do not accurately represent the physical system. We outline and demonstrate a protocol for identifying the equilibration time that is based on the physical model of Normal Mode Analysis. We attain the computational efficiency required of large-protein simulations via a stretched exponential approximation that enables an analytically tractable and physically meaningful form of the root-mean-square deviation of atoms comprising the protein. We find that the fitting parameters (which correspond to physical properties of the protein) fluctuate initially but then stabilize for increased simulation time, independently of the simulation duration or sampling frequency. We define the end of the equilibration stage--and thus the equilibration time--as the point in the simulation when these parameters attain constant values. Compared to existing methods, our approach provides the objective identification of the time at

  19. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  20. A constraint solving approach to model reduction by tropical equilibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sylvain; Fages, François; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Model reduction is a central topic in systems biology and dynamical systems theory, for reducing the complexity of detailed models, finding important parameters, and developing multi-scale models for instance. While singular perturbation theory is a standard mathematical tool to analyze the different time scales of a dynamical system and decompose the system accordingly, tropical methods provide a simple algebraic framework to perform these analyses systematically in polynomial systems. The crux of these methods is in the computation of tropical equilibrations. In this paper we show that constraint-based methods, using reified constraints for expressing the equilibration conditions, make it possible to numerically solve non-linear tropical equilibration problems, out of reach of standard computation methods. We illustrate this approach first with the detailed reduction of a simple biochemical mechanism, the Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction model, and second, with large-scale performance figures obtained on the http://biomodels.net repository.

  1. Analyses of 476 MHz and 952 MHz Crab Cavities for JLAB Electron Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, HyeKyoung [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Castilla, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); De Silva, Subashini U. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University has designed, fabricated and successfully tested a crab cavity for Electron Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab (JLEIC) [1]. This proof-of-principle cavity was based on the earlier MEIC design which used 748.5 MHz RF system. The updated JLEIC (called MEIC earlier) design [2] utilizes the components from PEP-II. It results in the change on the bunch repetition rate of stored beam to 476.3 MHz. The ion ring collider will eventually require 952.6 MHz crab cavities. This paper will present the analyses of crab cavities of both 476 MHz and 952 MHz options. It compares advantages and disadvantages of the options which provide the JLEIC design team important technical information for a system down selection.

  2. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  3. In-situ Nd isotope measurements on accessory minerals: Insights into isotope equilibration during metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerli, Johannes; Spandler, Carl; Kemp, Tony; Pirard, Cassian

    2015-04-01

    Understanding isotope equilibration processes during metamorphism has huge implications for a range of geoscience applications, ranging from provenance studies of sedimentary units to the origin of magmas and ore bodies. Furthermore, recent claims of isotope disequilibrium situations during the melting of continental crust have questioned the reliability of using certain isotope systems to track magma sources. Our recent work investigated a prograde sequence of high-temperature, low-pressure (350-650 ˚C, ~3-5 kbar) metasedimentary rocks from the Mt. Lofty Ranges, South Australia that underwent widespread pervasive fluid flow at peak metamorphism. In situ Nd-isotope analyses by LA-MC-ICP-MS found that the detrital signature of apatite survives temperatures of 500 °C. However, the observed isotope equilibration of REE-bearing accessory minerals at ~600 °C, before the onset of partial melting, suggests that isotope disequilibrium is unlikely during high-grade metamorphism of upper crustal rocks where fluid induced melting takes place. Here, we extend our research to metasedimentary rocks from (ultra)-high pressure metamorphic terrains from northern New Caledonia, and Dabieshan, China that represent pressure and temperature conditions found in subduction zones. Our study helps to understand isotope equilibration processes from heterogeneous protoliths as well as the impact of retrogression and the resetting of isotope systems over a pressure-temperature range from ~350 °C to 700 °C and ~15 kbar to 40 kbar. Nd isotope analyses of apatite, allanite, titanite, xenotime, monazite, lawsonite and epidote in pelitic and psammitic samples allow the investigation of isotope equilibration on a mineral and sub-mineral scale, as well as comparison with traditional bulk rock isotope analyses. Our preliminary results show that under high-pressure conditions (~20 to 30 kbar) and temperatures to ~650 °C, REE-bearing phases show variable ɛNd values in some cases. These

  4. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos...Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos” Date 13

  5. Two Tests of Piaget's Equilibration Model: A Replication and Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Irwin W.; Litman, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    Pairs of elementary school children at different concept development levels were given problems to discuss, in order to examine the prediction, derived from the equilibration model, that when two children holding different beliefs must arrive at a consenus, the child possessing the higher level of cognitive development will prevail over the child…

  6. Hadron identification with an Electron Ion Collider based on the sPHENIX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Lillian; Feege, Nils; Deshpande, Abhay; Sphenix Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC) aims to investigate the frontiers of quantum chromodynamics by colliding polarized electrons with ions and polarized protons. In electron-proton collisions, narrow cones of hadrons called jets are formed when a quark or gluon undergoes hadronization. Determining the identity of the leading hadron in these jets is critical to the study of the structure of the proton. The leading hadron is correlated to the flavor of the struck quark, so by identifying the leading hadron, the flavor of the struck quark can be discerned. In this work, we analyze hadron identification at the proposed EIC upgrade of the upcoming sPHENIX experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The proposed upgrade would require additional tracking, calorimeters, and particle identification systems, one of which is a gas-radiator Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector in the hadron-going direction. In this analysis, we wrote a module that identifies the leading hadron using jet information from the GEANT4 simulation of the RICH and ran this through simulated electron-proton collisions. Then, we ran the simulation with different collision energies. Finally, we checked its performance by comparing simulation results with known information.

  7. Equation of state of metallic hydrogen from coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Miguel A; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, D M

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of hydrogen at pressures higher than molecular dissociation using the coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo method. These calculations use the accurate reptation quantum Monte Carlo method to estimate the electronic energy and pressure while doing a Monte Carlo simulation of the protons. In addition to presenting simulation results for the equation of state over a large region of the phase diagram, we report the free energy obtained by thermodynamic integration. We find very good agreement with density-functional theory based molecular-dynamics calculations for pressures beyond 600 GPa and densities above rho=1.4 g/cm(3) , both for thermodynamic and structural properties. This agreement provides a strong support to the different approximations employed in the density-functional treatment of the system, specifically the approximate exchange-correlation potential and the use of pseudopotentials for the range of densities considered. We find disagreement with chemical models, which suggests that a reinvestigation of planetary models--previously constructed using the Saumon-Chabrier-Van Horn equations of state--might be needed.

  8. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  9. Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier - Understanding the glue that binds us all

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A.; Anselmino, M.; Armesto, N.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Bacchetta, A.; Boer, D.; Brooks, W.K.; Burton, T.; Chang, N.B.; Deng, W.T.; Deshpande, A.; Diehl, M.; Dumitru, A.; Dupré, R.; Ent, R.; Fazio, S.; Gao, H.; Guzey, V.; Hakobyan, H.; Hao, Y.; Hasch, D.; Holt, R.; Horn, T.; Huang, M.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Klein, S.; Kopeliovich, B.; Kovchegov, Y.; Kumar, K.; Kumerički, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Lappi, T.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, Y.; Levin, E.M.; Lin, F.L.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T.W.; Marquet, C.; Meziani, Z.E.; McKeown, R.; Metz, A.; Milner, R.; Morozov, V.S.; Mueller, A.H.; Müller, B.; Müller, Dieter; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Paukkunen, H.; Prokudin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qian, X.; Qiu, J.W.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Roser, T.; Sabatié, F.; Sassot, R.; Schnell, G.; Schweitzer, P.; Sichtermann, E.; Stratmann, M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Taneja, S.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S.; Vogelsang, W.; Weiss, C.; Xiao, B.W.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, Y.H.; Zheng, L.

    2016-01-01

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to prope...

  10. Nuclear physics with a medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Accardi, V. Guzey, A. Prokudin, C. Weiss

    2012-06-01

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with variable center-of-mass energy {radical}s {approx} 20-70 GeV and a luminosity {approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei: (i) the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon in QCD (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, correlations); (ii) the fundamental color fields in nuclei (nuclear parton densities, shadowing, coherence effects, color transparency); (iii) the conversion of color charge to hadrons (fragmentation, parton propagation through matter, in-medium jets). We briefly review the conceptual aspects of these questions and the measurements that would address them, emphasizing the qualitatively new information that could be obtained with the collider. Such a medium-energy EIC could be realized at Jefferson Lab after the 12 GeV Upgrade (MEIC), or at Brookhaven National Lab as the low-energy stage of eRHIC.

  11. Electron-Ion Collider: The next QCD frontier. Understanding the glue that binds us all

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardi, A. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Albacete, J.L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Anselmino, M. [Torino University (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Armesto, N. [University of Santiago de Campostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aschenauer, E.C.; Burton, T.; Fazio, S.; Hao, Y.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ludlam, T.W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Qiu, J.W.; Roser, T.; Toll, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Ullrich, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Vigdor, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bacchetta, A. [University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Boer, D. [University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brooks, W.K.; Hakobyan, H.; Kopeliovich, B. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Chang, N.B.; Huang, M. [Shandong University, Shandong (China); Deng, W.T. [Frankfurt University, FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany); Shandong University, Shandong (China); Deshpande, A.; Kumar, K. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, M. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dumitru, A.; Jalilian-Marian, J. [Baruch College, CUNY, New York, NY (United States); Dupre, R.; Sabatie, F. [Centre de Saclay, CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.L.; McKeown, R.; Morozov, V.S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Prokudin, A.; Weiss, C.; Zhang, Y.H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gao, H. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hasch, D. [INFN, LNF, Frascati (Italy); Holt, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Horn, T. [The Catholic University of America, N.E. Washington, DC (United States); Hyde, C. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, S.; Sichtermann, E.; Yuan, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kovchegov, Y. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Kumericki, K. [University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Lappi, T.; Paukkunen, H. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Levin, E.M. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Marquet, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Meziani, Z.E.; Metz, A. [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Milner, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Mueller, A.H. [Columbia University, New York, NY (US); Mueller, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Duke University, Durham, NC (US); Mueller, D. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (DE); Qian, X. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (US); Ramsey-Musolf, M. [University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA (US); Sassot, R. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (AR); Schnell, G. [University of Basque Country, Bilbao (ES); Schweitzer, P. [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (US); Stratmann, M.; Vogelsang, W. [University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (DE); Strikman, M. [Pennsylvania State University, Philadelphia, PA (US); Sullivan, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US); Taneja, S. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (CA); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (US); Xiao, B.W. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (CN); Zheng, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (CN)

    2016-09-15

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics over the past decades and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on ''Gluons and quark sea at high energies'' at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them. It has been benefited profoundly from inputs by the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the US, established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier. (orig.)

  12. Probing Sea Quarks and Gluons: The Electron-Ion Collider Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Tanja

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century holds great promise for reaching a new era for unlocking the mysteries of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the nucleons inside it governed by the theory of strong interactions (QCD. In particular, much remains to be learned about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons. One of the main goals of existing and nearly completed facilities is to map out the spin flavor structure of the nucleons in the valence region. A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge.

  13. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  14. Isospin equilibration processes and dipolar signals: Coherent cluster production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, M.; Berceanu, I.; Acosta, L.; Agodi, C.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Dell'Aquila, D.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Maiolino, C.; Martorana, N.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifiró, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2017-11-01

    The total dipolar signal related to multi-break-up processes induced on the system ^{48}Ca +{^{27}Al} at 40MeV/nucleon has been investigated with the CHIMERA multi-detector. Experimental data related to semi-peripheral collisions are shown and compared with CoMD-III calculations. The strong connection between the dipolar signal as obtained from the detected fragments and the dynamics of the isospin equilibration processes is also shortly discussed.

  15. The Perils of Partition: Erroneous Results from Applying D Mineral/Magma to Rocks that Equilibrated Without Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1995-09-01

    Compositions of extraterrestrial magmas are commonly derived from mineral compositions using, using experimentally determined mineral/basalt partition coefficients, Dmineral/basalt [1]. However, Dmineral/basalts cannot be applied to minerals which have experienced post-magmatic (subsolidus or metamorphic) chemical equilibration [2]. A failure to recognize post-magmatic equilibration can lead to wildly erroneous estimates of magma compositions and unrealistic scenarios of magmatic and planetary evolution [3]. To judge the effects of subsolidus chemical equilibration, consider REE distributions in a eucrite basalt, formed from a magma with CREE = 10 x CI. Let this magma crystallize and chemically equilibrate just below its solidus to a rock consisting of 49.5% plagioclase, 49.5% pigeonite, 0.1% whitlockite (a Ca phosphate), and 0.9% minor phases no REE content (silica, Fe metal, troilite); exact proportions are not critical. The total REE content ofthe rock is unchanged at 10 x CI, and distributions of REE among its minerals can be calculated from solidus-temperature Ds, e.g., Dpigeonite/plagioclase = Dpigeonite/basalt / Dplagioclase/basalt (where Dmineral/basalts are chosen to reflect the same magma compositions and temperature). REE abundances in minerals of this equilibrated rock (Figure 1 [5]) are significantly higher than they would be in the presence of magma. For instance, if this eucrite basalt system consisted of 50% magma, 25% pigeonite, and 25% plagioclase, one calculates C(La)Pigeonite = 0 04 x CI and C(La)Plagioclase = 0.8 x CI; with no magma present (Figure 1), C(La)Pigeonite = 0.4 x CI and CLaPIagioclase = 9 x CI! In the absence of magma, the incompatible REE must go somewhere!! If a mineral grain from this rock were used with Dmineral/basalts to derive a magma composition, that "Hparent basalt" would be rich in REE (130-200 x CI), enrichmed in light REE (La/Lu = 1.6 x CI), and strongly depleted in Eu. Compare this to the original eucrite, with REE at

  16. Equilibration of quantum hall edge states and its conductance fluctuations in graphene p-n junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Chandan; Kuiri, Manabendra; Das, Anindya

    2018-02-01

    We report an observation of conductance fluctuations (CFs) in the bipolar regime of quantum hall (QH) plateaus in graphene (p-n-p/n-p-n) devices. The CFs in the bipolar regime are shown to decrease with increasing bias and temperature. At high temperature (above 7 K) the CFs vanishes completely and the flat quantized plateaus are recovered in the bipolar regime. The values of QH plateaus are in theoretical agreement based on full equilibration of chiral channels at the p-n junction. The amplitude of CFs for different filling factors follows a trend predicted by the random matrix theory. Although, there are mismatch in the values of CFs between the experiment and theory but at higher filling factors the experimental values become closer to the theoretical prediction. The suppression of CFs and its dependence has been understood in terms of time dependent disorders present at the p-n junctions.

  17. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  18. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  19. Unitary equilibrations: Probability distribution of the Loschmidt echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-02-01

    Closed quantum systems evolve unitarily and therefore cannot converge in a strong sense to an equilibrium state starting out from a generic pure state. Nevertheless for large system size one observes temporal typicality. Namely, for the overwhelming majority of the time instants, the statistics of observables is practically indistinguishable from an effective equilibrium one. In this paper we consider the Loschmidt echo (LE) to study this sort of unitary equilibration after a quench. We draw several conclusions on general grounds and on the basis of an exactly solvable example of a quasifree system. In particular we focus on the whole probability distribution of observing a given value of the LE after waiting a long time. Depending on the interplay between the initial state and the quench Hamiltonian, we find different regimes reflecting different equilibration dynamics. When the perturbation is small and the system is away from criticality the probability distribution is Gaussian. However close to criticality the distribution function approaches a double-peaked, universal form.

  20. Combinations of glycerol percent, glycerol equilibration time, and thawing rate upon freezability of bull spermatozoa in plastic straws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggin, H B; Almquist, J O

    1975-03-01

    Twelve ejaculates were used in a central composite experiment to test 15 combinations of glycerol (7, 9, 11, 13, or 15%), glycerol equilibration times (1, 2, 4, 8, or 16 h) and thawing rates (water at 35 C for 15 s, 50 C for 13 s, 65 C for 11 s, 80 C for 9 s, or 95 C for 7 s). Semen was diluted in heated skim milk-glycerol, packaged in .3-ml. Continental U.S. straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. Based on post-thaw progressive sperm motility after storage at -196 C for 9 to 11 days, estimated optima from multiple regression were 10.7% for glycerol, 2.0 h for glycerol equilibration time, and 76 C for thawing bath temperature. Only the linear effect for each variable was significant. Much faster thawing rates and shorter glycerol equilibration times than those for freezing bull spermatozoa in glass ampules should be used for maximum post-thaw sperm motility in straws.

  1. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of

  2. Local quenches in frustrated quantum spin chains: Global versus subsystem equilibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Mathias; Chancellor, Nicholas; Haas, Stephan; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    We study the equilibration behavior following local quenches, using frustrated quantum spin chains as an example of interacting closed quantum systems. Specifically, we examine the statistics of the time series of the Loschmidt echo, the trace distance of the time-evolved local density matrix to its average state, and the local magnetization. Depending on the quench parameters, the equilibration statistics of these quantities show features of good or poor equilibration, indicated by Gaussian, exponential, or bistable distribution functions. These universal functions provide valuable tools to characterize the various time-evolution responses and give insight into the plethora of equilibration phenomena in complex quantum systems.

  3. Electron-Ion Dynamics with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Towards Predictive Solar Cell Modeling: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa [Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This project investigates the accuracy of currently-used functionals in time-dependent density functional theory, which is today routinely used to predict and design materials and computationally model processes in solar energy conversion. The rigorously-based electron-ion dynamics method developed here sheds light on traditional methods and overcomes challenges those methods have. The fundamental research undertaken here is important for building reliable and practical methods for materials discovery. The ultimate goal is to use these tools for the computational design of new materials for solar cell devices of high efficiency.

  4. Bremsstrahlung from an Equilibrating Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, Munshi G.; Mustafa, Munshi G.; Thoma, Markus H.

    2000-01-01

    The photon production rate from a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma likely to be produced at RHIC (BNL) and LHC (CERN) energies is computed taking into account bremsstrahlung. The plasma is assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium, but with a phase space distribution that deviates from the Fermi or Bose distribution by space-time dependent factors (fugacities). The photon spectrum is obtained by integrating the photon rate over the space-time history of the plasma, adopting a boost invariant cylindrically symmetric transverse expansion of the system with different nuclear profile functions. Initial conditions obtained from a self-screened parton cascade calculation and, for comparison, from the HIJING model are used. Compared to the equilibrium case a suppression of the photon yield by one to three orders of magnitude is observed. Furthermore the photon production due to bremsstrahlung from the chemically nonequilibrated plasma dominates over the emission from Compton scattering and quark-antiquar...

  5. Effect of pressure relaxation during the laser heating and electron-ion relaxation stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Hallo, L. [Univ Bordeaux 1, CEA, CNRS, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33 - Talence (France)

    2008-09-15

    The multi-phase equation of state by Bushman et al. (Sov. Tech. Rev. 5:1-44, 2008) is modified to describe states with different electron and ion temperatures and it is applied to the non-equilibrium evolution of an aluminum sample heated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. The sample evolution is described by the two-temperature model for the electron and ion temperatures, while the pressure and density are described by a simplified relaxation equation. The pressure relaxation in the heating stage reduces the binding energy and facilitates the electron-driven ablation. The model is applied to estimate the ablation depth of an Al target irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. It improves the agreement with the experimental data and provides a new explanation of the ablation process. (authors)

  6. Human ceruloplasmin. Intramolecular electron transfer kinetics and equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Bendahl, L; Skov, L K

    1999-01-01

    and indeed electron equilibration between T1A and the trinuclear copper center in the domain 1-6 interface takes place with a rate constant of 2.9 +/- 0.6 s(-1). The equilibrium constant is 0.17. Following reduction of T1A Cu(II), another ET process takes place between RSSR(-) and T1B copper(II) of domain 4......) copper centers, the following is proposed. The first T1 copper(II) ion to be reduced in ceruloplasmin is the blue copper center of domain 6 (T1A) by ET from RSSR(-) of domain 5. The rate constant is 28 +/- 2 s(-1) at 279 K and pH 7.0. T1A is in close covalent contact with the type 3 copper pair...... with a rate constant of 3.9 +/- 0.8. No reoxidation of T1B Cu(I) could be resolved. It appears that the third T1 center (T1C of domain 2) is not participating in intramolecular ET, as it seems to be in a reduced state in the resting enzyme....

  7. Non-equilibration of topological charge and its effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Claude

    2016-01-01

    In QCD simulations at small lattice spacings, the topological charge Q evolves very slowly and, if this quantity is not properly equilibrated, we could get incorrect results for physical quantities, or incorrect estimates of their errors. We use the known relation between the dependence of masses and decay constants on the QCD vacuum angle theta and the squared topological charge Q^2 together with chiral perturbation theory results for the dependence of masses and decay constants on theta to estimate the size of these effects and suggest strategies for dealing with them. For the partially quenched case, we sketch an alternative derivation of the known $\\chi$PT results of Aoki and Fukaya, using the nonperturbatively correct chiral theory worked out by Golterman, Sharpe and Singleton, and by Sharpe and Shoresh. With the MILC collaboration's ensembles of lattices with four flavors of HISQ dynamical quarks, we measure the $Q^2$ dependence of masses and decay constants and compare to the $\\chi$PT forms. The observ...

  8. Pion and Kaon structure function measurements at Jefferson Lab 12 GeV and the Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Andres; Horn, Tanja; Trotta, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The lightest mesons, Pions and Kaons play a fundamental role in the understanding of hadronic mass. The 12 GeV JLab will address some questions, but to ultimately understand the role of sea quarks and gluons in pion and kaon masses the wide kinematic reach in the longitudinal momentum fraction as well as in the four-momentum transfer, as enabled by the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is needed. In this talk, we present the current status of and projections for measurements of pion and kaon structure functions in the Jefferson Laboratory 12 GeV era and at the EIC. Supported in part by NSF Grants PHY1306227, PHY1306418 and PHY1530874.

  9. Fireball as the result of self-organization of an ensemble of diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles in molecular gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopasov, V. P., E-mail: lopas@iao.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zuev Institute for Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The conditions for dissipative self-organization of a fireball (FB) is a molecular gas by means of a regular correction of an elastic collision of water and nitrogen molecules by the field of a coherent bi-harmonic light wave (BLW) are presented. The BWL field is generated due to conversion of energy of a linear lightning discharge into light energy. A FB consists of two components: an ensemble of optically active diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles and a standing wave of elliptical polarization (SWEP). It is shown that the FB lifetime depends on the energies accumulated by nanoparticles and the SWEP field and on the stability of self-oscillations of the energy between nanoparticles and SWEP.

  10. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from container ship Cap Vilano in the Pacific Ocean from 2013-02-01 to 2013-06-06 (NCEI Accession 0132054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 3 trans-Pacific crossings...

  11. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2014-02-01 to 2014-11-26 (NCEI Accession 0132047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 6 trans-Pacific crossings...

  12. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector and other instruments from 3 trans-Pacific crossings onboard container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-13 to 2016-09-13 (NCEI Accession 0158484)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters that were collected during 3 trans-Pacific...

  13. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from 4 trans-Pacific crossings onboard container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2015-03-28 to 2015-12-04 (NCEI Accession 0141304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 4 trans-Pacific crossings in 2015 on the container ship...

  14. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson in the Bering Sea and coast of Alaska from 2014-03-03 to 2014-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0132046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected in 2014 on board NOAA Ship Oscar...

  15. Study of thin oxide films by electron, ion and synchrotron radiation beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sammelselg, V; Tarre, A; Asari, J; Rauhala, E; Arstila, K; Seppaelae, A; Zakharov, A; Aarik, J; Karlis, J; Martinson, Indrek

    2002-01-01

    Titanium oxide and zirconium oxide thin films deposited on silicon substrates were characterized using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA) and scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM). The composition and mass thickness of the films were determined and the results of different methods compared. lt was revealed that the synchrotron radiation used for SPEM studies caused considerable modification of zirconia films grown at low temperatures. (author)

  16. Necessity of eigenstate thermalisation for equilibration towards unique expectation values when starting from generic initial states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, C.; Gemmer, J.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate dynamical equilibration of expectation values in closed quantum systems for realistic non-equilibrium initial states. Thereby we find that the corresponding long-time expectation values depend on the initial expectation values if eigenstate thermalisation is violated. An analytical expression for the deviation from the expected ensemble value is derived for small displacements from equilibrium. Additional numerics for magnetisation and energy equilibration in an asymmetric anisotropic spin-(1/2)-ladder demonstrate that the analytical predictions persist beyond the limits of the theory. The results suggest eigenstate thermalisation as a physically necessary condition for initial-state-independent equilibration.

  17. Activity of some disiloxanes toward the cation exchange resin-catalyst in the siloxane equilibration reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. GOVEDARICA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The relative activities of four disiloxanes toward the cation exchange resin, which was used as an equilibration catalyst, were determined in such a way that the equilibrium initially present in an arbitrary chosen equilibrate was disturbed by adding the respective disiloxanes to it, and then by recording the viscosity of the equilibrating mixtures as a function of reaction time. As a result, a set of different viscosity-reaction time relationships was obtained, which implies different activities of disiloxanes toward the catalyst. In this way the following decreasing order of acitivites was established: 1,3-tetramethyldisiloxane > 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane > hexamethyldisiloxane > 1,3-bis(3-carboxypropyltetramethyldisiloxane.

  18. Equilibration in one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriadis, Spyros

    2017-10-01

    We study quench dynamics and equilibration in one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamics, which provides effective descriptions of the density and velocity fields in gapless quantum gases. We show that the information content of the large time steady state is inherently connected to the presence of ballistically moving localised excitations. When such excitations are present, the system retains memory of initial correlations up to infinite times, thus evading decoherence. We demonstrate this connection in the context of the Luttinger model, the simplest quantum hydrodynamic model, and in the quantum KdV equation. In the standard Luttinger model, memory of all initial correlations is preserved throughout the time evolution up to infinitely large times, as a result of the purely ballistic dynamics. However nonlinear dispersion or interactions, when separately present, lead to spreading and delocalisation that suppress the above effect by eliminating the memory of non-Gaussian correlations. We show that, for any initial state that satisfies sufficient clustering of correlations, the steady state is Gaussian in terms of the bosonised or fermionised fields in the dispersive or interacting case respectively. On the other hand, when dispersion and interaction are simultaneously present, a semiclassical approximation suggests that localisation is restored as the two effects compensate each other and solitary waves are formed. Solitary waves, or simply solitons, are experimentally observed in quantum gases and theoretically predicted based on semiclassical approaches, but the question of their stability at the quantum level remains to a large extent an open problem. We give a general overview on the subject and discuss the relevance of our findings to general out of equilibrium problems. Dedicated to John Cardy on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  19. Dynamic electron-ion collisions and nuclear quantum effects in quantum simulation of warm dense matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongdong; Dai, Jiayu

    2017-11-29

    The structural, thermodynamic and transport properties of warm dense matter (WDM) are crucial to the fields of astrophysical physics, planet science, as well as inertial confinement fusion. WDM refers to the states of matter in a regime of temperature and density between cold condensed matter and hot ideal plasmas, where the density is from near up to 10 times solid density and the temperature is between 0.1 and 100 eV. In the WDM regime, matter exhibits moderately or strongly coupled, partially degenerate. Therefore, the methods which used to deal with condensed matter and isolated atom should be validated for WDM properly. It is therefore a big challenge to understand WDM within a unified theoretical description with reliable accuracy. Here we review the progress in the theoretical study of WDM with state-of-the-art simulations, \\ie, quantum Langevin molecular dynamics and first principles path integral molecular dynamics. The related applications for WDM are also included. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1, as a Predictor of 5-Fluorouracil Resistance in Human Pancreatic Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MASANORI TSUJIE; SHOJI NAKAMORI; SHIN NAKAHIRA; YUJI TAKAHASHI; NOBUYASU HAYASHI; JIRO OKAMI; HIROAKI NAGANO; KEIZO DONO; KOJI UMESHITA; MASATO SAKON; MORITO MONDEN

    2007-01-01

    ...€²-difluoro-deoxycytidine) sensitivity in pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods: The relationship between 5-FU and gemcitabine sensitivity and the mRNA levels of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1...

  1. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Ivanov, M. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.; Audouin, L.; Khan, E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aumann, T.; Beller, P.; Boretzky, K.; Dolinskii, A.; Egelhof, P.; Emling, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kester, O.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.; Scheidenberger, Ch.; Simon, H.; Steck, M.; Weick, H.; Enders, J.; Pietralla, N.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Zilges, A.; Distler, M. O.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Junghans, A. R.; Lenske, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Suda, T.; Kato, S.; Adachi, T.; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Woertche, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Koop, I. A.; Logatchov, P. V.; Otboev, A. V.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Shatunov, P. Y.; Shatunov, Y. M.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Shvartz, D. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Chulkov, L. V.; Danilin, B. V.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Volkov, V. A.; Grishkin, Y.; Lisin, V. P.; Mushkarenkov, A. N.; Nedorezov, V.; Polonski, A. L.; Rudnev, N. V.; Turinge, A. A.; Artukh, A.; Avdeichikov, V.; Ershov, S. N.; Fomichev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L.; Klygin, S.; Krupko, S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rodin, A.; Sereda, Y.; Seleznev, I.; Sidorchuk, S.; Syresin, E.; Stepantsov, S.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Teterev, Y.; Vorontsov, A. N.; Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Litvinova, E. V.; Karataglidis, S.; Alvarez Rodriguez, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Ramirez, C. Fernandez; Garrido, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Vignote, J. R.; Fraile Prieto, L. M.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Udias-Moinelo, J.; Amaro Soriano, J. E.; Rojo, A. M. Lallena; Caballero, J. A.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Zhukov, M.; Golubev, P.; Rudolph, D.; Hencken, K.; Jourdan, J.; Krusche, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kiselev, D.; Trautmann, D.; Al-Khalili, J.; Catford, W.; Johnson, R.; Stevenson, P. D.; Barton, C.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, R.; Chartier, M.; Cullen, D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Heinz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the

  2. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Ivanov, M.V. [Grupo de Physica Nuclear, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Kadrev, D.N. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux-Gradingnan (CENBG) (France); Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S. [CEA Saclay (France); Farget, F.; Schmitt, C. [GANIL Caen (France)

    2011-05-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  3. R&D of a high-performance DIRC detector for a future electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Staceu L. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is proposed as the next big scientific facility to be built in the United States, costing over $1 billion in design and construction. Each detector concept for the electron/ion beam interaction point is integrated into a large solenoidal magnet. The necessity for excellent hadronic particle identification (pion/kaon/proton) in the barrel region of the solenoid has pushed research and development (R&D) towards a new, high-performance Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) detector design. The passage of a high energy charged particle through a fused silica bar of the DIRC generates optical Cherenkov radiation. A large fraction of this light propagates by total internal reflection to the end of the bar, where the photon trajectories expand in a large volume before reaching a highly segmented photo-detector array. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Cherenkov light at the photo-detector array allows one to reconstruct the angle of emission of the light relative to the incident charged particle track. In order to reach the desired performance of 3sigma pi/K separation at 6 GeV/c particle momentum a new 3-layer spherical lens focusing optic with a lanthanum crown glass central layer was designed to have a nearly at focal plane. In order to validate the EIC DIRC simulation package, a synergistic test beam campaign was carried out in 2015 at the CERN PS with the PANDA Barrel DIRC group using a prototype DIRC detector. Along with the analysis of the CERN test beam data, measurements of the focal plane of the 3-layer lens were performed using a custom-built laser setup at Old Dominion University. Radiation hardness of the lanthanum crown glass was tested using a 160 keV X-ray source and a monochromator at the Catholic University of America. Results of these test-bench experiments and the analysis of the 2015 CERN test beam data are presented here.

  4. R&D of a High-Performance DIRC Detector for a Future Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stacey Lee

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is proposed as the next big scientific facility to be built in the United States, costing over $1 billion in design and construction. Each detector concept for the electron/ion beam interaction point is integrated into a large solenoidal magnet. The necessity for excellent hadronic particle identification (pion/kaon/proton) in the barrel region of the solenoid has pushed research and development (R&D) towards a new, high-performance Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) detector design. The passage of a high energy charged particle through a fused silica bar of the DIRC generates optical Cherenkov radiation. A large fraction of this light propagates by total internal reflection to the end of the bar, where the photon trajectories expand in a large volume before reaching a highly segmented photo-detector array. The spatial and temporal distribution of the Cherenkov light at the photo-detector array allows one to reconstruct the angle of emission of the light relative to the incident charged particle track. In order to reach the desired performance of 3sigma pi/K separation at 6 GeV/c particle momentum a new 3-layer spherical lens focusing optic with a lanthanum crown glass central layer was designed to have a nearly flat focal plane. In order to validate the EIC DIRC simulation package, a synergistic test beam campaign was carried out in 2015 at the CERN PS with the PANDA Barrel DIRC group using a prototype DIRC detector. Along with the analysis of the CERN test beam data, measurements of the focal plane of the 3-layer lens were performed using a custom-built laser setup at Old Dominion University. Radiation hardness of the lanthanum crown glass was tested using a 160 keV X-ray source and a monochromator at the Catholic University of America. Results of these test-bench experiments and the analysis of the 2015 CERN test beam data are presented here.

  5. A novel cell-scale bio-nanogenerator based on electron-ion interaction for fast light power conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tian, He; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Jian, Mu-Qiang; Lv, Yu-Jia; Tian, Ye; Wang, Qian; Yang, Yi; Xiang, Yan; Zhang, Yingying; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2018-01-03

    Natural energy haversting devices serve as an alternative candidate for power supply in many micro-/nano-systems. However, traditional nanogenerators based on piezoelectricity or triboelectric power generation face challenges in terms of biocompatibility and stability in various biological systems. The bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein in Halobacterium halobium is an ideal biocompatible material for photoelectric conversion. Conventional bR systems based on ion transport or enhanced light absorption layers have a limited light power conversion speed. On the other hand, bR-based biohybrid devices have a great potential for sensitive light power conversion as compared to conventional nanogenerators. Herein, we present a biohybrid nanogenerator made of bR and horizontally aligned-long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with electron-ion interaction for the first time for sensitive light power conversion. The bR layer serves as the proton pump, whereas CNTs are utilized to enhance the photocurrent; thus, the photocurrent frequency response improves significantly because of the effect of the electron-ion interaction. The photocurrent shows a linear relationship with the intensity of light and can still obtain a stable signal at a light intensity of 0.03 mW cm-2. With regard to the influence of the light on-off period, the photocurrent initially increases and then decreases with an increase in flickering frequency up to 360 Hz; this can be ascribed to the combinational influence of light switch speed and photocycle decay time. The photocurrent shows highest value (99 nA cm-2) at a frequency of about 50 Hz at a light intensity of 0.43 mW cm-2, which matches well with the frequency standard of the electrical power supply system. Moreover, we found that a higher density of CNTs contributed to improve performance of the nanogenerators. Furthermore, a H+ ion releasing model was proposed to interpret the operating mechanism of the biohybrid nanogenerator. The biohybrid nanogenerator shows

  6. Electron and electron-ion sequential irradiation of borosilicate glasses: Impact of the pre-existing defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Anamul H.; Monnet, I.; Boizot, B.; Jégou, C.; Peuget, S.

    2017-06-01

    A three-oxide sodium borosilicate glass was irradiated with 2.3 MeV electrons up to 0.15 GGy and 4.6 GGy, and subsequently with 96 MeV Xe ions. The irradiated samples were characterised using Raman spectroscopy, ToF-SIMS, microhardness and surface profilometry. Electron irradiation of the pristine glasses resulted in different structural modifications at the sample surface and in the bulk of the glass, whereas, ion irradiation of either the pristine or bulk of the electron pre-irradiated glasses induced same structural, physical and mechanical property changes. Furthermore, sample surfaces showed a different behaviour than that of the bulk upon subsequent ion irradiation. These results show that the radiation sensitivity of surfaces can significantly vary depending on the type of the irradiation. Therefore, detailed studies aimed at understanding the response of the surfaces to mono and electron-ion double-beam irradiations should be undertaken to address the long-term evolution of the nuclear waste glass matrix surfaces.

  7. Results from the magnetic electron ion spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Joseph; O'Brien, Paul; Roeder, James; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Spence, Harlan; Blake, Bernard

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  8. Initial Results from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) Instruments Aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Van Allen Probes ECT Team

    2013-05-01

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of initial results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  9. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E

    2014-10-14

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation.

  10. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:25328493

  11. Optimization of the cryopreservation of dromedary camel semen: Cryoprotectants and their concentration and equilibration times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, Clara; Crichton, Elizabeth G; Skidmore, Julian A

    2017-02-01

    Research into an optimal cryoprotectant, its concentration and equilibration time underlies the successful cryopreservation of dromedary camel spermatozoa. This study assessed the cryo-efficiency of different cryoprotectants, their concentration and equilibration time and any interactions. In experiment 1, semen samples (n = 4 males; 2 ejaculates/male) were frozen using Green Buffer containing one of four cryoprotectants (3% glycerol, ethylene glycol, methyl formamide, dimethyl sulfoxide) and using 4 equilibration times (10 min, 0.5, 1 and 2 h). Glycerol and ethylene glycol provided the best motility recovery rates and different equilibration times were not significant for any cryoprotectant nor were any interactions noted. However different equilibration times were pertinent for improved kinematic parameters BCF and VSL. In experiment 2, glycerol and ethylene glycol were evaluated at 4 concentrations (1.5, 3, 6, 9%) with 0.5 h equilibration (n = 4 males, 3 ejaculates/male). Sperm motility recoveries, kinematics and acrosome status were assessed. Higher values for LIN and STR were found with ethylene glycol. At 0 and 1 h post thaw 3 and 6% of either cryoprotectant resulted in better motility values than 1.5%. Acrosome integrity was compromised at 9% cryoprotectant. There were interactions between cryoprotectant and concentration in total motility at 0 and 1 h. For glycerol, total motility recoveries were best at 3-9%; for ethylene glycol 1.5-6% were best at 0 h and 3-6% at 1 h. In conclusion, 3-6% glycerol or ethylene glycol offered the best cryoprotection for camel sperm while different equilibration times were not critical. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Continuous Measurements of Dissolved Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe Ratios with a Field-Deployable Gas Equilibration Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Cara C; Stanley, Rachel H R; Lott, Dempsey E

    2016-03-15

    Noble gases dissolved in natural waters are useful tracers for quantifying physical processes. Here, we describe a field-deployable gas equilibration mass spectrometer (GEMS) that provides continuous, real-time measurements of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe mole ratios in natural waters. Gas is equilibrated with a membrane contactor cartridge and measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, after in-line purification with reactive metal alloy getters. We use an electron energy of 35 V for Ne to eliminate isobaric interferences, and a higher electron energy for the other gases to improve sensitivity. The precision is 0.7% or better and 1.0% or better for all mole ratios when the instrument is installed in a temperature-controlled environment and a variable-temperature environment, respectively. In the lab, the accuracy is 0.9% or better for all gas ratios using air as the only calibration standard. In the field (and/or at greater levels of disequilbrium), the accuracy is 0.7% or better for Ne/Kr, Ne/Ar, and Ar/Kr, and 2.5% or better for Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe using air as the only calibration standard. The field accuracy improves to 0.6% or better for Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe when the data is calibrated using discrete water samples run on a laboratory-based mass spectrometer. The e-folding response time is 90-410 s. This instrument enables the collection of a large number of continuous, high-precision and accuracy noble gas measurements at substantially reduced cost and labor compared to traditional methods.

  13. 3D Simulations of Ultra-small MOSFETs with Real-space Treatment of the Electron – Electron and Electron-ion Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, W. J.; Vasileska, D.; Ferry, D. K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a 3D Ensemble Monte Carlo particle-based simulator with a novel realspace treatment of the short-range electron – electron and electron-ion interactions. By using a corrected Coulomb force in conjunction with a proper cutoff range, the shortrange portion of the force is properly accounted for, and the ‘double counting’ of the long-range interaction is eliminated. The proposed method naturally incorporates the multi-ion contributions, local distortions in the scatteri...

  14. The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System: general concept and aspects of botanical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, V; Hollander-Czytko, H; Voeste, D

    1997-09-01

    The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) consists of four subcomponents which form a closed (artificial) aquatic ecosystem initially designed to study the long-term influence of space conditions on several successive generations of aquatic organisms. Teleost fishes and water snails in the zoological component produce CO2 ammonium ions and waste compounds which can be utilized after ammonium is oxidised in a microbial component by the botanical component consisting of a rootless, aquatic higher plant species which eliminates ions, i.e. nitrate, and produces oxygen for animal respiration. An electronic component serves as a data-acquisition and regulation device for temperature and oxygen-dependent illumination of the plant chamber. A comprehensive interdisciplinary research programme, focused around the CEBAS, is especially well developed in the field of zoology. It covers a ground laboratory and preparations for two scheduled space flight projects, as well as aspects of combined animal-plant food production modules for human nutrition in bioregenerative space life-support systems and for terrestrial production sites. In the botanical research programme, morphological investigations on Ceratophyllum demersum L. performed with light and electron microscopy have demonstrated a gas lacuna system which, in addition to starch grains in the plastids, might regulate the buoyancy of the plant and/or serve as a 'gas skeleton'. Also, a remarkable symmetry in the arrangement of tissues was observed in stems and older leaves. The photosynthetic capacities of Ceratophyllum in the CEBAS-MINI MODULE proved to be more than sufficient for life support, and experiments on nitrate uptake into the plants showed their capacity to utilize ions from the water.

  15. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  16. The equilibrated state of freezing as a basis for distinguishing lethal stresses of freezing in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for coordination of stresses that limit winterhardiness in plants based on the thermodynamic equilibrated state of freezing and melting provides a rational basis for distinction of freeze-induced energies which can stress and injure living organisms in various ways. The departure from equili...

  17. Neuchatel ne gardera pas le Palais de l'equilibre apres Expo.02

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "La ville de Neuchatel ne souhaite pas conserver le Palais de l'equilibre apres Expo.02. Par 24 voix contre 7, le Conseil general a rejete le plan special du Conseil communal qui proposait de transformer l'edifice en un centre de congres" (1/2 page).

  18. The Effect of an Equilibrated Methodology on the Acquisition of the Concept-Conservation of Quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Hansom Prentice, Jr.

    The Piagetian operations of multiple classification, multiple attributes, seriation and reversibility were used to develop an "equilibrated methodology" to help preschool children conserve quantity. Randomly assigned experimental and control groups within morning and afternoon classes at a nursery school were used to evaluate the…

  19. Scaling properties of equilibrating semiconductor mounds of various initial shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzemen, A. T.; Esen, M.; Ozdemir, M.

    2017-07-01

    A surface below its roughening temperature consisting of two dimensional concentric circular monoatomic steps is discussed under step-flow model. Entropic interactions between the steps are considered and the diffusion equation is solved in two dimensional polar coordinates. It is assumed that the local mass transfer occurs due to surface diffusion only during the evolution of the initial surface. The evolution of initial surfaces bounded by both a sinusoidal and other envelope functions of the form xγ are considered. The evolution of the height of surface as a function of time is analyzed for each surface in Diffusion Limited (DL) regime. We have determined three scaling characteristics of evolution of the height of the surface. For an initial sinusoidal surface profile we have the following findings: The height of surface approximately decreases as τα where α is independent of wavelength and initial height of the surface. The time dependence of the evolution of the height scales with the cube of the wavelength of the initial surface. Finally the normalized height of the initial surfaces of different amplitudes with the same wavelength scales linearly with the amplitude as a function of time. Similar findings are obtained for non-sinusoidal initial surfaces also.

  20. Scale of the equilibration volume in eclogites: insights from a new micro-mapping approach - Example of Atbashi range, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2014-05-01

    Understanding geodynamic processes in subduction zones and mountains belts relies on the reconstruction of precise pressure-temperature paths (P-T paths) from metamorphic rocks. Most P-T paths are obtained using quantitative thermobarometry such as forward thermodynamics models. The question of the scale of the equilibration volume is of prime importance because its chemistry is used as input for the calculation of P-T sections. In chemically homogeneous rocks the bulk rock may be obtained either by ICP-MS or XRF analysis on whole rocks. For chemically heterogeneous rocks, containing different mineral assemblages and/or a high proportion of zoned minerals, the concept of local effective bulk (LEB) is essential. In the last 10 years, X-ray micro-mapping methods have been developed in this aim. Here we show how standardized X-ray maps can be used to estimate the equilibration volume at the pressure peak in an eclogite sample. The study area lies in the Atbashi range, in Kyrgyzstan, along the South-Tianshan carboniferous suture of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt with the Tarim block. We use the micro-mapping approach to unravel the P-T path of a mafic eclogite containing mm-scale garnet porphyroblasts. Quantitative compositional maps of a garnet and its surrounding matrix are obtained from standardized X-ray maps processed with the XMapTools program (Lanari et al, 2014). By using these maps we measured the LEB corresponding to the different stages of garnet growth. The equilibration volume is then modeled using the local compositions (extrapolated in 3D) combined with Gibbs free energy minimization. Our model suggests that equilibrium conditions are attained for chemistry made of 90% of garnet and 10% of matrix. P-T sections are calculated from the core of the garnet to the rim taking into account the fractionation at each stage of garnet growth by changing the bulk composition. We obtained the following P-T path: (1) garnet core crystallization during prograde stage

  1. Accurate evaluations of the field shift and lowest-order QED correction for the ground 1{sup 1}S−states of some light two-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, Alexei M., E-mail: afrolov@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6H 5B7 (Canada); Wardlaw, David M., E-mail: dwardlaw@mun.ca [Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Newfoundland A1C 5S7 (Canada)

    2014-09-14

    Mass-dependent and field shift components of the isotopic shift are determined to high accuracy for the ground 1{sup 1}S−states of some light two-electron Li{sup +}, Be{sup 2+}, B{sup 3+}, and C{sup 4+} ions. To determine the field components of these isotopic shifts we apply the Racah-Rosental-Breit formula. We also determine the lowest order QED corrections to the isotopic shifts for each of these two-electron ions.

  2. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  3. Liquid crystals and cholesterol nucleation during equilibration in supersaturated bile analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzbach, R T; Corbusier, C

    1978-03-30

    In recent work, apparent liquid crystal agglomeration to form typical solid cholesterol microcrystals was frequently observed photomicrographically in bile samples from prairie dogs fed a cholesterol-enriched diet, prior to solid crystal formation. We therefore have conducted a systematic study of time-course lipid compositional changes in the mesophase and micellar phase constituents of bile analog solutions while undergoing cholesterol nucleation during equilibration. On the basis of these studies, we conclude that the nucleation process for microcrystal formation most likely occurs within the mesophase component which is only the first of a two-step transition in a sequential series of physical ordering processes. We deduce that mesophase formation must have a lower kinetic energy requirement and that the second step (microcrystal formation) must be rate limiting. In keeping with theoretical considerations, structural evidence for increased hydration is demonstrable near the point of complete equilibration when the mesophase is dissolving.

  4. Equilibration, thermalisation, and the emergence of statistical mechanics in closed quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We review selected advances in the theoretical understanding of complex quantum many-body systems with regard to emergent notions of quantum statistical mechanics. We cover topics such as equilibration and thermalisation in pure state statistical mechanics, the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, the equivalence of ensembles, non-equilibration dynamics following global and local quenches as well as ramps. We also address initial state independence, absence of thermalisation, and many-body localisation. We elucidate the role played by key concepts for these phenomena, such as Lieb-Robinson bounds, entanglement growth, typicality arguments, quantum maximum entropy principles and the generalised Gibbs ensembles, and quantum (non-)integrability. We put emphasis on rigorous approaches and present the most important results in a unified language.

  5. Dipolar degrees of freedom and Isospin equilibration processes in Heavy Ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papa, M; Acosta, L; Amorini, F; Agodi, C; Anzalone, A; Auditore, L; Cardella, G; Cavallaro, S; Chatterjee, M B; De Filippo, E; Francalanza, L; Geraci, E; Grassi, L; Gnoffo, B; Han, J; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I; Pagano, C Maiolino T Minniti A; Pagano, E V; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Quattrocchi, L; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Russotto, P; Trifirò, A; Trimarchi, M; Verde, G; Vigilante, and M

    2015-01-01

    Background: In heavy ion collision at the Fermi energies Isospin equilibration processes occur- ring when nuclei with different charge/mass asymmetries interacts have been investigated to get information on the nucleon-nucleon Iso-vectorial effective interaction. Purpose: In this paper, for the system 48Ca +27 Al at 40 MeV/nucleon, we investigate on this process by means of an observable tightly linked to isospin equilibration processes and sensitive in exclusive way to the dynamical stage of the collision. From the comparison with dynamical model calculations we want also to obtain information on the Iso-vectorial effective microscopic interaction. Method: The average time derivative of the total dipole associated to the relative motion of all emitted charged particles and fragments has been determined from the measured charges and velocities by using the 4? multi-detector CHIMERA. The average has been determined for semi- peripheral collisions and for different charges Zb of the biggest produced fragment. E...

  6. Roles of energy eigenstates and eigenvalues in equilibration of isolated quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaoqi; Wu, Biao

    2017-10-01

    We show that eigenenergies and energy eigenstates play different roles in the equilibration process of an isolated quantum system. Their roles are revealed numerically by exchanging the eigenenergies between an integrable model and a nonintegrable model. We find that the structure of eigenenergies of a nonintegrable model characterized by nondegeneracy ensures that quantum revival occurs rarely whereas the energy eigenstates of a nonintegrable model suppress the fluctuations for the equilibrated quantum state. Our study is aided with a quantum entropy that describes how randomly a wave function is distributed in quantum phase space. We also demonstrate with this quantum entropy the validity of Berry's conjecture for energy eigenstates. This implies that the energy eigenstates of a nonintegrable model appear indeed random.

  7. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget's theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel Alejandro; Barandiaran, Xabier E; Beaton, Michael; Buhrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the "laws" of sensorimotor contingencies (SMCs). In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget's theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget's theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level.

  8. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget’s theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel Alejandro; Barandiaran, Xabier E.; Beaton, Michael; Buhrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Learning to perceive is faced with a classical paradox: if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the “laws” of sensorimotor contingencies (SMCs). In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget’s theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget’s theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level. PMID:25126065

  9. The first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre arrives at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Jean-Luc Baldy, Head of CERN civil engineering; Heiner Rieder, from the company appointed by the Swiss Confederation; Thomas B chi, wood-engineer from the Charpente-Concept SA; Carlo Wyss, CERN director for accelerators, and Hervé Dessinoz, the architect, in front of the keystone of the Palais de l'Equilibre.This was given to CERN by the Swiss Confederation to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of CERN and renamed the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  10. Evaluation of headspace equilibration methods for quantifying greenhouse gases in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, M M R; Johnston, P; Khalil, M I; Grant, J; Somers, C; Richards, K G

    2012-11-30

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the different headspace equilibration methods for the quantification of dissolved greenhouse gases in groundwater. Groundwater samples were collected from wells with contrasting hydrogeochemical properties and degassed using the headspace equilibration method. One hundred samples from each well were randomly selected, treatments were applied and headspace gases analysed by gas chromatography. Headspace equilibration treatments varied helium (He):water ratio, shaking time and standing time. Mean groundwater N(2)O, CO(2) and CH(4) concentrations were 0.024 mg N L(-1), 13.71 mg C L(-1) and 1.63 μg C L(-1), respectively. All treatments were found to significantly influence dissolved gas concentrations. Considerable differences in the optimal He:water ratio and standing time were observed between the three gases. For N(2)O, CO(2) and CH(4) the optimum operating points for He:water ratio was 4.4:1, 3:1 and 3.4:1; shaking time was 13, 12 and 13 min; and standing time was 63, 17 and 108 min, respectively. The headspace equilibration method needs to be harmonised to ensure comparability between studies. The experiment reveals that He:water ratio 3:1 and shaking time 13 min give better estimation of dissolved gases than any lower or higher ratios and shaking times. The standing time 63, 17 and 108 min should be applied for N(2)O, CO(2) and CH(4), respectively. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget's theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Alejandro Di Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning to perceive faces a classical paradox: if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the ‘laws’ of sensorimotor contingencies. In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget’s theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget’s theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level.

  12. An alternative method for the determination of siloxane activities toward basic equilibration catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILUTIN N. GOVEDARICA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The method used is based on the well-known fact that siloxane equilibrates, once formed, do not change their compositions unless some siloxane compound is added, in which case new equilibrium compositions appear. As these composition changes, as well as their dynamics, are caused solely because of the addition of a particular siloxane compound, they are expected to be specific, and should contain information about the siloxane activities toward the applied equilibration catalyst. It was shown that the viscosities of such systems, measured as a function of reaction times, could be used for the determination of the relative activities of siloxanes. Proceeding from this basic assumption, some commonly used siloxanes were tested in equilibrations catalysed with tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH. The siloxanes were: hexamathylcyclotrisiloxane, D3, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, D4, tetravinyltetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane, D4Vinyl, hexamethyldisiloxane, MM, and a linear all-methyl oligosiloxane of number average molecular weight of approximately 800. MD8,5M. The following decreasing order of activities toward the TMAH-catalyst was obtained: D3>MD8,5M>D4>D4Vinyl>MM.

  13. Proton channeling through long chiral carbon nanotubes: The rainbow route to equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, S. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: petrovs@vin.bg.ac.yu; Telecki, I.; Borka, D.; Neskovic, N. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2008-09-15

    In this work we investigate the rainbows appearing in channeling of 1 GeV protons through the long (11,9) single-wall carbon nanotubes. The nanotube length is varied from 10 to 500 {mu}m. The angular distributions of channeled protons are computed using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the Monte Carlo method. The rainbows are identified as the rings in the angular distributions, which correspond to the extrema of the proton deflection functions. Each rainbow is characterized by a sharp decrease of the proton yield on its large angle side. As the nanotube length increases, the number of rainbows increases and the average distance between them decreases in an easily predictable way. When the average distance between the rainbows becomes smaller than the resolution of the angular distribution, one cannot distinguish between the adjacent rainbows, and the angular distribution becomes equilibrated. We call this route to equilibration the rainbow route to equilibration. This work is a demonstration of how a simple one-dimensional bound dynamic system can exhibit a complex collective behavior.

  14. Laser based water equilibration method for d18O determination of water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Magda; Smajgl, Danijela; Stoebener, Nils

    2017-04-01

    Determination of d18O with water equilibration method using mass spectrometers equipped with equilibration unit or Gas Bench is known already for many years. Now, with development of laser spectrometers this extends methods and possibilities to apply different technologies in laboratory but also in the field. The Thermo Scientific™ Delta Ray™ Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) analyzer with the Universal Reference Interface (URI) Connect and Teledyne Cetac ASX-7100 offers high precision and throughput of samples. It employs optical spectroscopy for continuous measurement of isotope ratio values and concentration of carbon dioxide in ambient air, and also for analysis of discrete samples from vials, syringes, bags, or other user-provided sample containers. Test measurements and conformation of precision and accuracy of method determination d18O in water samples were done in Thermo Fisher application laboratory with three lab standards, namely ANST, Ocean II and HBW. All laboratory standards were previously calibrated with international reference material VSMOW2 and SLAP2 to assure accuracy of the isotopic values of the water. With method that we present in this work achieved repeatability and accuracy are 0.16‰ and 0.71‰, respectively, which fulfill requirements of regulatory method for wine and must after equilibration with CO2.

  15. Thermal equilibration of iron meteorite and pallasite parent bodies recorded at the mineral scale by Fe and Ni isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernonozhkin, Stepan M.; Weyrauch, Mona; Goderis, Steven; Oeser, Martin; McKibbin, Seann J.; Horn, Ingo; Hecht, Lutz; Weyer, Stefan; Claeys, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a femtosecond laser ablation (LA) system coupled to a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS) was used to obtain laterally resolved (30-80 μm), high-precision combined Ni and Fe stable isotope ratio data for a variety of mineral phases (olivine, kamacite, taenite, schreibersite and troilite) composing main group pallasites (PMG) and iron meteorites. The stable isotopic signatures of Fe and Ni at the mineral scale, in combination with the factors governing the kinetic or equilibrium isotope fractionation processes, are used to interpret the thermal histories of small differentiated asteroidal bodies. As Fe isotopic zoning is only barely resolvable within the internal precision level of the isotope ratio measurements within a single olivine in Esquel PMG, the isotopically lighter olivine core relative to the rim (Δ56/54Ferim-core = 0.059‰) suggests that the olivines were largely thermally equilibrated. The observed hint of an isotopic and concentration gradient for Fe of crudely similar width is interpreted here to reflect Fe loss from olivine in the process of partial reduction of the olivine rim. The ranges of the determined Fe and Ni isotopic signatures of troilite (δ56/54Fe of -0.66 to -0.09‰) and schreibersite (δ56/54Fe of -0.48 to -0.09‰, and δ62/60Ni of -0.64 to +0.29‰) may result from thermal equilibration. Schreibersite and troilite likely remained in equilibrium with their enclosing metal to temperatures significantly below their point of crystallization. The Ni isotopic signatures of bulk metal and schreibersite correlate negatively, with isotopically lighter Ni in the metal of PMGs and isotopically heavier Ni in the metal of the iron meteorites analyzed. As such, the light Ni isotopic signatures previously observed in PMG metal relative to chondrites may not result from heterogeneity in the Solar Nebula, but rather reflect fractionation in the metal-schreibersite system. Comparison between

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of defect equilibration in double perovskites based on PrBaCo2O6-δ cobaltite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politov, B. V.; Suntsov, A. Yu.; Leonidov, I. A.; Patrakeev, M. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. L.

    2017-05-01

    The double perovskite praseodymium cobaltite lightly doped with yttrium Pr0.9Y0.1BaCo2O6-δ (PYBCO) was obtained by combustion of organo-metallic precursors and shown to have a tetragonal structure with the crystalline lattice parameters a=b=3.903 and c=7.621 Å. The PYBCO composition occurs remarkably stable as show coulometric titration measurements of oxygen content (6-δ) in the oxygen pressure range 10-13-0.21 atm and at temperatures variations within 650-950°С. The experimental data were utilized in order to derive partial thermodynamic functions of oxygen that govern equilibration of defects in PYBCO. The oxygen partial enthalpy ΔHbarO (δ) and entropy ΔSbarO (δ) both experience strong changes near (6-δ)=5. The observed behavior of ΔHbarO (δ) and ΔSbarO (δ) is explained in frameworks of the defect formation model, which involves reactions of charge disproportionation of Co3+ cations, oxygen exchange with the gas phase and oxygen disordering over O2 and O3 structural positions. The verification of the suggested approach is carried out by comparison with independently obtained thermochemical data.

  17. Equilibration conditions of eclogite lenses from Isla Margarita, Venezuela: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the metasedimentary Juan Griego Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, R.; De Capitani, L.; Liborio, G.; Maresch, W. V.; Mottana, A.

    1996-02-01

    The constituent primary and secondary minerals in a suite of fifteen samples of eclogite, amphibole-eclogite and garnet-amphibolite, scattered as boudins and pods in metapelitic schists and gneisses on Isla Margarita, Venezuela, have been analysed by electron microprobe to augment existing bulk-rock chemical data. The large sample population available allows spurious effects of stoichiometric Fe 3+ calculation procedures and bulk-rock influence to be recognised and eliminated. All samples belong to one population with a relatively homogeneous character. The equilibration temperatures are derived from {Fe 2+}/{Mg} fractionation between garnet and clinopyroxene and range from 525-650 °C. Jadeite contents of clinopyroxene and the persistence of minor stable albite constrain pressures to between 13 and 19 kbar. Combined with new evidence for high-pressure metamorphism in the enclosing metapelites and with existing data on an eclogitic metabasic unit exposed in north-eastern Isla Margarita (La Rinconada Group), these data show convincingly that the Margarita crustal block is and has been a relatively coherent unit ever since the entire complex suffered high-pressure metamorphism in Late Mesozoic times.

  18. Equilibration in the reaction of 175 and 252 MeV /sup 20/Ne with /sup 197/Au. [Energy, element, and angular distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, J.B.

    1978-06-01

    The highly inelastic nuclear reaction of /sup 197/Au with /sup 20/Ne at 175 and 252 MeV laboratory energies is studied. Energy-, elemental-, and angular- distributions for atomic numbers 5 to 30 (175 MeV) or 34 (252 MeV) are presented. The means and widths of the kinetic energy spectra for detected elements are compared with a theoretical calculation. The calculation postulates thermalization of the incident projectile kinetic energy, and includes one sha(e-vibrational degree of freedom and rigid rotation of the reaction complex. The effect of particle evaporation is considered. Good agreement of the expurimental mean energies with the theory is obtained. Poorer agreement of the kinetic energy widths with the theory may be due to a low-temperature quantal effect. The relative elemental yields are analyzed for their degree of equilibration, based on a model of diffusive nucleon exchange as described by the master equation. A similar degree of equilibration is observed for both reaction energies. The absolute elemental yields are reproduced qualitatively by employing an advanced diffusion code, coupled with calculation of the subsequent fission of heavy reaction products, including the compound nucleus. The angular distributions are analyzed with a simple model, to estimate the reaction lifetime of selected elements.

  19. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  20. Combined Molecular Algorithms for the Generation, Equilibration and Topological Analysis of Entangled Polymers: Methodology and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Ch. Karayiannis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the methodology, algorithmic implementation and performance characteristics of a hierarchical modeling scheme for the generation, equilibration and topological analysis of polymer systems at various levels of molecular description: from atomistic polyethylene samples to random packings of freely-jointed chains of tangent hard spheres of uniform size. Our analysis focuses on hitherto less discussed algorithmic details of the implementation of both, the Monte Carlo (MC procedure for the system generation and equilibration, and a postprocessing step, where we identify the underlying topological structure of the simulated systems in the form of primitive paths. In order to demonstrate our arguments, we study how molecular length and packing density (volume fraction affect the performance of the MC scheme built around chain-connectivity altering moves. In parallel, we quantify the effect of finite system size, of polydispersity, and of the definition of the number of entanglements (and related entanglement molecular weight on the results about the primitive path network. Along these lines we approve main concepts which had been previously proposed in the literature.

  1. Tolerance of brown bear spermatozoa to conditions of pre-freezing cooling rate and equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Urueña, E; Alvarez, M; Gomes-Alves, S; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Borragan, S; Anel-López, L; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2014-06-01

    Specific protocols for the cryopreservation of endangered Cantabrian brown bear spermatozoa are critical to create a genetic resource bank. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cooling rates and equilibration time before freezing on post-thawed brown bear spermatozoa quality. Electroejaculates from 11 mature bears were extended to 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL in a TES-Tris-Fructose-based extender, cryopreserved following performance of the respective cooling/equilibration protocol each sample was assigned to, and stored at -196 °C for further assessment. Before freezing, after thawing, and after 1 hour's incubation post-thawing at 37 °C (thermal stress test), the quality of the samples was assessed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis, and for viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate /propidium iodide), and sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by flow cytometry. In experiment 1, three cooling rates (0.25 °C/min, 1 °C/min, and 4 °C/min) to 5 °C were assessed. After thawing, total motility (%TM) was higher and percentage of damaged acrosomes (%dACR) was lower (P bear sperm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Peritoneal dialysis adequacy in pediatrics. From the peritoneal equilibration test to the aquaporins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Lillian; Cano, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of the characteristics of peritoneal solute and water transport is essential to assess the suitability of prescribing dialysis in patients suffering from chronic renal disease. There are currently a series of models to perform this evaluation. The peritoneal equilibration test (PET) evaluates the peritoneal transport capacity, classifying the patients into four transport categories: high, high-average, low-average, and low. The short PET enables the same evaluation to be made in only 2hours, and has been validated in paediatric patients. On the other hand, the MiniPET provides additional information by evaluating the free water transport capacity by the ultra-small pores, and the Accelerated Peritoneal Examination Time (APEX) evaluates the time when the glucose and urea equilibration curves cross, and has been proposed as the optimum dwell time to achieve adequate ultrafiltration. An analysis is presented on the current information on these diagnostic methods as regards free water transport via aquaporins, which could be an important tool in optimising solute and water transport in patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis, particularly as regards the cardiovascular prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L.; Latour, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  4. Thiosemicarbazone Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Equilibrator-Induced Dynamic State, Formation of Complex Libraries, and a Supramolecular On/Off Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Dennis; Jeppesen, Anne; Kleinlein, Claudia; Pittelkow, Michael

    2017-08-18

    Dynamic combinatorial libraries that equilibrate under thermodynamic control and can be trapped kinetically when desired are key to creating complex systems that can mimic dynamic biological systems, such as the biochemical system of life. A much-sought-after feature is the ability to turn off the dynamic exchange of the system, in order to investigate a transient state away from thermodynamic equilibrium, and then turn on the dynamic exchange again. We describe here the first use of thiosemicarbazone exchange to form dynamic combinatorial libraries. The libraries were found to require a nucleophilic catalyst, or equilibrator, in order to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. This equilibrator approach adds a supramolecular level of control over the dynamic system and allows the dynamic exchange to be turned off by addition of 18-crown-6, which binds the equilibrator in a nonnucleophilic complex. The dynamic exchange can be restarted by addition of potassium ions that competitively bind 18-crown-6, thus liberating the equilibrator. The highly complex thiosemicarbazone-based macrocyclic libraries contain both [2]catenanes and sequence isomers, which can be distinguished by HPLC-MS/MS.

  5. Exploring the dynamics of kinetic/multi-ion effects and ion-electron equilibration rates in ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, H.

    2017-10-01

    During the last few years, an increasing number of experiments have shown that kinetic and multi-ion-fluid effects do impact the performance of an ICF implosion. Observations include: increasing yield degradation as the implosion becomes more kinetic; thermal decoupling between ion species; anomalous yield scaling for different fuel mixtures; ion diffusion; and fuel stratification. The common theme in these experiments is that the results are based on time-integrated nuclear observables that are affected by an accumulation of effects throughout the implosion, which complicate interpretation of the data. A natural extension of these studies is therefore to conduct time-resolved measurements of multiple nuclear-burn histories to explore the dynamics of kinetic/multi-ion effects in the fuel and their impact on the implosion performance. This was accomplished through simultaneous, high-precision measurements of the relative timing of the onset, bang time and duration of DD, D3He, DT and T3He burn from T3He (with trace D) or D3He gas-filled implosions using the new Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) on OMEGA. As the different reactions have different temperature sensitivities, Ti(t) was determined from the data. Uniquely to the PXTD, several x-ray emission histories (in different energy bands) were also measured, from which a spatially averaged Te(t) was also determined. The inferred Ti(t) and Te(t) data have been used to experimentally explore ion-electron equilibration rates and the Coulomb Logarithm for various plasma conditions. Finally, the implementation and use of PXTD, which represents a significant advance at OMEGA, have laid the foundation for implementing a Te(t) measurement in support of the main cryogenic DT programs at OMEGA and the NIF. This work was supported in part by the US DOE, LLE, LLNL, and DOE NNSA SSGF.

  6. An extended-Lagrangian scheme for charge equilibration in reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Small, Patrick E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2015-07-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations describe chemical reactions at orders-of-magnitude faster computing speed compared with quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. A major computational bottleneck of RMD is charge-equilibration (QEq) calculation to describe charge transfer between atoms. Here, we eliminate the speed-limiting iterative minimization of the Coulombic energy in QEq calculation by adapting an extended-Lagrangian scheme that was recently proposed in the context of QMD simulations, Souvatzis and Niklasson (2014). The resulting XRMD simulation code drastically improves energy conservation compared with our previous RMD code, Nomura et al. (2008), while substantially reducing the time-to-solution. The XRMD code has been implemented on parallel computers based on spatial decomposition, achieving a weak-scaling parallel efficiency of 0.977 on 786,432 IBM Blue Gene/Q cores for a 67.6 billion-atom system.

  7. Stochastic user equilibrium with equilibrated choice sets: Part I - Model formulations under alternative distributions and restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watling, David Paul; Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    the advantages of the two principles, namely the definition of unused routes in DUE and of mis-perception in SUE, such that the resulting choice sets of used routes are equilibrated. Two model families are formulated to address this issue: the first is a general version of SUE permitting bounded and discrete...... to pre-specify the choice set. We present model specifications within these families, show illustrative examples, evaluate their relative merits, and identify key directions for further research....... error distributions; the second is a Restricted SUE model with an additional constraint that must be satisfied for unused paths. The overall advantage of these model families consists in their ability to combine the unused routes with the use of random utility models for used routes, without the need...

  8. Estimation of Equilibrated Vapor Concentrations Using the UNIFAC Model for the Tetrachloroethylene-Chlorobenzene System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo; Hori, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrated vapor concentrations at 25°C of the tetrachloroethylene-chlorobenzene system were obtained in the presence of air to establish a method for estimating vapor concentrations in work environments where multicomponent organic solvents are used. The experimental data were correlated by introducing activity coefficients calculated by the UNIFAC (Universal Quasichemical Functional Group Activity Coefficient) model. There were four interaction parameters between groups in this solution system, and three had already been determined.However, the fourth parameter--the interaction parameter between ACCl and Cl-(C=C) groups--remains unknown. Therefore, this parameter was determined by a nonlinear least-squares method to obtain the best fit for the experimental data. The calculated values were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  9. Communication: One size fits all: Equilibrating chemically different polymer liquids through universal long-wavelength description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Stuehn, Torsten; Daoulas, Kostas Ch.; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Mesoscale behavior of polymers is frequently described by universal laws. This physical property motivates us to propose a new modeling concept, grouping polymers into classes with a common long-wavelength representation. In the same class, samples of different materials can be generated from this representation, encoded in a single library system. We focus on homopolymer melts, grouped according to the invariant degree of polymerization. They are described with a bead-spring model, varying chain stiffness and density to mimic chemical diversity. In a renormalization group-like fashion, library samples provide a universal blob-based description, hierarchically backmapped to create configurations of other class-members. Thus, large systems with experimentally relevant invariant degree of polymerizations (so far accessible only on very coarse-grained level) can be microscopically described. Equilibration is verified comparing conformations and melt structure with smaller scale conventional simulations.

  10. An experimental setup for studying the core-excited atoms and molecules by electron impact using energy analysed electron-ion coincidence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Prajapati, S.; Singh, B.; Singh, B. K.; Shanker, R.

    2017-07-01

    Operation and performance of an apparatus for studying the decay dynamics relevant to core-hole decay processes in atoms and molecules excited by energetic electrons using an energy analysed electron-ion coincidence technique are described in some detail. The setup consists of a time- and position sensitive double-field linear TOF mass spectrometer coupled with a dual MCP detector and a single-pass CMA to select the energy of detected electrons. Details of different components involved in the setup are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the performance and capability of the apparatus, we present some typical results extracted from the TOF argon ion-mass spectra observed in coincidence with 18-energy selected electrons emitted from interaction of a continuous beam of 3.5 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of argon atoms. Specifically, the variation of relative correlation probability for the final ion-charge states Ar1+ to Ar4+ produced in the considered collision reactions as a function of energy of emitted electrons is determined and discussed.

  11. EnhancerPred2.0: predicting enhancers and their strength based on position-specific trinucleotide propensity and electron-ion interaction potential feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenying; Jia, Cangzhi

    2017-03-28

    Enhancers are cis-acting elements that play major roles in upregulating eukaryotic gene expression by providing binding sites for transcription factors and their complexes. Because enhancers are highly cell/tissue specific, lack common motifs, and are far from the target gene, the systematic and precise identification of enhancer regions in DNA sequences is a big challenge. In this study, we developed an enhancer prediction method called EnhancerPred2.0 by combining position-specific trinucleotide propensity (PSTNP) information with the electron-ion interaction potential (EIIP) values for trinucleotides, to predict enhancers and their subgroups. To obtain the optimal combination of features, F-score values were used in a two-step wrapper-based feature selection method, which was applied in a high dimensional feature vector from PSTNP and EIIP. Finally, 126 optimized features from PSTNP combined with 32 optimized features from EIIP yielded the best performance for identifying enhancers and non-enhancers, with an overall accuracy (Acc) of 88.27% and a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.77. Additionally, 198 features from PSTNP combined with 37 features from EIIP yielded the best performance for identifying strong and weak enhancers, with an overall Acc of 98.05% and a MCC of 0.96. Rigorous jackknife tests indicated that EnhancerPred2.0 was significantly better than the existing enhancer prediction methods in both overall accuracy and stability.

  12. Novel virtual screening protocol based on the combined use of molecular modeling and electron-ion interaction potential techniques to design HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintori, Cristina; Manetti, Fabrizio; Veljkovic, Nevena; Perovic, Vladimir; Vercammen, Jo; Hayes, Sean; Massa, Silvio; Witvrouw, Myriam; Debyser, Zeger; Veljkovic, Veljko; Botta, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral replication and represents an intriguing target for the development of new drugs. Although a large number of compounds have been reported to inhibit IN in biochemical assays, no drug active against this enzyme has been approved by the FDA so far. In this study, we report, for the first time, the use of the electron-ion interaction potential (EIIP) technique in combination with molecular modeling approaches for the identification of new IN inhibitors. An innovative virtual screening approach, based on the determination of both short- and long-range interactions between interacting molecules, was employed with the aim of identifying molecules able to inhibit the binding of IN to viral DNA. Moreover, results from a database screening on the commercial Asinex Gold Collection led to the selection of several compounds. One of them showed a significant inhibitory potency toward IN in the overall integration assay. Biological investigations also showed, in agreement with modeling studies, that these compounds prevent recognition of DNA by IN in a fluorescence fluctuation assay, probably by interacting with the DNA binding domain of IN.

  13. Evaluation of the deuterium dilution method to estimate body composition in the barnacle goose : Accuracy and minimum equilibration time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichhorn, Gotz; Visser, G. Henk

    2008-01-01

    We examined body composition in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) by proximate carcass analysis and by deuterium isotope dilution. We studied the effect of isotope equilibration time on the accuracy of total body water (TBW) estimates and evaluated models to predict fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass

  14. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-06-01

    ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose DL(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = DL(0)/D(eq) from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D(eq) is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6-55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6-55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm(3) thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80-140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1-25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E(in)/E or E(out)/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD(eq) was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose ratios changed with beam aperture and phantom axis but were insensitive to

  15. VUV photoionization of acetamide studied by electron/ion coincidence spectroscopy in the 8-24 eV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwell, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Schwell@lisa.u-pec.fr [LISA UMR CNRS 7583, Universite Paris Est Creteil and Universite Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, 61 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France); Benilan, Yves; Fray, Nicolas; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Es-Sebbar, Et. [LISA UMR CNRS 7583, Universite Paris Est Creteil and Universite Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, 61 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France); Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Champion, Norbert [LERMA UMR CNRS 8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place Jules-Jansen, 92195 Meudon (France); Leach, Sydney, E-mail: Sydney.Leach@obspm.fr [LERMA UMR CNRS 8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place Jules-Jansen, 92195 Meudon (France)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the VUV photoionization of acetamide in the 8-24 eV photon energy range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron/ion coincidence measurements are performed using synchrotron radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide is determined by TPEPICO measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VUV induced fragmentation pathways of acetamide are assigned and discussed. - Abstract: A VUV photoionization study of acetamide was carried out over the 8-24 eV photon energy range using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron/photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy. Threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) measurements were also made. Photoion yield curves and branching ratios were measured for the parent ion and six fragment ions. The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide was determined as I.E. (1{sup 2}A Prime ) = (9.71 {+-} 0.02) eV, in agreement with an earlier reported photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) value. The adiabatic energy of the first excited state of the ion, 1{sup 2}A Double-Prime , was determined to be Almost-Equal-To 10.1 eV. Assignments of the fragment ions and the pathways of their formation by dissociative photoionization were made. The neutral species lost in the principal dissociative photoionization processes are CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CO, HCCO and NH{sub 2}CO. Heats of formation are derived for all ions detected and are compared with literature values. Some astrophysical implications of these results are discussed.

  16. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, as a predictor of 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujie, Masanori; Nakamori, Shoji; Nakahira, Shin; Takahashi, Yuji; Hayashi, Nobuyasu; Okami, Jiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Dono, Keizo; Umeshita, Koji; Sakon, Masato; Monden, Morito

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find a novel biomarker to predict 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-deoxycytidine) sensitivity in pancreatic cancer. The relationship between 5-FU and gemcitabine sensitivity and the mRNA levels of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1), thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was investigated using seven types of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (AsPC1, BxPC3, MiaPaCa-2, PSN1, Panc1, PCI6, and KMP-4). Quantitative mRNA expression was measured by LightCycler. A [3H] gemcitabine cellular uptake assay was performed to examine the inhibition of hENT1 by nitrobenzylmercaptoprine ribonucleoside (NBMPR). The expression levels of hENT1 mRNA significantly correlated with the IC50 value of 5-FU in all seven lines and also correlated with gemcitabine resistance in six lines (except AsPC1). No significant association was observed between TS or DPD mRNA levels and 5-FU sensitivity. In the PSN1 cells, [3H] gemcitabine uptake via hENT1 was significantly inhibited by NBMPR, and 5-FU sensitivity was significantly increased when the cells were pretreated with NBMPR. Our results suggest that hENT1 plays an important role in 5-FU resistance and that hENT1 mRNA levels might be a useful marker to predict 5-FU sensitivity in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Balance Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Evaluating Test-Retest Reliability of the Equilibrate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Mitchell J; Lee, Young M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Apple, Rachel P; Germanos, Theodore; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the test-retest reliability of a novel computer-based, portable balance assessment tool, the Equilibrate System (ES), used to diagnose sports-related concussion. Twenty-seven students participated in ES testing consisting of three sessions over 4 weeks. The modified Balance Error Scoring System was performed. For each participant, test-retest reliability was established using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ES test-retest reliability from baseline to week 2 produced an ICC value of 0.495 (95% CI, 0.123-0.745). Week 2 testing produced ICC values of 0.602 (95% CI, 0.279-0.803) and 0.610 (95% CI, 0.299-0.804), respectively. All other single measures test-retest reliability values produced poor ICC values. Same-day ES testing showed fair to good test-retest reliability while interweek measures displayed poor to fair test-retest reliability. Testing conditions should be controlled when using computerized balance assessment methods. ES testing should only be used as a part of a comprehensive assessment.

  18. Homogeneous isotropization and equilibration of a strongly coupled plasma with a critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critelli, Renato; Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    We use holography to investigate the process of homogeneous isotropization and thermalization in a strongly coupled N=4 Super Yang-Mills plasma charged under a U(1) subgroup of the global SU(4) R-symmetry which features a critical point in its phase diagram. Isotropization dynamics at late times is affected by the critical point in agreement with the behavior of the characteristic relaxation time extracted from the analysis of the lowest non-hydrodynamic quasinormal mode in the SO(3) quintuplet (external scalar) channel of the theory. In particular, the isotropization time may decrease or increase as the chemical potential increases depending on whether one is far or close enough to the critical point, respectively. On the other hand, the thermalization time associated with the equilibration of the scalar condensate, which happens only after the system has relaxed to a (nearly) isotropic state, is found to always increase with chemical potential in agreement with the characteristic relaxation time associated to the lowest non-hydrodynamic quasinormal mode in the SO(3) singlet (dilaton) channel. These conclusions about the late dynamics of the system are robust in the sense that they hold for different initial conditions seeding the time evolution of the far-from-equilibrium plasma.

  19. Expression and purification of human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae equilibrative nucleoside transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Roe-Žurž, Zygy; Duggan, Kelli D; Schmitz, Hannah; Hays, Franklin A

    2018-02-01

    Nucleosides play an essential role in the physiology of eukaryotes by acting as metabolic precursors in de novo nucleic acid synthesis and energy metabolism. Nucleosides also act as ligands for purinergic receptors. Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are polytopic integral membrane proteins that aid in regulating plasmalemmal flux of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleobases. ENTs exhibit broad substrate selectivity across different isoforms and utilize diverse mechanisms to drive substrate flux across membranes. However, the molecular mechanisms and chemical determinants of ENT-mediated substrate recognition, binding, inhibition, and transport are poorly understood. To determine how ENT-mediated transport occurs at the molecular level, greater chemical insight and assays employing purified protein are essential. This article focuses on the expression and purification of human ENT1, human ENT2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScENT1 using novel expression and purification strategies to isolate recombinant ENTs. ScENT1, hENT1, and hENT2 were expressed in W303 Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and detergent solubilized from the membrane. After detergent extraction, these ENTs were further purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. This effort resulted in obtaining quantities of purified protein sufficient for future biophysical analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nucleobase Transport by Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 (hENT1)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sylvia Y. M.; Ng, Amy M. L.; Cass, Carol E.; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Young, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The human equilibrative nucleoside transporters hENT1 and hENT2 (each with 456 residues) are 40% identical in amino acid sequence and contain 11 putative transmembrane helices. Both transport purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and are distinguished functionally by a difference in sensitivity to inhibition by nanomolar concentrations of nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside (NBMPR), hENT1 being NBMPR-sensitive. Previously, we used heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes to demonstrate that recombinant hENT2 and its rat ortholog rENT2 also transport purine and pyrimidine bases, h/rENT2 representing the first identified mammalian nucleobase transporter proteins (Yao, S. Y., Ng, A. M., Vickers, M. F., Sundaram, M., Cass, C. E., Baldwin, S. A., and Young, J. D. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 24938–24948). The same study also revealed lower, but significant, transport of hypoxanthine by h/rENT1. In the present investigation, we have used the enhanced Xenopus oocyte expression vector pGEMHE to demonstrate that hENT1 additionally transports thymine and adenine and, to a lesser extent, uracil and guanine. Fluxes of hypoxanthine, thymine, and adenine by hENT1 were saturable and inhibited by NBMPR. Ratios of Vmax (pmol/oocyte·min−1):Km (mm), a measure of transport efficiency, were 86, 177, and 120 for hypoxantine, thymine, and adenine, respectively, compared with 265 for uridine. Hypoxanthine influx was competitively inhibited by uridine, indicating common or overlapping nucleobase and nucleoside permeant binding pockets, and the anticancer nucleobase drugs 5-fluorouracil and 6-mercaptopurine were also transported. Nucleobase transport activity was absent from an engineered cysteine-less version hENT1 (hENT1C−) in which all 10 endogenous cysteine residues were mutated to serine. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Cys-414 in transmembrane helix 10 of hENT1 as the residue conferring nucleobase transport activity to the wild-type transporter. PMID:21795683

  1. Trace element diffusion during basaltic andesite-dacite equilibration: Effects of coupled dissolution and diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, P.; Simon, A. C.; Fiege, A.

    2016-12-01

    Magmatic systems from the mantle source to the surface experience a plethora of physicochemical processes that alter their heat and mass budget and drive compositional diversity. Magma recharge and mixing of distinct magma batches is recognized as one of the dominant processes occurring throughout the magmatic system. Mixing occurs at the large scale mostly through convective transport, while hybridization ultimately also requires diffusive exchange on the micrometer to centimeter scale. In natural systems, this small-scale exchange is not limited to simple melt-melt diffusive equilibration, but also includes local phase changes of crystals as well as of the melt and vapor phase. As a result, diffusive exchange during magma-magma mixing may be altered relative to melt-melt diffusion. We present extensive trace element zoning profiles (LA-ICPMS data) from an experimental study that investigates the local mass transfer during the juxtaposition of natural basaltic andesite and dacite. Our time series experiments (up to 80 hours) were performed at sub-liquidus conditions (T = 950 to 1000 °C, P = 1.5 kbar, nearly H2O-saturated) to document the complex interplay of mineral dissolution and diffusive exchange. While dissolution is mostly limited to the basaltic andesite, diffusion is operating throughout the entire experimental charge. As a result, we can compare and contrast the observed dissolution-diffusion interplay against determined diffusivities in dacitic melt. Most major elements (e.g., Fe) show diffusion at rates comparable to simple diffusion experiments. Trace elements show a more diverse behavior where some are slowed down relative to known diffusivities (e.g., Pb), and others show uphill diffusion (e.g., La, Nd) that may be a complex interplay of changing partition due to an evolving melt composition near the interface and multi-element coupled diffusion.

  2. Control of Rubisco function via homeostatic equilibration of CO2 supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rubisco is the most abundant protein on Earth that serves as the primary engine of carbon assimilation. It is characterized by a slow rate and low specificity for CO2 leading to photorespiration. We analyze here the challenges of operation of this enzyme as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeds that of its substrate CO2 by 2–3 orders of magnitude; however, the total pool of available carbon in chloroplast, i.e. mainly bicarbonate, is comparable to the concentration of Rubisco active sites. This makes the reactant stationary assumption (RSA, which is essential as a condition of satisfying the Michaelis-Menten (MM kinetics, valid if we assume that the delivery of CO2 from this pool is not limiting. The RSA is supported by active carbonic anhydrases (CA that quickly equilibrate bicarbonate and CO2 pools and supply CO2 to Rubisco. While the operation of stromal CA is independent of light reactions, the thylakoidal CA associated with PSII and pumping CO2 from the thylakoid lumen is coordinated with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. At high CO2 concentrations, CA becomes less efficient (the equilibrium becomes unfavourable, so a deviation from the MM kinetics is observed, consistent with Rubisco reaching its Vmax at approximately 50% lower level than expected from the classical MM curve. Previously, this deviation was controversially explained by the limitation of RuBP regeneration. At low ambient CO2 and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool, its depletion at Rubisco sites is relieved in that the enzyme utilizes O2 instead of CO2, i.e. by photorespiration. In this process, CO2 is supplied back to Rubisco, and the chloroplastic redox state and energy level are maintained. It is concluded that the optimal performance of photosynthesis is achieved via the provision of continuous CO2 supply to Rubisco by carbonic anhydrases and

  3. Testing a new Method of Estimating the δ13C of Photosynthate in Trees: Stem CO2 Equilibration}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubierna Lopez, N.; Kavanagh, K.; Marshall, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling and prediction of forest responses to climate change often deal with the difficulty of estimating gas- exchange responses to rising CO2 concentrations and temperatures. This difficulty can be overcome with stable carbon isotopes, which provide a tool to study the coupling of the carbon and water cycles. Recently, considerable research has concentrated on trying to identify processes occurring after photosynthesis that modify the isotopic composition of a given plant tissue, which has led to questions about which plant tissue will best reflect environmental variations and photosynthetic discrimination. Here, we propose a new method that uses CO2 collected from inside the stem. A simple collection apparatus consisting of a stainless steel tube is inserted into the tree. The gas from the stem diffuses and equilibrates with the headspace. Gas samples are subsequently collected by replacing the gas inside the tubing with acidified water. This technique minimizes any change in pressure inside the system or any atmospheric contamination from outside the system. We compared the measured δ13C of stem CO2 to known leaf values in four conifer species at Mica Creek Experimental Watershed, in northern Idaho, USA. In addition, δ13C of soil respiration, δ13C leaf bulk material, δ13C phloem contents, and photosynthetic gas- exchange data were collected. We collected stem CO2 samples weekly through August 2006 during a long drought period. Mean monthly temperature was 16°C, cumulative precipitation in July and August was 33 mm, and mean maximum VPD was 4.1 kPa during this month. The most depleted species was Larix occidentalis, with δ13C = -26.97 ‰ (SE = 0.30), following by the shade-tolerant Abies grandis, with δ13C = -26.33 ‰ (SE = 0.23). In comparison, Pseudotsuga menziesii, with δ13C = -24.88 ‰ (SE =0.48) and Thuja plicata with δ13C = - 23.79 ‰ (SE = 0.30) were more enriched. These δ13C values are consistent with previous measurements of leaf bulk

  4. Effect of shortening the prefreezing equilibration time with glycerol on the quality of chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), ibex (Capra pyrenaica), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) ejaculates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradiee, J; O'Brien, E; Esteso, M C; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Marcos-Beltrán, J L; Vega, R S; Guillamón, F G; Martínez-Nevado, E; Guerra, R; Santiago-Moreno, J

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the effect of shortening the prefreezing equilibration time with glycerol on the quality of frozen-thawed ejaculated sperm from four Mediterranean mountain ungulates: Cantabrian chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and aoudad (Ammotragus lervia). Ejaculated sperm from these species were divided into two aliquots. One was diluted with either a Tris-citric acid-glucose based medium (TCG-glycerol; for chamois and ibex sperm) or a Tris-TES-glucose-based medium (TTG-glycerol; for mouflon and aoudad sperm), and maintained at 5°C for 3h prior to freezing. The other aliquot was diluted with either TCG (chamois and ibex sperm) or TTG (mouflon and aoudad sperm) and maintained at 5°C for 1h before adding glycerol (final concentration 5%). After a 15min equilibration period in the presence of glycerol, the samples were frozen. For the ibex, there was enhanced (P<0.05) sperm viability and acrosome integrity after the 3h as compared with the 15min equilibration time. For the chamois, subjective sperm motility and cell membrane functional integrity were less (P<0.05) following 15min of equilibration. In the mouflon, progressive sperm motility and acrosome integrity was less (P<0.05) when the equilibration time was reduced to 15min. For the aoudad, the majority of sperm variables measured were more desirable after the 3h equilibration time. The freezing-thawing processes reduced the sperm head size in all the species studied; however, the equilibration time further affected the frozen-thawed sperm head variables in a species-dependent fashion. While the equilibration time for chamois sperm might be shortened, this appears not to be the case for all ungulates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Solvent-Controlled Branching of Localized versus Delocalized Singlet Exciton States and Equilibration with Charge Transfer in a Structurally Well-Defined Tetracene Dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Jasper D. [Department; Carey, Thomas J. [Department; Arias, Dylan H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Johnson, Justin C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Damrauer, Niels H. [Department

    2017-11-21

    A detailed photophysical picture is elaborated for a structurally well-defined and symmetrical bis-tetracene dimer in solution. The molecule was designed for interrogation of the initial photophysical steps (S1 - 1TT) in intramolecular singlet fission (SF). (Triisopropylsilyl)acetylene substituents on the dimer TIPS-BT1 as well as a monomer model TIPS-Tc enable a comparison of photophysical properties, including transient absorption dynamics, as solvent polarity is varied. In nonpolar toluene solutions, TIPS-BT1 decays via radiative and nonradiative pathways to the ground state with no evidence for dynamics related to the initial stages of SF. This contrasts with the behavior of the previously reported unsubstituted dimer BT1 and is likely a consequence of energetic perturbations to the singlet excited-state manifold of TIPS-BT1 by the (trialkylsilyl)acetylene substituents. In polar benzonitrile, two key findings emerge. First, photoexcited TIPS-BT1 shows a bifurcation into both arm-localized (S1-loc) and dimer-delocalized (S1-dim) singlet exciton states. The S1-loc decays to the ground state, and weak temperature dependence of its emissive signatures suggests that once it is formed, it is isolated from S1-dim. Emissive signatures of the S1-dim state, on the other hand, are strongly temperature-dependent, and transient absorption dynamics show that S1-dim equilibrates with an intramolecular charge-transfer state in 50 ps at room temperature. This equilibrium decays to the ground state with little evidence for formation of long-lived triplets nor 1TT. These detailed studies spectrally characterize many of the key states in intramolecular SF in this class of dimers but highlight the need to tune electronic coupling and energetics for the S1 - 1TT photoreaction.

  6. Molecular determinants of acidic pH-dependent transport of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Fazlur; Askwith, Candice; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2017-09-08

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) translocate hydrophilic nucleosides across cellular membranes and are essential for salvage nucleotide synthesis and purinergic signaling. Unlike the prototypic human ENT members hENT1 and hENT2, which mediate plasma membrane nucleoside transport at pH 7.4, hENT3 is an acidic pH-activated lysosomal transporter partially localized to mitochondria. Recent studies demonstrate that hENT3 is indispensable for lysosomal homeostasis, and that mutations in hENT3 can result in a spectrum of lysosomal storage-like disorders. However, despite hENT3's prominent role in lysosome pathophysiology, the molecular basis of hENT3-mediated transport is unknown. Therefore, we sought to examine the mechanistic basis of acidic pH-driven hENT3 nucleoside transport with site-directed mutagenesis, homology modeling, and [(3)H]adenosine flux measurements in mutant RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes. Scanning mutagenesis of putative residues responsible for pH-dependent transport via hENT3 revealed that the ionization states of Asp-219 and Glu-447, and not His, strongly determined the pH-dependent transport permissible-impermissible states of the transporter. Except for substitution with certain isosteric and polar residues, substitution of either Asp-219 or Glu-447 with any other residues resulted in robust activity that was pH-independent. Dual substitution of Asp-219 and Glu-447 to Ala sustained pH-independent activity over a broad range of physiological pH (pH 5.5-7.4), which also maintained stringent substrate selectivity toward endogenous nucleosides and clinically used nucleoside drugs. Our results suggest a putative pH-sensing role for Asp-219 and Glu-447 in hENT3 and that the size, ionization state, or electronegative polarity at these positions is crucial for obligate acidic pH-dependent activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Quantifying Density, Water Adsorption and Equilibration Properties of Wind Tunnel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinting; Horst, Sarah; He, Chao; Bridges, Nathan; Burr, Devon M.; Sebree, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    Aeolian processes are found on various planetary bodies including Earth, Venus, Mars, Titan, Triton, Pluto, and Comet 67P. Wind tunnels can simulate aeolian processes under different planetary parameters, with the robustness of results relying on experimental conditions and understanding of experimental materials. Threshold wind speed, the minimum wind speed to initiate saltation, is one parameter that can be investigated in wind tunnels. Liquid water adsorbed on wind tunnel materials could greatly enhance the threshold wind speed by increasing the interparticle force, density, and effective size of particles. Previous studies have shown that this effect could increase the threshold by 100% by putting 0.3-0.6% of water into typical dry quartz sand (Fecan et al. 1998). In order to simulate the weight of particles on other planetary bodies where gravity is significantly lower than on Earth, low-density materials are used in planetary wind tunnels, including walnut shells, activated charcoal, iced tea, and instant coffee.We first quantified the densities for all wind tunnel materials using a pycnometer and updated the density for low-density materials (e.g., walnut shells have density of 1.4 g/cm3 instead of 1.1 g/cm3 in the literature (Greeley et al. 1980)). Then we present a set of measurements that quantify water adsorption for both low and high-density materials (sand, basalt, and chromite). We first measured the water content and equilibration timescales for the materials through gravimetric measurements. We found low-density materials tend to have much more water (>5%) compared to high-density materials ( 6 hrs) compared to high-density materials (10-50 minutes). Since only water adsorbed on the particle surface would change the interparticle force, we then separate the surface and internal water using thermo-gravimetric analysis, and found that >80% of the water is still on the surface. Thus we assume water adsorption for low-density materials could greatly

  8. Equilibration rates in a dual-species ultracold neutral Ca/Yb plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenkle, Tucker; Dodson, Adam; McKnight, Quin; Bergeson, Scott

    2017-10-01

    We study energy relaxation in a strongly-coupled neutral plasma of calcium and ytterbium ions at temperatures near 1 K. The ion temperature is determined by disorder-induced heating, and denser plasmas have higher temperatures. The electron temperature is determined by the wavelength of the ionizing laser, and is typically 20 to 200 K. We control the plasma stoichiometry and overall plasma density in order to vary the temperatures of the two ion species. We control the electron temperature to adjust the electron screening length and the plasma expansion rate. We will present measurements of energy relaxation rates in this mixed-species plasma. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1500376.

  9. Control of matric water potential by temperature differential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. J. Jr; Nienow, J. A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1987-01-01

    A method for controlling relative humidity based on temperature differentials, rather than on salt solutions, is described. This method has the following advantages: (1) it does not exhibit the anomalous CO2 solution effects that we have found to occur with salt solutions; (2) humidity is continuously adjustable without sample removal; (3) circulation of the atmosphere results in short equilibration times.

  10. The Comparison of One and Two Steps Equilibration in Vitrification Process on The Morphology and Viability of Mouse Blastocysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ita Djuwita

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to compare the effect of one and two steps equilibration method of vitrificationon the morphology and viability of mouse blastocysts. Blastocysts were firstly exposed to modified PhosphateBuffered saline (mPBS containing 1% Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA proceeded by exposure in mPBSrespectively containing 0.25M sucrose (S for 2 minutes . Blastocysts were then exposed for 2 minutesrespectively to mPS+0.5M S (one step method or in mPBS+0.5M S+10% ethylene glycol (EG (two stepmethod.. Blastocysts were then exposed in mPBS+0.5M S+30% EG for 60 second, loaded into 0.25 mlplastic straw, and exposed immediately in vapor of liquid nitrogen for 10 second before they were and thenplunged into liquid nitrogen. The blastocysts were reconstituted by diluting with mPBS+0.5M S followedby mPBS+0.25M S for each 3 min and washed in mPBS without sucrose. The viability of cells was assessedby fluorescent vital staining, by re-expansion for 24 hours in vitro culture, and by implantation into therecipient oviduct. The percentages of morphologically normal blastocysts following recovery fromvitrification were higher (p<0.05 in one step equilibration than in those of two steps methods (89.6%. vs82.6%. The viability of blastocysts examined under light microscope after staining with biz-benzimidizepropidiumiodine and 24 hours in vitro culture in one step methods (64.0%; 57.8% were higher (p<0.05compared with two steps methods (40.0%; 35.6%, respectively. The implantation rate of vitrifiedblastocysts (23.1% was not significantly different to that of fresh blastocysts (33.4%. These resultsshowed that the one and two step equilibration methods are effective for vitrification and maintaining theviability of the mouse blastocysts.

  11. Postshock Annealing and Postannealing Shock in Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites: Implications for the Thermal and Shock Histories of Chondritic Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to shock effects in olivine, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and Ca-pyroxene, petrographic shock indicators in equilibrated ordinary chondrites (OC) include chromite veinlets, chromite-plagioclase assemblages, polycrystalline troilite, metallic Cu, irregularly shaped troilite grains within metallic Fe-Ni, rapidly solidified metal-sulfide intergrowths, martensite and various types of plessite, metal-sulfide veins, large metal and/or sulfide nodules, silicate melt veins, silicate darkening, low-Ca clinopyroxene, silicate melt pockets, and large regions of silicate melt. The presence of some of these indicators in every petrologic type-4 to -6 ordinary chondrite (OC) demonstrates that collisional events caused all equilibrated OC to reach shock stages S3-S6. Those type-4 to -6 OC that are classified as shock-stage S1 (on the basis of sharp optical extinction in olivine) underwent postshock annealing due to burial beneath materials heated by the impact event. Those type-4 to -6 OC that are classified S2 (on the basis of undulose extinction and lack of planar fractures in olivine) were shocked to stage S3-S6, annealed to stage S1 and then shocked again to stage S2. Some OC were probably shocked to stage 253 after annealing. It seems likely that many OC experienced multiple episodes of shock and annealing. Because 40Ar-39Ar chronological data indicate that MIL 99301 (LL6, Sl) was annealed approximately 4.26 Ga ago, presumably as a consequence of a major impact, it seems reasonable to suggest that other equilibrated S1 and S2 OC (which contain relict shock features) were also annealed by impacts. Because some type-6 S1 OC (e.g., Guarena, Kernouve, Portales Valley, all of which contain relict shock features) were annealed 4.44-4.45 Ga ago (during a period when impacts were prevalent and most OC were thermally metamorphosed), it follows that impact-induced annealing could have contributed significantly to OC thermal metamorphism.

  12. Evaluation of the deuterium dilution method to estimate body composition in the barnacle goose: accuracy and minimum equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Götz; Visser, G Henk

    2008-01-01

    We examined body composition in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) by proximate carcass analysis and by deuterium isotope dilution. We studied the effect of isotope equilibration time on the accuracy of total body water (TBW) estimates and evaluated models to predict fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) from different measurements varying in their level of invasiveness. Deuterium enrichment determined at 45, 90, and 180 min after isotope injection did not differ significantly. At all sampling intervals, isotope dilution spaces (TBW(d)) consistently overestimated body water determined by carcass analysis (TBW(c)). However, variance in the deviation from actual TBW was higher at the 45-min sampling interval, whereas variability was the same at 90 and 180 min, indicating that 90 min is sufficient time to allow for adequate equilibration. At 90 min equilibration time, deuterium isotope dilution overestimated TBW(c) by 7.1% +/= 2.6% (P < 0.001, paired t-test, n=20). This overestimate was consistent over the range of TBW studied, and TBW(c) could thus be predicted from TBW(d) (r2=0.976, P<0.001). Variation in TBW(c) and TBW(d) explained, respectively, 99% and 98% of the variation in FFM. FM could be predicted with a relative error of ca. 10% from TBW estimates in combination with body mass (BM). In contrast, BM and external body measurements allowed only poor prediction. Abdominal fat fresh mass was highly correlated to total FM and, if the carcass is available, allows simple means of fat prediction without dissecting the entire specimen.

  13. Temperatures of Mediterranean Volcanic Hydrothermal Systems Reflected by Gas Geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, J.; Tassi, F.; D'Alessandro, W.; Vaselli, O.; Woodland, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    We have addressed the genetic relationship between H2, H2O, CO, CO2, n-alkanes and n-alkenes in volcanic-hydrothermal gases emitted from Nisyros (Greece), Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Pantelleria (all Italy). Methane attains chemical and isotopic equilibrium with CO2 in the associated hydrothermal systems within the single liquid phase. Calculated aquifer temperatures at depth are ~360°C at Nisyros, 420-460°C at Vesuvio, ~450°C at Campi Flegrei and ~540°C at Pantelleria. CH4-CO2 equilibrium temperatures are in agreement with propane/propene concentration ratios. Temperatures >400°C are additionally confirmed by ethane/ethene ratios. In contrast to CH4-CO2, metastable equilibration of the alkane/alkene pairs takes place in the saturated water vapor phase. Overall agreement of vapor and liquid equilibration temperatures suggests that boiling in the investigated high-enthalpy hydrothermal systems is essentially isothermal. Our results imply that the chemical and isotopic CH4-CO2 geothermometer is least prone to re-equilibration reactions occurring in the vapor phase after vapor separation. Redox conditions during these re-equilibration reactions are homogeneously buffered by H2/H2O ratios of the vapor phase, which, in turn, are controlled by those of the parental liquid phase and by the degree of superimposed vapor separation. Amongst the redox pairs investigated, CO/CO2 is most prone to secondary vapor phase equilibration. Our results imply that the isotopic CH4-CO2 geothermometer has the potential to record temperatures of aquifers associated with dormant volcanoes. Alkene/alkane and H2/H2O concentration ratios should be measured along with CH4 and CO2 to prove independently whether isotopic equilibrium has been attained.

  14. Effect of glutamine supplementation and replacement of tris-egg yolk based extender with defatted cow milk on spermatozoa quality after equilibration and thawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Dawra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of supplementation of glutamine and replacement of Tris-egg yolk (TE based buffer with defatted cow milk on the spermatozoa quality after equilibration and thawing. Materials and Methods: Semen was collected from five Bhadawari bulls biweekly, and a total of 30 ejaculates were taken. The semen ejaculates were pooled and divided into three equal parts. The pooled semen was diluted by TE based extender (control, TE + glutamine (8 mM (T1 and 50% TE + 50% deffated cow milk + glutamine (8 mM (T2. At two stages viz. after equilibration and after 12 h of cryopreservation (thawed samples, progressive motility, percent live, and percent acrosomal damage of the spermatozoa was assessed. Results: Supplementation of glutamine improved (p<0.05 the spermatozoa quality with respect to the progressive motility, percent live and acrosomal damage both post-equilibration and post-thaw. T2 improved (p<0.05 the spermatozoa quality as compared to control, however; it was less (p<0.05 effective as compared T1 both post-equilibration and post-thaw. Conclusion: From the results of present study it can be concluded that glutamine supplementation was effective in maintaining post-equilibration and post-thaw spermatozoa quality whereas defatted cow milk was not as effective as TE based buffer in the extender in improving the spermatozoa quality.

  15. Physical aging of molecular glasses studied by a device allowing for rapid thermal equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Olsen, Niels Boye; Niss, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Aging to the equilibrium liquid state of organic glasses is studied. The glasses were prepared by cooling the liquid to temperatures just below the glass transition. Aging following a temperature jump was studied by measuring the dielectric loss at a fixed frequency using a microregulator in which...... temperature is controlled by means of a Peltier element. Compared to conventional equipment, the new device adds almost two orders of magnitude to the span of observable aging times. Data for the following five glass-forming liquids are presented: dibutyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, 2,3-epoxy propyl......-phenyl-ether, 5-polyphenyl-ether, and triphenyl phosphite. The aging data were analyzed using the Tool–Narayanaswamy formalism. The following features are found for all five liquids: (1) The liquid has an “internal clock,” a fact that is established by showing that aging is controlled by the same material time...

  16. Developmental competence of ovine oocyte following vitrification: effect of oocyte developmental stage, cumulus cells, cytoskeleton stabiliser, FBS concentration, and equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Abolfazl; Taheri, Fatemeh; Nazari, Hassan; Norbakhsh-Nia, Maryam; Ahmadi, Ebrahim; Heidari, Banafsheh

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration, equilibration time, and oocyte pre-treatment with cytochalasin B (CCB) on subsequent development of vitrified-warmed ovine immature (GVCOCs) and matured (MII) oocytes with (MIICOCs) or without cumulus cells (MIIDOs). In Experiment 1, the effects of FBS concentrations (10 and 20%) during the vitrification-warming procedure were examined. Survival rates after warming were not different between GVCOCs, MIICOCs and MIIDOs oocytes. After in vitro fertilization, rate of cleaved embryos in MIICOCs group at the presence of 20%FBS was higher than MIIDOs and GVCOCs groups. In Experiment 2, the effects of equilibration times (5, 7, and 10 min) were examined. There was no difference in survival rate of vitrified-warmed oocytes equilibrated at different times. Although, the rate of cleavage in MIICOCs and MIIDOs oocytes equilibrated for 10 and 7 min, respectively, was higher than 5 min equilibrated MIIDOs and 7 and 10 min equilibrated GVCOCs oocytes. In Experiment 3, the effects of oocyte pre-treatment with CCB were examined. Despite the insignificant difference in survival rate of vitrified-warmed ovine immature and matured oocytes, the rates of cleavage in CCB pretreated groups were significantly lower than untreated groups. Moreover, the blastocysts were only derived from those cumulus enclosed vitrified-warmed germinal vesicle (GV) and MII oocytes that had been exposed to 10% FBS in the absence of CCB. In conclusion, the presence of cumulus cells, 10% FBS, and the omission of CCB were beneficial for post-warming development of vitrified ovine oocytes.

  17. Reduction by metals dissolved in liquid ammonia of keto steroids. Equilibration of the alcohols; Reduction par les metaux dissous dans l'ammoniac liquide de cetones en serie steroide. Equilibration des alcools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroud, A.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    Reducing a ketone by dissolved metals involves two electrons; we may consider as intermediate a radical-anion, then a di-anion or a carbo-anion. The radical-anion may also split and give pinacols away. In order to discuss the reduction proceeds, we had to know the respective stabilities of the alcohols, which lead us to effectuate equilibration. The first chapter is devoted to the method of preparing the androstanone-II and the androstanols-II{alpha} and II-{beta}. We further establish the impossibility of using our methods for reaching a conclusion about the alcohols relative stability by experimental equilibration. Last we describe the methods for reducing the ketone by alkaline and earth-alkaline metals, dissolved in liquid ammonia, either in contact with a protons donor or with a later added protons donor. The resulting mixture of the two alcohols shows a prevailing quantity of the stable equatorial isomer {alpha}. In a second chapter, we study the action of selenic acid and hydroperoxide on cholestanone-3, which leads us to study the preparation and stereochemistry of the A-nor cholestane derivates. We further describe the preparation of the A-nor cholestanols-2{alpha} and 2{beta}, and the corresponding acetates. Equilibration of the alcohols by chemical methods shows the 2 {alpha}-alcohol more stable than the 2{beta}, which is mathematically confirmed. Last, the reduction of the A-nor cholestanone-2 by dissolved metals consistently leads to the less stable 2 {beta} epimer, with associated pinacols. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the androstanone-17 reductions, and the relative stabilities of the 17{alpha} and 17{beta} alcohols. Whichever operating methods is used, we predominantly obtain the more stable 17{beta} alcohol. In all cases, a pinacol production is observed. Summing up, we note that, in all cases, we predominantly obtain the equatorial epimer, whether it should be the more stable or the less stable. (author) [French] La reduction d

  18. Differential electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections extracted from ion-atom collisions of 0.53 MeV/u Cu{sup 5+} on H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). J.R. MacDonald Lab.]|[Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Grabbe, S.R. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). J.R. MacDonald Lab.

    1997-12-31

    A method of extracting electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from ion-atom collisions has been developed. By analyzing the binary encounter electron (BEe) production in energetic ion-atom collisions, which is due to loosely bound target electrons ionized through direct, hard collisions with the projectile ions, differential cross sections of electrons elastic scattered from highly charged ions are derived for a broad range of scattering angles. The cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections, and immediately yielded an electron diffraction in angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons. Experimental data are compared with a partial-wave treatment using the Hartree-Fock model. (orig.). 19 refs.

  19. Electron-ion coupling and ambipolar diffusion in dense electron-hole plasma in thin amorphous Si films studied by single-shot, pulse-width dependent ultrafast laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Pavel; Ionin, Andrey; Khmelnitskii, Roman; Kiseleva, Irina; Kudryashov, Sergey; Mel'nik, Nikolay; Rudenko, Andrey; Smirnov, Nikita; Zayarny, Dmitry

    2017-12-01

    Single-shot ablation of amorphous silicon films of 50-, 100- and 150-nm thickness by laser pulses of variable (0.2-6 ps) widths demonstrates non-monotonous variation of ablation thresholds and characteristic ablation 1/e-radii with their minima at the 0.6-ps pulse-width and the following increase. For the shorter laser pulses the increased thresholds and enhanced transport can be related to fast ambipolar electron-hole plasma diffusion and other electronic energy losses in dense transient plasma prior its energy transfer to the ionic subsystem (electron-ion thermalization) at 0.6 ps, while for the longer laser pulses slower ambipolar diffusion in moderate-density electron-hole plasma, ionic heat conduction and other thermal losses may predominate.

  20. Carbon, Helium, and Proton Kinetic Temperatures in a Cygnus Loop Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.

    2015-06-01

    Observations of SN 1006 have shown that ions and electrons in the plasma behind fast supernova remnant shock waves are far from equilibrium, with the electron temperature much lower than the proton temperature and ion temperatures approximately proportional to ion mass. In the ˜360 km s-1shock waves of the Cygnus Loop, on the other hand, electron and ion temperatures are roughly equal, and there is evidence that the oxygen kinetic temperature is not far from the proton temperature. In this paper, we report observations of the He ii λ1640 line and the C iv λ1550 doublet in a 360 km s-1shock in the Cygnus Loop. While the best-fit kinetic temperatures are somewhat higher than the proton temperature, the temperatures of He and C are consistent with the proton temperature and the upper limits are 0.5 and 0.3 times the mass-proportional temperatures, implying efficient thermal equilibration in this collisionless shock. The equilibration of helium and hydrogen affects the conversion between proton temperatures determined from Hα line profiles and shock speeds, and the efficient equilibration found here reduces the shock speed estimates and the distance estimate to the Cygnus Loop of Medina et al. to about 800 pc.

  1. Statistical and off-equilibrium production of fragments in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies; Production statistique et hors-equilibre de fragments dans les collisions d`ions lourdes aux energies intermediaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocage, Frederic [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-12-15

    The study of reaction products, fragments and light charged particles, emitted during heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies has shown the dominant binary dissipative character of the reaction, which is persisting for almost all impact parameters. However, in comparison with this purely binary process, an excess of nuclear matter is observed in-between the quasi-projectile and the quasi-target. To understand the mechanisms producing such an excess, this work studies more precisely the breakup in two fragments of the quasi-projectile formed in Xe+Sn, from 25 to 50 MeV/u, and Gd+C and Gd+U at 36 MeV/u. The data were obtained during the first INDRA experiment at GANIL. The angular distributions of the two fragments show the competition between statistical fission and non-equilibrated breakup of the quasi-projectile. In the second case, the two fragments are aligned along the separation axis of the two primary partners. The comparison of the fission directions and probabilities with statistical models allows us to measure the fission time, as well as the angular momentum, temperature and size of the fissioning residue. The relative velocities are compatible with Coulomb and thermal effects in the case of statistical fission and are found much higher for the breakup of a non-equilibrated quasi-projectile, which indicates that the projectile was deformed during interaction with the target. Such deformations should be compared with dynamical calculations in order to constrain the viscosity of nuclear matter and the parameters of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, (author) 148 refs., 77 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Equilibration of a strongly interacting plasma: holographic analysis of local and nonlocal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellantuono Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation of a strongly coupled plasma towards the hydrodynamic regime is studied by analyzing the evolution of local and nonlocal observables in the holographic approach. The system is driven in an initial anisotropic and far-from equilibrium state through an impulsive time-dependent deformation (quench of the boundary spacetime geometry. Effective temperature and entropy density are related to the position and area of a black hole horizon, which has formed as a consequence of the distortion. The behavior of stress-energy tensor, equal-time correlation functions and Wilson loops of different shapes is examined, and a hierarchy among their thermalization times emerges: probes involving shorter length scales thermalize faster.

  3. Equilibration in the Nosé–Hoover Isokinetic Ensemble: Effect of Inter-Particle Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamik Gupta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the stationary and dynamic properties of the celebrated Nosé–Hoover dynamics of many-body interacting Hamiltonian systems, with an emphasis on the effect of inter-particle interactions. To this end, we consider a model system with both short- and long-range interactions. The Nosé–Hoover dynamics aim to generate the canonical equilibrium distribution of a system at a desired temperature by employing a set of time-reversible, deterministic equations of motion. A signature of canonical equilibrium is a single-particle momentum distribution that is Gaussian. We find that the equilibrium properties of the system within the Nosé–Hoover dynamics coincides with that within the canonical ensemble. Moreover, starting from out-of-equilibrium initial conditions, the average kinetic energy of the system relaxes to its target value over a size-independent timescale. However, quite surprisingly, our results indicate that under the same conditions and with only long-range interactions present in the system, the momentum distribution relaxes to its Gaussian form in equilibrium over a scale that diverges with the system size. On adding short-range interactions, the relaxation is found to occur over a timescale that has a much weaker dependence on system size. This system-size dependence of the timescale vanishes when only short-range interactions are present in the system. An implication of such an ultra-slow relaxation when only long-range interactions are present in the system is that macroscopic observables other than the average kinetic energy when estimated in the Nosé–Hoover dynamics may take an unusually long time to relax to its canonical equilibrium value. Our work underlines the crucial role that interactions play in deciding the equivalence between Nosé–Hoover and canonical equilibrium.

  4. Discovery of Keilite in Type 3 Enstatite Chondrites: Influence of Metamorphic Temperature on Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, E. S.; McCoy, T. J.; Corrigan, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    The discovery of keilite, previously observed in type 4-6 enstatite chondrites, in shock- or impact-melted type 3 enstatite chondrites, constrains the post-shock equilibration temperatures experienced by these meteorites to the range of 400°-500°C.

  5. Complexation of Sr in aqueous fluids equilibrated with silicate melts: effect of melt and fluid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Manuela; Wilke, Max; Schmidt, Christian; Kvashnina, Kristina

    2010-05-01

    (111) for low resolution measurements. An overall resolution of 1.98 eV (Si(311)) and 3 eV (Si(111)) was achieved using a beamsize of 120x400 μm, Si(777) analyzer crystals and a Rowland circle diameter of 1 m. Strontium XANES spectra of peraluminous and peralkaline starting glasses show distinct differences in pre-edge, main edge and position of the first EXAFS maximum which is directly correlated to the distance of Sr and its nearest neighbor. Therefore, the spectra indicate an effect of the ASI on the local structure around Sr. Spectra of standard solution at various PT conditions indicate detectable temperature-dependent changes in the intensity and peak width of the white line. The XANES spectra of chloridic solutions with peraluminous or peralkaline melt dissolved differ significantly from each other. The latter are similar to the one of the peralkaline starting glass, while this is not the case for solutions with peraluminous melt. The spectra of water with dissolved peralkaline melt distinctly differ from those using chloridic fluids. In conclusion, the first spectroscopic evidence on Sr complexation at elevated PT condition indicates significant speciation changes in both fluid and melt, and suggest ASI-dependent formation of Sr-Si complexes in the fluids. Literature Bai and Koster van Groos (1999), GCA 63, 1117-1131. Borchert et al. (2010), GCA 74, 1057-1076. Kohn et al. (1990), CMP 105, 359-368. Webster et al. (1989), Econ. Geol. 84, 116-134.

  6. Water Saturation Relations and Their Diffusion-Limited Equilibration in Gas Shale: Implications for Gas Flow in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Shen, Weijun; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhang, Yingqi; Finsterle, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of water are used for hydraulic fracturing of low permeability shale reservoirs to stimulate gas production, with most of the water remaining unrecovered and distributed in a poorly understood manner within stimulated regions. Because water partitioning into shale pores controls gas release, we measured the water saturation dependence on relative humidity (rh) and capillary pressure (Pc) for imbibition (adsorption) as well as drainage (desorption) on samples of Woodford Shale. Experiments and modeling of water vapor adsorption into shale laminae at rh = 0.31 demonstrated that long times are needed to characterize equilibrium in larger (5 mm thick) pieces of shales, and yielded effective diffusion coefficients from 9 × 10-9 to 3 × 10-8 m2 s-1, similar in magnitude to the literature values for typical low porosity and low permeability rocks. Most of the experiments, conducted at 50°C on crushed shale grains in order to facilitate rapid equilibration, showed significant saturation hysteresis, and that very large Pc (˜1 MPa) are required to drain the shales. These results quantify the severity of the water blocking problem, and suggest that gas production from unconventional reservoirs is largely associated with stimulated regions that have had little or no exposure to injected water. Gravity drainage of water from fractures residing above horizontal wells reconciles gas production in the presence of largely unrecovered injected water, and is discussed in the broader context of unsaturated flow in fractures.

  7. Equilibrated atomic models of outward-facing P-glycoprotein and effect of ATP binding on structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G

    2015-01-20

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that alternates between inward- and outward-facing conformations to capture and force substrates out of cells like a peristaltic pump. The high degree of similarity in outward-facing structures across evolution of ABC transporters allowed construction of a high-confidence outward-facing Pgp atomic model based on crystal structures of outward-facing Sav1866 and inward-facing Pgp. The model adhered to previous experimentally determined secondary- and tertiary- configurations during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in the presence or absence of MgATP. Three long lasting (>100 ns) meta-stable states were apparent in the presence of MgATP revealing new insights into alternating access. The two ATP-binding pockets are highly asymmetric resulting in differential control of overall structural dynamics and allosteric regulation of the drug-binding pocket. Equilibrated Pgp has a considerably different electrostatic profile compared to Sav1866 that implicates significant kinetic and thermodynamic differences in transport mechanisms.

  8. Atomic-scale structure evolution in a quasi-equilibrated electrochemical process of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have proven to be extremely attractive candidates for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and smart grid in terms of energy density, power density, and service life. Further performance optimization to satisfy ever-increasing demands on energy storage of such applications is highly desired. In most of cases, the kinetics and stability of electrode materials are strongly correlated to the transport and storage behaviors of lithium ions in the lattice of the host. Therefore, information about structural evolution of electrode materials at an atomic scale is always helpful to explain the electrochemical performances of batteries at a macroscale. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows simultaneous imaging of light and heavy elements, providing an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nearly equilibrated local structure of electrode materials after electrochemical cycling at atomic resolution. Recent progress toward unraveling the atomic-scale structure of selected electrode materials with different charge and/or discharge state to extend the current understanding of electrochemical reaction mechanism with the ABF and high angle annular dark field STEM imaging is presented here. Future research on the relationship between atomic-level structure evolution and microscopic reaction mechanisms of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries is envisaged. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Determination of Zinc Sulfide Solubility to High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2017-01-01

    A new experimental set-up and methodology for the measurement of ZnS solubility in aqueous solutions at 40, 60 and 80 °C (atmospheric pressure) is presented. The methodology implemented includes the preparation of the samples in a reduced oxygen atmosphere, particle size analysis of ZnS, quality...... control of the analytical technique and evaluation of equilibration time. ZnS solubility analyses were run for prolonged times (up to 11 days) to ensure that equilibrium conditions were met. The equilibration time was explored at three temperatures (40, 60 and 80 °C) observing small variations in the time...... required to reach the solid–liquid equilibrium at each temperature. Equilibrium was reached within 72 h. The concentration of zinc and of total sulfur were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The experimental solubility data show an exponential dependency...

  10. Linking deformation and chemical re-equilibration: new results from the Cretaceous Vinschgau shear zone (Southern Tyrol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlei, Tobias; Habler, Gerlinde; Grasemann, Bernhard; Abart, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    The Austroalpine Matsch Unit in the European Eastern Alps preserves evidence for at least three tectonometamorphic cycles, including a Variscan amphibolite-facies metamorphism, a Permian high-T/low-P event related to the intrusion of pegmatites and a Cretaceous metamorphism at the greenschist to amphibolite-facies transition. The southern tectonic boundary of the Matsch unit is formed by the about 2 km thick Vinschgau shear zone, which was active during the Cretaceous and involves metapelites, orthogneisses and metapegmatites (Schmid & Haas 1989). A characteristic mylonitic foliation with an E-W trending stretching lineation, S-C and S-C-Ć fabrics with general top W non-coaxial shear kinematics developed. Remarkable strain-gradients occur at the cm- to m-scale, partly associated with lithological heterogeneities. In this contribution we focus on the relationship between deformation and microstructural- and chemical re-equilibration of white mica and feldspar in the Permian metapegmatites. Based on detailed structural characterization during field work, we used optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for microstructural and microtextural characterization. An electron microprobe (EPMA) was used for analyzing the major element compositions of microstructurally different phase generations. In the Permian metapegmatites metamorphic white mica, plagioclase feldspar (ab87 - ab99) and K-feldspar replaced the primary pegmatite assemblages. Magmatic white mica with near-end member composition of muscovite is strongly deformed, showing kinks, undulose extinction and cracks. A new fine-grained white mica generation with elevated celadonite-component (SiIV = 3.05-3.25 cations/11O) not only predominates the mylonitic foliation and compressional quadrants of mm-sized albite and muscovite clasts but also compositionally altered zones within primary magmatic white mica along kink planes and cleavage planes. The

  11. An enhanced method with local energy minimization for the robust a posteriori construction of equilibrated stress fields in finite element analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pled, Florent; Chamoin, Ludovic; Ladevèze, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    In the context of global/goal-oriented error estimation applied to computational mechanics, the need to obtain reliable and guaranteed bounds on the discretization error has motivated the use of residual error estimators. These estimators require the construction of admissible stress fields verifying the equilibrium exactly. This article focuses on a recent method, based on a flux-equilibration procedure and called the element equilibration + star-patch technique (EESPT), that provides for such stress fields. The standard version relies on a strong prolongation condition in order to calculate equilibrated tractions along finite element boundaries. Here, we propose an enhanced version, which is based on a weak prolongation condition resulting in a local minimization of the complementary energy and leads to optimal tractions in selected regions. Geometric and error estimate criteria are introduced to select the relevant zones for optimizing the tractions. We demonstrate how this optimization procedure is important and relevant to produce sharper estimators at affordable computational cost, especially when the error estimate criterion is used. Two- and three-dimensional numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency of the improved technique.

  12. High resolution pore water delta2H and delta18O measurements by H2O(liquid)-H2O(vapor) equilibration laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, L I; Hendry, M J; Chostner, V L; Lis, G P

    2008-12-15

    A new H2O(liquid)-H2O(vapor) pore water equilibration and laser spectroscopy method provides a fast way to obtain accurate high resolution deltaD and delta18O profiles from single core samples from saturated and unsaturated geologic media. The precision and accuracy of the H2O(liquid)-H2O(vapor) equilibration method was comparable to or better than conventional IRMS-based methods, and it can be conducted on geologic cores that contain volumetric water contents as low as 5%. Significant advantages of the H2O(liquid)-H2O(vapor) pore water equilibration method and laser isotopic analysis method include dual hydrogen- and oxygen-isotope assays on single small core samples, low consumable and instrumentation costs, and the potential for field-based hydrogeologic profiling. A single core is sufficient to obtain detailed vertical isotopic depth profiles in geologic, soil, and lacustrine pore water, dramatically reducing the cost of obtaining pore water by conventional wells or physical water extraction methods. In addition, other inherent problems like contamination of wells by leakage and drilling fluids can be eliminated.

  13. Phosphate and feldspar mineralogy of equilibrated L chondrites: The record of metasomatism during metamorphism in ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jonathan A.; Jones, Rhian H.

    2016-10-01

    In ordinary chondrites (OCs), phosphates and feldspar are secondary minerals known to be the products of parent-body metamorphism. Both minerals provide evidence that metasomatic fluids played a role during metamorphism. We studied the petrology and chemistry of phosphates and feldspar in petrologic type 4-6 L chondrites, to examine the role of metasomatic fluids, and to compare metamorphic conditions across all three OC groups. Apatite in L chondrites is Cl-rich, similar to H chondrites, whereas apatite in LL chondrites has lower Cl/F ratios. Merrillite has similar compositions among the three chondrite groups. Feldspar in L chondrites shows a similar equilibration trend to LL chondrites, from a wide range of plagioclase compositions in petrologic type 4 to a homogeneous albitic composition in type 6. This contrasts with H chondrites which have homogeneous albitic plagioclase in petrologic types 4-6. Alkali- and halogen-rich and likely hydrous metasomatic fluids acted during prograde metamorphism on OC parent bodies, resulting in albitization reactions and development of phosphate minerals. Fluid compositions transitioned to a more anhydrous, Cl-rich composition after the asteroid began to cool. Differences in secondary minerals between H and L, LL chondrites can be explained by differences in fluid abundance, duration, or timing of fluid release. Phosphate minerals in the regolith breccia, Kendleton, show lithology-dependent apatite compositions. Bulk Cl/F ratios for OCs inferred from apatite compositions are higher than measured bulk chondrite values, suggesting that bulk F abundances are overestimated and that bulk Cl/F ratios in OCs are similar to CI.

  14. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater: expression differences in tumour histotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Perrone

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 is the major means by which gemcitabine enters human cells; recent evidence exists that hENT1 is expressed in carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and that it should be considered as a molecular prognostic marker for patients with resected ampullary cancer. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the variations of hENT1 expression in ampullary carcinomas and to correlate such variations with histological subtypes and clinicopathological parameters. Forty-one ampullary carcinomas were histologically classified into intestinal, pancreaticobiliary and unusual types. hENT1 and Ki67 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and apoptotic cells were identified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL method. hENT1 overexpression was detected in 63.4% ampullary carcinomas. A significant difference in terms of hENT1 and Ki67 expression was found between intestinal vs. pancreaticobiliary types (P=0.03 and P=0.009 respectively. Moreover, a significant statistical positive correlation was found between apoptotic and proliferative Index (P=0.036, while no significant correlation was found between hENT1 and apoptosis. Our results on hENT1 expression suggest that classification of ampullary carcinoma by morphological subtypes may represent an additional tool in prospective clinical trials aimed at examining treatment efficacy; in addition, data obtained from Ki67 and TUNEL suggest a key role of hENT1 in tumour growth of ampullary carcinoma.

  15. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  16. The Electron-Ion Collider Science Case

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, physicists are in the position to precisely study a fully relativistic quantum field theory: Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD). QCD is a central element of the Standard Model and provides the theoretical framework for understanding the strong interaction. This demands a powerful new electron microscope to probe the virtual particles of QCD. Ab initio calculations using lattice gauge theory on the world's most powerful supercomputers are essential for comparison with the data. The new accelerator and computing techniques demand aggressive development of challenging, innovative technologies.

  17. Couleurs, etoiles, temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spite, F.

    The eye is able to distinguish very tiny color differences of contiguous objects (at high light level, cones vision), but it is not a reliable colorimeter. Hot objects (a heated iron rod) emits some red light, a hotter object would provide a yellow-orange light (the filament of a bulb) and a still hotter one a white or even bluish light : this may be at reverse of common life codes, where "red" means hot water and/or danger, and "blue" cool water or cool air. Stars are a good illustration of the link between temperatures and colors. A heated iron rod has a temperature of about 800 K. Let us recall that K is a temperature unit (Kelvin) such that the Kelvin temperature is the Celsius temperature +273).The so called red stars (or cool stars) have temperature around 3000 K, higher than "white-hot iron". The Sun has a still higher temperature (5800 K) and its color is white : the solar light is by definition the "white light", and includes violet, blue, green, yellow, orange and red colors in balanced proportions (the maximum in the yellow-green). It is often said that the Sun is a yellow star. Admittedly, a brief glimpse at the Sun (take care ! never more than a VERY brief glimpse !) provides a perception of yellow light, but such a vision, with the eye overwhelmed by a fierce light, is not able to provide a good evaluation of the solar color : prefer a white sheet of paper illuminated by the Sun at noon and conclude that "the Sun is a white star". It is sometimes asked why red, white and bluish stars are seen in the sky, but no green stars : the solar light has its maximum intensity in the green, but such a dominant green light, equilibrated by some blue and some red light, is what we call "white", so that stars similar to the Sun, with a maximum in the green, are seen as white stars. Faint stars (rods vision of the eye) are also seen as white stars. Spots on the Sun (never look at the Sun ! let us say spots on "projected images of the Sun") appear as black spots

  18. On the interaction between two fireballs in low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriu, D. G., E-mail: dimitriu@uaic.ro; Irimiciuc, S. A.; Popescu, S. [Faculty of Physics, “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi (Romania); Agop, M. [Department of Physics, “Gh. Asachi” Technical University, 59A Mangeron Blvd., 700050 Iasi (Romania); Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R. W. [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, 25 Technikerstr., A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-11-15

    We report experimental results and theoretical modeling showing the interaction between two fireballs excited on two positively biased electrodes immersed in a low-temperature plasma. This interaction leads to a synchronized dynamics of the two fireballs, its frequency depending on the plasma density, the voltages applied on the electrodes, and the distance between the two electrodes. By considering that the plasma particles (electrons, ions, neutrals) move on fractal curves, a theoretical model describing the interaction between the two fireballs is developed. The results of the theoretical model were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Continuous-flow step gradient mass spectrometry based method for the determination of kinetic parameters of immobilized mushroom tyrosinase in equilibrating conditions: comparison with free enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2011-12-15

    A mass spectrometry (MS)-based methodology for enzymatic assay in equilibrium conditions was designed and evaluated. This on-line assay involves the introduction of a continuous-flow step gradient (CFSG) of a substrate solution in the column containing immobilized enzyme and the simultaneous tracking of the product formation. We showed that the constant concentration of substrate in the entire bioreactor for an appropriate duration ensures the equilibration of the studied enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase). Under these conditions, it was demonstrated also that the kinetic and enzymatic parameters (Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M) , the maximal specific activity, SA(max)) are independent of the flow rate of the mobile phase. The feasibility of the mentioned approach for inhibitory tests was also investigated. The coupling of the mass spectrometer to the bio-reactor allows the selective monitoring of the enzymatic reaction products and increases their detection level. Very high sensitivity, 500 pmol/min/column, and selective monitoring of the products of the enzymatic reaction are allowed by MS detection. The methodology developed here constitutes a sensitive analytical tool to study enzymes requiring long equilibration times. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Characterization of air temperature in modern ion chambers due to phantom geometry and ambient temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L; Kirby, Neil; Gutiérrez, Alonso N

    2016-07-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections are necessary to account for the varying mass of air in the sensitive volume of a vented ionization chamber (IC) when performing absolute dose measurements. Locations commonly used to measure the presumed IC air temperature may not accurately represent the chamber cavity air temperature, and phantoms undergoing temperature changes further compound the problem. Prior studies have characterized thermal equilibrium in separate phantoms for Farmer chambers alone. However, the purpose of this study was to characterize the cavity air temperature dependence on changes in the ambient temperature and phantom geometry configuration for a wider and more modern variety of chambers to determine if previously published wait times apply to these chambers as well. Thermal conduction properties were experimentally investigated by modifying a PTW 0.3 cm(3) Semiflex IC with a thermocouple replacing the central electrode. Air cavity temperature versus time was recorded in three phantom geometries characteristic of common absolute dose measurements. The phantoms were (15 ± 1) °C before measurement with an IC at the treatment vault temperature of (21 ± 1) °C. Simulations were conducted to provide a theoretical basis for the measurements and to simulate temperature response of a PTW PinPoint® and Farmer chamber. The simulation methods were first validated by comparison with measured Semiflex chamber thermal response curves before extension to the other chambers. Two thermal equilibria curves were recorded on different time scales. IC temperature initially dropped to the colder phantom temperature but subsequently increased as the phantom itself equilibrated with the warmer room temperature. In a large phantom of dimensions (25.5 × 25.5 × 23.4) cm(3), 3 min was required before the IC temperature reached within 0.5 °C of its equilibrium within the phantom. Similarly, wait times of 2 min were needed for 7.5 and 2 cm slab phantoms. Recording

  1. Global warming: Temperature estimation in annealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sampling from a Boltzmann distribution is NP-hard and so requires heuristic approaches. Quantum annealing is one promising candidate. The failure of annealing dynamics to equilibrate on practical time scales is a well understood limitation, but does not always prevent a heuristically useful distribution from being generated. In this paper we evaluate several methods for determining a useful operational temperature range for annealers. We show that, even where distributions deviate from the Boltzmann distribution due to ergodicity breaking, these estimates can be useful. We introduce the concepts of local and global temperatures that are captured by different estimation methods. We argue that for practical application it often makes sense to analyze annealers that are subject to post-processing in order to isolate the macroscopic distribution deviations that are a practical barrier to their application.

  2. Activity measurements of Al and Cu in Si-Al-Cu melt at 1273 and 1373 K by the equilibration with molten Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: yoshikawa@wood2.mm.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Morita, Kazuki [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2006-08-31

    For the effective control of Al introduction to solidified Si during the solidification refining of Si with the Si-Al-based melt for the solar cell material or the LPE Si film growth processes from the Si-Cu-Al solvent, thermodynamic properties of the Si-Al-Cu melt were investigated at 1273 and 1373 K. Activities of Al and Cu in the Si-Al-Cu melt were measured by the equilibration with molten Pb. Also, the excess Gibbs energy of the melt was studied by the ternary regular solution model. The evaluated thermodynamic properties of the Si-Al-Cu melt indicated that Cu addition to the Si-Al melt brings the smaller activity coefficient of Al and is effective for reducing the Al content of solidified Si from the melt more effectively than its dilution effect for Al.

  3. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the rate of solvent equilibration in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlis, William W.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The principles of the hanging-drop method of crystal growth are discussed, and the rate of water evaporation in a water droplet (containing protein, buffer, and a precipitating agent) suspended above a well containing a double concentration of precipitating agent is investigated theoretically. It is shown that, on earth, the rate of evaporation may be determined from diffusion theory and the colligative properties of solutions. The parameters affecting the rate of evaporation include the temperature, the vapor pressure of water, the ionization constant of the salt, the volume of the drop, the contact angle between the droplet and the coverslip, the number of moles of salt in the droplet, the number of moles of water and salt in the well, the molar volumes of water and salt, the distance from the droplet to the well, and the coefficient of diffusion of water vapor through air. To test the theoretical equations, hanging-drop experiments were conducted using various reagent concentrations in 25-microliter droplets and measuring the evaporation times at 4 C and 25 C. The results showed good agreement with the theory.

  4. Equilibres de phases dans les systèmes fluides petroliers-eau Phase Equilibria in Oil-Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peneloux A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nous présentons quelques résultats obtenus à partir du logiciel FHYD qui permet le traitement des mélanges eau-fluides pétroliers, avec la détermination de la nature des phases (huile-gaz-eau-hydrate thermodynamiquement stables dans des conditions données de température et de pression, ainsi que de la quantité, de la composition de ces différentes phases et de leurs propriétés. Ce logiciel permet le tracé automatique des diagrammes de phases et nous présentons des exemples, depuis les systèmes binaires (eau-éthane, ternaires (eau-méthane-propane jusqu'aux fluides les plus complexes. La présence de sels (chlorure de sodium dissous est envisagée, ainsi que le calcul des conditions de dépôt du sel solide. Des exemples de problèmes pétroliers sont cités (gaz de séparateur saturé en eau, huile saturée en eau dans les conditions de gisement, huile en présence d'eau salée. Les estimations sur les quantités d'hydrate formées et leurs compositions sont comparées à des données expérimentales et aux résultats obtenus par d'autres logiciels. Le programme FHYD pourrait permettre une représentation plus réaliste de l'évolution des fluides pétroliers et des propriétés de transport de leurs différentes phases dans les modèles de simulation des conduites polyphasiques. This article presents a selection of results obtained with the FHYD program. This software allows simulation of mixtures composed of petroleum fluids and water, with determination of the nature of thermodynamically stable phases (oil-gas-water-hydrate under given conditions of temperature and pressure, along with the quantity, composition and properties of these different phases. Additionally, the program can automatically produce phase diagrams. Several examples of these have been included here, ranging from binary systems (water-ethane and ternary systems (water-methane-propane to the most complex petroleum fluids. The presence of dissolved salts

  5. Expression Levels of Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 and Deoxycytidine Kinase Enzyme as Prognostic Factors in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, Myrna; Corrales-Alfaro, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Olga; Díaz-Chavez, José; Labardini-Méndez, Juan; Vidal-Millán, Silvia; Herrera, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Cytarabine (Ara-C) is the primary drug in different treatment schemas for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and requires the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1) to enter cells. The deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) enzyme limits its activation rate. Therefore, decreased expression levels of these genes may influence the response rate to this drug. AML patients without previous treatment were enrolled. The expression of hENT1 and dCK genes was analyzed using RT-PCR. Clinical parameters were registered. All patients received Ara-C + doxorubicin as an induction regimen (7 + 3 schema). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors that influenced response and survival. Twenty-eight patients were included from January 2011 until December 2012. Median age was 36.5 years. All patients had an adequate performance status (43% with ECOG 1 and 57% with ECOG 2). Cytogenetic risk was considered unfavorable in 54% of the patients. Complete response was achieved in 53.8%. Cox regression analysis showed that a higher hENT1 expression level was the only factor that influenced response and survival. These results highly suggest that the pharmacogenetic analyses of Ara-C influx may be decisive in AML patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Equilibration of complexes of DNA and H-NS proteins on charged surfaces: A coarse-grained model point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Joyeux, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Histone-like Nucleoid Structuring protein (H-NS) is a nucleoid-associated protein, which is involved in both gene regulation and DNA compaction. Although it is a key player in genome organization by forming bridges between DNA duplexes, the precise structure of complexes of DNA and H-NS proteins is still not well understood. In particular, it is not clear whether the structure of DNA/H-NS complexes in the living cell is similar to that of complexes deposited on mica surfaces, which may be observed by AFM microscopy. A coarse-grained model, which helps getting more insight into this question, is described and analyzed in the present paper. This model is able of describing both the bridging of bacterial DNA by H-NS in the bulk and the deposition and equilibration of the complex on a charged surface. Simulations performed with the model reveal that a slight attraction between DNA and the charged surface is sufficient to let DNA/H-NS complexes reorganize from 3D coils to planar plasmids bridged by H-NS protei...

  7. Influence of the preceding dwell time on the peritoneal equilibration test with 3.86% glucose solution in automated peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, Trijntje; Beerenhout, Charles; Smit, Watske; Konings, Constantijn; Kooman, Jeroen; Leunissen, Karel; Krediet, Raymond T

    2010-01-01

    The peritoneal equilibration test (PET) using 3.86% glucose solution is preceded by a long dwell with 3.86% glucose solution. A point of concern in patients treated with automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) is the influence of the preceding short nightly dwells on the results of a standardized PET. The aim of the study was to compare net ultrafiltration, small solute transport, sodium sieving, and solute transport type between a PET preceded by a long night dwell and one preceded by short (APD) dwells. 13 stable APD patients (mean age 60 +/- 15 years; mean duration of peritoneal dialysis 31 +/- 15 months) underwent 2 PETs: 1 preceded by short nightly dwells (PET A) and 1 preceded by a long night dwell (PET B). Both PETs were performed within a mean period of 8 (range 5 - 11) days. Mean total ultrafiltration of PET A was 626 +/- 218 mL and PET B was 644 +/- 223 mL (NS). The 4-hour results of both tests for dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) ratios of creatinine and urea, D(t)/D(0) ratios of glucose, and the dip in D/P sodium (sodium sieving) were similar. Classification of transport categories was identical for 10 of 13 patients. In APD, the preceding dwell time of a 3.86% glucose PET does not influence fluid transport, solute transport, or transport type.

  8. Batch test equilibration studies examining the removal of Cs, Sr, and Tc from supernatants from ORNL underground storage tanks by selected ion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Anderson, K.K.; Chase, C.W.; Bell, J.T.

    1995-06-01

    Bench-scale batch equilibration tests have been conducted with supernatants from two underground tanks at the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the effectiveness of selected ion exchangers in removing cesium, strontium, and technetium. Seven sorbents were evaluated for cesium removal, nine for strontium removal, and four for technetium removal. The results indicate that granular potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate was the most effective of the exchangers evaluated for removing cesium from the supernatants. The powdered forms of sodium titanate (NaTiO) and cystalline silicotitanate (CST) were superior in removing the strontium; however, for the sorbents of suitable particle size for column use, titanium monohydrogen phosphate (TiHP {phi}), sodium titanate/polyacrylonitrile (NaTiO-PAN), and titanium monohydrogen phosphate/polyacrylonitrile (TiP-PAN) gave the best results and were about equally effective. Reillex{trademark} 402 was the most effective exchanger in removing the technetium; however, it was only slightly more satisfactory than Reillex{trademark} HPQ.

  9. C.E.B.A.S., a closed equilibrated biological aquatic system as a possible precursor for a long-term life support system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüm, V.

    C.E.B.A.S.-AQUARACK is a long-term multi-generation experimental device for aquatic organisms which is disposed for utlizitation in a space station. It results from the basic idea of a space aquarium for maintaining aquatic animals for longer periods integrated in a AQUARACK which consists of a modular animal holding tank, a semi-biological/physical water recycling system and an electronical control unit. The basic idea to replace a part of the water recycling system by a continuous culture of unicellular algae primarily leads to a second system for experiments with algae, a botanical AQUARACK consisting of an algal reactor, a water recycling and the electronical control unit. The combination of the zoological part, and the botanical part with a common control system in the AQUARACK, however, results in a ``Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System'' (C.E.B.A.S.) representing an closed artificial ecosystem. Although this is disposed primarily as an experimental device for basic zoological, botanical and interdisciplinary research it opens the theoretical possibility to adapt it for combined production of animal and plant biomass on ground or in space. The paper explains the basic conception of the hardware construction of the zoological part of the system, the corresponding scientific frame program including the choice of the experimental animals and gives some selected examples of the hardware-related resrearch. It furtheron discusses the practical and economical relevance of the system in the development of a controlled aquatical life support system in general.

  10. Phase equilibria at low temperature for light hydrocarbons-methanol-water-acid gases mixtures: measurements and modelling; Equilibres de phases a basse temperature de systemes complexes CO{sub 2} - hydrocarbures legers - methanol - eau: mesures et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffine, L.

    2005-10-15

    The need to develop and improve natural gas treatment processes is real. The petroleum industry usually uses separation processes which require phase equilibrium phenomena. Yet, the complexity of the phase equilibria involved results in a lack of data, which in turn limits the development of thermodynamic models. The first part of this work is devoted to experimental investigations for systems containing light hydrocarbons, methanol, water and acid gases. We present a new apparatus that was developed to measure vapor-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria. It allowed us to obtain new phase composition data for the methanol-ethane binary system and different mixtures, and also to determine a part of the three phases equilibrium envelope of the same systems. In the second part of this work, we have developed a thermodynamic model based on the CPA equation of state. This choice may be justified by the presence of associating components like methanol, hydrogen sulfide and water in the systems. Such model is necessary for the design of gas treatment plants. Our model provides good results for phase equilibrium calculations for binaries systems without binary interaction parameter in many cases, and describes correctly the vapour-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria for complex mixtures. (author)

  11. Solution-Mediated Annealing of Polymer Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Woyessa, Getinet; Janting, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the response of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) after immersion inmethanol/water solutions at room temperature. As the glass transition temperature of solution-equilibrated PMMA differs from the one...... a permanent change in the size of the fiber. The results are compared with conventional annealing. The proposed methodology is cost-effective as it does not require a climate chamber. Furthermore, it enables an easy-to-control tuning of the resonance wavelength of POFBGs....

  12. Dust ion acoustic freak waves in a plasma with two temperature electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Manpreet; Shalini; Saini, N. S.

    2018-02-01

    We present an investigation for the nonlinear dust ion acoustic wave modulation in a plasma composed of charged dust grains, two temperature (cold and hot) nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the multiscale reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The critical wave number, which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. The influence of plasma background nonextensivity on the growth rate of modulational instability is discussed. The modulated wavepackets in the form of either bright or dark type envelope solitons may exist. Formation of rogue waves from bright envelope solitons is also discussed. The investigation indicates that the structural characteristics of these envelope excitations (width, amplitude) are significantly affected by nonextensivity, dust concentration, cold electron-ion density ratio and temperature ratio.

  13. Temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an oral temperature. Other factors to take into account are: In general, rectal temperatures are considered to ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  14. Evolution from increased cardiac mechanical function towards cardiomyopathy in the obese rat due to unbalanced high fat and abundant equilibrated diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourmoura Evangelia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to know whether high dietary energy intake (HDEI with equilibrated and unbalanced diets in term of lipid composition modify the fatty acid profile of cardiac phospholipids and function of various cardiac cells and to know if the changes in membrane lipid composition can explain the modifications of cellular activity. Wistar rats were fed either a control or high-fat (HF diet for 12 weeks and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats as well as their lean littermate (ZL a control diet between week 7 to 11 of their life. Energy intake and abdominal obesity was increased in HF-fed and ZDF rats. Circulating lipids were also augmented in both strains although hyperglycemia was noticed only in ZDF rats. HDEI induced a decrease in linoleate and increase in arachidonate in membrane phospholipids which was more pronounced in the ZDF rats compared to the HF-fed rats. In vivo cardiac function (CF was improved in HF-fed rats whereas ex vivo cardiac function was unchanged, suggesting that environmental factors such as catecholamines stimulated the in vivo CF. The unchanged ex vivo CF was associated with an increased cardiac mass which indicated development of fibrosis and/or hypertrophy. The increased in vivo CF was sustained by an augmented coronary reserve which was related to the cyclooxygenase pathway and accumulation of arachidonate in membrane phospholipids. In conclusion, before triggering a diabetic cardiomyopathy, HDEI stimulated the CF. The development of cardiomyopathy seems to result from fibrosis and/or hypertrophy which augments myocardial stiffness and decreases contractility.

  15. Novel aquatic modules for bioregenerative life-support systems based on the closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (c.e.b.a.s.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluem, Volker; Paris, Frank

    2002-06-01

    The closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (C.E.B.A.S) is a man-made aquatic ecosystem which consists of four subcomponents: an aquatic animal habitat, an aquatic plant bioreactor, an ammonia oxidizing bacteria filter and a data acquisition/control unit. It is a precursor for different types of fish and aquatic plant production sites which are disposed for the integration into bioregenerative life-support systems. The results of two successful spaceflights of a miniaturized C.E.B.A.S version (the C.E.B.A.S. MINI MODULE) allow the optimization of aquatic food production systems which are already developed in the ground laboratory and open new aspects for their utilization as aquatic modules in space bioregenerative life support systems. The total disposition offers different stages of complexity of such aquatic modules starting with simple but efficient aquatic plant cultivators which can be implemented into water recycling systems and ending up in combined plant/fish aquaculture in connection with reproduction modules and hydroponics applications for higher land plants. In principle, aquaculture of fishes and/or other aquatic animals edible for humans offers optimal animal protein production under lowered gravity conditions without the tremendous waste management problems connected with tetrapod breeding and maintenance. The paper presents details of conducted experimental work and of future dispositions which demonstrate clearly that aquaculture is an additional possibility to combine efficient and simple food production in space with water recycling utilizing safe and performable biotechnologies. Moreover, it explains how these systems may contribute to more variable diets to fulfill the needs of multicultural crews.

  16. Mutations in SLC29A3, encoding an equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT3, cause a familial histiocytosis syndrome (Faisalabad histiocytosis and familial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil V Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The histiocytoses are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by an excessive number of histiocytes. In most cases the pathophysiology is unclear and treatment is nonspecific. Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC (MIM 602782 has been classed as an autosomal recessively inherited form of histiocytosis with similarities to Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD (also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML. To elucidate the molecular basis of FHC, we performed autozygosity mapping studies in a large consanguineous family and identified a novel locus at chromosome 10q22.1. Mutation analysis of candidate genes within the target interval identified biallelic germline mutations in SLC29A3 in the FHC kindred and in two families reported to have familial RDD. Analysis of SLC29A3 expression during mouse embryogenesis revealed widespread expression by e14.5 with prominent expression in the central nervous system, eye, inner ear, and epithelial tissues including the gastrointestinal tract. SLC29A3 encodes an intracellular equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT3 with affinity for adenosine. Recently germline mutations in SLC29A3 were also described in two rare autosomal recessive disorders with overlapping phenotypes: (a H syndrome (MIM 612391 that is characterised by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatomegaly, heart anomalies, hearing loss, and hypogonadism; and (b PHID (pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome. Our findings suggest that a variety of clinical diagnoses (H and PHID syndromes, FHC, and familial RDD can be included in a new diagnostic category of SLC29A3 spectrum disorder.

  17. Nonadditive empirical force fields for short-chain linear alcohols: methanol to butanol. Hydration free energetics and Kirkwood-Buff analysis using charge equilibration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-09-02

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parametrizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parametrized to at least semiquantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semiquantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parametrized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive.

  18. Assessment of accuracy and precision in speciation analysis by competitive ligand equilibration-cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV) and application to Antarctic samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monticelli, Damiano, E-mail: damiano.monticelli@uninsubria.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Ambientali, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria - sede di Como, via Valleggio 11 22100 Como (Italy); Dossi, Carlo; Castelletti, Alessio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Ambientali, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria - sede di Como, via Valleggio 11 22100 Como (Italy)

    2010-08-24

    The analytical performances of Competitive Ligand Equilibration with Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric detection of the labile fraction (CLE-CSV) were assessed. This speciation method enables the concentration of natural ligand(s) and their conditional stability constants for the complexation of the investigated metal to be determined through thermodynamic considerations. Literature data were discussed and general trends in the precision of the determined parameters identified: ligand concentrations were affected, on average, by a 10% relative percentage standard deviation (RSD%), whereas conditional stability constants showed much lower precision, with an average RSD% of 50%. New experimental data were collected to obtain a complete assessment of accuracy and precision attainable for the determination of strong ligands at the ultra trace level, enabling the whole protocol to be evaluated. Firstly, the side reaction coefficient alpha for the formation of the complex between the added ligand and the investigated metal ({alpha}{sub CuL}) was determined. The method was subsequently applied to the analysis of solution containing ligand at trace levels (5-50 nM) with known complexing characteristics. Copper was used as the model metal ion and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as the model ligands. Results evidenced that the CLE-CSV protocol is not affected by systematic errors in the determination of both ligand concentration and the conditional stability constants. Good precision is obtained for ligand concentrations, with an average relative standard deviation (RSD%) of 5%; an average RSD% of 23% was calculated for the conditional stability constants. Including the contribution of the uncertainty in the value of {alpha}{sub CuL} in the evaluation of the uncertainty in the latter parameter increased the RSD% up to 40%. The CLE-CSV protocol was subsequently applied to the detection of strong ligands in water samples

  19. Non-additive Empirical Force Fields for Short-Chain Linear Alcohols: Methanol to Butanol. Hydration Free Energetics and Kirkwood-Buff Analysis Using Charge Equilibration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parameterizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parameterized to at least semi-quantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semi-quantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parameterized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive. PMID:20687517

  20. Equilibration in Transcendental Meditation (TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bagheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Today in the realm of theoretical and applied humanities, the main concern is the ways to attain inner equilibrium than prosperity and the ways to discover it. Equilibrium, in some way, evokes the development of tolerance and a peaceful life which is mostly, a controversial issue in Christianity and with a few differences, in sophism controversies. The present meaning seeking human or modern and post-modern human is testing different anti-progress and prophetic theories for peace and inner equilibrium to end his adversary and outer contradictions. By the massive advertisement on meditation and Transcendental Meditation (TM and its effects on health and equanimity which has been started since 1960s in Europe and continued to spread everywhere with the help of global networks, it seems necessary to study the roots, vitality, necessity, levels and related techniques and compare it with Islamic religious and cultural concepts and investigate the positive and negative aspects of these practices. The present study aims at discovering whether the equilibrium or peace attained through TM is genuine and beatific.

  1. Categorization of sodium sieving by 2.27% and 3.86% peritoneal equilibration tests--a comparative analysis in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana Marta; Fontán, Miguel Pérez; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana; Sastre, Arancha; Cambre, Helena Díaz; Muñiz, Andrés López; Falcón, Teresa García

    2009-11-01

    Analysis of the dialysate sodium concentration during a peritoneal equilibration test (PET) provides information on the rates of water and solute transport through different membrane pathways. A hypertonic (3.86%) glucose-based dialysate may enhance the accuracy of analysis. There are still gaps in our knowledge regarding this question, in the clinical setting. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the categorization of the sodium sieving effect in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients by 2.27% and 3.86% PETs, and to disclose clinical correlates of this phenomenon. Method. Ninety PD patients underwent prospectively 2.27% and 3.86% modified (dialysate samples at 0, 60, 90, 120 and 240 min) PETs, in a random order. We searched for differences in the time profiles of sodium sieving and its categorization. We correlated sodium sieving with ultrafiltration (UF) and solute transport capacity, as also with selected clinical and demographic variables, using a multivariate approach. The maximum dip in the dialysate sodium concentration (11.1 mM/L, 3.86% versus 7.1 mM/L, 2.27%, P sieving (defined by a dip sieving in the 2.27% test (100.0% sensitivity and 72.0% specificity, using 3.86% as a reference). UF and D/P(240 min) creatinine were independent predictors of the sodium sieving effect in both tests. Moreover, multivariate analysis disclosed a consistent inverse correlation between GFR and sodium sieving in both the 2.27% (B = -0.23, 95% CI -0.40, -0.07, P = 0.006) and 3.86% PET (B = -0.46, 95% CI -0.65, -0.26, P sieving in PD patients. However, the information provided by this test lacks the discriminatory capacity of the 3.86% PET, which should be considered the one for reference for this purpose. GFR keeps a consistent inverse correlation with the intensity of sodium sieving in both the 2.27% and 3.86% PET.

  2. Uptake of purines in Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes is mostly mediated by the human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter and the human Facilitative Nucleobase Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranford-Cartwright Lisa C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium parasites are unable to synthesize purines de novo and have to salvage them from the host. Due to this limitation in the parasite, purine transporters have been an area of focus in the search for anti-malarial drugs. Although the uptake of purines through the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1, the human facilitative nucleobase transporter (hFNT1 and the parasite-induced new permeation pathway (NPP has been studied, no information appears to exist on the relative contribution of these three transporters to the uptake of adenosine and hypoxanthine. Using the appropriate transporter inhibitors, the role of each of these salvage pathways to the overall purine transport in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum was systematically investigated. Methods The transport of adenosine, hypoxanthine and adenine into uninfected and P. falciparum-infected human erythrocytes was investigated in the presence or absence of classical inhibitors of the hFNT1, hENT1 and NPP. The effective inhibition of the various transporters by the classical inhibitors was verified using appropriate known substrates. The ability of high concentration of unlabelled substrates to saturate these transporters was also studied. Results Transport of exogenous purine into infected or uninfected erythrocytes occurred primarily through saturable transporters rather than through the NPP. Hypoxanthine and adenine appeared to enter erythrocytes mainly through the hFNT1 nucleobase transporter whereas adenosine entered predominantly through the hENT1 nucleoside transporter. The rate of purine uptake was approximately doubled in infected cells compared to uninfected erythrocytes. In addition, it was found that the rate of adenosine uptake was considerably higher than the rate of hypoxanthine uptake in infected human red blood cells (RBC. It was also demonstrated that furosemide inhibited the transport of purine bases through hFNT1. Conclusion

  3. Phase-Transfer Energetics of Small-Molecule Alcohols Across the Water-Hexane Interface: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Using Charge Equilibration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A.; Zhong, Yang; Meninger, David J.; Davis, Joseph E.; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We study the water-hexane interface using molecular dynamics (MD) and polarizable charge equilibration (CHEQ) force fields. Bulk densities for TIP4P-FQ water and hexane, 1.0086±0.0002 g/cm3 and 0.6378±0.0001 g/cm3, demonstrate excellent agreement with experiment. Interfacial width and interfacial tension are consistent with previously reported values. The in-plane component of the dielectric permittivity (ε∥) for water is shown to decrease from 81.7±0.04 to unity, transitioning longitudinally from bulk water to bulk hexane. ε∥ for hexane reaches a maximum in the interface, but this term represents only a small contribution to the total dielectric constant (as expected for a non-polar species). Structurally, net orientations of the molecules arise in the interfacial region such that hexane lies slightly parallel to the interface and water reorients to maximize hydrogen bonding. Interfacial potentials due to contributions of the water and hexane are calculated to be -567.9±0.13mV and 198.7±0.01mV, respectively, giving rise to a total potential in agreement with the range of values reported from previous simulations of similar systems. Potentials of mean force (PMF) calculated for methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol for the transfer from water to hexane indicate an interfacial free energy minimum, corresponding to the amphiphilic nature of the molecules. The magnitudes of transfer free energies were further characterized from the solvation free energies of alcohols in water and hexane using thermodynamic integration. This analysis shows that solvation free energies for alcohols in hexane are 0.2-0.3 kcal/mol too unfavorable, whereas solvation of alcohols in water is approximately 1 kcal/mol too favorable. For the pure hexane-water interfacial simulations, we observe a monotonic decrease of the water dipole moment to near-vacuum values. This suggests that the electrostatic component of the desolvation free energy is not as severe for polarizable models than

  4. Thermocouple temperature measurements in shock-compressed solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, D. D.; Sheffield, S. A.

    1980-10-01

    The emf produced by 5-μm-thick foil thermocouples when subjected to shock loading was studied over a stress range from 0.5 to 10 GPa. Thermocouples of either copper and constantan or chromel and alumel were embedded in the host materials, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Epon 828 epoxy, single-crystal Al2O3, or vitreous SiO2. The observed emf history rises to a plateau in a period that varied from less than 100 ns for Al2O3 to about 500 ns for PMMA. Temperatures inferred from the constant-voltage portion of the records using standard thermocouple tables (corrected for pressure) compare favorably with calculated temperatures for PMMA and epoxy below 2.0 and 4.5 GPa, respectively. Above these threshold stresses, the observed temperatures increase rapidly with compression, which may indicate an exothermic reaction. Inferred temperatures for the two types of thermocouples are in good agreement. The shape of the response history, and agreement with predicted temperatures for PMMA and epoxy, indicate that the thermocouple and host material come to thermal equilibrium during the transient portion of the response. In the elastic materials Al2O3 and SiO2, the observed temperatures are better correlated with temperatures predicted for shock compression of the thermocouple materials than those predicted for the host materials, indicating that thermal equilibration is not achieved in the available test time.

  5. A Recipe for implementing the Arrhenius-Shock-Temperature State Sensitive WSD (AWSD) model, with parameters for PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    A reactive ow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. The equation of state for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model7,8. Thus, modifying an existing WSD model in a hydrocode should be rather straightforward.

  6. Radial Distribution Functions of Strongly Coupled Two-Temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    We present tests of three theoretical models for the radial distribution functions (RDFs) in two-temperature strongly coupled plasmas. RDFs are useful in extending plasma thermodynamics and kinetic theory to strong coupling, but they are usually known only for thermal equilibrium or for approximate one-component model plasmas. Accurate two-component modeling is necessary to understand the impact of strong coupling on inter-species transport, e.g., ambipolar diffusion and electron-ion temperature relaxation. We demonstrate that the Seuferling-Vogel-Toeppfer (SVT) extension of the hypernetted chain equations not only gives accurate RDFs (as compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations), but also has a simple connection with the Yukawa OCP model. This connection gives a practical means to recover the structure of the electron background from knowledge of the ion-ion RDF alone. Using the model RDFs in Effective Potential Theory, we report the first predictions of inter-species transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas far from equilibrium. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1453736, AFSOR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0221, and used XSEDE computational resources.

  7. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  8. Effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract and pre-freezing equilibration time on the post-thawing quality of ram semen cryopreserved in a soybean lecithin-based extender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, Mahdieh; Daghigh Kia, Hossein; Najafi, Abouzar; Vaseghi Dodaran, Hossein; García-Álvarez, Olga

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Camellia sinensis extract as antioxidant supplement and pre-freezing equilibration times in a soybean lecithin extender for freezing ram semen. In this study, a total of 20 ejaculates were collected from four Ghezel rams and diluted with extenders (1.5% soybean lecithin, 7% glycerol) containing no supplements (control) and Camellia sinensis extract (5, 10, and 15 mg/L) and cryopreserved, immediately after thermal equilibrium was reached at 5 °C (0 h), or 4 h after equilibration. Sperm motility characteristics, membrane integrity, abnormal morphology, mitochondria activity, apoptotic status, MDA and antioxidant activities (GPx, SOD and total antioxidant capacity (TAC)) were evaluated following freeze-thawing. Camellia sinensis extract at level 10 mg/L led to the highest total and progressive motilities percentages, in comparison to other treatments (P Camellia sinensis extract at level of 5 and 10 mg/L led to higher plasma membrane integrity, mitochondria activity and Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in comparison to the level of 15 mg/L and control group (P Camellia sinensis extract at 10 mg/L level produced the highest percentage of live spermatozoa and the lowest apoptotic spermatozoa in comparison to all treatments (P  0.05) were observed between equilibration times (0 h vs. 4 h) for sperm samples incubated with or without different concentrations of Camellia sinensis extract. In conclusion, addition of Camellia sinensis extract at level of 10 mg/L can improve post-thawing quality of ram semen cryopreserved in a soybean lecithin extender. However, further research is needed to standardize the process of Camellia sinensis extraction and specially for identifying which compounds are responsible of its beneficial effect on ram sperm cryopreservation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the equilibration reaction between the sulfur and carbon bonded forms of a cobalt(III) complex with the ligands 2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropylsulfide and 1,1,1-tris(aminomethyl)ethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J.; Kjellerup, S.; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    A thermodn. and kinetic study of the equilibration between the Co-S bonded complex Co(tame)(S-aeaps)3+ and the Co-C bonded complex Co(tame)(C-aeaps)2+ is reported (tame = 1,1,1-tris(aminomethyl)ethane, aeaps = 2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl sulfide = 3-thiahexane-1,6-diamine and C-aeaps = 1,6-diamine...... the Co-alkyl complex gave complete loss of D. From the kinetic data it is estd. that the carbanion reacts with H2O 170 times faster than it is captured by Co(III)....

  10. Comparison of nickel silicide and aluminium ohmic contact metallizations for low-temperature quantum transport measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polley Craig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We examine nickel silicide as a viable ohmic contact metallization for low-temperature, low-magnetic-field transport measurements of atomic-scale devices in silicon. In particular, we compare a nickel silicide metallization with aluminium, a common ohmic contact for silicon devices. Nickel silicide can be formed at the low temperatures (<400°C required for maintaining atomic precision placement in donor-based devices, and it avoids the complications found with aluminium contacts which become superconducting at cryogenic measurement temperatures. Importantly, we show that the use of nickel silicide as an ohmic contact at low temperatures does not affect the thermal equilibration of carriers nor contribute to hysteresis in a magnetic field.

  11. Sensing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Piali; Garrity, Paul

    2013-04-22

    Temperature is an omnipresent physical variable reflecting the rotational, vibrational and translational motion of matter, what Richard Feynman called the "jiggling" of atoms. Temperature varies across space and time, and this variation has dramatic effects on the physiology of living cells. It changes the rate and nature of chemical reactions, and it alters the configuration of the atoms that make up nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules, significantly affecting their activity. While life may have started in a "warm little pond", as Charles Darwin mused, the organisms that surround us today have only made it this far by devising sophisticated systems for sensing and responding to variations in temperature, and by using these systems in ways that allow them to persist and thrive in the face of thermal fluctuation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Low temperature (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, J.K.; de Jong, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon films have been made by HWCVD at a very low substrate temperature of ≤ 100 °C (in a dynamic substrate heating mode) without artificial substrate cooling, through a substantial increase of the filament–substrate distance ( 80 mm) and using one straight tantalum filament. The

  13. ULYSSES JUPITER HISCALE LEFS 60 ELECTRON/ION COUNTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of HISCALE Low-Energy Foil Spectrometer (LEFS) electron and ion counts at 60 degrees from the spacecraft spin axis. These measurements were...

  14. Electron-Ion Beam Coupling Through Collective Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    growth of this 9 ’a instability and provide an analytical 9W - 1.00E8-0 framework to describe its growth and saturation. 997.5 1.00o-10 . In reference...matches much more closely the results of Parks. Reference 10 develops an analytical framework that takes the Buneman instability beyond the saturation...2A7H-m n I/i 2r M- (7T V /2 f f f v 2 + 2uvcosO)/v:Iu•dd( cosO )du (A.7) oo I 27rG n •2f f~p- (U2o -+ V2+ / 2 U Oad( cosO )d.. (.8 While taking the integral

  15. ERL Based Electron-Ion Collider eRHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Bai, Mei; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph M; Calaga, Rama; Chang, Xiangyun; Deshpande, Abhay A; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Fedotov, Alexei V; Fischer, Wolfram; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; MacKay, William W; Montag, Christoph; Parker, Brett; Peggs, Steve; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Satogata, Todd; Surrow, Bernd; Tepikian, Steven; Trbojevic, Dejan; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    We present the designs of a future polarized electron-hadron collider, eRHIC* based on a high current super-conducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) with energy of electrons up to 20 GeV. We plan to operate eRHIC in both dedicated (electron-hadrons only) and parallel(with the main hadron-hadron collisions) modes. The eRHIC has very large tunability range of c.m. energies while maintaining very high luminosity up to 1034 cm-2 s-1 per nucleon. Two of the most attractive features of this scheme are full spin transparency of the ERL at all operational energies and the capability to support up to four interaction points. We present two main layouts of the eRHIC, the expected beam and luminosity parameter, and discuss the potential limitation of its performance.

  16. Plasma behavior in an oscillating-electron ion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J. W.; Angelbeck, A. W.; Pinsley, E. A.

    1963-03-15

    Results of an experimental investigation of the effects of external operating parameters on both steady-state and transient plasma behavior in the engine environment are reported. Parameters studied included anode voltage, anode current, magnetic field strength, and mass flow. Measurement of axial plasma potential gradients was emphasized. Under certain conditions the engine exhibited a cyclic onand-off type of operation. There was evidence that this fluctuating mode of operation was caused by the pumping action of the engine. Rotation of the plasma within the engine was also observed. (A.G.W.)

  17. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  18. Lifetime measurements of nuclei in few-electron ions

    CERN Document Server

    Faestermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this review lifetime measurements of ions with at most two electrons are summarized. Such highly ionized systems have been studied - until now - only in the Experimental Storage Ring of the GSI in Darmstadt. Emphasis is put on decays via the weak interaction. The first observations of beta-decay into bound atomic states are described as well as its time mirrored counterpart, the electron-capture decay. In the latter case the decays of hydrogen- and helium-like ions are compared with a surprising result. Further on, the observation of sinusoidal modulations of the decay rate in two-body decays is summarized. As a possible cause an interference due to the emission of neutrinos with different rest mass is discussed.

  19. Mars: destruction of the tropical belt and building up extra tropics is a physical requirement of angular momentum equilibration between zones with different distances to the rotation axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-t ropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun (Fig. 6) compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon [1-3]. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different lat itudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (Fig. 1) (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable cheaper launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou in the French Guyana is better than Baikonur in Kazakhstan). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a total rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature (well known pygmioidness process). Ext ratropical belts, on the contrary, tend to add material and increase radius. Thus, a body tends to be like a cucumber but mighty gravity always makes it globular. According to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with opposing tendencies also begin to act. However, traces of this cosmic "struggle" very often are seen on surfaces of heavenly bodies as structurally distinguished tropical and extra-t ropical zones (Fig. 1, 6) [1-3]. At Mars the widespread "enigmatic" chaotic and fretted terrains at the highland-lowland boundary could be considered as traces of the crust destruction along the wide tropical belt (Fig. 2-4). A system of hillocks and their relics, mesas, ridges, cliffs and separating them depressions or plains (deep up to 1-2 km) is controlled by a crosscutting

  20. Temperature Effects on Stiffness Moduli of Reservoir Sandstone from the Deep North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlander, Tobias; Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    We investigate effect of testing temperature on the dynamic frame stiffness of quartz-bearing North Sea sandstone from depths of 5 km. We show that at low stress levels, the rock frame stiffens with increasing temperature and we propose an explanation for the controlling mechanisms. While...... equilibrating to atmospheric conditions, cooling and stress release of reservoir material can induce tensional forces in the rock frame leading to ruptures of the contact cement in the weakest grain contacts. The frame stiffness hence reduces, as the ruptures are permanent. However, a fraction of the in......-situ stiffness can be restored by reestablishment of reservoir stress or temperature, but only as recovery of contact between ruptures and not as re-cementation. In literature, ruptures of contact cement are denoted as micro-cracks, strictly posing a bulk term, without distinguishing effects of stress from...

  1. Average-atom model for two-temperature states and ionic transport properties of aluminum in the warm dense matter regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Fu, Yongsheng; Bredow, Richard; Kang, Dongdong; Redmer, Ronald; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    The average-atom model combined with the hyper-netted chain approximation is an efficient tool for electronic and ionic structure calculations for warm dense matter. Here we generalize this method in order to describe non-equilibrium states with different electron and ion temperature as produced in laser-matter interactions on ultra-short time scales. In particular, the electron-ion and ion-ion correlation effects are considered when calculating the electron structure. We derive an effective ion-ion pair-potential using the electron densities in the framework of temperature-depended density functional theory. Using this ion-ion potential we perform molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the ionic transport properties such as the ionic diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity through the ionic velocity autocorrelation functions.

  2. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Katz, J; Stoeckl, C; Weiner, D; Bedzyk, M; Glebov, V; Sorce, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Sangster, T C; Regan, S P; Kwan, T; Le, A; Simakov, A N; Taitano, W T; Chacòn, L; Keenan, B; Shah, R; Sutcliffe, G; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D(3)He, and T(3)He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences, and measurements of Ti(t) and Te(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.

  3. Gas temperature measurements in a microwave plasma by optical emission spectroscopy under single-wall carbon nanotube growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, R K [Cummins Inc, 1900 McKinley Ave, MC 50180, Columbus, IN 47201 (United States); Anderson, T N; Lucht, R P; Fisher, T S; Gore, J P [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: rajesh.garg@cummins.com

    2008-05-07

    Plasma gas temperatures were measured via in situ optical emission spectroscopy in a microwave CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} plasma under carbon nanotube (CNT) growth conditions. Gas temperature is an important parameter in controlling and optimizing CNT growth. The temperature has a significant impact on chemical kinetic rates, species concentrations and CNT growth rates on the substrate. H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were determined from the Q-branch spectrum of the d{sup 3}{pi}{sub u}(0){yields}a{sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(0) transition. N{sub 2} rotational and vibrational temperatures were measured by fitting rovibrational bands from the N{sub 2} emission spectrum of the C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u} {yields} B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g} transition. The N{sub 2} rotational temperature, which is assumed to be approximately equal to the translational gas temperature, increases with an increase in input microwave plasma power and substrate temperature. The measured H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were not in agreement with the measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures under the CNT growth conditions in this study. The measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures compared with the H{sub 2} rotational temperatures suggest the partial equilibration of upper excited state due to higher, 10 Torr, operating pressure. Methane addition in the hydrogen plasma increases the gas temperature slightly for methane concentrations higher than 10% in the feed gas.

  4. Considerations for the measurement of core, skin and mean body temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Tipton, Michael J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-12-01

    Despite previous reviews and commentaries, significant misconceptions remain concerning deep-body (core) and skin temperature measurement in humans. Therefore, the authors have assembled the pertinent Laws of Thermodynamics and other first principles that govern physical and physiological heat exchanges. The resulting review is aimed at providing theoretical and empirical justifications for collecting and interpreting these data. The primary emphasis is upon deep-body temperatures, with discussions of intramuscular, subcutaneous, transcutaneous and skin temperatures included. These are all turnover indices resulting from variations in local metabolism, tissue conduction and blood flow. Consequently, inter-site differences and similarities may have no mechanistic relationship unless those sites have similar metabolic rates, are in close proximity and are perfused by the same blood vessels. Therefore, it is proposed that a gold standard deep-body temperature does not exist. Instead, the validity of each measurement must be evaluated relative to one's research objectives, whilst satisfying equilibration and positioning requirements. When using thermometric computations of heat storage, the establishment of steady-state conditions is essential, but for clinically relevant states, targeted temperature monitoring becomes paramount. However, when investigating temperature regulation, the response characteristics of each temperature measurement must match the forcing function applied during experimentation. Thus, during dynamic phases, deep-body temperatures must be measured from sites that track temperature changes in the central blood volume. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analytical study of effects of positron density and temperature anisotropy on electrostatic ion cyclotron instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Moqadam Niyat, M.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the positron concentration and ion temperature anisotropy on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability are studied analytically, in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with temperature anisotropy, using the linear kinetic theory. Positrons and electrons are supposed to drift either in the same direction or in opposite directions relative to singly ionized stationary ions and parallel to the magnetic field. The dispersion relation of the electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is derived, and then the conditions for exciting the instability of the waves are investigated. Moreover, the condition for the marginally stable state is also studied. It is found that as the positron concentration and perpendicular ion temperature increase, the growth rate of the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability decreases, whereas the critical drift velocity increases. It is also found that for the chosen set of parameters, with electrons and positrons drifting in the same direction, the instability in the plasma is stronger than when the electrons and positrons drift in opposite directions. In addition, a comparison is made to the normal electron-ion plasma.

  6. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  7. The Melting Temperature of Liquid Water with the Effective Fragment Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Xantheas, Sotiris S; Gordon, Mark S

    2015-09-17

    The direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (T(m)) of ice-I(h). Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at P = 1 atm and T = 305 K, 325 K and 399 K, respectively, yielded corresponding T(m) values of 378 ± 16 K, 382 ± 14 K and 384 ± 15 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree as previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D).

  8. Enthalpy Relaxation of a DGEBA Epoxy as a function of Time, Temperature, and Cooling Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Caitlyn M.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.

    2015-03-01

    Enthalpy relaxation resulting from physical aging of a DGEBA epoxy, Epon 828, cross-linked with an amine curative, Jeffamine T-403, was studied for two isothermal aging temperatures at sequential aging times up to two weeks. Results were analyzed using the peak shift method to obtain the relaxation parameters β, δ (H*), and χ. The individual effects of cooling rate from the equilibrated state, aging time, and aging temperature were isolated to understand the initial state of the glassy epoxy and its evolution during physical aging. [Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Temperature Logging to Characterize Flow Patterns in a Highly Permeable Fractured Karstic Aquifer, Poitiers (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelier, M.; Ruelleu, S.; Bour, O.; Porel, G.; Delay, F.

    2008-12-01

    In heterogeneous media, such as higly fractured rocks or karstic aquifers, the characterization of the main flow paths is required for further flow modeling but rather difficult to achieve due to the complexity of the flow field. Here we compare the information provided by temperature logs with flow logs measurements in a fractured karstic aquifer at the Hydrogeological Experimental Site (HES) of Poitiers (France). Temperature logs have been widely used to address flow in fractured rocks. Basically, the method tracks eventual distortions of the geothermic gradient due to groundwater motion. It is considered as inexpensive since the point is simply to monitor water temperatures along a borehole profile and then to translate the measures in terms of inflow-outflow locations and incidentally of vertical flows along the borehole. Flow logs were obtained from an heat-pulse flowmeter that allow to measure downward or upward vertical groundwater velocities larger than a mm/s. The HES is set up over a 100m thickness confined Jurassic limestone aquifer. The HES includes 32 fully penetrating wells which geometry is inspired from the "five spot" borehole configuration. The inter- comparisons between previous data from flowmeter testing, borehole imaging and 3D seismic imaging indicate that main flow-paths are mostly concealed within sub-horizontal layers riddled with karstic channels and along sub-vertical fractures. Temperature and flow measurements have been carried out under both ambient and forced flow conditions. Two forced flow conditions are available yielding short pumping time data with pumping at the monitored well, large pumping time data with pumping at a distant well. Most boreholes show quite constant vertical profiles of temperature indicating the existence of flow along boreholes. In addition, a few wells may show drop of temperature at 115 m depth and anomalous warm-water arrivals at 65m. These features associated with non equilibrated temperatures highlight

  10. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  11. Effective temperatures and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation for particle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I; Pérez-Madrid, A

    2015-09-14

    The short- and long-time breakdown of the classical Stokes-Einstein relation for colloidal suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions is explained here by examining the role that confinement and attractive interactions play in the intra- and inter-cage dynamics executed by the colloidal particles. We show that the measured short-time diffusion coefficient is larger than the one predicted by the classical Stokes-Einstein relation due to a non-equilibrated energy transfer between kinetic and configuration degrees of freedom. This transfer can be incorporated in an effective kinetic temperature that is higher than the temperature of the heat bath. We propose a Generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER) in which the effective temperature replaces the temperature of the heat bath. This relation then allows to obtain the diffusion coefficient once the viscosity and the effective temperature are known. On the other hand, the temporary cluster formation induced by confinement and attractive interactions of hydrodynamic nature makes the long-time diffusion coefficient to be smaller than the corresponding one obtained from the classical Stokes-Einstein relation. Then, the use of the GSER allows to obtain an effective temperature that is smaller than the temperature of the heat bath. Additionally, we provide a simple expression based on a differential effective medium theory that allows to calculate the diffusion coefficient at short and long times. Comparison of our results with experiments and simulations for suspensions of hard and porous spheres shows an excellent agreement in all cases.

  12. NON-EQUILIBRIUM ELECTRONS IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avestruz, Camille; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Nelson, Kaylea, E-mail: camille.avestruz@yale.edu, E-mail: camille.avestruz@yale.edu [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich measurements of the intracluster medium (ICM) assumes that electrons are in thermal equilibrium with ions in the plasma. However, in the outskirts of galaxy clusters, the electron–ion equilibration timescale can become comparable to the Hubble time, leading to systematic biases in cluster mass estimates and mass-observable scaling relations. To quantify an upper limit of the impact of non-equilibrium electrons, we use a mass-limited sample of simulated galaxy clusters taken from a cosmological simulation with a two-temperature model that assumes the Spitzer equilibration time for the electrons and ions. We show that the temperature bias is more pronounced in more massive and rapidly accreting clusters. For the most extreme case, we find that the bias is of the order of 10% at half of the cluster virial radius and increases to 40% at the edge of the cluster. Gas in filaments is less susceptible to the non-equilibrium effect, leading to azimuthal variations in the temperature bias at large cluster-centric radii. Using mock Chandra observations of simulated clusters, we show that the bias manifests in ultra-deep X-ray observations of cluster outskirts and quantify the resulting biases in hydrostatic mass and cluster temperature derived from these observations. We provide a mass-dependent fitting function for the temperature bias profile, which can be useful for modeling the effect of electron-ion equilibration in galaxy clusters.

  13. Two-Step Calibration of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer for High Temperature Measurement Using a Quartz Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    There is no theoretical upper temperature limit for pyrometer application in temperature measurements. NASA Glenn's multiwavelength pyrometer can make measurements over wide temperature ranges. However, the radiation spectral response of the pyrometer's detector must be calibrated before any temperature measurement is attempted, and it is recommended that calibration be done at temperatures close to those for which measurements will be made. Calibration is a determination of the constants of proportionality at all wavelengths between the detector's output (voltage) and its input signals (usually from a blackbody radiation source) in order to convert detector output into radiation intensity. To measure high temperatures, the detectors are chosen to be sensitive in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers. A blackbody furnace equilibrated at around 1000 C is often used for this calibration. Though the detector may respond sensitively to short wavelengths radiation, a blackbody furnace at 1000 C emits only feebly at very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the calibration constants that result may not be the most accurate. For pyrometry calibration, a radiation source emitting strongly at the short wavelengths is preferred. We have chosen a quartz halogen lamp for this purpose.

  14. ``Multi-temperature'' method for high-pressure sorption measurements on moist shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparik, Matus; Ghanizadeh, Amin; Gensterblum, Yves; Krooss, Bernhard M.

    2013-08-01

    A simple and effective experimental approach has been developed and tested to study the temperature dependence of high-pressure methane sorption in moist organic-rich shales. This method, denoted as "multi-temperature" (short "multi-T") method, enables measuring multiple isotherms at varying temperatures in a single run. The measurement of individual sorption isotherms at different temperatures takes place in a closed system ensuring that the moisture content remains constant. The multi-T method was successfully tested for methane sorption on an organic-rich shale sample. Excess sorption isotherms for methane were measured at pressures of up to 25 MPa and at temperatures of 318.1 K, 338.1 K, and 348.1 K on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples. The measured isotherms were parameterized with a 3-parameter Langmuir-based excess sorption function, from which thermodynamic sorption parameters (enthalpy and entropy of adsorption) were obtained. Using these, we show that by taking explicitly into account water vapor as molecular species in the gas phase with temperature-dependent water vapor pressure during the experiment, more meaningful results are obtained with respect to thermodynamical considerations. The proposed method can be applied to any adsorbent system (coals, shales, industrial adsorbents) and any supercritical gas (e.g., CH4, CO2) and is particularly suitable for sorption measurements using the manometric (volumetric) method.

  15. Microbial impacts on geothermometry temperature predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiko Fujita; David W. Reed; Kaitlyn R. Nowak; Vicki S. Thompson; Travis L. McLing; Robert W. Smith

    2013-02-01

    Conventional geothermometry approaches assume that the composition of a collected water sample originating in a deep geothermal reservoir still reflects chemical equilibration of the water with the deep reservoir rocks. However, for geothermal prospecting samples whose temperatures have dropped to <120°C, temperature predictions may be skewed by the activity of microorganisms; microbial metabolism can drastically and rapidly change the water’s chemistry. We hypothesize that knowledge of microbial impacts on exploration sample geochemistry can be used to constrain input into geothermometry models and thereby improve the reliability of reservoir temperature predictions. To evaluate this hypothesis we have chosen to focus on sulfur cycling, because of the significant changes in redox state and pH associated with sulfur chemistry. Redox and pH are critical factors in defining the mineral-fluid equilibria that form the basis of solute geothermometry approaches. Initially we are developing assays to detect the process of sulfate reduction, using knowledge of genes specific to sulfate reducing microorganisms. The assays rely on a common molecular biological technique known as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which allows estimation of the number of target organisms in a particular sample by enumerating genes specific to the organisms rather than actually retrieving and characterizing the organisms themselves. For quantitation of sulfate reducing genes using qPCR, we constructed a plasmid (a piece of DNA) containing portions of two genes (known as dsrA and dsrB) that are directly involved with sulfate reduction and unique to sulfate reducing microorganisms. Using the plasmid as well as DNA from other microorganisms known to be sulfate reducers or non-sulfate reducers, we developed qPCR protocols and showed the assay’s specificity to sulfate reducers and that a qPCR standard curve using the plasmid was linear over >5 orders of magnitude. As a first test

  16. Olivine Crystallization and Mantle Potential Temperatures Beneath Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderly, A.; Putirka, K. D.; Atosa, A.; Hurwitz, S.

    2007-12-01

    New basalt samples from the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field provide evidence for some of the most primitive liquids yet recovered for the region, and yield clues regarding mantle processes. The sample distribution covers a large area and an extended period, and one sample in particular (basalt of Warm River) contains 11% MgO, with olivines that are in equilibrium with the host whole rock. Using olivine thermometry, we calculate both olivine crystallization and mantle potential temperatures (Tp, the temperature a parcel of mantle would have if it rose adiabatically to Earth's surface without melting) to test whether the alleged Yellowstone hot spot is truly hot. These tests make use of thermometers from (1) and (2), and we compare temperatures at Yellowstone with estimates from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project, HSDP-2 (2, 3) and the Siqueiros Transform, near the East Pacific Rise (4). Assessment of olivine-liquid equilibrium is based on the Fe-Mg exchange coefficient between olivine and liquid, which is assumed to be 0.30+/-0.03 (5). In total, the Yellowstone lavas have mean crystallization temperatures of 1251+/-41°C (n=79) with a maximum of 1327°C. The mean temperature is similar to crystallization temperatures of basalts from Siqueiros (1264+/-21°C), but lower than the mean temperature for HDSP samples (1343+/-50°C). Mantle potential temperatures appear to approach an olivine-control line, which if valid, yields a mantle potential temperature of 1610°C, slightly higher than most Snake River Plain (SRP) lavas (Tp =1540°C). Applying the same model to lavas from the Siqueiros Transform yields a Tp of 1400°C, and so excess temperatures (relative to MORB) along the SRP are in the range of 140-209°C, consistent with a mantle plume interpretation for the Yellowstone hot spot track. These calculations presume that primitive melts have equilibrated with mantle olivine of Fo90 in composition; given the FeO contents of SRP lavas, parental liquids should

  17. Body temperature norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal body temperature; Temperature - normal ... Morrison SF. Regulation of body temperature. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 59. Sajadi MM, Mackowiak ...

  18. Shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of ionic liquid aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, M; Esperança, J M S S; Soromenho, M R C; Rebelo, L P N; Lopes, J N Canongia

    2013-07-14

    This work investigates for the first time shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of water caused by ionic liquid solutes. A vast amount of high-precision volumetric data--more than 6000 equilibrated (static) high-precision density determination corresponding to ∼90 distinct ionic liquid aqueous solutions of 28 different types of ionic liquid--allowed us to analyze the TMD shifts for different homologous series or similar sets of ionic solutes and explain the overall effects in terms of hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding contributions. The differences between the observed TMD shifts in the -2 liquids and are consistent with previous results that established hydrophobic and hydrophilic scales for ionic liquid ions based on their specific interactions with water and other probe molecules.

  19. Photonic Architectures for Equilibrium High-Temperature Bose-Einstein Condensation in Dichalcogenide Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; John, Sajeev

    2014-12-01

    Semiconductor-microcavity polaritons are composite quasiparticles of excitons and photons, emerging in the strong coupling regime. As quantum superpositions of matter and light, polaritons have much stronger interparticle interactions compared with photons, enabling rapid equilibration and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). Current realizations based on 1D photonic structures, such as Fabry-Pérot microcavities, have limited light-trapping ability resulting in picosecond polariton lifetime. We demonstrate, theoretically, above-room-temperature (up to 590 K) BEC of long-lived polaritons in MoSe2 monolayers sandwiched by simple TiO2 based 3D photonic band gap (PBG) materials. The 3D PBG induces very strong coupling of 40 meV (Rabi splitting of 62 meV) for as few as three dichalcogenide monolayers. Strong light-trapping in the 3D PBG enables the long-lived polariton superfluid to be robust against fabrication-induced disorder and exciton line-broadening.

  20. The uranium dioxide-uranium system at high temperature; Le systeme uranium-dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinet, Ph.; Vaugoyeau, H.; Blum, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The liquidus curve has been determined by a saturation method in which the thermal gradient was cancelled upon cooling, and the solidus curve by analyzing the deposits in equilibrium with the liquid at each temperature. The diagram, of a displaced eutectic type, presents a liquid immiscibility domain between 47 and 59 mol per cent of dioxide and a substoichiometry range UO{sub 2x}, the minimum O/U ratio being 1,6 at 3470 {+-} 30 C. The monotectic composition was found by chemical analysis to be 59 mol per cent of dioxide and the reaction temperature 2470 {+-} 30 C. (author) [French] La courbe liquidus a ete determinee par une methode de saturation en annulant le gradient thermique au cours du refroidissement, la courbe solidus par analyse des depots en equilibre avec le liquide a chaque temperature. Le diagramme du type a eutectique deporte comporte un domaine d'immiscibilite liquide entre 47 et 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde, ainsi qu'un domaine d'existence du compose sous stoechiometrique UO{sub 2x}, le rapport O/U minimum etant egal a 1,6 a 2470 {+-} 30 C. La composition du monotectique, obtenue par analyse chimique, est de 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde et la temperature de la reaction a ete trouvee egale a 2470 {+-} 30 C. (auteur)

  1. Role of Equilibrative Nucleobase Transporter 1/SLC43A3 as a Ganciclovir Transporter in the Induction of Cytotoxic Effect of Ganciclovir in a Suicide Gene Therapy with Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Junji; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Ohta, Kinya; Yasujima, Tomoya; Mimura, Yoshihisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    A suicide gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) with ganciclovir (GCV) has been under development as a tumor-targeted therapy; however, the mechanism of cellular GCV uptake, which is prerequisite in the therapy, has not been clarified. In an attempt to resolve this situation and gain information to optimize HSV-TK/GCV system for cancer therapy, we found that human equilibrative nucleobase transporter 1 (ENBT1) can transport GCV with a Michaelis constant of 2.75 mM in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells stably transfected with this transporter. In subsequent experiments using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged ENBT1 (GFP-ENBT1) and HSV-TK, the uptake of GCV (30 μM), which was minimal in MDCKII cells and unchanged by their transfection with HSV-TK alone, was increased extensively by their transfection with GFP-ENBT1, together with HSV-TK. Accordingly, cytotoxicity, which was assessed by the WST-8 cell viability assay after the treatment of those cells with GCV (30 μM) for 72 hours, was induced in those transfected with GFP-ENBT1, together with HSV-TK but not in those transfected with HSV-TK alone. These results suggest that ENBT1 could facilitate GCV uptake and thereby enhance cytotoxicity in HSV-TK/GCV system. We also identified Helacyton gartleri (HeLa) and HepG2 as cancer cell lines that are rich with ENBT1 and A549, HCT-15 and MCF-7 as those poor with ENBT1. Accordingly, the HSV-TK/GCV system was effective in inducing cytotoxicity in the former but not in the latter. Thus, ENBT1 was found to be a GCV transporter that could enhance the performance of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia; Skotland, Tore; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Kauhanen, Dimple; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-06-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present in these models are: cholesterol (CHOL), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (SOPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (SOPS), N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM16), and N-lignoceroyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM24). The bilayers׳ compositions are based on lipidomic studies of PC-3 prostate cancer cells and exosomes discussed in Llorente et al. (2013) [1], showing an increase in the section of long-tail lipid species (SOPS, SOPE, and SM24) in the exosomes. Former knowledge about lipid asymmetry in cell membranes was accounted for in the models, meaning that the model of the inner leaflet is composed of a mixture of PC, PS, PE, and cholesterol, while the extracellular leaflet is composed of SM, PC and cholesterol discussed in Van Meer et al. (2008) [2]. The provided data include lipids׳ topologies, equilibrated structures of asymmetric bilayers, all force field parameters, and input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp). The data is associated with the research article "Interdigitation of Long-Chain Sphingomyelin Induces Coupling of Membrane Leaflets in a Cholesterol Dependent Manner" (Róg et al., 2016) [3].

  3. Modeling the effect of water activity and storage temperature on chemical stability of coffee brews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzocco, Lara; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2007-08-08

    This work was addressed to study the chemical stability of coffee brew derivatives as a function of water activity (aw) and storage temperature. To this purpose, coffee brew was freeze-dried, equilibrated at increasing aw values, and stored for up to 10 months at different temperatures from -30 to 60 degrees C. The chemical stability of the samples was assessed by measuring H3O+ formation during storage. Independently of storage temperature, the rate of H3O+ formation was considerably low only when aw was reduced below 0.5 (94% w/w). Beyond this critical boundary, the rate increased, reaching a maximum value at ca. 0.8 aw (78% w/w). Further hydration up to the aw of the freshly prepared beverage significantly increased chemical stability. It was suggested that mechanisms other than lactones' hydrolysis, probably related to nonenzymatic browning pathways, could contribute to the observed increase in acidity during coffee staling. The temperature dependence of H3O+ formation was well-described by the Arrhenius equation in the entire aw range considered. However, aw affected the apparent activation energy and frequency factor. These effects were described by simple equations that were used to set up a modified Arrhenius equation. This model was validated by comparing experimental values, not used to generate the model, with those estimated by the model itself. The model allowed efficient prediction of the chemical stability of coffee derivatives on the basis of only the aw value and storage temperature.

  4. Experimental permeability studies at elevated temperature and pressure of granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, J.M.

    1978-05-01

    Permeability of quartz monzonite from the Los Alamos hot-dry-rock geothermal well GT-2 was experimentally measured as a function of pressure and temperature. Permeability of the GT-2 rocks from depths of 8580 ft and 9522 ft behaves like Westerly granite for changes in effective confining pressure. However, permeability of these rocks behaves much differently with increasing temperature. As temperature is increased, the permeability of Westerly granite passes through a slight minimum and then increases exponentially above 100/sup 0/C. Upon cooling the permeability shows a permanent increase of up to four times its original value. The permeability of GT-2-9522', on the other hand, drops off exponentially with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum near 140/sup 0/C; above 150/sup 0/C, permeability rises slowly. These changes in permeability with temperature are postulated to be caused by differential thermal expansion (DTE), a phenomena related to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous coefficients of thermal expansion of the mineral grains in the rock. Scanning electron photomicrographs of unheated and heated samples of Westerly and GT-2 rocks support the DTE hypothesis. Differences in the behavior of these rocks with temperature are believed to be due to the respective temperature and pressure environments in which they became equilibrated, since both GT-2 rocks had existed at moderately high temperatures and pressures for some time. Temperature disequilibrium of the GT-2 rocks in their present in situ environments is believed to have caused the differences in the behavior between the two samples and may provide a method for determining the pre-intrusion geothermal gradient of the Jemez area. Flow channels were observed in GT-2 samples using radioactive tracer techniques. Several radioactive isotopes were tried in these experiments, including /sup 22/Na, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 35/S.

  5. Temperature and the Ventilatory Response to Hypoxia in Gromphadorhina portentosa (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jon F; Manoucheh, Milad; Klok, C Jaco; Campbell, Jacob B

    2016-04-01

    In general, insects respond to hypoxia by increasing ventilation frequency, as seen in most other animals. Higher body temperatures usually also increase ventilation rates, likely due to increases in metabolic rates. In ectothermic air-breathing vertebrates, body temperatures and hypoxia tend to interact significantly, with an increasing responsiveness of ventilation to hypoxia at higher temperatures. Here, we tested whether the same is true in insects, using the Madagascar hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum) (Blattodea: Blaberidae). We equilibrated individuals to a temperature (beginning at 20 °C), and animals were exposed to step-wise decreases in PO2 (21, 15, 10, and 5 kPa, in that order), and we measured ventilation frequencies from videotapes of abdominal pumping after 15 min of exposure to the test oxygen level. We then raised the temperature by 5 °C, and the protocol was repeated, with tests run at 20, 25, 30, and 35 °C. The 20 °C animals had high initial ventilation rates, possibly due to handling stress, so these animals were excluded from subsequent analyses. Across all temperatures, ventilation increased in hypoxia, but only significantly at 5 kPa PO2 Surprisingly, there was no significant interaction between temperature and oxygen, and no significant effect of temperature on ventilation frequency from 25 to 35 °C. Plausibly, the rise in metabolic rates at higher temperatures in insects is made possible by increasing other aspects of gas exchange, such as decreasing internal PO2, or increases in tidal volume, spiracular opening (duration or amount), or removal of fluid from the tracheoles. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Rapid high-temperature metamorphism of East Pacific Rise gabbros from Hess Deep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Craig E.; Weston, Patricia E.; Mahon, Keith I.

    1996-10-01

    Metamorphosed oceanic gabbros provide a record of the cooling history of the lower crust near mid-ocean ridges, but the temperature range, rate, and location of subsolidus events are poorly known. We combine hornblende-plagioclase thermometry, statistical analysis, and thermal models to estimate precisely the temperature, time, distance from axis, and duration of metamorphism in East Pacific Rise gabbros from Hess Deep, ODP Hole 894G. Metamorphic hornblende and plagioclase, which formed during microfracturing and sea water penetration, equilibrated at a mean temperature of 716 ± 8°C (90% confidence level). Comparison of the properties of the observed temperature distribution with those of model events indicates that metamorphism spanned ≤ 60°C. When combined with thermal models of fast-spreading centers, this implies that metamorphism was rapid (≤ 6000 yr) and occurred 1-4 km off axis. Application of this approach to other gabbros will allow comparison of spatial and temporal characteristics of deformation and fluid flow in the lower oceanic crust as a function of ridge setting.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations to calculate glass transition temperature and elastic constants of novel polyethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Reddy, Sreekantha T; Sikder, Arun K

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations studies are carried out on hydroxyl terminated polyethers that are useful in energetic polymeric binder applications. Energetic polymers derived from oxetanes with heterocyclic side chains with different energetic substituents are designed and simulated under the ensembles of constant particle number, pressure, temperature (NPT) and constant particle number, volume, temperature (NVT). Specific volume of different amorphous polymeric models is predicted using NPT-MD simulations as a function of temperature. Plots of specific volume versus temperature exhibited a characteristic change in slope when amorphous systems change from glassy to rubbery state. Several material properties such as Young's, shear, and bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc. are predicted from equilibrated structures and established the structure-property relations among designed polymers. Energetic performance parameters of these polymers are calculated and results reveal that the performance of the designed polymers is comparable to the benchmark energetic polymers like polyNIMMO, polyAMMO and polyBAMO. Overall, it is worthy remark that this molecular simulations study on novel energetic polyethers provides a good guidance on mastering the design principles and allows us to design novel polymers of tailored properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maine River Temperature Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We collect seasonal and annual temperature measurements on an hourly or quarter hourly basis to monitor habitat suitability for ATS and other species. Temperature...

  9. High temperature measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  10. GISS Surface Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GISTEMP dataset is a global 2x2 gridded temperature anomaly dataset. Temperature data is updated around the middle of every month using current data files from...

  11. Rescaling Temperature and Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, John, III

    2010-01-01

    Temperature and entropy traditionally are expressed in units of kelvin and joule/kelvin. These units obscure some important aspects of the natures of these thermodynamic quantities. Defining a rescaled temperature using the Boltzmann constant, T' = k[subscript B]T, expresses temperature in energy units, thereby emphasizing the close relationship…

  12. Survival of Salmonella or Escherichia coli O157:H7 during holding of manure-based compost mixtures at sublethal temperatures as influenced by the carbon amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Smith, Chris; Jiang, Xiuping; Flitcroft, Ian D; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    During the early phases of aerobic composting of animal manures, pathogens are inactivated primarily from the accumulation of heat produced by indigenous microbial activity. When compost materials are not exposed to these lethal temperatures, the required holding time needed to obtain a pathogen-free product that may be applied to fields is unknown. Consequently, a series of studies examined whether the carbon amendment (wheat straw, peanut hulls, rice hulls, and pine needles) added to animal manures affected survival of either Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7 during storage of compost mixtures at sublethal temperatures (20 to 40°C). Pathogens consistently survived for longer periods of time in compost mixtures prepared with pine needles than compost mixtures prepared with either of the other three carbon amendments. Pathogen inactivation in wheat straw- or peanut hull-amended compost mixtures was dependent on the target pathogen, moisture level, and storage temperature. Moisture levels in wheat straw-amended compost mixtures stored at 40°C had no effect on inactivation of E. coli O157:H7. In contrast, wheat straw-amended mixtures stored at 30 to 35°C and equilibrated to suboptimal moisture contents (30 to 40%) were less effective for inactivating pathogens compared with drier (25% moisture) or moister (60% moisture) mixtures. In peanut hull-amended compost mixtures, inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 was affected minimally by moisture levels, whereas Salmonella survival increased as the moisture level was decreased. The different inactivation responses of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in compost mixtures prepared with wheat straw or peanut hulls and equilibrated to different moisture levels suggest that there are different mechanisms for inactivation. Hence, developing reliable guidelines relying on time-temperature for holding of compost mixtures at sublethal temperatures will be challenging and, perhaps, not possible.

  13. Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Dasgupta, A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Chong, Y. K.; Mehlhorn, T. A. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kroupp, E.; Osin, D.; Maron, Y.; Starobinets, A.; Fisher, V.; Zarnitsky, Yu.; Bernshtam, V. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Apruzese, J. P. [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Fisher, A. [Falculty of Physics, Technion-Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Deeney, C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The difference between the ion thermal and effective temperatures is investigated through simulations of the Ne gas puff z-pinch reported by Kroupp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 105001 (2011)]. Calculations are performed using a 2D, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic code with Tabular Collisional-Radiative Equilibrium, namely Mach2-TCRE [Thornhill et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 3480 (2001)]. The extensive data set of imaging and K-shell spectroscopy from the experiments provides a challenging validation test for z-pinch simulations. Synthetic visible images of the implosion phase match the observed large scale structure if the breakdown occurs at the density corresponding to the Paschen minimum. At the beginning of stagnation (−4 ns), computed plasma conditions change rapidly showing a rising electron density and a peak in the ion thermal temperature of ∼1.8 keV. This is larger than the ion thermal temperature (<400 eV) inferred from the experiment. By the time of peak K-shell power (0 ns), the calculated electron density is similar to the data and the electron and ion thermal temperatures are equilibrated, as is observed. Effective ion temperatures are obtained from calculated emission line widths accounting for thermal broadening and Doppler velocity shifts. The observed, large effective ion temperatures (∼4 keV) early in the stagnation of this Ne pinch can be explained solely as a combination of compressional ion heating and steep radial velocity gradients near the axis. Approximations in the modeling are discussed in regard to the higher ion thermal temperature and lower electron density early in the stagnation compared to the experimental results.

  14. Potential hydrothermal resource temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanashayam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Cody J. Cannon; Trevor A. Atkinson; Travis L. McLing; Thomas R. Wood; Patrick F. Dobson; Mark E. Conrad

    2016-02-01

    The Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in southern Idaho is a region of high heat flow. Sustained volcanic activities in the wake of the passage of the Yellowstone Hotspot have turned this region into an area with great potential for geothermal resources as evidenced by numerous hot springs scattered along the margins of the plain and several hot-water producing wells and hot springs within the plain. Despite these thermal expressions, it is hypothesized that the pervasive presence of an overlying groundwater aquifer in the region effectively masks thermal signatures of deep-seated geothermal resources. The dilution of deeper thermal water and re-equilibration at lower temperature are significant challenges for the evaluation of potential resource areas in the ESRP. Over the past several years, we collected approximately 100 water samples from springs/wells for chemical analysis as well as assembled existing water chemistry data from literature. We applied several geothermometric and geochemical modeling tools to these chemical compositions of ESRP water samples. Geothermometric calculations based on principles of multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry with inverse geochemical modeling capability (e.g., Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) have been useful for the evaluation of reservoir temperatures. RTEst geothermometric calculations of ESRP thermal water samples indicated numerous potential geothermal areas with elevated reservoir temperatures. Specifically, areas around southern/southwestern side of the Bennett Hills and within the Camas Prairies in the western-northwestern regions of the ESRP and its margins suggest temperatures in the range of 140-200°C. In the northeastern portions of the ESRP, Lidy Hot Springs, Ashton, Newdale, and areas east of Idaho Falls have expected reservoir temperature =140 °C. In the southern ERSP, areas near Buhl and Twin Falls are found to have elevated temperatures as high as 160 °C. These areas are likely to host

  15. Measurement of solid-liquid interfacial energy in the In-Bi eutectic alloy at low melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasli, N [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Akbulut, S [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Ocak, Y [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keslioglu, K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Boeyuek, U [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Kaya, H [Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Cadirli, E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey)

    2007-12-19

    The Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy of the solid In solution in equilibrium with In Bi eutectic liquid have been determined to be (1.46 {+-} 0.07) x 10{sup -7} K m and (40.4 {+-} 4.0) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by observing the equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes. The grain boundary energy of the solid In solution phase has been calculated to be (79.0 {+-} 8.7) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by considering force balance at the grain boundary grooves. The thermal conductivities of the In-12.4 at.% Bi eutectic liquid phase and the solid In solution phase and their ratio at the eutectic melting temperature (72 deg. C) have also been measured with radial heat flow apparatus and Bridgman-type growth apparatus.

  16. Study of direct-current, pulsed, and temperature--field emission from LaB/sub 6//tungsten field emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, R. S.; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Joag, D. S.; Kanitkar, P. L.; Nigavekar, A. S.

    1989-07-01

    This paper reports dc, temperature--field (/ital T/--/ital F/), and pulsed emission from a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/)--tungsten (W) field emitter. Various parameters are drived from the Fowler--Nordheim plots for the three configurations of the emitter, viz., clean tungsten, LaB/sub 6/ overgrowth on W(111) plane (''two spot''), and LaB/sub 6/ equilibrated W surface (''well spread''). The current stability is observed at 300, 730, and 850 K, (and 1065 K for well spread) under /ital T/--/ital F/ operation. A comparison is made with various types of field emitting cathodes and the results are discussed from the point of view of LaB/sub 6//W field emitting cathodes.

  17. Shannon entropic temperature and its lower and upper bounds for non-Markovian stochastic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-09-01

    In this article we have studied Shannon entropic nonequilibrium temperature (NET) extensively for a system which is coupled to a thermal bath that may be Markovian or non-Markovian in nature. Using the phase-space distribution function, i.e., the solution of the generalized Fokker Planck equation, we have calculated the entropy production, NET, and their bounds. Other thermodynamic properties like internal energy of the system, heat, and work, etc. are also measured to study their relations with NET. The present study reveals that the heat flux is proportional to the difference between the temperature of the thermal bath and the nonequilibrium temperature of the system. It also reveals that heat capacity at nonequilibrium state is independent of both NET and time. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the time variations of the above-mentioned and related quantities to differentiate between the equilibration processes for the coupling of the system with the Markovian and the non-Markovian thermal baths, respectively. It implies that in contrast to the Markovian case, a certain time is required to develop maximum interaction between the system and the non-Markovian thermal bath (NMTB). It also implies that longer relaxation time is needed for a NMTB compared to a Markovian one. Quasidynamical behavior of the NMTB introduces an oscillation in the variation of properties with time. Finally, we have demonstrated how the nonequilibrium state is affected by the memory time of the thermal bath.

  18. Effect of temperature and aluminium on calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate chemistry under equilibrium conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Rupert J., E-mail: rjmyers@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, EMPA, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); L' Hôpital, Emilie, E-mail: Emilie.Lhopital@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, EMPA, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom); Lothenbach, Barbara, E-mail: Barbara.Lothenbach@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, EMPA, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    There exists limited information regarding the effect of temperature on the structure and solubility of calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H). Here, calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C–(A–)S–H) is synthesised at Ca/Si = 1, Al/Si ≤ 0.15 and equilibrated at 7–80 °C. These systems increase in phase-purity, long-range order, and degree of polymerisation of C–(A–)S–H chains at higher temperatures; the most highly polymerised, crystalline and cross-linked C–(A–)S–H product is formed at Al/Si = 0.1 and 80 °C. Solubility products for C–(A–)S–H were calculated via determination of the solid-phase compositions and measurements of the concentrations of dissolved species in contact with the solid products, and show that the solubilities of C–(A–)S–H change slightly, within the experimental uncertainty, as a function of Al/Si ratio and temperature between 7 °C and 80 °C. These results are important in the development of thermodynamic models for C–(A–)S–H to enable accurate thermodynamic modelling of cement-based materials.

  19. Chapter 6: Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hauer, F. Richard; F. Richard Hauer,; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Stream temperature has direct and indirect effects on stream ecology and is critical in determining both abiotic and biotic system responses across a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales. Temperature variation is primarily driven by solar radiation, while landscape topography, geology, and stream reach scale ecosystem processes contribute to local variability. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in freshwater ecosystems influences habitat distributions, physiological functions, and phenology of all aquatic organisms. In this chapter we provide an overview of methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. Recent advances in temperature monitoring allow for more comprehensive studies of the underlying processes influencing annual variation of temperatures and how thermal variability may impact aquatic organisms at individual, population, and community based scales. Likewise, the development of spatially explicit predictive models provide a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes which is integral for sustainable management of freshwater systems.

  20. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, James E.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  1. Temperature measurement and control

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, JR

    1988-01-01

    This book treats the theory and practice of temperature measurement and control and important related topics such as energy management and air pollution. There are no specific prerequisites for the book although a knowledge of elementary control theory could be useful. The first half of the book is an application oriented survey of temperature measurement techniques and devices. The second half is concerned mainly with temperature control in both simple and complex situations.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmogenesis and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ujas; Bien, Harold; Entcheva, Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Fast processes in cardiac electrophysiology are often studied at temperatures lower than physiological. Extrapolation of values is based on widely accepted Q10 (Arrhenius) model of temperature dependence (ratio of kinetic properties for a 10 degrees C change in temperature). In this study, we set out to quantify the temperature dependence of essential parameters that define spatiotemporal behavior of cardiac excitation. Additionally, we examined temperature's effects on restitution dynamics. We employed fast fluorescence imaging with voltage-and calcium-sensitive dyes in neonatal rat cardiomyocyte sheets. Conduction velocity (CV), calcium transient duration (CTD), action potential duration (APD) and wavelength (W=CV*duration) change as functions of temperature were quantified. Using 24 degrees C as a reference point, we found a strong temperature-driven increase of CV (Q10=2.3) with smaller CTD and APD changes (Q10=1.33, 1.24, respectively). The spatial equivalents of voltage and calcium duration, wavelength, were slightly less sensitive to temperature with Q10=2.05 and 1.78, respectively, due to the opposing influences of decreasing duration with increased velocity. More importantly, we found that Q10 varies as a function of diastolic interval. Our results indicate the importance of examining temperature sensitivity across several frequencies. Armed with our results, experimentalists and modelers alike have a tool for reconciling different environmental conditions. In a broader sense, these data help better understand thermal influences on arrhythmia development or suppression such as during hibernation or cardiac surgery.

  3. High temperature materials; Materiaux a hautes temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  4. Measuring body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Louise; Higgins, Dan

    Body temperature is one of the four main vital signs that must be monitored to ensure safe and effective care. Temperature measurement is recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence a part of the initial assessment in acute illness in adults (NICE, 2007) and by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines for post-operative management in adults (SIGN, 2004). Despite applying in all healthcare environments, wide variations exist on the methods and techniques used to measure body temperature. It is essential to use the most appropriate technique to ensure that temperature is measured accurately. Inaccurate results may influence diagnosis and treatment, lead to a failure to identify patient deterioration and compromise patient safety. This article explains the importance of temperature regulation and compares methods of its measurement.

  5. High temperature structural silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  6. Indirect effects of impoundment on migrating fish: temperature gradients in fish ladders slow dam passage by adult Chinook salmon and steelhead.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Caudill

    Full Text Available Thermal layering in reservoirs upstream from hydroelectric dams can create temperature gradients in fishways used by upstream migrating adults. In the Snake River, Washington, federally-protected adult salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp. often encounter relatively cool water in dam tailraces and lower ladder sections and warmer water in the upstream portions of ladders. Using radiotelemetry, we examined relationships between fish passage behavior and the temperature difference between the top and bottom of ladders (∆T at four dams over four years. Some spring Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha experienced ∆T ≥ 0.5 °C. Many summer and fall Chinook salmon and summer steelhead (O. mykiss experienced ∆T ≥ 1.0 °C, and some individuals encountered ΔT > 4.0°C. As ΔT increased, migrants were consistently more likely to move down fish ladders and exit into dam tailraces, resulting in upstream passage delays that ranged from hours to days. Fish body temperatures equilibrated to ladder temperatures and often exceeded 20°C, indicating potential negative physiological and fitness effects. Collectively, the results suggest that gradients in fishway water temperatures present a migration obstacle to many anadromous migrants. Unfavorable temperature gradients may be common at reservoir-fed fish passage facilities, especially those with seasonal thermal layering or stratification. Understanding and managing thermal heterogeneity at such sites may be important for ensuring efficient upstream passage and minimizing stress for migratory, temperature-sensitive species.

  7. About thermometers and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, M.; Puglisi, A.; Sarracino, A.; Vulpiani, A.

    2017-11-01

    We discuss a class of mechanical models of thermometers and their minimal requirements to determine the temperature for systems out of the common scope of thermometry. In particular we consider: (1) anharmonic chains with long time of thermalization, such as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) model; (2) systems with long-range interactions where the equivalence of ensembles does not always hold; (3) systems featuring absolute negative temperatures. We show that for all the three classes of systems a mechanical thermometer model can be designed: a temporal average of a suitable mechanical observable of the thermometer is sufficient to get an estimate of the system’s temperature. Several interesting lessons are learnt from our numerical study: (1) the long thermalization times in FPU-like systems do not affect the thermometer, which is not coupled to normal modes but to a group of microscopic degrees of freedom; (2) a thermometer coupled to a long-range system measures its microcanonical temperature, even at values of the total energy where its canonical temperature would be very different; (3) a thermometer to read absolute negative temperatures must have a bounded total energy (as the system), otherwise it heavily perturbs the system changing the sign of its temperature. Our study shows that in order to also work in a correct way in ‘non standard’ cases, the proper model of thermometer must have a special functional form, e.g. the kinetic part cannot be quadratic.

  8. Control of supply temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, H.; Nielsen, T.S.; Soegaard, H.T.

    1996-09-01

    For many district heating systems, e.g. the system in Hoeje Taastrup, it is desirable to minimize the supply temperature from the heat production unit(s). Lower supply temperature implies lower costs in connection with the production and distribution of heat. Factors having impact on the heat demand are for instance solar radiation, wind speed, wind direction and a climate independent part, which is a function of the time of the day/week/year. By applying an optimization strategy, which minimizes the supply temperature, it is assumed that optimal economical operation can be obtained by minimizing the supply temperature and thereby the heat losses in the system. The models and methods described in this report take such aspects into account, and can therefore be used as elements in a more efficient minimization of the supply temperature. The theoretical part of this report describes models and methods for optimal on-line control of the supply temperature in district heating systems. Some of the models and methods have been implemented - or are going to be implemented - in the computer program PRESS which is a tool for optimal control of supply temperature and forecasting of heat demand in district heating systems. The principles for using transfer function models are briefly described. The ordinary generalized predictive control (OGPC) method is reviewed, and several extensions of this method are suggested. New controller, which is called the extended generalized predictive controller (XGPC), is described. (EG) 57 refs.

  9. Temperature estimation with ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Matthew

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma is the fastest growing type of cancer in the United States. In addition, the survival rate after one year is approximately zero without treatment. In many instances, patients with hepatocelluar carcinoma may not be suitable candidates for the primary treatment options, i.e. surgical resection or liver transplantation. This has led to the development of minimally invasive therapies focused on destroying hepatocelluar by thermal or chemical methods. The focus of this dissertation is on the development of ultrasound-based image-guided monitoring options for minimally invasive therapies such as radiofrequency ablation. Ultrasound-based temperature imaging relies on relating the gradient of locally estimated tissue displacements to a temperature change. First, a realistic Finite Element Analysis/ultrasound simulation of ablation was developed. This allowed evaluation of the ability of ultrasound-based temperature estimation algorithms to track temperatures for three different ablation scenarios in the liver. It was found that 2-Dimensional block matching and a 6 second time step was able to accurately track the temperature over a 12 minute ablation procedure. Next, a tissue-mimicking phantom was constructed to determine the accuracy of the temperature estimation method by comparing estimated temperatures to that measured using invasive fiber-optic temperature probes. The 2-Dimensional block matching was able to track the temperature accurately over the entire 8 minute heating procedure in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Finally, two separate in-vivo experiments were performed. The first experiment examined the ability of our algorithm to track frame-to-frame displacements when external motion due to respiration and the cardiac cycle were considered. It was determined that a frame rate between 13 frames per second and 33 frames per second was sufficient to track frame-to-frame displacements between respiratory cycles. The second experiment examined

  10. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also...... input to the cell then hydrogen is produced giving syngas. This syngas can then be further reacted to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. Operating at high temperature gives much higher efficiencies than can be achieved with low temperature electrolysis. Current state of the art SOECs utilise a dense...

  11. High Temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, M P

    2012-01-01

    I review recent results on QCD at high temperature on a lattice. Steady progress with staggered fermions and Wilson type fermions allow a quantitative description of hot QCD whose accuracy in many cases parallels that of zero temperature studies. Simulations with chiral quarks are coming of age, and togheter with theoretical developments trigger interesting developments in the analysis of the critical region. Issues related with the universality class of the chiral transition and the fate of the axial symmetry are discussed in the light of new numerical and analytical results. Transport coefficients and analysis of bottomonium spectra compare well with results of heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Model field theories, lattice simulations and high temperature systematic expansions help building a coherent picture of the high temperature phase of QCD. The (strongly coupled) Quark Gluon Plasma is heavily investigated, and asserts its role as an inspiring theoretical laboratory.

  12. QUARKONIUM AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETRECZKY,P.

    2003-07-21

    The author discusses quarkonium spectral functions at finite temperature reconstructed using the Maximum Entropy Method. The author shows in particular that the J/{psi} survives in the deconfined phase up to 1.5T{sub c}.

  13. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  14. Anisotropic Unruh temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Raúl E.; Casini, Horacio; Huerta, Marina; Pontello, Diego

    2017-11-01

    The relative entropy between very high-energy localized excitations and the vacuum, where both states are reduced to a spatial region, gives place to a precise definition of a local temperature produced by vacuum entanglement across the boundary. This generalizes the Unruh temperature of the Rindler wedge to arbitrary regions. The local temperatures can be read off from the short distance leading have a universal geometric expression that follows by solving a particular eikonal type equation in Euclidean space. This equation generalizes to any dimension the holomorphic property that holds in two dimensions. For regions of arbitrary shapes the local temperatures at a point are direction dependent. We compute their explicit expression for the geometry of a wall or strip.

  15. Sediment Temperature, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data table contains summary data for temperature time series in near-surface sediments in high and low tidal marsh at 7 sites during 2015. These data support...

  16. Temperatures of exploding nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfling, V.; Schwarz, C.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Gross, C.; Kleinevoss, U.; Kunze, W.D; Lynen, U.; Mahi, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Odeh, T.; Schnittker, M.; Trautmann, W.; Woerner, A.; Xi, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Bassini, R.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Petruzzelli, F. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Gaff, S.J.; Kunde, G.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Imme, G.; Maddalena, V.; Nociforo, C.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F.P.; Saija, A.; Sfienti, C.; Verde, G. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Moehlenkamp, T.; Seidel, W. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Ocker, B.; Schuettauf, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Pochodzalla, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-01-01

    Breakup temperatures in central collisions of {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at bombarding energies E/A=50 to 200 MeV were determined with two methods. Isotope temperatures, deduced from double ratios of hydrogen, helium, and lithium isotopic yields, increase monotonically with bombarding energy from 5 MeV to 12 MeV, in qualitative agreement with a scenario of chemical freeze-out after adiabatic expansion. Excited-state temperatures, derived from yield ratios of states in {sup 4}He, {sup 5,6}Li, and {sup 8}Be, are about 5 MeV, independent of the projectile energy, and seem to reflect the internal temperature of fragments at their final separation from the system. (orig.)

  17. High temperature battery. Hochtemperaturbatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, M.

    1992-06-04

    To prevent heat losses of a high temperature battery, it is proposed to make the incoming current leads in the area of their penetration through the double-walled insulating housing as thermal throttle, particularly spiral ones.

  18. Light hydrocarbons as redox and temperature indicators in the geothermal field of El Tatio (northern Chile)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassi, F. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Martinez, C. [University Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. of Earth Science; Vaselli, O. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Florence (Italy). National Council of Research; Capaccioni, B. [University of Urbino (Italy). Institute of Volcanology and Geochemistry; Viramonte, J. [National University of Salta (Argentina). Institute GEONORTE and CONICET

    2005-11-15

    El Tatio (northern Chile), one of the largest geothermal fields of South America, is presently undergoing a new program of geothermal exploration, after the failure of the first exploration phase in the early 1970s. The geochemical features of the fluid discharges characterizing this system mainly consist of boiling pools and fumaroles, and represent the result of a complex mixing process involving 3 main components: (i) hydrothermal; (ii) atmospheric; (iii) magmatic. Chemical reactions involving light hydrocarbons equilibrate at higher temperature than those directly measured in the geothermal wells and calculated on the basis of the composition of the inorganic gas species. This suggests that in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system temperatures higher than 300{sup o}C may be achieved. Such results can have a strong impact for the evaluation of the potential resources of this geothermal system. Moreover, the chemical characteristics of the organic gas fraction allow the assessment of the chemical-physical conditions governing the geochemical processes acting on geothermal fluids at depth. (author)

  19. High-temperature experimental and thermodynamic modelling research on the pyrometallurgical processing of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Taufiq; Shishin, Denis; Decterov, Sergei A.; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-01-01

    Uncertainty in the metal price and competition between producers mean that the daily operation of a smelter needs to target high recovery of valuable elements at low operating cost. Options for the improvement of the plant operation can be examined and decision making can be informed based on accurate information from laboratory experimentation coupled with predictions using advanced thermodynamic models. Integrated high-temperature experimental and thermodynamic modelling research on phase equilibria and thermodynamics of copper-containing systems have been undertaken at the Pyrometallurgy Innovation Centre (PYROSEARCH). The experimental phase equilibria studies involve high-temperature equilibration, rapid quenching and direct measurement of phase compositions using electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The thermodynamic modelling deals with the development of accurate thermodynamic database built through critical evaluation of experimental data, selection of solution models, and optimization of models parameters. The database covers the Al-Ca-Cu-Fe-Mg-O-S-Si chemical system. The gas, slag, matte, liquid and solid metal phases, spinel solid solution as well as numerous solid oxide and sulphide phases are included. The database works within the FactSage software environment. Examples of phase equilibria data and thermodynamic models of selected systems, as well as possible implementation of the research outcomes to selected copper making processes are presented.

  20. Partitioning of siderophile elements between metallic liquids and silicate liquids under high-pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, A.; Urakawa, S.

    2010-12-01

    High-pressure metal-silicate element partitioning studies have shown the possibility that the mantle abundance of siderophile elements is consistent with core-mantle equilibration at high pressures and high temperatures. Equilibrium conditions are, however, still under debates partly due to the uncertainty of partition coefficients, which vary not only with pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity but also with composition. We have carried out partitioning experiments of siderophile elements between liquid metal and ultramafic silicate liquid at high pressure to evaluate the effects of composition on the partition coefficients. Partitioning experiments were conducted by KAWAI-type high pressure apparatus. We used natural peridotite and Fe alloy as starting materials and they were contained in graphite capsule. The quenched samples were examined by electron microprobe. Quenched textures indicate that metallic melts coexisted with silicate melts during experiment. The metallic melt contained 7-9 wt% of C. Oxygen fugacity varied from IW-3 to IW-1 in associated with the composition of the starting material. At the reduced condition, silicate melt was enriched in SiO2 compared to peridotite because of the oxidation of Si in metallic melts. When oxygen fugacity is close to IW buffur, silicate melt was enriched in FeO due to the oxidation of metallic Fe and it had high NBO/T = 3.5-4. The partition coefficients D for Co, Ni and Fe were dependent on oxygen fugacity as well as the chemical compositions.

  1. Confinement at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Nuno; Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2017-05-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed on the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the squared strengths of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the critical temperature. Our results are for pure gauge SU(3) gauge theory, they are invariant and all computations are done with GPUs using CUDA.

  2. Portable Body Temperature Conditioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    patients become hypothermic after severe injury due to environmental exposure during transport. These patients also have decreased thermoregulation due to...based on the load demand to conserve power consumption 4 Requires glycol solution to prevent H20 freezing at cold ambient temperatures 3. Product...three days. To encompass the range of the temperature to be used during the Patient Simulation testing (15oC – 40oC); cold (15oC), neutral (25oC

  3. Temperature in the throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Kaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the temperature of extended objects in string theory. Rotating probe D-branes admit horizons and temperatures a la Unruh effect. We find that the induced metrics on slow rotating probe D1-branes in holographic string solutions including warped Calabi–Yau throats have distinct thermal horizons with characteristic Hawking temperatures even if there is no black hole in the bulk Calabi–Yau. Taking the UV/IR limits of the solution, we show that the world volume black hole nucleation depends on the deformation and the warping of the throat. We find that world volume horizons and temperatures of expected features form not in the regular confining IR region but in the singular nonconfining UV solution. In the conformal limit of the UV, we find horizons and temperatures similar to those on rotating probes in the AdS throat found in the literature. In this case, we also find that activating a background gauge field form the U(1 R-symmetry modifies the induced metric with its temperature describing two different classes of black hole solutions.

  4. Temperature in the throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Dariush; Mosaffa, Amir Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    We study the temperature of extended objects in string theory. Rotating probe D-branes admit horizons and temperatures a la Unruh effect. We find that the induced metrics on slow rotating probe D1-branes in holographic string solutions including warped Calabi-Yau throats have distinct thermal horizons with characteristic Hawking temperatures even if there is no black hole in the bulk Calabi-Yau. Taking the UV/IR limits of the solution, we show that the world volume black hole nucleation depends on the deformation and the warping of the throat. We find that world volume horizons and temperatures of expected features form not in the regular confining IR region but in the singular nonconfining UV solution. In the conformal limit of the UV, we find horizons and temperatures similar to those on rotating probes in the AdS throat found in the literature. In this case, we also find that activating a background gauge field form the U (1) R-symmetry modifies the induced metric with its temperature describing two different classes of black hole solutions.

  5. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of 4-alkyl-branched chain fatty acids and 3-methylindole in an oil-air matrix and analysis of volatiles in lamb fat using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castada, Hardy Z; Polentz, Victoria; Barringer, Sheryl; Wick, Macdonald

    2017-10-07

    4-Alkyl-branched chain fatty acids and 3-methylindole are characteristic flavor compounds associated with sheep meat. Determining their partitioning behavior between the gas and condensed phase and ultimately developing a correlation between the compound's headspace concentration and sensory descriptive grouping are important for high throughput characterization and grading classification. The headspace concentrations of 3-methylindole, 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, and 4-methylnonanoic acid above corn oil-based standard solutions, and lamb fat samples were measured using selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The standard solutions were equilibrated at 80, 100, 110 and 125(o) C while the fat samples were equilibrated at 125(o) C. Statistical evaluation, linear and polynomial regression analyses were performed to establish the compound-specific and temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, enthalpy (∆H) and entropy (∆S) of phase changes. The Henry's law constants (kH(cp) ) were calculated from the regression analysis with a high degree of confidence (p 0.99). The kH(cp) increased with increase in equilibrium temperature. The empirical calculation of the ∆H and ∆S at different temperatures confirmed the temperature-dependence of the Henry's law constants. The headspace concentrations of the lamb-flavor compounds were determined above actual lamb fat samples and the corresponding condensed phase concentrations were successfully derived. The temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, ∆H, and ∆S of phase changes for 3-methylindole, 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, and 4-methylnonanoic acid in an air-oil matrix were empirically derived. The effectiveness of SIFT-MS for the direct, real-time, and rapid determination of key flavor compounds in lamb fat samples was established. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Temperature measurement: Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    This Data Item is available as part of the ESDU Sub-series on Heat Transfer. Background information and practical guidance on designing temperature measuring systems using thermocouples is provided. The nominal temperature range covered is -200 degrees C to 2000 degrees C but the comments apply, in general terms, to all thermocouple systems. The information is aimed at the user who wishes to design and install a practical thermocouple system using improved techniques that will allow temperatures to be measured within known tolerances. The selection, preparation, and installation of thermocouples, the use of compensating or extension cables, methods of referencing to a known temperature and measurement system are considered. The requirements for reliable systems operating to commercial tolerances are also described. Various factors that might impair the accuracy and stability of thermocouples are identified together with methods of reducing their effect. A check list for the design of a thermocouple system is given and a flow chart procedure for selecting appropriate thermocouple materials is provided as well. The employment of the techniques described will ensure that the temperature of the measuring junction is within known tolerances.

  7. Temperature Data Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, David

    2003-03-01

    Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS.

  8. DETERMINING SURFACE TEMPERATURE AND CLOUD TEMPERATURE FROM METEOROLOGICAL EARTH SATELLITES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, *METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITES), SURFACE TEMPERATURE , CLOUDS, BLACKBODY RADIATION, PERIODIC VARIATIONS, INTEGRALS, BOUNDARY LAYER, INTENSITY, ERRORS, CORRECTIONS, FUNCTIONS(MATHEMATICS), USSR

  9. Elevated temperature deformation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. M.

    The paper demonstrates a novel nondestructive test and data analysis technique for quantitative measurement of circumferentially varying flexural moduli of 2D involute carbon-carbon tag rings containing localized wrinkles and dry plies at room and rocket nozzle operating temperatures. Room temperature computed tomography (CT) deformation tests were performed on 11 carbon-carbon rings selected from the cylinders and cones fabricated under the NDE data application program and two plexiglass rings fabricated under this program. This testing and analysis technique is found to have primary application in validation of analytical models for carbon-carbon performance modeling. Both effects of defects assumptions, the effects of high temperature environments, and failure-related models can be validated effectively. The testing and analysis process can be interwoven in a manner that increases the engineering understanding of the material behavior and permits rapid resolution of analysis questions. Specific recommendations for the development and implementation of this technique are provided.

  10. Do `negative' temperatures exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    A modification of the second law is required for a system with a bounded density of states and not the introduction of a `negative' temperature scale. The ascending and descending branches of the entropy versus energy curve describe particle and hole states, having thermal equations of state that are given by the Fermi and logistic distributions, respectively. Conservation of energy requires isentropic states to be isothermal. The effect of adiabatically reversing the field is entirely mechanical because the only difference between the two states is their energies. The laws of large and small numbers, leading to the normal and Poisson approximations, characterize statistically the states of infinite and zero temperatures, respectively. Since the heat capacity also vanishes in the state of maximum disorder, the third law can be generalized in systems with a bounded density of states: the entropy tends to a constant as the temperature tends to either zero or infinity.

  11. Temperature-reflection I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGady, David A.

    2017-01-01

    -temperature path integrals for quantum field theories (QFTs) should be T-reflection invariant. Because multi-particle partition functions are equal to Euclidean path integrals for QFTs, we expect them to be T-reflection invariant. Single-particle partition functions though are often not invariant under T......In this paper, we revisit the claim that many partition functions are invariant under reflecting temperatures to negative values (T-reflection). The goal of this paper is to demarcate which partition functions should be invariant under T-reflection, and why. Our main claim is that finite...... that T-reflection is unrelated to time-reversal. Finally, we study the interplay between T-reflection and perturbation theory in the anharmonic harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics and in Yang-Mills in four-dimensions. This is the first in a series of papers on temperature-reflections....

  12. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats; Une nouvelle methode d'etude du metabolisme de l'iode: la methode d'equilibre isotopique - aspects cinetiques et quantitatifs obtenus chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 {mu}g of {sup 127}I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T{sub 4} and T{sub 3}). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}. The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent {sup 127}I measurements. (author) [French] La methode d'equilibre isotopique, mise au point chez le rat, a permis de mesurer en valeur absolue les principaux parametres du metabolisme de l'iode chez cet animal. Les quantites ou les concentrations d'iode ont ete mesurees pour la thyroide et pour le

  13. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  14. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  15. Nimbus-7 SMMR Antenna Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SMMR Antenna Temperatures (Nimbus-7) data set consists of antenna temperatures from passive microwave radiometers aboard NOAA's Nimbus-7 satellite. The...

  16. Decoupling of component diffusivities in glass-forming Zr-Ni-Ti-Cu-Be alloys above the melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basuki, Sri Wahyuni; Raetzke, Klaus; Faupel, Franz [Faculty of Engineering, Kiel (Germany); Yang, Fan; Meyer, Andreas [Inst. of Materials Physics in Space, Koeln (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Previous work on glass forming Pd-Cu-Ni-P alloys, showed that while a vast decoupling occurs between the diffusivity of Pd and of the smaller components, the diffusivities of all components merge close to the critical temperature T{sub c} of mode coupling theory. For Pd, the Stokes-Einstein relation holds in the whole range investigated encompassing more than 14 orders of magnitude. In order to check for the general validity of these results, we extended our investigations to the Zr-Cu-Ni-Ti-Be system. In this work, Co-57 and Zr-95 tracer diffusivities were determined in glass-forming Zr{sub 46.75}Ti{sub 8.25}Cu{sub 7.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 27.5} above the melting temperature. In particular, measurements were carried out simultaneously to minimize artefacts from diffusion barriers and to reduce absolute errors. Even at 20 K above the liquidus temperature, the diffusivities of Zr and Co differ clearly by a factor of four, while Co tracer diffusivities agree very well with diffusivities determined by quasielastic neutron scattering. This together with measurements of the time dependence of the penetration profiles demonstrates the general reliability of the measurements. The results are discussed in connection with viscosity data and the Stokes-Einstein equation in terms of imperfect equilibration of the melt.

  17. TEMPERATURE INDEPENDENT PHOTOLUMINESCENCE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8

    [1] C.A.K. Gouvˆea, F. Wypych, S.G. Moraes, N. Dur´an, P. Peralta-Zamora, Semiconductor- assisted photocatalytic degradation of reactive dyes in aqueous solution, Chemosphere. 427(2000) 40. [2] D.C Look, Equation of state for the study of temperature dependence of volume thermal expansion of nanomaterials, Mater.

  18. Life at High Temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-09-15

    Sep 15, 2005 ... or more in the vicinity of geothermal vents in the deep sea and the plant Tidestromia oblongifolia (Amaranthaceae) found in Death. Valley in California, where the hottest temperature on earth ever recorded during 43 consecutive days in 1917 was >48 °C. (Guinness Book of W orId Records, 1999).

  19. High temperature superconducting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alario-Franco, M.A. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas

    1995-02-01

    The perovskite structure is the basis of all known high-temperature superconducting materials. Many of the most successful (highest T{sub c}) materials are based on mercury and thallium phases but, due to the high toxicity of the component compounds effort has been invested in the substitution of these elements with silver. Progress is reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Measuring Temperature: The Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Mirvette

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses the historical development of the thermometer with the view of helping children understand the role that mathematics plays in society. A model thermometer that is divided into three sections, each displaying one of the three temperature scales used today (Fahrenheit, Celsius and Kelvin) is highlighted as a project to allow…

  1. High-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The present book aims at describing the phenomenon of superconductivity and high-temperature superconductors discovered by Bednorz and Muller in 1986. The book covers the superconductivity phenomenon, structure of high-Tc superconductors, critical currents, synthesis routes for high Tc materials, superconductivity in cuprates, the proximity effect and SQUIDs, theories of superconductivity and applications of superconductors.

  2. High temperature superconductivity: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedell, K.S.; Coffey, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Meltzer, D.E. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA)); Pines, D. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Schrieffer, J.R. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (USA)) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This book is the result of a symposium at Los Alamos in 1989 on High Temperature Superconductivity. The topics covered include: phenomenology, quantum spin liquids, spin space fluctuations in the insulating and metallic phases, normal state properties, and numerical studies and simulations. (JF)

  3. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  4. Temperature responsive cooling apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weker, M.L.; Stearns, R.M.

    1987-08-11

    A temperature responsive cooling apparatus is described for an air conditioner or refrigeration system in operative association with a reservoir of fluid, the air conditioner or refrigeration system having an air cooled coil and means for producing a current of air for cooling the coil, the temperature responsive cooling apparatus comprising: (a) means for transferring the fluid from the reservoir to the air conditioner temperature responsive cooling apparatus, (b) a fluid control device activated by the current of air for cooling the coil; (c) a temperature activated, nonelectrical device for terminating and initiating the flow of fluid therethrough in an intermittent fashion for enhancing the operability of the compressor associated with the refrigeration system and for reducing the quantity of fluid required to cool the coil of the refrigeration system, (d) a fluid treatment device for preventing, reducing or mitigating the deposition of nonevaporative components on the air cooled coil, and (e) means for dispersing the fluid to the air cooled coil from the fluid control device for cooling the coil and increasing the efficiency of the air conditioner thereby reducing the cost of operating and maintaining the air conditioner without damaging the air conditioner and without the deposition of nonevaporative components thereupon.

  5. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU...

  6. Life at High Temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 9. Life at High Temperatures. Ramesh Maheshwari. General Article Volume 10 Issue 9 September 2005 pp 23-36. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/09/0023-0036. Keywords.

  7. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  8. Temperature differential detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  9. Temperature crossovers in cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubukov, Andrey V. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pines, David; Stojkovic, Branko P. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-11-25

    We study the temperature crossovers seen in the magnetic and transport properties of cuprates using a nearly antiferromagnetic Fermi-liquid model (NAFLM). We distinguish between underdoped and overdoped systems on the basis of their low-frequency magnetic behaviour and so classify the optimally doped cuprates as a special case of the underdoped cuprates. For the overdoped cuprates, we find, in agreement with earlier work, mean-field z=2 behaviour of the magnetic variables associated with the fact that the damping rate of their spin fluctuations is essentially independent of temperature, while the resistivity exhibits a crossover from Fermi-liquid behaviour at low temperature to linear-in-T behaviour above a certain temperature T{sub o}. We demonstrate that above T{sub o} the proximity of the quasiparticle Fermi surface to the magnetic Brillouin zone boundary brings about the measured linear-in-T resistivity. For the underdoped cuprates we argue that the sequence of crossovers identified by Barzykin and Pines in the low-frequency magnetic behaviour (from mean-field z=2 behaviour at high temperatures, T>T{sub cr}, to non-universal z=1 scaling behaviour at intermediate temperatures, T{sub *}temperature-dependent spin damping and ends at T{sub *} where the Fermi surface has lost pieces near corners of the magnetic Brillouin zone. For T{sub *}

  10. Estimation of bare soil surface temperature from air temperature and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil surface temperature has critical influence on climate, agricultural and hydrological activities since it serves as a good indicator of the energy budget of the earth's surface. Two empirical models for estimating soil surface temperature from air temperature and soil depth temperature were developed. The coefficient of ...

  11. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  12. Effects of CaO, Al2O3 and MgO on liquidus temperatures of copper smelting and converting slags under controlled oxygen partial pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase equilibria of silicate slags relevant to the copper smelting/converting operations have been experimentally studied over a wide range of slag compositions, temperatures and atmospheric conditions. Selected systems are of industrial interest and fill the gaps in fundamental information required to systematically characterise and describe copper slag chemistry. The experimental procedures include equilibration of synthetic slag at high temperatures, rapid quenching of resulting phases, and accurate measurement of phase compositions using electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA. The effects of CaO, Al2O3 and MgO on the phase equilibria of this slag system have been experimentally investigated in the temperature range 1200 to 1300 oC and oxygen partial pressures between 10-5 and 10-9 atm. It was found that spinel and silica are major primary phases in the composition range related to copper smelting/converting slags. In addition, olivine, diopside and pyroxene also appear at certain conditions. The presence of CaO, MgO and Al2O3 in the slag increases the spinel liquidus and decreases the silica liquidus. Liquidus temperatures in silica primary phase field are not sensitive to Po2; Liquidus temperatures in spinel primary phase field increase with increasing Po2. At 1300 oC and low Po2, the spinel (Fe2+,Mg2+O.(Al3+,Fe3+ primary phase field can be replaced by wustite (Fe2+,Mg2+O.

  13. Survival, growth and reproduction of non-indigenous Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus 1758). I. Physiological capabilities in various temperatures and salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Peterson, Mark S.; Lowe, Michael R.; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J.; Slack, William T.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological tolerances of non-native fishes is an integral component of assessing potential invasive risk. Salinity and temperature are environmental variables that limit the spread of many non-native fishes. We hypothesised that combinations of temperature and salinity will interact to affect survival, growth, and reproduction of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, introduced into Mississippi, USA. Tilapia withstood acute transfer from fresh water up to a salinity of 20 and survived gradual transfer up to 60 at typical summertime (30°C) temperatures. However, cold temperature (14°C) reduced survival of fish in saline waters ≥10 and increased the incidence of disease in freshwater controls. Although fish were able to equilibrate to saline waters in warm temperatures, reproductive parameters were reduced at salinities ≥30. These integrated responses suggest that Nile tilapia can invade coastal areas beyond their point of introduction. However, successful invasion is subject to two caveats: (1) wintertime survival depends on finding thermal refugia, and (2) reproduction is hampered in regions where salinities are ≥30. These data are vital to predicting the invasion of non-native fishes into coastal watersheds. This is particularly important given the predicted changes in coastal landscapes due to global climate change and sea-level rise.

  14. Study of the vapor-liquid equilibria used in the fabrication process of hydrogen by thermochemistry: Final report. Etude des equilibres liquide-vapeur utiles dans les procedes de fabrication d'hydrogene par thermochimie: Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthelot, P.; Houzelle, C.; Laugier, S.; Legret, D.; Muehbauer, R.; Renon, H.; Richon, D.

    1986-01-01

    Two new flow apparatuses have been designed and constructed to determine vapor-liquid equilibria of very corrosive components. Main differences between the two apparatuses are their temperature and pressure ranges of operation. When using each of the two equipments, a monophasic mixture is introduced continuously at constant pressure into a thermostated equilibrium coil. The vapor and liquid leave the coil at equilibrium and enter a separator from which each phase is withdrawn continuously to maintain a constant level of the interface in the separator. Samples taken from the outcoming flows are analyzed. The first apparatus (medium temperature-low pressure) was developed to test the new dynamic method. The experimental results obtained for the system water-acetic acid are in good agreement with those of Othmer et al. (1952). The second apparatus for measurements up to 50 bar and 823/sup 0/K was used to obtain SO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O equilibrium data. The results obtained are presented; at low pressures they are in good agreement with tabulated data of Gmitro and Vermeulen (1963, 1964).

  15. Temperature Measurement and Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    feasibility based on potential usefulness in clinical medicine ’ias explored. All information herein wasn obtained from literature rrv’iew only. No...measurements, applications for temperature measuring devices, and description of several modern body temperature monitoring devices (techniques). Finally...gynecology, drug therapy, and ophthalmology. TEMPERATURE SENSING DEVICES Hippocrates is believed to be the first person Lo associate body temperature as

  16. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  17. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  18. High temperature future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheinkopf, K. [Solar Energy Research and Education Foundation, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  19. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  20. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  1. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU......) and Spencer C. Sorenson (ET). The theory which decribes in detail the overall dynamic chracteristics of the sensor was developed at IAU, DTU....

  2. Mantle temperatures, and tests of experimentally calibrated olivine-melt equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2005-12-01

    Because the ratio Mgol/Mgliq (Kd(Mg)) is sensitive to T, olivine-liquid Kd's have long been used as geothermometers, and more recently, maximum Fo contents from volcanic rocks have been used to estimate mantle potential temperatures. Such estimates by Putirka (2005, G3) indicate higher mantle equilibration temperatures at Hawaii, compared to temperatures derived from earlier calibrations. Several published models were thus tested for their ability to reproduce T for 862 experimental data. The Putirka (2005) models did not include P corrections, which are added here: lnKd(Mg)=-1.88 + 30.85P(GPa)/T(C) - 0.04[H2O]liq + 0.068[Na2O+K2O]liq + 3629.7/T(C) + 0.0087[SiO2]liq - 0.015[CaO]liq lnKd(Fe)= -2.92 - 0.05[H2O]liq + 0.0264[Na2O+K2O]liq + 2976.13/T(C) + 0.01847[SiO2]liq + 0.0171[Al2O3]liq - 0.039[CaO]liq + 33.17P(GPa)/T(C) In these expressions, Kd(Mg) and Kd(Fe) are the partition coefficients for Mg and Fe between olivine and liquid, expressed as cation fractions; compositional corrections are in weight percent. The models are calibrated from 785 experimental data (P = 0.0001-15.5 GPa; 1213-2353 K). In the tests, the expressions of Beattie (1993) performed exceptionally well for dry systems with MgOliq 17 wt. %; new models are therefore needed. Over the greater compositional range, model 1 above can be inverted to yield T with a SEE of 56 K, and an average mean (systematic) error of +3 K for 856 experimental data; this compares to a systematic error of -26 K for Beattie (1993) and -36 K for Ford et al. (1983). For use in equation (1) of Putirka (2005), the models above are also more precise at both low and high MgO, and hydrous and non-hydrous systems compared to Beattie (1993) and Ford et al. (1983). Herzberg (pers. comm.) has modeled olivine-melt pairs for Hawaii and MOR's, which are in accord with Putirka (2005); these pairs are used to test for the effects of systematic model error on estimates of mantle temperatures. The Beattie (1993) and Ford (1983) models

  3. Fuel Temperature Fluctuations During Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, R. E.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    When oil and petroleum products are stored, their temperature significantly impacts how their properties change. The paper covers the problem of determining temperature fluctuations of hydrocarbons during storage. It provides results of the authors’ investigations of the stored product temperature variations relative to the ambient temperature. Closeness and correlation coefficients between these values are given. Temperature variations equations for oil and petroleum products stored in tanks are deduced.

  4. Characteristics of the Shanghai high-temperature superconducting electron-beam ion trap and studies of the space-charge effect under ultralow-energy operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, B.; Lu, Q. F.; Cheng, T.; Li, M. C.; Yang, Y.; Yao, K.; Shen, Y.; Lu, D.; Xiao, J.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2017-10-01

    A high-temperature superconducting electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT Laboratory for spectroscopic studies of low-charge-state ions. In the study reported here, beam trajectory simulations are implemented in order to provide guidance for the operation of this EBIT under ultralow-energy conditions, which has been successfully achieved with a full-transmission electron-beam current of 1-8.7 mA at a nominal electron energy of 30-120 eV. The space-charge effect is studied through both simulations and experiments. A modified iterative formula is proposed to estimate the space-charge potential of the electrons and shows very good agreement with the simulation results. In addition, space-charge compensation by trapped ions is found in extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic measurements of carbon ions and is studied through simulation of ion behavior in the EBIT. Based on the simulation results, the ion-cloud radius, ion density, and electron-ion overlap are obtained.

  5. Spectral non-uniform temperature and non-local heat transfer in the spin Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Konstantin S; Sinova, Jairo; Finkel'stein, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Recently discovered spin-dependent thermoelectric effects have merged spin, charge, and thermal physics, known as spin caloritronics, of which the spin Seebeck effect is its most puzzling. Here we present a theory of this effect driven by subthermal non-local phonon heat transfer and spectral non-uniform temperature. The theory explains its non-local behaviour from the fact that phonons that store the energy (thermal) and the phonons that transfer it (subthermal) are located in different parts of the spectrum and have different kinetics. This gives rise to a spectral phonon distribution that deviates from local equilibrium along the substrate and is sensitive to boundary conditions. The theory also predicts a non-magnon origin of the effect in ferromagnetic metals in agreement with observations in recent experiments. Equilibration of the heat flow from the substrate to the Pt probe and backwards leads to a vertical spin current produced by the spin-polarized electrons dragged by the thermal phonons.

  6. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James C. R.; Leijnse, Hidde; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. It has been shown that a straightforward heat transfer model can be employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. The methodology has been applied to Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree

  7. Room temperature high power frequency conversion in periodically poled quasi-phase-matched crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M.; Blau, P.; Shulga, B.

    2008-02-01

    Near-stoichiometric lithium tantalate (SLT) crystals were produced from congruent lithium tantalate by a vapor-transport equilibration (VTE) process. The VTE'ed SLT (VSLT) crystals exhibited very low coercive field of 60-120-V/mm and improved high intensity damage resistance. The ~603°C Curie temperature of the congruent raw material climbed to 693+/-0.1°C in the VSLT crystal regardless of the congruent crystal stoichiometric composition or of the exact VTE process temperature profile. Stable, high power near room temperature second harmonic generation (SHG) and optical parametric oscillation (OPO) were demonstrated with these crystals. SHG measurements of a 1064-nm pulsed laser were realized by an 8-μm period grating, 21-mm-long sample. With 29-ns long pulses at 20-kHz repetition rate, 7.3-W (average power), of 532-nm radiation was generated with 55% conversion efficiency. With 25-ns long pulses at 10-kHz repetition rate in the same sample, 6.3-W of average-power with 61% conversion efficiency was obtained. 1.41-W average-power, at 4.013-μm idler wavelength was generated in an OPO configuration. The 28.65-μm period grating, 24-mm-long sample, was pumped by 25-ns pulses, 10-kHz repetition rate, 1.064-μm Nd:YVO 4 laser. In addition to the original (intended) signal and idler wavelengths, 0.27-W was obtained at 4.686-μm idler wavelength, by a secondary OPO process which developed in the system. Primary and secondary OPO operation was also observed in a 27.15-μm period grating, 38-mm-long sample. 0.67-W at 4.48-μm and 0.15-W at 5.03-μm were generated in this experiment.

  8. Electron-ion hybrid instability experiment upgrades to the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, A M; Arnold, I; Thomas, E; Tejero, E; Amatucci, W E

    2013-04-01

    The Auburn Linear EXperiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) is a laboratory plasma physics experiment used to study spatially inhomogeneous flows in a magnetized cylindrical plasma column that are driven by crossed electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields. ALEXIS was recently upgraded to include a small, secondary plasma source for a new dual source, interpenetrating plasma experiment. Using two plasma sources allows for highly localized electric fields to be made at the boundary of the two plasmas, inducing strong E × B velocity shear in the plasma, which can give rise to a regime of instabilities that have not previously been studied in ALEXIS. The dual plasma configuration makes it possible to have independent control over the velocity shear and the density gradient. This paper discusses the recent addition of the secondary plasma source to ALEXIS, as well as the plasma diagnostics used to measure electric fields and electron densities.

  9. NATO Advanced Summer Institute on the Physics of Ion-Ion and Electron-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    McGowan, J

    1983-01-01

    Some of the earliest civilizations regarded the universe as organized around four principles, the four "elements" earth. water, air, and fire. Fire, which was the source of light and as such possessed an immaterial quality related to the spiritual world. was clearly the most impressive of these elements, although its quanti­ tative importance could not have been properly discerned. M- ern science has changed the names, but macroscopic matter is still divided into four states. The solid, liquid, and gaseous states are ordinary states, but the fourth state of matter, the plasma state, has retained a somewhat extraordinary character. It is now recognized that most of the matter of the universe is in the ionized state. but on the earth. the plasma state is still the exception. Hence the importance and also the difficulty of investigations dealing with ionized matter, which have been greatly furthered by the development of thermonuclear fusion research. The study of matter in the ionized state comprises a large d...

  10. Effect of electron disruption in the energy recovery linac based electron ion collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Beam-beam effects present one of the major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In the energy recovery linac (ERL based eRHIC design, the electron beam, accelerated in a superconducting ERL, collides with the proton beam circulating in the RHIC ring. During such collisions the electron beam undergoes a very strong beam-beam interaction with the protons, which warrants careful examination. We evaluated transverse disruption and linear mismatch effects in the electron beam caused by collisions and considered several countermeasures to mitigate the emittance growth from these interactions. The minimum required aperture of transport lines is calculated that should allow the transport of the electron beam during the deceleration process.

  11. Electron-ion collisional ionization cross sections and rates for the Na isoelectronic sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Y; Wang, Y S; Yang, F J; Xu, X J; Sun, Y S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electron-impact ionization cross sections for eight highly charged Na-like ions in the range 18<=Z<=39 calculated by means of a distorted-wave Born exchange approximation method including relativistic corrections. Direct ionization from the ground and excited states (n=3-5) is calculated. For the ground state, contributions due to excitation-autoionization are also calculated, taking account of branching ratios and configuration interaction. A systematic study of the dependence of the cross sections on impact energy and nuclear charge is carried out for the direct ionization of all states and for excitation-autoionization. The results of the calculations are fitted by empirical formulas to facilitate use in practical applications; the fitted values are found to be in good agreement with the calculated results. An accurate empirical formula for calculating ionization rates is also given.

  12. Relativistic quantum dynamics in strong fields: Photon emission from heavy, few-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, S. [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Indelicato, P. [Lab. Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure et Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Stoehlker, T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of the photon emission from highly-charged heavy ions is reviewed. These investigations show that high-Z ions provide a unique tool for improving the understanding of the electron-electron and electron-photon interaction in the presence of strong fields. Apart from the bound-state transitions, which are accurately described in the framework of quantum electrodynamics, much information has been obtained also from the radiative capture of (quasi-) free electrons by high-Z ions. Many features in the observed spectra hereby confirm the inherently relativistic behavior of even the simplest compound quantum systems in nature. (orig.)

  13. Residential Indoor Temperature Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booten, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robertson, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Dane [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heaney, Mike [Arrow Electronics, Centennial, CO (United States); Brown, David [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Norton, Paul [Norton Energy Research and Development, Boulder, CO (United States); Smith, Chris [Ingersoll-Rand Corp., Dublin (Ireland)

    2017-04-07

    In this study, we are adding to the body of knowledge around answering the question: What are good assumptions for HVAC set points in U.S. homes? We collected and analyzed indoor temperature data from US homes using funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America (BA) program, due to the program's reliance on accurate energy simulation of homes. Simulations are used to set Building America goals, predict the impact of new building techniques and technologies, inform research objectives, evaluate home performance, optimize efficiency packages to meet savings goals, customize savings approaches to specific climate zones, and myriad other uses.

  14. Room Temperature Curing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    UJ LU LU LU UJ LU W -Q U "O 26 -- - -■- — ■ ■- ■ MBti ^L. IIIIIIII.IHI.I|.UHI,IW’I»;I.!I"IT,U» mpwi«ŕ "^Wl be 190,000 psi which is consistent...was added to the mixture. After 1 hour benzene and water were added and the mixture was stirred until the salt was dissolved. The organic ...for 15 minutes and then cooled to room temperature. The mixture was extracted with two 100 ml portions of water. The organic layer was dried (MgS04

  15. High temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  16. The relationship between body and ambient temperature and corneal temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Johnson, Leif; Arvidsson, Henrik Sven

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature....

  17. The relationship between body and ambient temperature and corneal temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Johnson, Leif; Arvidsson, Henrik Sven

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature.......Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature....

  18. Study of atmospheric tritium transfers in lettuce: kinetic study, equilibrium and organic incorporation during a continuous atmospheric exposure; Etude des transferts du tritium atmospherique chez la laitue: Etude cinetique, etat d'equilibre et integration du tritum sous forme organique lors d'une exposition atmospherique continue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, C.

    2009-11-30

    This thesis has explored the mechanisms of tritium 'absorption and incorporation in a human-consumed plant, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), due to atmospheric exposure. Foliar uptake appears to play a key role in absorption of tritium as tissue free water tritium. Whatever the development stage and the light conditions, the specific activity in tissue free water reaches that of water vapour in air in several hours. The specific activity ratio is then about 0, 4. The time to reach equilibrium in soil is over 24 hours in most cases: the specific activity ratio ranges then 0, 01 to 0, 26. Incorporation rate of tissue free water tritium as organically-bound tritium has been estimated to 0, 13 to 0, 16 % h-l in average over the growing period of the plant, but marked variations are observed during growth. In particular, a significant increase appeared at the exponential growth stage. Deposition and diffusion of tritium in soil lead to significant OBT activities in soil. Results globally indicate equilibrium between the different environmental compartments (air, soil, plant). However, some experiments have revealed high OBT concentrations regarding atmospheric level exposure and ask for a possible phenomenon of local tritium accumulation in OBT for particular conditions of exposure. (author) [French] Ce travail de these a concerne l'etude des phenomenes d'absorption et d'incorporation sous forme organique du tritium dans un vegetal de consommation courante, la laitue (Lactuca sativa L.), en reponse a une exposition atmospherique. Il apparait que la voie foliaire joue un role primordial dans l'absorption du tritium au sein de l'eau tissulaire des plants. Quels que soient le stade de developpement des plants et les conditions d'eclairement, le temps necessaire pour atteindre l'equilibre des concentrations dans l'eau libre et dans la vapeur d'eau de l'air est de plusieurs heures; le rapport des concentrations est alors de

  19. Core temperature affects scalp skin temperature during scalp cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Peerbooms, Mijke; van den Hurk, Corina J G; van Os, Bernadet; Levels, Koen; Teunissen, Lennart P J; Breed, Wim P M

    2015-08-01

    The efficacy of hair loss prevention by scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy induced hair loss has been shown to be related to scalp skin temperature. Scalp skin temperature, however, is dependent not only on local cooling but also on the thermal status of the body. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of body temperature on scalp skin temperature. We conducted experiments in which 13 healthy subjects consumed ice slurry to lower body temperature for 15 minutes after the start of scalp cooling and then performed two 12-minute cycle exercise sessions to increase body core temperature. Esophageal temperature (Tes ), rectal temperature (Tre ), mean skin temperature (eight locations, Tskin ), and mean scalp temperature (five locations, Tscalp ) were recorded. During the initial 10 minutes of scalp cooling, Tscalp decreased by >15 °C, whereas Tes decreased by 0.2 °C. After ice slurry ingestion, Tes , Tre , and Tskin were 35.8, 36.5, and 31.3 °C, respectively, and increased after exercise to 36.3, 37.3, and 33.0 °C, respectively. Tscalp was significantly correlated to Tes (r = 0.39, P scalp cooling contributes to the decrease in scalp temperature and may improve the prevention of hair loss. This may be useful if the desired decrease of scalp temperature cannot be obtained by scalp cooling systems. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, A.; Robinson, J.C.R.; Leijnse, H.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Horn, B.K.P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in

  1. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on body temperature during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of dogs were hypothermic (<37oC). The addition of warmed irrigation fluids to a temperature management protocol in dogs undergoing elbow arthroscopy during general anaesthesia did not lead to decreased temperature losses. Keywords: Arthroscopy, Hypothermia, Irrigation fluid temperature, Thermoregulation.

  2. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  3. Controlling the temperature and chemical potential for light with laser-cooled motional modes in an optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiao-Hsuan; Taylor, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Massless gauge bosons, including photons, do not exhibit particle conservation and thus have no chemical potential. However, in parametrically driven systems, near equilibrium dynamics can lead to equilibration of photons into a thermodynamic ensemble with a finite number of photons. This Gibbs-like ensemble then has an effective chemical potential. Here we build upon this general concept with an optomechanical implementation appropriate for a nonlinear photonic or microwave quantum simulator, as well as a parallel neutral atom approach. We consider how laser cooling of a narrow mechanical mode or atomic motion can provide an effective low frequency bath for other photon modes. In the optomechanical approach, the parametric interaction between the optical system and the low frequency bath is mediated through a beam-splitter coupling between the optical system and another laser-driven photonic mode, which can be potentially realized in a Michelson-Sagnac interferometry design. The engineered matter-light interaction enables control of both the chemical potential - by drive frequency - and temperature - by the effective temperature of the motional mode induced after laser cooling - of the resulting photonic grand canonical ensemble. Funding is provided by Physics Frontier Center at the JQI and the NSF-funded MRSEC at Princeton.

  4. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  5. Temperature measurement in the sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnamacharyulu, R.J.; Rao, L.V.G.

    meters with temperature sensors, moored data buoys and drifting buoys) are described in brief. Specialised equipment used for studying oceanic features like internal waves, thermal fronts and temperature microstructure (thermistor chain, isotherm follower...

  6. Temperature Measurement for the LSST

    OpenAIRE

    Czekala, Ian; Paul O'Connor

    2014-01-01

    We explore the various means of temperature measurement to search for a low-cost accurate temperature measuring device.  This poster was completed as part of the Brookhaven National Laboratory High School intern program in 2005.

  7. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  8. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  9. Melting temperature of archaeometallurgical slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Petrík

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of submitted work is to search the softening and melting temperature of archeometallurgy bloomery and blast furnace slag using high – temperature microscope. The high values of melting temperature of bloomery slag is a result of secondary oxidation of wüstite in the chamber of a microscope. The melting temperature increases with an increase in SiO2 and decreases with increasing basicity of the slag.

  10. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, 37150 Leon, Gto (Mexico)

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Modeling Temperature and Pricing Weather Derivatives Based on Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhan Taştan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study first proposes a temperature model to calculate the temperature indices upon which temperature-based derivatives are written. The model is designed as a mean-reverting process driven by a Levy process to represent jumps and other features of temperature. Temperature indices are mainly measured as deviations from a base temperature, and, hence, the proposed model includes jumps because they may constitute an important part of this deviation for some locations. The estimated value of a temperature index and its distribution in this model apply an inversion formula to the temperature model. Second, this study develops a pricing process over calculated index values, which returns a customized price for temperature-based derivatives considering that temperature has unique effects on every economic entity. This personalized price is also used to reveal the trading behavior of a hypothesized entity in a temperature-based derivative trade with profit maximization as the objective. Thus, this study presents a new method that does not need to evaluate the risk-aversion behavior of any economic entity.

  12. High temperature autoclave vacuum seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. R.; Simpson, W. G.; Walker, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Aluminum sheet forms effective sealing film at temperatures up to 728 K. Soft aluminum wire rings provide positive seal between foil and platen. For applications at temperatures above aluminum's service temperature, stainless steel is used as film material and copper wire as sealant.

  13. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  14. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  15. Battery system with temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Equinox in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean in 2017 (NCEI Accession 0161868)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2015, the Ocean Carbon Group at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) installed an autonomous instrument to measure CO2 levels in...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Las Cuevas cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea from 2011-01-06 to 2011-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0162099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2009, the Global Carbon Group at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in collaboration with Methanol Holdings LTD and the National...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Las Cuevas cruises in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea from 2009-09-12 to 2009-10-28 (NCEI Accession 0162030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2009, the Global Carbon Group at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in collaboration with Methanol Holdings LTD and the National...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from time series observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Polaris II in the South Pacific Ocean from 2006-08-29 to 2006-10-24 (NODC Accession 0112883)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112883 includes time series data collected from Polaris II in the South Pacific Ocean from 2006-08-29 to 2006-10-24. These data include Partial...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1995-11-09 to 1995-12-01 (NODC Accession 0112941)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112941 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from POLARSTERN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2007-05-02 to 2007-08-24 (NODC Accession 0117500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117500 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2007-05-02 to 2007-08-24. These data...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_OSTERGARNSHOLM in the Baltic Sea from 2005-06-01 to 2005-08-12 (NCEI Accession 0157446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157446 includes chemical, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_OSTERGARNSHOLM in the Baltic Sea from 2005-06-01 to 2005-08-12. These...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the METEOR in the English Channel, Indian Ocean and others from 1994-10-12 to 1994-11-12 (NODC Accession 0115605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115605 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from METEOR in the English Channel, Indian Ocean, North...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2006-12-14 to 2006-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108159 includes Surface underway data collected from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-01-08 to 2009-01-07 (NCEI Accession 0162251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162251 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Munida in the South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-26 to 2006-07-30 (NODC Accession 0100218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100218 includes Surface underway data collected from Munida in the South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-26 to 2006-07-30. These data include Partial...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from AEGAEO in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea from 2006-02-08 to 2006-02-13 (NODC Accession 0084543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084543 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from AEGAEO in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea from...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2011-05-17 to 2012-10-26 (NODC Accession 0083197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083197 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Coastal Waters of...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2010-05-07 to 2013-06-25 (NODC Accession 0109901)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109901 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Cordell Bank...

  10. High Temperature Hybrid Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kerry Anthony

    Conventional high temperature elastomers are produced by chain polymerization of olefinic or fluorinated olefinic monomers. Ultimate thermal stabilities are limited by backbone bond strengths, lower thermal stability of cross-link sites relative to backbone bonds, and depolymerization or "unzipping" at high temperatures. In order to develop elastomers with enhanced thermal stability, hybrid thermally cross-linkable polymers that consisted only of organic-inorganic and aromatic bonds were synthesized and evaluated. The addition of phenylethynyl or phenylacetylinic functional groups to these polymers resulted in conversion of the polymers into high temperature elastomers when cross-linked by thermal curing. Polyphenyoxydiphenylsilanes were synthesized via several different condensation reactions. Results of these synthetic reactions, which utilized both hydroquinone and biphenol as monomers, were systematically evaluated to determine the optimal synthetic conditions for subsequent endcapping reactions. It was determined that dichlorodiphenylsilane condensations with biphenol in toluene or THF were best suited for this work. Use of excess dichlorodiphenylsilane yielded polymers of appropriate molecular weights with terminal reactive chlorosilane groups that could be utilized for coupling with phenylethynyl reagents in a subsequent reaction. Two new synthetic routes were developed to endcap biphenoxysilanes with ethynyl containing substituents, to yield polymers with cross-linkable end groups. Endcapping by lithiumphenylacetylide and 4[(4-fluorophenylethynyl))phenol yielded two new polymers that could be thermally cross-linked on heating above 300 °C. Successful endcapping was verified chemically by 13C NMR, FTIR and Raman analysis. Exothermic peaks consistent with ethynyl curing reactions were observed in endcapped polymers by DSC. A new diacetylinic polymer was prepared through reaction of 4,4'-buta-1,3-diyne-1,4-diyldiphenol and dichlorodiphenylsilane. This

  11. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  12. The effect of media, serum and temperature on in vitro survival of bovine blastocysts after Open Pulled Straw (OPS) vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajta, G; Rindom, N; Peura, T T; Holm, P; Greve, T; Callesen, H

    1999-10-01

    The recently introduced Open Pulled Straw (OPS) vitrification technique has successfully been used for cryopreserving porcine embryos as well as for bovine embryos and oocytes. The aim of this work is to investigate several factors on the in vitro survival of bovine blastocysts. In 5 experiments, a total of 862 in vitro produced blastocysts and expanded blastocysts was vitrified and warmed using the OPS technology, then cultured in vitro for an additional 3 days. The culture medium in Experiments 1 to 4 was SOFaa with supplements and 5% calf serum (CS). In Experiment 1, the replacement of TCM-199 + 20% CS with PBS + 20% CS in the holding medium during vitrification and warming did not result in significant differences in the re-expansion (92 vs 95%) and hatching rates (79 vs 72%). In Experiment 2, the PBS holding medium was supplemented with either 20% CS, 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA) or 3 mg/mL polyvinylalcohol (PVA). Although the re-expansion rates did not differ (98, 95 and 93%, respectively), there was a decrease in the hatching rate after vitrification with PVA (77 and 78 vs 51%, respectively). In Experiment 3, the influence of temperature of equilibration media prior to and rehydration media after the vitrification was investigated. When the temperature of these media was adjusted to 20 degrees C instead of the standard 35 degrees C, both the re-expansion and the hatching rates decreased markedly. However, increasing the time of equilibration with the diluted cryoprotectant solution at 20 degrees C eliminated these differences. In Experiment 4, the ethylene-glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide cryoprotectant mixture was replaced with ethylene glycol-ficoll-trehalose solution. No difference in the re-expansion (89 vs 96%, respectively) or hatching rate (79 vs 84%, respectively) was detected. In Experiment 5, the vitrified-warmed blastocysts were cultured in SOFaa medium supplemented with 5% CS or 5 mg/mL BSA. Although the re-expansion rates were identical in

  13. Temperature integration and DIF in cut chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korner, O.; Challa, H.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption in greenhouses, temperature integration can be used. However, the temperature integration principle considers only average temperatures and does not comply with the DIF concept (difference between mean day temperature and mean night temperature). With DIF, stem

  14. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  15. Bradycardia During Targeted Temperature Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Nielsen, Niklas; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Bradycardia is common during targeted temperature management, likely being a physiologic response to lower body temperature, and has recently been associated with favorable outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in smaller observational studies. The present study sought...... to confirm this finding in a large multicenter cohort of patients treated with targeted temperature management at 33°C and explore the response to targeted temperature management targeting 36°C. DESIGN: Post hoc analysis of a prospective randomized study. SETTING: Thirty-six ICUs in 10 countries. PATIENTS......: We studied 447 (targeted temperature management = 33°C) and 430 (targeted temperature management = 36°C) comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with available heart rate data, randomly assigned in the targeted temperature management trial from 2010 to 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Targeted...

  16. Micro-Mechanical Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity in the world. The field of thermometry is therefore constantly evolving towards better temperature sensors and better temperature measurements. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to improve an existing type of micro-mechanical temperature...... sensor or to develop a new one. Two types of micro-mechanical temperature sensors have been studied: Bilayer cantilevers and string-like beam resonators. Both sensor types utilize thermally generated stress. Bilayer cantilevers are frequently used as temperature sensors at the micro-scale, and the goal....... The reduced sensitivity was due to initial bending of the cantilevers and poor adhesion between the two cantilever materials. No further attempts were made to improve the sensitivity of bilayer cantilevers. The concept of using string-like resonators as temperature sensors has, for the first time, been...

  17. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  18. Controlled experimental aquarium system for multi-stressor investigation: carbonate chemistry, oxygen saturation, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockmon, E. E.; Frieder, C. A.; Navarro, M. O.; White-Kershek, L. A.; Dickson, A. G.

    2013-02-01

    As the field of ocean acidification has grown, researchers have increasingly turned to laboratory experiments to understand the impacts of increased CO2 on marine organisms. However, other changes such as ocean warming and deoxygenation are occurring concurrently with the increasing CO2 concentrations, complicating the anthropogenic impact on organisms. This experimental aquarium design allows for independent regulation of CO2 concentration, O2 levels, and temperature in a controlled environment to study the impacts of multiple stressors. The system has the flexibility for a wide range of treatment chemistry, seawater volumes, and study organisms. Control of the seawater chemistry is achieved by equilibration of a chosen gas mixture with seawater using a Liqui-Cel® membrane contactor. Included as examples, two experiments performed using the system have shown control of CO2 between approximately 500-1400 μatm and O2 from 80-240 μmol kg-1. Temperature has been maintained to 0.5 °C or better in the range of 10-17 °C. On a weeklong timescale, control results in variability in pH of less than 0.007 pH units and in oxygen concentration less than 3.5 μmol kg-1. Longer experiments, over a month, have been completed with reasonable but lessened control, still better than 0.08 pH units and 13 μmol kg-1 O2. The ability to study the impacts of multiple stressors in the laboratory simultaneously, as well as independently, will be an important part of understanding the response of marine organisms to a high-CO2 world.

  19. Effect of Solar Radiation on Viscoelastic Properties of Bovine Leather: Temperature and Frequency Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalyanya, Kallen Mulilo; Rop, Ronald K.; Onyuka, Arthur S.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents both analytical and experimental results of the effect of unfiltered natural solar radiation on the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of Boran bovine leather at both pickling and tanning stages of preparation. Samples cut from both pickled and tanned pieces of leather of appropriate dimensions were exposed to unfiltered natural solar radiation for time intervals ranging from 0 h (non-irradiated) to 24 h. The temperature of the dynamic mechanical analyzer was equilibrated at 30°C and increased to 240°C at a heating rate of 5°C \\cdot Min^{-1}, while its oscillation frequency varied from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. With the help of thermal analysis (TA) control software which analyzes and generates parameter means/averages at temperature/frequency range, the graphs were created by Microsoft Excel 2013 from the means. The viscoelastic properties showed linear frequency dependence within 0.1 Hz to 30 Hz followed by negligible frequency dependence above 30 Hz. Storage modulus (E') and shear stress (σ ) increased with frequency, while loss modulus (E''), complex viscosity (η ^{*}) and dynamic shear viscosity (η) decreased linearly with frequency. The effect of solar radiation was evident as the properties increased initially from 0 h to 6 h of irradiation followed by a steady decline to a minimum at 18 h before a drastic increase to a maximum at 24 h. Hence, tanning industry can consider the time duration of 24 h for sun-drying of leather to enhance the mechanical properties and hence the quality of the leather. At frequencies higher than 30 Hz, the dynamic mechanical properties are independent of the frequency. The frequency of 30 Hz was observed to be a critical value in the behavior in the mechanical properties of bovine hide.

  20. HIGH TEMPERATURE VACUUM MIXER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Chertov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the creation of a new type of mixer to produce homogeneous mixtures of dissimilar materials applied to recycling of housing and communal services waste. The article describes the design of a dual-chamber device of the original high-temperature vacuum mixer, there investigated the processes occurring in the chambers of such devices. The results of theoretical and experimental research of the process of mixing recycled polyethylene with a mixture of "grinded food waste – Eco wool” are presented. The problem of the optimum choice of bending the curvilinear blades in the working volume of the seal, which is achieved by setting their profile in the form of involute arc of several circles of different radii, is examined . The dependences, allowing to define the limits of the changes of the main mode parameters the angular velocity of rotation of the working body of the mixer using two ways of setting the profile of the curvilinear blade mixer are obtained. Represented design of the mixer is proposed to use for a wide range of tasks associated with the mixing of the components with a strongly pronounced difference of physic al chemical properties and, in particular, in the production of composites out of housing and communal services waste.

  1. Effect of sugar addition on glass transition temperatures of cassava starch with low to intermediate moisture contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Yetzury; Guevara, Marvilan; Pérez, Adriana; Cova, Aura; Sandoval, Aleida J; Müller, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    This work studies how sucrose (S) addition modifies the thermal properties of cassava starch (CS). Neat CS and CS-S blends with 4, 6 and 8% sugar contents (CS-S-4%, CS-S-6% and CS-S-8%) were prepared and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), in a wide range of moisture levels (2-20%). In equilibrated samples with moisture contents lower than 10%, twoendothermic steps were observed during first DSC heating scans and two corresponding relaxation maxima in tan δ were detected by DMTA. The first transition, detected at around 45-55°C by both DSC and DMTA, is frequently found in starchy foods, while the second observed at higher temperatures is associated to the glass transition temperature of the blends. At higher moisture contents, only one thermal transition was observed. Samples analyzed immediately after cooling from the melt (i.e., after erasing their thermal history), exhibited a single glass transition temperature, regardless of their moisture content. Addition of sugar promotes water plasticization of CS only at high moisture contents. In the low moisture content range, anti-plasticization was observed for both neat and sugar-added CS samples. Addition of sugar decreases the moisture content needed to achieve the maximum value of the glass transition temperature before plasticization starts. The results of this work may be valuable for the study of texture establishment in low moisture content extruded food products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  3. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  4. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-01

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 "Radiation Thermometry". The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  5. Hall Sensors for Extreme Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Oszwaldowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the preparation of the first complete extreme temperature Hall sensor. This means that the extreme-temperature magnetic sensitive semiconductor structure is built-in an extreme-temperature package especially designed for that purpose. The working temperature range of the sensor extends from −270 °C to +300 °C. The extreme-temperature Hall-sensor active element is a heavily n-doped InSb layer epitaxially grown on GaAs. The magnetic sensitivity of the sensor is ca. 100 mV/T and its temperature coefficient is less than 0.04 %/K. This sensor may find applications in the car, aircraft, spacecraft, military and oil and gas industries.

  6. Temperature Monitoring and Perioperative Thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I.

    2008-01-01

    Most clinically available thermometers accurately report the temperature of whatever tissue is being measured. The difficulty is that no reliably core-temperature measuring sites are completely non-invasive and easy to use — especially in patients not having general anesthesia. Nonetheless, temperature can be reliably measured in most patients. Body temperature should be measured in patients having general anesthesia exceeding 30 minutes in duration, and in patients having major operations under neuraxial anesthesia. Core body temperature is normally tightly regulated. All general anesthetics produce a profound dose-dependent reduction in the core temperature triggering cold defenses including arterio-venous shunt vasoconstriction and shivering. Anesthetic-induced impairment of normal thermoregulatory control, and the resulting core-to-peripheral redistribution of body heat, is the primary cause of hypothermia in most patients. Neuraxial anesthesia also impairs thermoregulatory control, although to a lesser extant than general anesthesia. Prolonged epidural analgesia is associated with hyperthermia whose cause remains unknown. PMID:18648241

  7. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  8. TEMPERATURE TOLERANCES AND OSMOREGULATION IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MQCOmQ IItora/I' and P,ammotelllllll capelUis) have upper lethal temperatures of 4l-46°C when heated at a rate of 1 CO/lO minutes. TWo species have upper lethal temperatures of 37°C and 39°C when heated at a rate of 1 CO/day. It has been concluded that they can tolerate much hisher temperatures thaD they normally ...

  9. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  10. Sensors for low temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  11. Low-temperature tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Anbinderis, P; Anbinderis, T; D'Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, M; Buontempo, S; Chen, W; Cindro, V; Dezillie, B; Dierlamm, A; Eremin, V; Gaubas, E; Gorbatenko, V; Granata, V; Grigoriev, E; Grohmann, S; Hauler, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Hempel, O; Herzog, R; Härkönen, J; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Kalesinskas, V; Kapturauskas, J; Laiho, R; Li, Z; Luukka, Panja; Mandic, I; De Masi, R; Menichelli, D; Mikuz, M; Militaru, O; Nüssle, G; O'Shea, V; Pagano, S; Paul, S; Perea-Solano, B; Piotrzkowski, K; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, K; Rahman, M; Rato-Mendes, P; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Sousa, P; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Vaitkus, J; Verbitskaya, E; Da Vià, C; Vlasenko, L; Vlasenko, M; Wobst, E; Zavrtanik, M

    2004-01-01

    RD39 collaboration develops new detector techniques for particle trackers, which have to withstand fluences up to 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -2 / of high-energy particles. The work focuses on the optimization of silicon detectors and their readout electronics while keeping the temperature as a free parameter. Our results so far suggest that the best operating temperature is around 130 K. We shall also describe in this paper how the current-injected mode of operation reduces the polarization of the bulk silicon at low temperatures, and how the engineering and materials problems related with vacuum and low temperature can be solved. (9 refs).

  12. Core temperature affects scalp skin temperature during scalp cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Peerbooms, M.; van den Hurk, C.J.G.; van Os, B.; Levels, K.; Teunissen, L.P.J.; Breed, W.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of hair loss prevention by scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy induced hair loss has been shown to be related to scalp skin temperature. Scalp skin temperature, however, is dependent not only on local cooling but also on the thermal status of the body. Objectives: This

  13. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  14. (Krauss) at constant high temperatures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snail Research Unit of the SAMRC and Department of Zoology, Potchefstroom University for CHE,. Potchefstroom. The survival of the freshwater snail species Bulinus africanus, Bulinus g/obosus and Biompha/aria pfeifferi at extreme high temperatures was experimentally investigated. Snails were exposed to temperatures ...

  15. Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ochkin, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    Providing an up-to-date overview on spectroscopical diagnostics of low temperature plasma Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma covers the latest developments and techniques. Written by a distinguished scientist and experienced book author this text is applicable to many fields in materials and surface science as well as nanotechnology and contains numerous appendices with indispensable reference data.

  16. Embedded Temperature-Change Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Thakoor, Anil; Karmon, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Transducers sensitive to rates of change of temperature embedded in integrated circuits and discrete electronic components damaged by overheating, according to proposal. Used to detect onset of rapid heating and to trigger shutoffs of power or other corrective actions before temperatures rise beyond safe limits. Sensors respond fast and reliably to incipient overheating because they are in direct thermal contact with vulnerable circuit elements.

  17. Multiple Waveband Temperature Sensor (MWTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath; Wilson, Daniel; Stirbl, Robert; Blea, Anthony; Harding, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Multiple Waveband Temperature Sensor (MWTS). The MWTS project will result in a highly stable, monolithically integrated, high resolution infrared detector array sensor that records registered thermal imagery in four infrared wavebands to infer dynamic temperature profiles on a laser-irradiated ground target. An accurate surface temperature measurement of a target in extreme environments in a non-intrusive manner is required. The development challenge is to: determine optimum wavebands (suitable for target temperatures, nature of the targets and environments) to measure accurate target surface temperature independent of the emissivity, integrate simultaneously readable multiband Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs) in a single monolithic focal plane array (FPA) sensor and to integrate the hardware/software and system calibration for remote temperature measurements. The charge was therefore to develop and demonstrate a multiband infrared imaging camera with the detectors simultaneously sensitive to multiple distinct color bands for front surface temperature measurements Wavelength ( m) measurements. Amongst the requirements are: that the measurement system will not affect target dynamics or response to the laser irradiation and that the simplest criterion for spectral band selection is to choose those practically feasible spectral bands that create the most contrast between the objects or scenes of interest in the expected environmental conditions. There is in the presentation a review of the modeling and simulation of multi-wave infrared temperature measurement and also a review of the detector development and QWIP capacities.

  18. Certification testing at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noss, P.W. [Packaging Technology, Tacoma, WA (United States); Ammerman, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials require that most hypothetical accident condition tests or analyses consider the effects of the environmental temperature that most challenges package performance. For many packages, the most challenging temperature environment is the cold condition (-29 C according to U.S. regulations), primarily because the low temperature causes the highest free drop impact forces due to the higher strength of many energy-absorbing materials at this temperature. If it is decided to perform low temperature testing, it is only necessary that the relevant parts of the package have the required temperature prior to the drop. However, the details of performing a drop at low temperature can have a large influence on testing cost and technical effectiveness. The selection of the test site, the chamber and type of chilling equipment, instrumentation, and even the time of year are all important. Control of seemingly minor details such as the effect on internal pressure, placement of monitoring thermocouples, the thermal time constant of the test article, and icing of equipment are necessary to ensure a successful low temperature test. This paper will discuss these issues and offer suggestions based on recent experience.

  19. Temperature, light and the tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, K.

    1955-01-01

    In good illumination, six tomato varieties all responded to an increase in day or/and night temperature by faster stem and fruit growth, earlier but smaller fruit yield with fewer fruits in shorter and lighter clusters, and a reduction in root, stem and leaf weight. Optimum temperatures for moderate

  20. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...

  1. Temperature rise of installed FCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Report discusses temperature profiles of installed FCC for wood and tile surfaces. Three-conductor FCC was tested at twice nominal current-carrying capacity over bare floor and under carpet, with result indicating that temperature rise is not a linear function of current with FCC at this level.

  2. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by ...

  3. The Kelvin and Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, B. W.; Furukawa, G. T.; Kreider, K. G.; Meyer, C. W.; Ripple, D. C.; Strouse, G. F.; Tew, W. L.; Moldover, M. R.; Johnson, B. Carol; Yoon, H. W.; Gibson, C. E.; Saunders, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is defined from 0.65 K upwards to the highest temperature measurable by spectral radiation thermometry, the radiation thermometry being based on the Planck radiation law. When it was developed, the ITS-90 represented thermodynamic temperatures as closely as possible. Part I of this paper describes the realization of contact thermometry up to 1234.93 K, the temperature range in which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of calibration of thermometers at 15 fixed points and vapor pressure/temperature relations which are phase equilibrium states of pure substances. The realization is accomplished by using fixed-point devices, containing samples of the highest available purity, and suitable temperature-controlled environments. All components are constructed to achieve the defining equilibrium states of the samples for the calibration of thermometers. The high quality of the temperature realization and measurements is well documented. Various research efforts are described, including research to improve the uncertainty in thermodynamic temperatures by measuring the velocity of sound in gas up to 800 K, research in applying noise thermometry techniques, and research on thermocouples. Thermometer calibration services and high-purity samples and devices suitable for “on-site” thermometer calibration that are available to the thermometry community are described. Part II of the paper describes the realization of temperature above 1234.93 K for which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of the calibration of spectroradiometers using reference blackbody sources that are at the temperature of the equilibrium liquid-solid phase transition of pure silver, gold, or copper. The realization of temperature from absolute spectral or total radiometry over the temperature range from about 60 K to 3000 K is also described. The dissemination of the temperature scale using radiation thermometry from NIST to the customer is achieved by

  4. The Kelvin and Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, B W; Furukawa, G T; Kreider, K G; Meyer, C W; Ripple, D C; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Moldover, M R; Johnson, B C; Yoon, H W; Gibson, C E; Saunders, R D

    2001-01-01

    The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is defined from 0.65 K upwards to the highest temperature measurable by spectral radiation thermometry, the radiation thermometry being based on the Planck radiation law. When it was developed, the ITS-90 represented thermodynamic temperatures as closely as possible. Part I of this paper describes the realization of contact thermometry up to 1234.93 K, the temperature range in which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of calibration of thermometers at 15 fixed points and vapor pressure/temperature relations which are phase equilibrium states of pure substances. The realization is accomplished by using fixed-point devices, containing samples of the highest available purity, and suitable temperature-controlled environments. All components are constructed to achieve the defining equilibrium states of the samples for the calibration of thermometers. The high quality of the temperature realization and measurements is well documented. Various research efforts are described, including research to improve the uncertainty in thermodynamic temperatures by measuring the velocity of sound in gas up to 800 K, research in applying noise thermometry techniques, and research on thermocouples. Thermometer calibration services and high-purity samples and devices suitable for "on-site" thermometer calibration that are available to the thermometry community are described. Part II of the paper describes the realization of temperature above 1234.93 K for which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of the calibration of spectroradiometers using reference blackbody sources that are at the temperature of the equilibrium liquid-solid phase transition of pure silver, gold, or copper. The realization of temperature from absolute spectral or total radiometry over the temperature range from about 60 K to 3000 K is also described. The dissemination of the temperature scale using radiation thermometry from NIST to the customer is achieved by calibration of

  5. Pricing of temperature index insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Mohd Imran Che Taib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study pricing of weather insurance contracts based on temperature indices. Three different pricing methods are analysed: the classical burn approach, index modelling and temperature modelling. We take the data from Malaysia as our empirical case. Our results show that there is a significant difference between the burn and index pricing approaches on one hand, and the temperature modelling method on the other. The latter approach is pricing the insurance contract using a seasonal autoregressive time series model for daily temperature variations, and thus provides a precise probabilistic model for the fine structure of temperature evolution. We complement our pricing analysis by an investigation of the profit/loss distribution from the contract, in the perspective of both the insured and the insurer.

  6. Small Cold Temperature Instrument Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Feng, S.; Brigham, D.; Beaman, B.

    We are developing a small cold temperature instrument package concept that integrates a cold temperature power system with ultra low temperature ultra low power electronics components and power supplies now under development into a 'cold temperature surface operational' version of a planetary surface instrument package. We are already in the process of developing a lower power lower temperature version for an instrument of mutual interest to SMD and ESMD to support the search for volatiles (the mass spectrometer VAPoR, Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) both as a stand alone instrument and as part of an environmental monitoring package. We build on our previous work to develop strategies for incorporating Ultra Low Temperature/Ultra Low Power (ULT/ULP) electronics, lower voltage power supplies, as well as innovative thermal design concepts for instrument packages. Cryotesting has indicated that our small Si RHBD CMOS chips can deliver >80% of room temperature performance at 40K (nominal minimum lunar surface temperature). We leverage collaborations, past and current, with the JPL battery development program to increase power system efficiency in extreme environments. We harness advances in MOSFET technology that provide lower voltage thresholds for power switching circuits incorporated into our low voltage power supply concept. Conventional power conversion has a lower efficiency. Our low power circuit concept based on 'synchronous rectification' could produce stable voltages as low as 0.6 V with 85% efficiency. Our distributed micro-battery-based power supply concept incorporates cold temperature power supplies operating with a 4 V or 8 V battery. This work will allow us to provide guidelines for applying the low temperature, low power system approaches generically to the widest range of surface instruments.

  7. New temperature dependent hyperonic equation of state: Application to rotating neutron star models and I -Q relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Miguel; Oertel, Micaela; Hempel, Matthias; Novak, Jérôme

    2017-10-01

    In this work we present a newly constructed equation of state (EoS), applicable to stellar core collapse and neutron star mergers including the entire baryon octet. Our EoS is compatible with the main constraints from nuclear physics and, in particular, with a maximum mass for cold β -equilibrated neutron stars of 2 M⊙ in agreement with recent observations. As an application of our new EoS, we compute numerical stationary models for rapidly (rigidly) rotating hot neutron stars. We consider maximum masses of hot stars, such as protoneutron stars or hypermassive neutron stars in the postmerger phase of binary neutron star coalescence. The universality of I -Q relations at nonzero temperature for fast rotating models, comparing a purely nuclear EoS with its counterparts containing Λ hyperons or the entire baryon octet, respectively, is discussed, too. We find that the I -Q universality is broken in our models when thermal effects become important, independent on the presence of entropy gradients. Thus, the use of I -Q relations for the analysis of protoneutron stars or merger remnant data, including gravitational wave signals from the last stages of binary neutron star mergers, should be regarded with care.

  8. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of 2-diethanolamino-4,8-diheptamethyleneimino-2-(N-aminoethyl-N-ethanolamino)-6-(N,N-diethanolamino)pyrimido[5,4-d]pyrimidine-fluorescein conjugate (8MDP-fluor), as a novel equilibrative nucleoside transporter probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenwei; Buolamwini, John K

    2011-06-15

    Nucleoside transporters are integral membrane glycoproteins that play critical roles in physiological nucleoside and nucleobase fluxes, and influence the efficacy of many nucleoside chemotherapy drugs. Fluorescent reporter ligands/substrates have been shown to be useful in the analysis of nucleoside transporter (NT) protein expression and discovery of new NT inhibitors. In this study, we have developed a novel dipyridamole (DP)-based equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) fluorescent probe. The potent ENT1 and ENT2 inhibitor analogue of dipyridamole, 2,6-bis(diethanolamino)-4,8-diheptamethyleneiminopyrimido[5,4-d]pyrimidine (4, 8MDP), was modified to replace one β-hydroxyethyl group of the amino substituent at the 2-position with a β-aminoethyl group and then conjugated through the amino group to 6-(fluorescein-5-carboxamido)hexanoyl moiety to obtain a new fluorescent molecule, 2-diethanolamino-4,8-diheptamethyleneimino-2-(N-aminoethyl-N-ethanolamino)-6-(N,N-diethanolamino)pyrimido[5,4-d]pyrimidine-fluorescein conjugate, designated 8MDP-fluorescein (8MDP-fluor, 6). The binding affinities of 8MDP-fluor at ENT1 and ENT2 are reflected by the uridine uptake inhibitory K(i) values of 52.1 nM and 285 nM, respectively. 8MDP-fluor was successfully demonstrated to be a flow cytometric probe for ENT1 comparable to the nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside (NBMPR) analogue ENT1 fluorescent probe SAENTA-X8-fluorescein (SAENTA-fluor, 1). This is the first reported dipyridamole-based ENT1 fluorescent probe, which adds a novel tool for probing ENT1, and possibly ENT2.

  9. Temperature trends with reduced impact of ocean air temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansner, Frank; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    Temperature data 1900-2010 from meteorological stations across the world have been analysed and it has been found that all areas generally have two different valid temperature trends. Coastal stations and hill stations facing dominant ocean winds are normally more warm-trended than the valley sta...... between Ocean Air Affected and Ocean Air Sheltered stations canbe used to identify the influence of the oceans on land surface temperatures and also as a tool to better study climate variability on the land surface without the moderating effects of the ocean....

  10. The effect of cooling to different subzero temperatures on dog sperm cryosurvival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantar-Rodriguez, A; Medrano, A

    2017-06-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of cooling to different subzero temperatures around ice formation (-5°C) on dog sperm cryosurvival and plasma membrane fluidity. Semen was centrifuged, and sperm were resuspended in a Tris-egg yolk medium (3% glycerol). Diluted sperm were cooled from 22 to 5°C, and then, a Tris-egg yolk medium containing 7% glycerol was added (final concentration of 5% glycerol and 200 × 10 6  cells/ml). Sperm were packaged in 0.5-ml plastic straws, and equilibration was done 16 hr at 5°C before freezing. I. Straws (n = 47) at 5°C were exposed to nitrogen vapours to determine the freezing point. II. Other straws (from different ejaculates) processed as mentioned, were further cooled to -3, -5 or -7°C and immediately rewarmed in a water bath at 37°C. Motility, plasma membrane functionality and acrosome integrity were assessed. III. Other straws (from different ejaculates) processed as mentioned were further cooled to -3 or -5°C, frozen over nitrogen vapours and stored in liquid nitrogen for one month. Straws were thawed in a water bath at 38°C for 30 s. Motility, plasma membrane functionality, plasma membrane integrity, acrosome integrity, capacitation status and plasma membrane fluidity were assessed. Ice nucleation temperature was -14.3 ± 2.05°C (mean ± SD); cooling to +5, -3, -5 and -7°C, without freezing, produces no differences on sperm quality between target temperatures; cooling to +5, -3, and -5°C produced no differences on sperm survival and plasma membrane fluidity after freeze-thawing. In conclusion, cooling of dog spermatozoa to different subzero temperatures did not improve sperm cryosurvival and had no effect on plasma membrane fluidity after thawing. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Effective vs Thermal Ion Temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-Pinch: Modeling and Stagnation Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, John

    2013-10-01

    Effective ion temperatures (Ti,eff), based on the widths of emission lines in Z-pinches, have been reported for over a decade to exceed the electron temperature by more than an order of magnitude. This is observed in mid-size current generators (3.5 MA) as well as on high current (>15 MA) ones. Proposed explanations include turbulence, ion viscous heating, or 3D effects. Recent experiments with a Ne gas puff on a low current (0.5 MA) generator at the Weizmann Institute of Science also display this effect, but also provide extensive time and space resolved measurements of the plasma during stagnation. The radiation-MHD code MACH2-TCRE at NRL has been used to model this Ne pinch in R-Z cylindrical geometry with a moving grid, and a non-LTE ionization kinetics coupled to a 3D radiation transport. The computed implosion dynamics depends on the initial density profile and shows flaring as seen in visible imaging. The computed electron temperature agrees with the data as does the peak K-shell power, but the pulse width is less. The calculated electron density varies strongly during stagnation, especially in the early phases, but is within the observed range during the radiation pulse. Ti,eff is computed analogously to the experimental technique: the simulation is post-processed for the emission profiles of the satellite lines, including the Doppler shifts due to the velocity structure in the K-shell emitting region. The resultant Ti,eff for the 2D model are significantly larger than the ion thermal temperatures early in the K-shell pulse, in agreement with the data. This implies that the broad line widths reflect strong radially velocity gradients near the axis. The underlying stagnation physics of thermalization and equilibration, and its relation to the detailed data, are examined for this pinch. Supported by DOE/NNSA. Work in collaboration with J. Thornhill, A. Dasgupta, T. Mehlhorn, A. Velikovich, E. Kroupp, D. Osin, A. Starobinets, Y. Maron, and C. Deeney.

  12. Electron-Phonon Coupling and Energy Flow in a Simple Metal beyond the Two-Temperature Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Waldecker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron-phonon coupling and the corresponding energy exchange are investigated experimentally and by ab initio theory in nonequilibrium states of the free-electron metal aluminium. The temporal evolution of the atomic mean-squared displacement in laser-excited thin freestanding films is monitored by femtosecond electron diffraction. The electron-phonon coupling strength is obtained for a range of electronic and lattice temperatures from density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations. The electron-phonon coupling parameter extracted from the experimental data in the framework of a two-temperature model (TTM deviates significantly from the ab initio values. We introduce a nonthermal lattice model (NLM for describing nonthermal phonon distributions as a sum of thermal distributions of the three phonon branches. The contributions of individual phonon branches to the electron-phonon coupling are considered independently and found to be dominated by longitudinal acoustic phonons. Using all material parameters from first-principles calculations except the phonon-phonon coupling strength, the prediction of the energy transfer from electrons to phonons by the NLM is in excellent agreement with time-resolved diffraction data. Our results suggest that the TTM is insufficient for describing the microscopic energy flow even for simple metals like aluminium and that the determination of the electron-phonon coupling constant from time-resolved experiments by means of the TTM leads to incorrect values. In contrast, the NLM describing transient phonon populations by three parameters appears to be a sufficient model for quantitatively describing electron-lattice equilibration in aluminium. We discuss the general applicability of the NLM and provide a criterion for the suitability of the two-temperature approximation for other metals.

  13. Metal-silicate partitioning of potassium at high pressure and temperature conditions and implications for thermal history of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, R.; Hirose, K.

    2011-12-01

    The possible presence of potassium in the Earth's core as a radioactive heat source can have a significant influence on the thermal evolution of the Earth (Buffett, 2002 GRL; Labrosse, 2003 PEPI). Core-mantle equilibration at high P-T (e.g. ~30 GPa, ~3450 K [Righter, 2011 EPSL]) was suggested from the mantle contents of siderophile elements. Basal magma ocean (Labrosse et al., 2007 Nature) also should be equilibrated with molten iron at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) (~135 GPa) due to its gravitational stability (Nomura et al., 2011 Nature). Previous experimental studies on potassium partitioning between liquid metal and silicate melt showed contradictory results on the concentration of potassium in the Earth's core because of experimental artifacts (K loss in metal phase), different (simplified) chemical compositions for study and large extrapolations to high P-T which suits for core-mantle equilibration at the base of the magma ocean. Recently, Corgne et al. (2007 EPSL) performed the partitioning experiments up to 7.7 GPa and 2200°C with chemical compositions of CI chondrite doped with moderate amount of S and K and revealed a significant effect of O contents in molten alloy on K partition coefficient while with negligible effect of P-T and S and C contents. The change in electronic structure of potassium from 4s- to 3d-like was predicted by theory (Bukowinski, 1976 GRL) and potassium alloying with nickel and iron was reported by experiments using diamond anvil cell at ~30 GPa and 2200 K (Parker et al., 1997 Science; Lee and Jeanloz, 2003 GRL). So, it is important to investigate the effect of pressure on K partition coefficient at the pressure conditions above ~30 GPa up to 135 GPa. Hirao et al. (2006 GRL) performed melting experiment at 135 GPa and 3500 K using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and showed the value of partition coefficient Dk is 0.15, but their results lack the elemental mass balances between run products and starting materials. Our

  14. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  15. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  16. Nouvelle vie pour le Palais de l'Equilibre

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan-Hess, I

    2004-01-01

    The wooden sphere from Expo.02 has been renamed the "Globe of Innovation" and has been reassembled at CERN. The Globe will be prepared for the celebration on the 19th October and then re-opened in autumn 2005 with a permanent exhibition (1 page)

  17. Nanodomain Swelling of Water-Equilibrated Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chelsea; Jiang, Xi; Balsara, Nitash

    In this work, we examine the nanoscale swelling behavior of block copolymer electrolytes immersed in liquid water. A series of sulfonated polystyrene- b-polyethylene- b-polystyrene (S-SES) membranes having the same chemical composition but with different morphologies are prepared. We use small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy (cryo-STEM) and cryogenic electron tomography to characterize the nanodomain swelling of S-SES membranes. The relative increase of the nanodomain size upon hydration shows a transition which coincides with a morphological transition from lamellar to bicontinuous morphology. The nanodomain swelling of S-SES membranes with bicontinuous morphology is smaller than that of S-SES membranes with lamellar morphology while the water uptake is much larger. Electron tomography revealed that swelling of the membrane with bicontinuous morphology was spatially isotropic, which is the origin of the smaller relative domain size increase compared to the lamellar membranes whose swelling is anisotropic. This work was primarily supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division under Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231 within the Electron Microscopy of Soft Matter Program (KC11BN).

  18. Entropy production and equilibration in Yang-Mills quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Ming; Müller, Berndt

    2012-01-01

    The Husimi distribution provides for a coarse-grained representation of the phase-space distribution of a quantum system, which may be used to track the growth of entropy of the system. We present a general and systematic method of solving the Husimi equation of motion for an isolated quantum system, and we construct a coarse-grained Hamiltonian whose expectation value is exactly conserved. As an application, we numerically solve the Husimi equation of motion for two-dimensional Yang-Mills quantum mechanics (the x-y model) and calculate the time evolution of the coarse-grained entropy of a highly excited state. We show that the coarse-grained entropy saturates to a value that coincides with the microcanonical entropy corresponding to the energy of the system. © 2012 American Physical Society

  19. Ubiquitous brecciation after metamorphism in equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Lusby, D.; Keil, K.

    1985-01-01

    Ten objects with aberrant Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios have been found in apparently unbrecciated types 4-6 H and L chondrites. Since the Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios of these objects are incompatible with the metamorphic history of the host chondrites, it is concluded that a high proportion of ordinary chondrites are breccias that were lithified after peak metamorphism. This is consistent with the results of Scott (1984), who concluded that most type three ordinary chondrites are breccias of materials with diverse thermal histories, even though they do not show prominent brecciation. It is found that the classification scheme of Van Schmus and Wood (1967) does not identify chondrites with similar thermal histories; the petrologic type of a chondrite is only a measure of the average thermal history of its ingredients. Chondrite and achondrite breccias are also compared in order to understand how brecciation of chondrites after metamorphism is so well camouflaged.

  20. Copper isotope fractionation during equilibration with natural and synthetic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Scheiderich, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    As copper (Cu) stable isotopes emerge as a tool for tracing Cu biogeochemical cycling, an understanding of how Cu isotopes fractionate during complexation with soluble organic ligands in natural waters and soil solutions is required. A Donnan dialysis technique was employed to assess the isotopic fractionation of Cu during complexation with the soluble synthetic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and desferrioxamine B (DFOB), as well as with Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The results indicated enrichment of the heavy isotope ((65)Cu) in the complexes, with Δ(65)Cu complex-free values ranging from +0.14 to +0.84‰. A strong linear correlation was found between the logarithms of the stability constants of the Cu complexes and the magnitudes of isotopic fractionation. These results show that complexation of Cu by organic ligands can affect the isotopic signature of the free Cu ion. This free Cu is considered the most bioavailable species, and hence, our results highlight the importance of understanding fractionation processes in the uptake medium when using Cu isotopes to study the uptake mechanisms of organisms. These data contribute a vital piece to the emerging picture of Cu isotope cycling in the natural environment, as organic complexation plays a key role in the Cu cycle.

  1. Pressure and temperature variation of octahedral Na and tetrahedral Al in amphiboles in metamafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. M.; Lei, J.

    2013-12-01

    The sodium content in the M4 site of amphibole (BNa) was calibrated by Brown (1977, J Petrol, 18, 53-72) in a study that continues to be highly cited to this day. This study, based on empirical observations of amphibole compositional changes in the presence of the buffering assemblage plagioclase, chlorite, epidote, iron oxide, and water, demonstrated a systematic variation in the BNa and tetrahedral Al (TAl) content with pressure. Recent experimental work in this lab aimed at defining the extent of miscibility along the tremolite-glaucophane and hornblende-glaucophane joins in the Na2O-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O system has provided some additional information on the cation mixing along these joins. These joins also serve as the chemically-simplified framework of the BNa versus TAl correlation reported by Brown (1977). There are now sufficient, though still a bare minimum, of experimentally-confirmed mixing data for sodium-rich amphiboles to test this correlation and for quantifying the pressure-temperature (P-T) dependence of amphibole compositions in metamafic rocks relevant to subduction zones. From experimental results obtained over the range of 500-800°C, 1.5-2.0 GPa, and using a variety of amphibole synthesis and re-equilibration methods, the following set of asymmetric formalism (ASF) macroscopic interaction and mixing parameters have been derived that can be used with THERMOCALC dataset 55: Wtrgl = 70 kJ, Wglts = Wtrts =20 kJ, α(tr) = 1.0, α(ts) = 1.2, and α(gl) = 0.52. Using a fixed MORB bulk composition, the composition of amphiboles within the P-T stability field of the buffering assemblage were calculated for the above chemical system with FeO added (i.e., NCFMASH) over the range of 0.2 - 2.0 GPa and 400 - 700°C. The following main observations can be made. First, the empirical amphibole compositions at low TAl and high BNa contents are well modeled by the miscibility gap in the amphibole ternary sub-system tremolite

  2. Ion potential in warm dense matter: wake effects due to streaming degenerate electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-02-01

    The effective dynamically screened potential of a classical ion in a stationary flowing quantum plasma at finite temperature is investigated. This is a key quantity for thermodynamics and transport of dense plasmas in the warm-dense-matter regime. This potential has been studied before within hydrodynamic approaches or based on the zero temperature Lindhard dielectric function. Here we extend the kinetic analysis by including the effects of finite temperature and of collisions based on the Mermin dielectric function. The resulting ion potential exhibits an oscillatory structure with attractive minima (wakes) and, thus, strongly deviates from the static Yukawa potential of equilibrium plasmas. This potential is analyzed in detail for high-density plasmas with values of the Brueckner parameter in the range 0.1≤r(s)≤1 for a broad range of plasma temperature and electron streaming velocity. It is shown that wake effects become weaker with increasing temperature of the electrons. Finally, we obtain the minimal electron streaming velocity for which attraction between ions occurs. This velocity turns out to be less than the electron Fermi velocity. Our results allow for reliable predictions of the strength of wake effects in nonequilibrium quantum plasmas with fast streaming electrons showing that these effects are crucial for transport under warm-dense-matter conditions, in particular for laser-matter interaction, electron-ion temperature equilibration, and stopping power.

  3. Flexible Multiplexed Surface Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Johnson, Preston B.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Unitary array of sensors measures temperatures at points distributed over designated area on surface. Useful in measuring surface temperatures of aerodynamic models and thermally controlled objects. Made of combination of integrated-circuit microchips and film circuitry. Temperature-sensing chips scanned at speeds approaching 10 kHz. Operating range minus 40 degrees C to 120 degrees C. Flexibility of array conforms to curved surfaces. Multiplexer eliminates numerous monitoring cables. Control of acquisition and recording of data effected by connecting array to microcomputers via suitable interface circuitry.

  4. Method for measuring surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  5. Dinosaur fossils predict body temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Gillooly

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Perhaps the greatest mystery surrounding dinosaurs concerns whether they were endotherms, ectotherms, or some unique intermediate form. Here we present a model that yields estimates of dinosaur body temperature based on ontogenetic growth trajectories obtained from fossil bones. The model predicts that dinosaur body temperatures increased with body mass from approximately 25 degrees C at 12 kg to approximately 41 degrees C at 13,000 kg. The model also successfully predicts observed increases in body temperature with body mass for extant crocodiles. These results provide direct evidence that dinosaurs were reptiles that exhibited inertial homeothermy.

  6. Dinosaur Fossils Predict Body Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew P; Charnov, Eric L

    2006-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest mystery surrounding dinosaurs concerns whether they were endotherms, ectotherms, or some unique intermediate form. Here we present a model that yields estimates of dinosaur body temperature based on ontogenetic growth trajectories obtained from fossil bones. The model predicts that dinosaur body temperatures increased with body mass from approximately 25 °C at 12 kg to approximately 41 °C at 13,000 kg. The model also successfully predicts observed increases in body temperature with body mass for extant crocodiles. These results provide direct evidence that dinosaurs were reptiles that exhibited inertial homeothermy. PMID:16817695

  7. High ambient temperature reverses hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in an animal model of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, E; Churruca, I; Zárate, J; Carrera, O; Portillo, M P; Cerrato, M; Vázquez, R; Echevarría, E

    2009-04-01

    The potential involvement of the melanocortin system in the beneficial effects of heat application in rats submitted to activity-based anorexia (ABA), an analogous model of anorexia nervosa (AN), was studied. Once ABA rats had lost 20% of body weight, half of the animals were exposed to a high ambient temperature (HAT) of 32 degrees C, whereas the rest were maintained at 21 degrees C. Control sedentary rats yoked to ABA animals received the same treatment. ABA rats (21 degrees C) showed increased Melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptor and Agouti gene Related Peptide (AgRP) expression, and decreased pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels (Real Time PCR), with respect to controls. Heat application increased weight gain and food intake, and reduced running rate in ABA rats, when compared with ABA rats at 21 degrees C. However, no changes in body weight and food intake were observed in sedentary rats exposed to heat. Moreover, heat application reduced MC4 receptor, AgRP and POMC expression in ABA rats, but no changes were observed in control rats. These results indicate that hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression could occur on the basis of the characteristic hyperactivity, weight loss, and self-starvation of ABA rats, and suggest the involvement of hypothalamic melanocortin neural circuits in behavioural changes shown by AN patients. Changes in AgRP and POMC expression could represent an adaptative response to equilibrate energy balance. Moreover, the fact that HAT reversed hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in ABA rats indicates the involvement of brain melanocortin system in the reported beneficial effects of heat application in AN. A combination of MC4 receptor antagonists and heat application could improve the clinical management of AN.

  8. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  9. ISLSCP II Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important indicator of the state of the earth climate system as well as a key variable in the coupling between the atmosphere and...

  10. High Temperature Bell Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Research Council (NRC) has identified the need for motors and actuators that can operate in extreme high and low temperature environments as a technical...

  11. (Krauss) at constant high temperatures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of opinions are held on the relative importance of the various physical ... optimum as well as extreme temperatures on vital functions such as survival, egg ..... solids on the biology of certain freshwater molluscs. D .Sc. thesis,. Potch.

  12. Temperature profiles of coal stockpiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensogut, C.; Ozdeniz, A.H.; Gundogdu, I.B. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

    2008-07-01

    Excess of produced coals should be kept in the stockyards of the collieries. The longer the duration time for these coals, the greater possibility for spontaneous combustion to take place. Spontaneously burnt coals result in economical and environmental problems. Therefore, taking the necessary precautions before an outburst of the spontaneous combustion phenomenon is too important in terms of its severe results. In this study, a stockpile having industrial dimensions was formed in coal stockyard. The effective parameters on the stockpiles of coal such as temperature and humidity of the weather, time, and atmospheric pressure values were measured. The interior temperature variations of these stockpiles caused by the atmospheric conditions were also measured. The interior temperature distribution maps of the stockpile together with maximum and minimum temperature values were expressed visually and numerically by the assistance of obtained data.

  13. Raman Lidar Temperature Profiler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft wake vortices is especially hazardous during the landing and taking-off phases of flight. It is essential to obtain an accurate atmospheric temperature...

  14. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  15. Temperature optimization of high con

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sabry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Active cooling is essential for solar cells operating under high optical concentration ratios. A system comprises four solar cells that are in thermal contact on top of a copper tube is proposed. Water is flowing inside the tube in order to reduce solar cells temperature for increasing their performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation of such system has been performed in order to investigate the effect of water flow rate, tube internal diameter, and convective heat transfer coefficient on the temperature of the solar cells. It is found that increasing convective heat transfer coefficient has a significant effect on reducing solar cells temperatures operating at low flow rates and high optical concentration ratios. Also, a further increase of water flow rate has no effect on reducing cells temperatures.

  16. ISLSCP II Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important indicator of the state of the earth climate system as well as a key variable in the coupling between the...

  17. High Temperature Electrostrictive Ceramics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TRS Technologies proposes to develop high temperature electrostrictors from bismuth-based ferroelectrics. These materials will exhibit high strain and low loss in...

  18. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Yonatan; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  19. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Yonatan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  20. Low-temperature coal desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, P. S.; Gavalas, G. R.; Hsu, G. C.; Kalfayan, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    Economical, low-temperature chlorinolysis converts sulfur to water-soluble sulfates. Sulfates are removed by washing. Subsequent steps dry coal and remove chlorine. Chlorine and solvents can be reused.

  1. High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The six user centers in the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML), a DOE User Facility, are dedicated to solving materials problems that limit the efficiency...

  2. RPC operation at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Stante, L; Liberti, B; Paoloni, A; Pastori, E; Santonico, R

    2003-01-01

    The resistive electrodes of RPCs utilised in several current experiments (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE, BABAR and ARGO) are made of phenolic /melaminic polymers, with room temperature resistivities ranging from 10**1**0 Omega cm, for high rate operation in avalanche mode, to 5 multiplied by 10**1**1 Omega cm, for streamer mode operation at low rate. The resistivity has however a strong temperature dependence, decreasing exponentially with increasing temperature. We have tested several RPCs with different electrode resistivities in avalanche as well as in streamer mode operation. The behaviours of the operating current and of the counting rate have been studied at different temperatures. Long-term operation has also been studied at T = 45 degree C and 35 degree C, respectively, for high and low resistivity electrodes RPCs.

  3. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  4. Flexible Temperature Sensors on Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sibinski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Malgorzata; Sloma, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present research dedicated to the elaboration of novel, miniaturized flexible temperature sensors for textronic applications. Examined sensors were manufactured on a single yarn, which ensures their high flexibility and good compatibility with textiles. Stable and linear characteristics were obtained by special technological process and applied temperature profiles. As a thermo-sensitive materials the innovative polymer compositions filled with multiwalled carbon n...

  5. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  6. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  7. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    OpenAIRE

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet is ...

  8. High Temperature Superconductor Accelerator Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Van Nugteren, Jeroen; ten Kate, Herman; de Rijk, Gijs; Dhalle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding $20T$. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet ...

  9. Dinosaur fossils predict body temperatures.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillooly, James F; Allen, Andrew P.; Charnov, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest mystery surrounding dinosaurs concerns whether they were endotherms, ectotherms, or some unique intermediate form. Here we present a model that yields estimates of dinosaur body temperature based on ontogenetic growth trajectories obtained from fossil bones. The model predicts that dinosaur body temperatures increased with body mass from approximately 25 degrees C at 12 kg to approximately 41 degrees C at 13,000 kg. The model also successfully predicts observed increases ...

  10. Electroweak relaxation from finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Edward [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-11-12

    We study theories which naturally select a vacuum with parametrically small Electroweak Scale due to finite temperature effects in the early universe. In particular, there is a scalar with an approximate shift symmetry broken by a technically natural small coupling to the Higgs, and a temperature dependent potential. As the temperature of the universe drops, the scalar follows the minimum of its potential altering the Higgs mass squared parameter. The scalar also has a periodic potential with amplitude proportional to the Higgs expectation value, which traps it in a vacuum with a small Electroweak Scale. The required temperature dependence of the potential can occur through strong coupling effects in a hidden sector that are suppressed at high temperatures. Alternatively, it can be generated perturbatively from a one-loop thermal potential. In both cases, for the scalar to be displaced, a hidden sector must be reheated to temperatures significantly higher than the visible sector. However this does not violate observational constraints provided the hidden sector energy density is transferred to the visible sector without disrupting big bang nucleosynthesis. We also study how the mechanism can be implemented when the visible sector is completed to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at a high scale. Models with a UV cutoff of 10 TeV and no fields taking values over a range greater than 10{sup 12} GeV are possible, although the scalar must have a range of order 10{sup 8} times the effective decay constant in the periodic part of its potential.

  11. Solute strengthening at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyson, G. P. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high temperature behavior of solute strengthening has previously been treated approximately using various scaling arguments, resulting in logarithmic and power-law scalings for the stress-dependent energy barrier Δ E(τ ) versus stress τ. Here, a parameter-free solute strengthening model is extended to high temperatures/low stresses without any a priori assumptions on the functional form of Δ E(τ ) . The new model predicts that the well-established low-temperature, with energy barrier Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and zero temperature flow stress {τy0} , transitions to a near-logarithmic form for stresses in the regime 0.2intermediate-temperature and the associated transition for the activation volume. Overall, the present analysis unifies the different qualitative models in the literature and, when coupled with the previous parameter-free solute strengthening model, provides a single predictive model for solute strengthening as a function of composition, temperature, and strain rate over the full range of practical utility.

  12. Temperature analysis in CFRP drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Takashi; Tamura, Shoichi

    2016-10-01

    The cutting temperature in drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is simulated numerically in finite difference analysis. The cutting force is predicted to estimate heat generation on the shear plane and the rake face by an energy approach. In the force model, three dimensional chip flow is interpreted as a piling up of the orthogonal cuttings in the planes containing the cutting velocities and the chip flow velocities, in which the chip flow direction is determined to minimize the cutting energy. Then, the cutting force is predicted in the determined chip flow model. The cutting temperature distribution is simulated with the thermal conductions, the thermal convections and the heat generations in the discrete elements of the tool, the chip and the workpiece. The heat generations on the shear plane and the rake face are given by stress distributions based on the cutting force predicted. The cutting temperature is analyzed on assumption that all mechanical works contribute the heat generation. The temperature of CFRP is compared with that of carbon steel in the numerical simulation. The maximum temperature of CFRP is much lower than carbon steel. The position at the maximum temperature is near the tool tip due to a low thermal conductivity of CFRP.

  13. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  14. Solubility of crude oil in methane as a function of pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, L.C.; Wenger, L.M.; Ging, T.; Blount, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of a 44?? API (0.806 sp. gr.) whole crude oil has been measured in methane with water present at temperatures of 50 to 250??C and pressures of 740 to 14,852 psi, as have the solubilities of two high molecular weight petroleum distillation fractions at temperatures of 50 to 250??C and pressures of 4482 to 25,266 psi. Both increases in pressure and temperature increase the solubility of crude oil and petroleum distillation fractions in methane, the effect of pressure being greater than that of temperature. Unexpectedly high solubility levels (0.5-1.5 grams of oil per liter of methane-at laboratory temperature and pressure) were measured at moderate conditions (50-200??C and 5076-14504 psi). Similar results were found for the petroleum distillation fractions, one of which was the highest molecular weight material of petroleum (material boiling above 266??C at 6 microns pressure). Unexpectedly mild conditions (100??C and 15,200 psi; 200??C and 7513 psi) resulted in cosolubility of crude oil and methane. Under these conditions, samples of the gas-rich phase gave solubility values of 4 to 5 g/l, or greater. Qualitative analyses of the crude-oil solute samples showed that at low pressure and temperature equilibration conditions, the solute condensate would be enriched in C5-C15 range hydrocarbons and in saturated hydrocarbons in the C15+ fraction. With increases in temperature and especially pressure, these tendencies were reversed, and the solute condensate became identical to the starting crude oil. The data of this study, compared to that of previous studies, shows that methane, with water present, has a much greater carrying capacity for crude oil than in dry systems. The presence of water also drastically lowers the temperature and pressure conditions required for cosolubility. The data of this and/or previous studies demonstrate that the addition of carbon dioxide, ethane, propane, or butane to methane also has a strong positive effect on crude oil

  15. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  16. Passive electronic identification with temperature monitoring. [Temperature monitor for cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, D.M.; Bobbett, R.E.; Koelle, A.R.; Landt, J.A.; Sanders, W.M.; Depp, S.W.; Seawright, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) have been supporting an electronic identification and temperature monitoring project at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) since early 1973. The development, so far, indicates that a subdermally-implanted, electronic transponder (having no batteries) can be remotely activated and transmit temperature and identification information back to a receiver in a few tenths of a second. If this electronic identification and temperature monitoring system is developed into a commercially available product line, and is widely accepted by the cattle industry, it will enable them to carry out more extensive management practices. Better management can result in greater efficiency and productivity. The system will also enable regulatory agencies to trace the movements of diseased animals through commerce, and thus assist in disease control measures. Work so far has been concentrated primarily on determining the technical feasibility of the electronic concepts. (auth)

  17. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system consists of a prototype...... cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes, runs on pure hydrogen in a dead end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack is managed by running...... the stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the PBI fuel cell membranes used, and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle and end and predicting the temperatures in these three...

  18. Sustained Low Temperature NOx Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Yuhui

    2017-04-05

    Increasing regulatory, environmental, and customer pressure in recent years led to substantial improvements in the fuel efficiency of diesel engines, including the remarkable breakthroughs demonstrated through the Super Truck program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). On the other hand, these improvements have translated into a reduction of exhaust gas temperatures, thus further complicating the task of controlling NOx emissions, especially in low power duty cycles. The need for improved NOx conversion over these low temperature duty cycles is also observed as requirements tighten with in-use emissions testing. Sustained NOx reduction at low temperatures, especially in the 150-200oC range, shares some similarities with the more commonly discussed cold-start challenge, however poses a number of additional and distinct technical problems. In this project we set a bold target of achieving and maintaining a 90% NOx conversion at the SCR catalyst inlet temperature of 150oC. The project is intended to push the boundaries of the existing technologies, while staying within the realm of realistic future practical implementation. In order to meet the resulting challenges at the levels of catalyst fundamentals, system components, and system integration, Cummins has partnered with the DOE, Johnson Matthey, and Pacific Northwest National Lab and initiated the Sustained Low-Temperature NOx Reduction program at the beginning of 2015. Through this collaboration, we are exploring catalyst formulations and catalyst architectures with enhanced catalytic activity at 150°C; opportunities to approach the desirable ratio of NO and NO2 in the SCR feed gas; options for robust low-temperature reductant delivery; and the requirements for overall system integration. The program is expected to deliver an on-engine demonstration of the technical solution and an assessment of its commercial potential. In the SAE meeting, we will share the initial performance data on engine to

  19. Temperature Distribution in a Displacement Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The vertical temperature gradient is normally given as a linear temperature distribution between a minimum temperature close to the floor and a maximum temperature close to the ceiling. The minimum temperature can either be a constant fraction of a load dependent difference or it can be connected...

  20. Betavoltaic performance under extreme temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Tom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Longevity of sensors and portable devices is severely limited by temperature, chemical instability, and electrolyte leakage issues associated with conventional electrochemical batteries. Betavoltaics, which operate similar to photo voltaics, can operate in a wide temperature range safely without permanent degradation. Though not a new concept, which began in the 1950's and peaked in the mid 1970's, research has been minimal and sporadic until recent advancements in ultra-low power electronics and materialization of low power applications. The technology is rapidly maturing, generating research, and development in increasing the beta emitting source and semiconductor efficiencies. This study presents an update on betavoltaic technology, results from temperature evaluation on commercially available General Licensed betavoltaic cells, development of a hybrid system for latent and burst power, modeling and simulation techniques and results, and current and proposed research and development. Betavoltaic performance was successfully demonstrated for a wide temperature range (-30°C to 70°C. Short circuit current and open circuit voltage were used to compare electrical performance. Results indicate that the open-circuit voltage and maximum power decreased as temperature increased due to increases in the semiconductor's intrinsic carrier concentration.

  1. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  2. Quantum interferometric measurements of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Marcin; Zwierz, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    We provide a detailed description of the quantum interferometric thermometer, which is a device that estimates the temperature of a sample from the measurements of the optical phase. We rigorously analyze the operation of such a device by studying the interaction of the optical probe system prepared in a single-mode Gaussian state with a heated sample modeled as a dissipative thermal reservoir. We find that this approach to thermometry is capable of measuring the temperature of a sample in the nanokelvin regime. Furthermore, we compare the fundamental precision of quantum interferometric thermometers with the theoretical precision offered by the classical idealized pyrometers, which infer the temperature from a measurement of the total thermal radiation emitted by the sample. We find that the interferometric thermometer provides a superior performance in temperature sensing even when compared with this idealized pyrometer. We predict that interferometric thermometers will prove useful for ultraprecise temperature sensing and stabilization of quantum optical experiments based on the nonlinear crystals and atomic vapors.

  3. VAB Temperature and Humidity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Muktarian, Edward; Nurge, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, 17 data loggers were placed in the VAB to measure temperature and humidity at 10-minute intervals over a one-year period. In 2013, the data loggers were replaced with an upgraded model and slight adjustments to their locations were made to reduce direct solar heating effects. The data acquired by the data loggers was compared to temperature data provided by three wind towers located around the building. It was found that the VAB acts as a large thermal filter, delaying and reducing the thermal oscillations occurring outside of the building. This filtering is typically more pronounced at higher locations in the building, probably because these locations have less thermal connection with the outside. We surmise that the lower elevations respond more to outside temperature variations because of air flow through the doors. Temperatures inside the VAB rarely exceed outdoor temperatures, only doing so when measurements are made directly on a surface with connection to the outside (such as a door or wall) or when solar radiation falls directly on the sensor. A thermal model is presented to yield approximate filter response times for various locations in the building. Appendix A contains historical thermal and humidity data from 1994 to 2009.

  4. Temperature moments vs poison moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, U.M.

    1947-05-19

    The excess reactivity available in an operating pile is absorbed in poison columns and horizontal rods. The temperature distribution of the pile is determined by the relative strengths and locations of the poison columns and the configuration of control rods used. A method for adjusting poison columns and rods to improve upon the pile`s temperature distribution is given in Document {number_sign}7-2654, ``Procedure for Improving Temperature Distribution via Rods and Columns,`` Wheeler and Menegus to Jordan, September 9, 1945. A relationship between poison moment (inhour lattice units) and temperature moments (per coat) was theoretically derived in the above document and has since been measured on several occasions on the basis of operating experience. A survey of recent operating data for the F Pile has been made by H. A. Gauper, Jr. with the intent of improving the method for obtaining the temperature and poison moments and relating changes in the two. This study was concerned with only the horizontal and vertical dipole moments. The results of Mr. Gauper`s investigation are summarized in this memorandum.

  5. Technical Note: Controlled experimental aquarium system for multi-stressor investigation of carbonate chemistry, oxygen saturation, and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Bockmon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the field of ocean acidification has grown, researchers have increasingly turned to laboratory experiments to understand the impacts of increased CO2 on marine organisms. However, other changes such as ocean warming and deoxygenation are occurring concurrently with the increasing CO2 concentrations, complicating the understanding of the impacts of anthropogenic changes on organisms. This experimental aquarium design allows for independent regulation of CO2 concentration, O2 levels, and temperature in a controlled environment to study the impacts of multiple stressors. The system has the flexibility for a wide range of treatment chemistry, seawater volumes, and study organisms. Control of the seawater chemistry is achieved by equilibration of a chosen gas mixture with seawater using a Liqui-Cel® membrane contactor. Included as examples, two experiments performed using the system have shown control of CO2 at values between approximately 500 and 1400 μatm and O2 at values from 80 to 240 μmol kg−1. Temperature has been maintained to 0.5 °C or better in the range of 10–17 °C. On a weeklong timescale, the system has achieved variability in pH of less than 0.007 pH units and in oxygen concentration of less than 3.5 μmol kg−1. Longer experiments, over a month in duration, have been completed with control to better than 0.08 pH units and 13 μmol kg−1 O2. The ability to study the impacts of multiple stressors in the laboratory simultaneously, as well as independently, will be an important part of understanding the response of marine organisms to a high-CO2 world.

  6. Technical Note: Controlled experimental aquarium system for multi-stressor investigation of carbonate chemistry, oxygen saturation, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockmon, E. E.; Frieder, C. A.; Navarro, M. O.; White-Kershek, L. A.; Dickson, A. G.

    2013-09-01

    As the field of ocean acidification has grown, researchers have increasingly turned to laboratory experiments to understand the impacts of increased CO2 on marine organisms. However, other changes such as ocean warming and deoxygenation are occurring concurrently with the increasing CO2 concentrations, complicating the understanding of the impacts of anthropogenic changes on organisms. This experimental aquarium design allows for independent regulation of CO2 concentration, O2 levels, and temperature in a controlled environment to study the impacts of multiple stressors. The system has the flexibility for a wide range of treatment chemistry, seawater volumes, and study organisms. Control of the seawater chemistry is achieved by equilibration of a chosen gas mixture with seawater using a Liqui-Cel® membrane contactor. Included as examples, two experiments performed using the system have shown control of CO2 at values between approximately 500 and 1400 μatm and O2 at values from 80 to 240 μmol kg-1. Temperature has been maintained to 0.5 °C or better in the range of 10-17 °C. On a weeklong timescale, the system has achieved variability in pH of less than 0.007 pH units and in oxygen concentration of less than 3.5 μmol kg-1. Longer experiments, over a month in duration, have been completed with control to better than 0.08 pH units and 13 μmol kg-1 O2. The ability to study the impacts of multiple stressors in the laboratory simultaneously, as well as independently, will be an important part of understanding the response of marine organisms to a high-CO2 world.

  7. Modeling the Effect of Temperature and Water Activity on the Thermal Resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 in Wheat Flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Danielle F; Hildebrandt, Ian M; Casulli, Kaitlyn E; Dolan, Kirk D; Marks, Bradley P

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella continues to be a problem associated with low-moisture foods, particularly given enhanced thermal resistance at lower water activity (aw). However, there is a scarcity of thermal inactivation models accounting for the effect of aw. The objective of this study was to test multiple secondary models for the effect of product (wheat flour) aw on Salmonella enterica Enteritidis phage type 30 thermal resistance. A full-factorial experimental design included three temperatures (75, 80, and 85°C) and four aw values (~0.30, 0.45, 0.60, and 0.70). Prior to isothermal treatment, sample aw was achieved by equilibrating samples in a humidity-controlled conditioning chamber. Two primary models (log linear and Weibull type) and three secondary models (second-order response surface, modified Bigelow type, and combined effects) were evaluated using the corrected Akaike information criterion and root mean squared errors. Statistical analyses of the primary models favored the log-linear model. Incorporating the three secondary models into the log-linear primary model yielded root mean squared errors of 2.1, 0.78, and 0.96 log CFU/g and corrected Akaike information criterion values of 460, -145, and -19 for the response surface, modified Bigelow, and combined-effects models, respectively. The modified Bigelow-type model, which exponentially scaled both temperature and aw effects on thermal inactivation rates, predicted Salmonella lethality significantly better (P Salmonella in low-moisture products and should be appropriately included in thermal inactivation models for these types of systems.

  8. Variable color temperature fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, J.; Maya, J.

    2000-05-01

    Color temperature change in a mercury-rare gas low pressure discharge has been investigated. Different pulse waveforms have been employed to increase the ratio of mercury upper level transitions with respect to the resonant 254 nm radiation. Low pressure fluorescent light sources were made with coatings consisting of a blue phosphor, sensitive to 365 nm ultraviolet radiation, blended with the standard 254 nm excited red/green phosphors. With a fast rise excitation waveform, a color temperature rise of as much as 1700 K was realized although at a cost of 26% in relative luminous efficacy. An improved scheme for greater color temperature change is proposed based on a phosphor that is excitable by the mercury 185 nm ultraviolet radiation but which does not absorb 254 nm radiation.

  9. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  10. Brain temperature and exercise performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Events arising within the central nervous system seem to play a major factor in the aetiology of hyperthermia-induced fatigue. Thus, various studies with superimposed electrical nerve stimulation or transcranial magnetic stimulation have shown that both passive and exercise-induced hyperthermia...... will impair voluntary motor activation during sustained maximal contractions. In humans the brain temperature increases in parallel with that of the body core making it very difficult to evaluate the independent effect of the cerebral temperature. Experiments with separate manipulation of the brain...... temperature in exercising goats indicate that excessive brain hyperthermia will directly affect motor performance. However, several homeostatic changes arise in parallel with hyperthermia including factors that may influence both peripheral and central fatigue and it is likely that these changes interact...

  11. Quantum entanglement and temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we consider entanglement in a system out of equilibrium, adopting the viewpoint given by the formalism of superstatistics. Such an approach yields a good effective description for a system in a slowly fluctuating environment within a weak interaction between the system and the environment. For this purpose, we introduce an alternative version of the formalism within a quantum mechanical picture and use it to study entanglement in the Heisenberg XY model, subject to temperature fluctuations. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic cases and explore the effect of different temperature fluctuations (χ^{2}, log-normal, and F distributions). Our results suggest that particular fluctuations may enhance entanglement and prevent it from vanishing at higher temperatures than those predicted for the same system at thermal equilibrium.

  12. Michelson interferometer for measuring temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Xu, Chunling; Wang, An Min

    2017-09-01

    We investigate that temperature can be measured by a modified Michelson interferometer, where at least one reflected mirror is replaced by a thermalized sample. Both of two mirrors replaced by the corresponding two thermalized samples can help to approximatively improve the resolution of temperature up to twice than only one mirror replaced by a thermalized sample. For further improving the precision, a nonlinear medium can be employed. The Michelson interferometer is embedded in a gas displaying Kerr nonlinearity. We obtain the analytical equations and numerically calculate the precision with parameters within the reach of current technology, proving that the precision of temperature can be greatly enhanced by using a nonlinear medium. Our results show that one can create an accurate thermometer by measuring the photons in the Michelson interferometer, with no need to directly measure the population of thermalized sample.

  13. Temperature characterization of versatile transceivers

    CERN Document Server

    Olanterä, L.; Storey, S; Sigaud, C; Soos, C; Troska, J; Vasey, F

    2013-01-01

    The Versatile Transceiver is a part of the Versatile Link project, which is developing optical link architectures and components for future HL-LHC experiments. While having considerable size and weight constraints, Versatile Transceivers must work under severe environmental conditions. One such environmental parameter is the temperature: the operating temperature range is specified to be from -30 to +60°C. In this contribution we present the results of the temperature characterization of the VTRx transmitter and receiver. Several transmitter candidates from three different manufacturers have been characterized: multi-mode Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers and a single-mode Edge-Emitter Laser. Also both single- and multi-mode receivers have been tested.

  14. High Temperature Composite Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2002-01-01

    High temperature composite heat exchangers are an enabling technology for a number of aeropropulsion applications. They offer the potential for mass reductions of greater than fifty percent over traditional metallics designs and enable vehicle and engine designs. Since they offer the ability to operate at significantly higher operating temperatures, they facilitate operation at reduced coolant flows and make possible temporary uncooled operation in temperature regimes, such as experienced during vehicle reentry, where traditional heat exchangers require coolant flow. This reduction in coolant requirements can translate into enhanced range or system payload. A brief review of the approaches and challengers to exploiting this important technology are presented, along with a status of recent government-funded projects.

  15. Flexible Temperature Sensors on Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sloma

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present research dedicated to the elaboration of novel, miniaturized flexible temperature sensors for textronic applications. Examined sensors were manufactured on a single yarn, which ensures their high flexibility and good compatibility with textiles. Stable and linear characteristics were obtained by special technological process and applied temperature profiles. As a thermo-sensitive materials the innovative polymer compositions filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes were used. Elaborated material was adapted to printing and dip-coating techniques to produce NTC composites. Nanotube sensors were free from tensometric effect typical for other carbon-polymer sensor, and demonstrated TCR of 0.13%/K. Obtained temperature sensors, compatible with textile structure, can be applied in rapidly developing smart textiles and be used for health and protections purposes.

  16. Relationship between body temperature and air temperature In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-06-22

    Jun 22, 1992 ... couple was glued to the exoskeleton with cyano-acrylic glue. The thermocouple was connected to a Sensonek BAT-. 12 digital thermometer (aCcuracy bener than O,IOC) and a chart recorder. Ambient temperature (T.) was measured with a second thermometer of the same kind. Measurements were.

  17. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Domier, C.W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Brower, D.L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI

  18. Moire interferometry at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jau-Je

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide an optical technique allowing full-field in-plane deformation measurements at high temperature by using high-sensitivity moire interferometry. This was achieved by a new approach of performing deformation measurements at high temperatures in a vacuum oven using an achromatic interferometer. The moire system setup was designed with particular consideration for the stability, compactness, flexibility, and ease of control. A vacuum testing environment was provided to minimize the instability of the patterns by protecting the optical instruments from the thermal convection currents. Also, a preparation procedure for the high-temperature specimen grating was developed with the use of the plasma-etched technique. Gold was used as a metallic layer in this procedure. This method was demonstrated on a ceramic block, metal/matrix composite, and quartz. Thermal deformation of a quartz specimen was successfully measured in vacuum at 980 degrees Celsius, with the sensitivity of 417 nm per fringe. The stable and well-defined interference patterns confirmed the feasibility of the developments, including the high-temperature moire system and high-temperature specimen grating. The moire system was demonstrated to be vibration-insensitive. Also, the contrast of interference fringes at high temperature was enhanced by means of a spatial filter and a narrow band interference filter to minimize the background noise from the flow of the specimen and heater. The system was verified by a free thermal expansion test of an aluminum block. Good agreement demonstrated the validity of the optical design. The measurements of thermal deformation mismatch were performed on a graphite/epoxy composite, a metal/matrix composite equipped with an optical fiber, and a cutting tool bit. A high-resolution data-reduction technique was used to measure the strain distribution of the cutting tool bit.

  19. High temperature superconductor current leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  20. Superhigh Temperatures and Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, V B; Miller, M B; Sermyagin, A V; Topolnikov, A S

    2003-01-01

    The experimental results on thermonuclear synthesis under acoustic cavitation have been analyzed with the account of the latest data and their discussion. The analysis testifies that this avenue of research is a very promising one. The numerical calculations of the D(d, n)^{3}He reaction rate in the deuterated acetone (C_{3}D_{6}O) under the influence of ultrasound depending on T environment temperature within the range T=249-295 K have been carried out within the framework of hydrodynamic model. The results show that it is possible to improve substantially the effect/background relationship in experiments by decreasing the fluid temperature twenty-thirty degrees below zero.