WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron tunneling process

  1. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-01-01

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed

  2. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  3. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  4. Electron beam induced purification of dilute off gases from industrial processes and automobile tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paur, H.-R.; Maetzing, H.

    1993-01-01

    The electron beam process has proved to be an efficient method for the removal of inorganic pollutants from flue gas. Since it simulates natural processes which occur in the atmospheric photochemistry, it appeared attractive to investigate the potential of the e-beam process to clean off-gases which contain hydrocarbon and inorganic trace components. Such emissions arise from industrial processes and from automobile tunnels. Commercial solvents were vaporized in air and irradiated with energetic electrons (300 keV). CO, CO 2 and aerosol particles were found as products and were determined quantitatively. The aerosol particles can be collected by a gravel bed filter and can be removed by combustion or biological degradation. From experiments and model calculations it was found that the e-beam process is a very economic tool to remove hydrocarbons from large off-gas volumes at initial concentrations of 50-100 mg C/m 3 , and that NO x can be removed very efficiently from tunnel off-gas. (author)

  5. Electron tunneling in proteins program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-05

    We developed a unique integrated software package (called Electron Tunneling in Proteins Program or ETP) which provides an environment with different capabilities such as tunneling current calculation, semi-empirical quantum mechanical calculation, and molecular modeling simulation for calculation and analysis of electron transfer reactions in proteins. ETP program is developed as a cross-platform client-server program in which all the different calculations are conducted at the server side while only the client terminal displays the resulting calculation outputs in the different supported representations. ETP program is integrated with a set of well-known computational software packages including Gaussian, BALLVIEW, Dowser, pKip, and APBS. In addition, ETP program supports various visualization methods for the tunneling calculation results that assist in a more comprehensive understanding of the tunneling process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. High density processing electronics for superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, W.K., E-mail: bill@xia.com [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Harris, J.T. [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are excellent soft x-ray (100–2000 eV) detectors, particularly for synchrotron applications, because of their ability to obtain energy resolutions below 10 eV at count rates approaching 10 kcps. In order to achieve useful solid detection angles with these very small detectors, they are typically deployed in large arrays – currently with 100+ elements, but with 1000 elements being contemplated. In this paper we review a 5-year effort to develop compact, computer controlled low-noise processing electronics for STJ detector arrays, focusing on the major issues encountered and our solutions to them. Of particular interest are our preamplifier design, which can set the STJ operating points under computer control and achieve 2.7 eV energy resolution; our low noise power supply, which produces only 2 nV/√Hz noise at the preamplifier's critical cascode node; our digital processing card that digitizes and digitally processes 32 channels; and an STJ I–V curve scanning algorithm that computes noise as a function of offset voltage, allowing an optimum operating point to be easily selected. With 32 preamplifiers laid out on a custom 3U EuroCard, and the 32 channel digital card in a 3U PXI card format, electronics for a 128 channel array occupy only two small chassis, each the size of a National Instruments 5-slot PXI crate, and allow full array control with simple extensions of existing beam line data collection packages.

  7. Klein tunneling phenomenon with pair creation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Fu, L. B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Klein tunneling phenomenon with electron-positron pair creation process. Pairs can be created from the vacuum by a supercritical single-well potential (for electrons). In the time region, the time-dependent growth pattern of the created pairs can be characterized by four distinct regimes which can be considered as four different statuses of the single well. We find that if positrons penetrate the single well by Klein tunneling in different statuses, the total number of the tunneling positrons will be different. If Klein tunneling begins at the initial stage of the first status i.e. when the sing well is empty, the tunneling process and the total number of tunneling positrons are similar to the traditional Klein tunneling case without considering the pair creation process. As the tunneling begins later, the total tunneling positron number increases. The number will finally settle to an asymptotic value when the tunneling begins later than the settling-down time t s of the single well which has been defined in this paper.

  8. Principles of electron tunneling spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, E L

    2012-01-01

    Electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a research tool has strongly advanced understanding of superconductivity. This book explains the physics and instrumentation behind the advances illustrated in beautiful images of atoms, rings of atoms and exotic states in high temperature superconductors, and summarizes the state of knowledge that has resulted.

  9. Electron tunneling across a tunable potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A; Anthore, A; Rocca, M L Della; Boulat, E; Lafarge, P

    2009-01-01

    We present an experiment where the elementary quantum electron tunneling process should be affected by an independent gate voltage parameter. We have realized nanotransistors where the source and drain electrodes are created by electromigration inducing a nanometer sized gap acting as a tunnel barrier. The barrier potential shape is in first approximation considered trapezoidal. The application of a voltage to the gate electrode close to the barrier region can in principle affect the barrier shape. Simulations of the source drain tunnel current as a function of the gate voltage predict modulations as large as one hundred percent. The difficulty of observing the predicted behaviour in our samples might be due to the peculiar geometry of the realized tunnel junction.

  10. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  11. Resonance tunneling electron-vibrational spectroscopy of polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalidchik, F I; Kovalevskii, S A; Balashov, E M

    2017-05-21

    The tunneling spectra of the ordered monolayer films of decamolybdodicobaltate (DMDC) compounds deposited from aqueous solutions on HOPG were measured by scanning tunnel microscopy in air. The DMDC spectra, as well as the tunneling spectra of other polyoxometalates (POMs), exhibit well-defined negative differential resistances (NDRs). The mechanism of formation of these spectral features was established from the collection of revealed NDR dependences on the external varying parameters and found to be common to all systems exhibiting Wannier-Stark localization. A model of biresonance tunneling was developed to provide an explanation for the totality of experimental data, both the literature and original, on the tunneling POM probing. A variant of the tunneling electron-vibrational POM spectroscopy was proposed allowing the determination of the three basic energy parameters-energy gaps between the occupied and unoccupied states, frequencies of the vibrational transitions accompanying biresonance electron-tunneling processes, and electron-vibrational interaction constants on the monomolecular level.

  12. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  13. Electronic tunneling currents at optical frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, S. M.; Fan, B.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1975-01-01

    Rectification characteristics of nonsuperconducting metal-barrier-metal junctions as deduced from electronic tunneling theory have been observed experimentally for optical frequency irradiation of the junction.

  14. Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices. C L ROY. Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India. Abstract. The purpose of the present paper is to report a study of tunneling of electrons through semicon- ductor superlattices (SSL); specially, we have ...

  15. First principles studies of electron tunneling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    A first principles study of electronic tunneling along the chain of seven Fe/S clusters in respiratory complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain, is described. The broken-symmetry states of the Fe/S metal clusters calculated at both DFT and semi-empirical ZINDO levels were utilized to examine both the extremely weak electronic couplings between Fe/S clusters and the tunneling pathways, which provide a detailed atomistic-level description of the charge transfer process in the protein. One-electron tunneling approximation was found to hold within a reasonable accuracy, with only a moderate induced polarization of the core electrons. The method is demonstrated to be able to calculate accurately the coupling matrix elements as small as 10−4 cm−1. A distinct signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as quantum interferences of multiple tunneling pathways. PMID:25383312

  16. Electroluminescence from graphene excited by electron tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams, Ryan; Bharadwaj, Palash; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    We use low-energy electron tunneling to excite electroluminescence in single layer graphene. Electrons are injected locally using a scanning tunneling microscope and the luminescence is analyzed using a wide-angle optical imaging system. The luminescence can be switched on and off by inverting the tip–sample bias voltage. The observed luminescence is explained in terms of a hot luminescence mechanism. (paper)

  17. Hard rock tunneling using pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Brekke, T.L.; Finnie, I.

    1974-01-01

    Intense submicrosecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and surface spalling of a variety of rock types, the spall debris generally consisting of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate this can lead to a promising technique for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a Pulsed Electron Tunnel Excavator capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods were studied. (auth)

  18. FUNDAMENTAL TUNNELING PROCESSES IN MOSa SOLAR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Balberg , I.; Hanak , J.; Weakliem , H.; Gal , E.

    1981-01-01

    In previous studies of tunneling through a MOSa tunnel junction, where Sa was a-Si : H, it was shown that their characteristics resemble those of MOSc devices where Sc was crystalline silicon. In the present work we would like to report a demonstration of fundamental tunneling processes in such tunnel junctions. In particular, the transition from semiconductor controlled regime to tunneling controlled regime can be clearly distinguished. The present results represent one of the rare cases whe...

  19. Electron accelerator for tunneling through hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.

    1975-10-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that intense sub-microsecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and spalling of a variety of rock types. The spall debris generally consists of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate, this can lead to a promising technique for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a Pulsed Electron Tunnel Excavator capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods are presented, with primary emphasis on the electron accelerator and only a brief description of the tunneling aspects. Of several candidate types of accelerators, a linear induction accelerator producing electron pulses (5 MV, 5 kA, 1.0 μs = 25 kJ) at a 360 Hz rate was selected for the conceptual example. This provides the required average electron beam power output of 9 MW. The feasibility of such an accelerator is discussed

  20. Electron accelerator for tunneling through hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.

    1975-01-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that intense sub-microsecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and spalling of a variety of rock types. The spall debris generally consists of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate, this can lead to a promising technique for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a Pulsed Electron Tunnel Excavator capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods are presented with primary emphasis on the electron accelerator and only a brief description of the tunneling aspects. Of several candidate types of accelerators, a linear induction accelerator producing electron pulses (5 MV, 5 kA, 1.0 μs = 25 kJ) at a 360 Hz rate was selected for the conceptual example. This provides the required average electron beam power output of 9 MW. The feasibility of such an accelerator is discussed

  1. Study of Scanning Tunneling Microscope control electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, A.J.; Pancarobo, M.; Denisenko, N.; Aguilar, M.; Rejon, V.; Pena, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical study of Scanning Tunneling Microscope control electronics is made. The knowledge of its behaviour allows us to determine accurately the region where the unstable operation could effect the measurements, and also to set the optimal working parameters. Each feedback circuitry compound is discussed as well as their mutual interaction. Different working conditions analysis and results are presented. (Author) 12 refs

  2. Electron tunnelling in glassy media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, E.J.; Pilling, M.J.; Rice, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of electron scavenging by a range of solute molecules in methanol, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) and 10mol dm -3 hydroxide glasses has been investigated by γ-radiolysis at 77K using spectrophotometric detection. The data have been analyzed using the recent theory of Dainton, Pilling and Rice (J.C.S. Faraday II; 71:1311 (1975)), and a satisfactory fit found. The trap depths for the thre systems are estimated to be 1.7eV (methanol), 1.0eV (MTHF) and 0.95eV (aq.hydroxide). A wide variation in the scavenging efficiency is tentatively ascribed to the differing geometries of the scavenger molecules. For MTHF and 10mol dm -3 hydroxide glasses, the efficiency of scavenging is independent of wave-length, suggesting that the width of the electron spectrum is not due to a range of trap depths. (author)

  3. Tunneling induced electron transfer between separated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia; Meier, Christoph; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2018-04-01

    We study electron transfer between two separated protons using local control theory. In this symmetric system one can favour a slow transfer by biasing the algorithm, achieving high efficiencies for fixed nuclei. The solution can be parametrized using a sequence of a pump followed by a dump pulse that lead to tunneling-induced electron transfer. Finally, we study the effect of the nuclear kinetic energy on the efficiency. Even in the absence of relative motion between the protons, the spreading of the nuclear wave function is enough to reduce the yield of electronic transfer to less than one half.

  4. Single-electron tunnel junction array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likharev, K.K.; Bakhvalov, N.S.; Kazacha, G.S.; Serdyukova, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have carried out an analysis of statics and dynamics of uniform one-dimensional arrays of ultrasmall tunnel junctions. The correlated single-electron tunneling in the junctions of the array results in its behavior qualitatively similar to that of the Josephson transmission line. In particular, external electric fields applied to the array edges can inject single-electron-charged solitons into the array interior. Shape of such soliton and character of its interactions with other solitons and the array edges are very similar to those of the Josephson vortices (sine-Gordon solitons) in the Josephson transmission line. Under certain conditions, a coherent motion of the soliton train along the array is possible, resulting in generation of narrowband SET oscillations with frequency f/sub s/ = /e where is the dc current flowing along the array

  5. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  6. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  7. Electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yang; Li Jianmei; Lu Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is highly expected that the future informatics will be based on the spins of individual electrons. The development of elementary information unit will eventually leads to novel single-molecule or single-atom devices based on electron spins; the quantum computer in the future can be constructed with single electron spins as the basic quantum bits. However, it is still a great challenge in detection and manipulation of a single electron spin, as well as its coherence and entanglement. As an ideal experimental tool for such tasks, the development of electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope (ESR-STM) has attracted great attention for decades. This paper briefly introduces the basic concept of ESR-STM. The development history of this instrument and recent progresses are reviewed. The underlying mechanism is explored and summarized. The challenges and possible solutions are discussed. Finally, the prospect of future direction and applications are presented. (authors)

  8. Lowest order in inelastic tunneling approximation : efficient scheme for simulation of inelastic electron tunneling data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, E.T.R.; Flipse, C.F.J.; Cerda, J.I.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an efficient and accurate formalism which allows the simulation at the ab initio level of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy data under a scanning tunneling microscope setup. It exploits fully the tunneling regime by carrying out the structural optimization and vibrational

  9. Quantum Electron Tunneling in Respiratory Complex I1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated the atomistic details of electronic wiring of all Fe/S clusters in complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain. The tunneling current theory of many-electron systems is applied to the broken-symmetry (BS) states of the protein at the ZINDO level. One-electron tunneling approximation is found to hold in electron tunneling between the anti-ferromagnetic binuclear and tetranuclear Fe/S clusters with moderate induced polarization of the core electrons. Calculated tunneling energy is about 3 eV higher than Fermi level in the band gap of the protein, which supports that the mechanism of electron transfer is quantum mechanical tunneling, as in the rest of electron transport chain. Resulting electron tunneling pathways consist of up to three key contributing protein residues between neighboring Fe/S clusters. A distinct signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as quantum interferences when multiple tunneling pathways exist. In N6a-N6b, electron tunnels along different pathways depending on the involved BS states, suggesting possible fluctuations of the tunneling pathways driven by the local protein environment. The calculated distance dependence of the electron transfer rates with internal water molecules included are in good agreement with a reported phenomenological relation. PMID:21495666

  10. Electron tunneling in carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gau, C; Kuo, Cheng-Yung; Ko, H S

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites, such as polymer blending with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been shown to have a drastic reduction in the resistivity and become conductive when the CNTs concentration has reached a certain percolation threshold. The reduction could be more than a millionth of the original polymer material. This has been realized as the formation of an infinite cluster of connected CNTs or pathways. Therefore, the conductivity of a nanocomposite should follow that of CNTs. Here we show that the resistivity of a nanocomposite is not governed by the interconnected CNTs, but the polymer between neighboring CNTs. That is, polymer-CNTs exhibit the nature of a conducting polymer, which can be explained as the tunneling of electrons one by one from the first CNT electrode to the next-nearest CNT electrode, forming a CNT/polymer pathway. A conduction model based on the tunneling of electrons passing, one by one, through the polymer gap between two neighboring CNT electrodes is formulated and derived. This model can accurately predict the significant reduction of the polymer-CNTs' resistivity with the addition of CNTs. The temperature effect can be readily incorporated to account for resistivity variation with the temperature of this nanocomposites.

  11. Electron beam instabilities in gyrotron beam tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrozzi, M.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J.P.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1997-10-01

    Electron beam instabilities occurring in a gyrotron electron beam can induce an energy spread which might significantly deteriorate the gyrotron efficiency. Three types of instabilities are considered to explain the important discrepancy found between the theoretical and experimental efficiency in the case of quasi-optical gyrotrons (QOG): the electron cyclotron maser instability, the Bernstein instability and the Langmuir instability. The low magnetic field gradient in drift tubes of QOG makes that the electron cyclotron maser instability can develop in the drift tube at very low electron beam currents. Experimental measurements show that with a proper choice of absorbing structures in the beam tunnel, this instability can be suppressed. At high beam currents, the electrostatic Bernstein instability can induce a significant energy spread at the entrance of the interaction region. The induced energy spread scales approximately linearly with the electron beam density and for QOG one observes that the beam density is significantly higher than the beam density of an equivalent cylindrical cavity gyrotron. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  12. Sub-electron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel; Sverdlov, Viktor; Korotkov, Alexander; Likharev, Konstantin

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed quasi-continuous charge transport in two-dimensional tunnel junction arrays with a special distribution of background charges, providing a complete suppression of Coulomb blockade thresholds of tunneling between any pair of islands. Numerical simulations show that at low currents the dc I-V curve is indeed linear, while the shot noise is strongly suppressed and approaches 1/N of the Schottky value (where N is the array length). Thus both conditions of quasi-continuous transport, formulated earlier by Matsuoka and Likharev (Phys. Rev. B, v57, 15613, 1998), are satisfied. At higher fields the electron-hole pair production begins, and shot noise grows sharply. At higher voltages still, the array enters the "plasma" regime (with nearly balanced number of electrons and holes) and the Fano factor drops to 1/N once again. We have studied the resulting shot noise peak in detail, and concluded that its physics is close to that of critical opalescence.

  13. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  14. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  15. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazin, G V; Wu, S W; Ho, W

    2005-06-21

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks corresponding to the individual vibronic states depends on the relative electron tunneling rates through the two barriers of the junction, as found by varying the vacuum gap tunneling rate by changing the height of the scanning tunneling microscope tip above the molecule. A simple, sequential tunneling model explains the observed trends.

  16. Giant tunnel-electron injection in nitrogen-doped graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagoute, Jerome; Joucken, Frederic; Repain, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been performed to measure the local electron injection in nitrogen-doped graphene on SiC(000) and were successfully compared to ab initio calculations. In graphene, a gaplike feature is measured around the Fermi level due to a phonon-mediated tunneling...... and at carbon sites. Nitrogen doping can therefore be proposed as a way to improve tunnel-electron injection in graphene....

  17. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  18. Quantum Calculations of Electron Tunneling in Respiratory Complex III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2015-11-19

    The most detailed and comprehensive to date study of electron transfer reactions in the respiratory complex III of aerobic cells, also known as bc1 complex, is reported. In the framework of the tunneling current theory, electron tunneling rates and atomistic tunneling pathways between different redox centers were investigated for all electron transfer reactions comprising different stages of the proton-motive Q-cycle. The calculations reveal that complex III is a smart nanomachine, which under certain conditions undergoes conformational changes gating electron transfer, or channeling electrons to specific pathways. One-electron tunneling approximation was adopted in the tunneling calculations, which were performed using hybrid Broken-Symmetry (BS) unrestricted DFT/ZINDO levels of theory. The tunneling orbitals were determined using an exact biorthogonalization scheme that uniquely separates pairs of tunneling orbitals with small overlaps out of the remaining Franck-Condon orbitals with significant overlap. Electron transfer rates in different redox pairs show exponential distance dependence, in agreement with the reported experimental data; some reactions involve coupled proton transfer. Proper treatment of a concerted two-electron bifurcated tunneling reaction at the Q(o) site is given.

  19. Quantum Hall Effect: proposed multi-electron tunneling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, I.Z.

    1985-11-01

    Here we propose a tunneling experiment for the fractional and Integral Quantum Hall Effect. It may demonstrate multi-electron tunneling and may provide information about the nature of the macroscopic quantum states of 2D electronic liquid or solid. (author)

  20. Tunneling processes into localized subgap states in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, Michael; Heinrich, Benjamin W.; Franke, Katharina J. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Pientka, Falko; Peng, Yang; Oppen, Felix von [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Dahlem Center for Complex Quantum Systems, Freie Universitaet Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states bound by magnetic impurities in conventional s-wave superconductors are a simple model system for probing the competition between superconducting and magnetic correlations. Shiba states can be observed in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) as a pair of resonances at positive and negative bias voltages in the superconducting gap. These resonances have been interpreted in terms of single-electron tunneling into the localized sub-gap states. This requires relaxation mechanisms that depopulate the state after an initial tunneling event. Recently, theory suggests that the current can also be carried by Andreev processes which resonantly transfer a Cooper pair into the superconductor. We performed high-resolution STS experiments on single adatom Shiba states on the superconductor Pb, and provide evidence for the existence of two transport regimes. The single-electron processes dominate at large tip-sample distances and small tunneling currents, whereas Andreev processes become important at stronger tunneling. Our conclusions are based on a careful comparison of experiment and theory.

  1. Tunneling-Electron-Induced Light Emission from Single Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Gregory; Ho, W

    2016-09-14

    The coupling of tunneling electrons with the tip-nanocluster-substrate junction plasmon was investigated by monitoring light emission in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Gold atoms were evaporated onto the ∼5 Å thick Al2O3 thin film grown on the NiAl (110) surface where they formed nanoclusters 3-7 nm wide. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of these nanoclusters revealed quantum-confined electronic states. Spatially resolved photon imaging showed localized emission hot spots. Size dependent study and light emission from nanocluster dimers further support the viewpoint that coupling of tunneling electrons to the junction plasmon is the main radiative mechanism. These results showed the potential of the STM to reveal the electronic and optical properties of nanoscale metallic systems in the confined geometry of the tunnel junction.

  2. "Size-Independent" Single-Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianli; Sun, Shasha; Swartz, Logan; Riechers, Shawn; Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Shaowei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2015-12-17

    Incorporating single-electron tunneling (SET) of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) into modern electronic devices offers great promise to enable new properties; however, it is technically very challenging due to the necessity to integrate ultrasmall (<10 nm) particles into the devices. The nanosize requirements are intrinsic for NPs to exhibit quantum or SET behaviors, for example, 10 nm or smaller, at room temperature. This work represents the first observation of SET that defies the well-known size restriction. Using polycrystalline Au NPs synthesized via our newly developed solid-state glycine matrices method, a Coulomb Blockade was observed for particles as large as tens of nanometers, and the blockade voltage exhibited little dependence on the size of the NPs. These observations are counterintuitive at first glance. Further investigations reveal that each observed SET arises from the ultrasmall single crystalline grain(s) within the polycrystal NP, which is (are) sufficiently isolated from the nearest neighbor grains. This work demonstrates the concept and feasibility to overcome orthodox spatial confinement requirements to achieve quantum effects.

  3. Analysis of Co-Tunneling Current in Fullerene Single-Electron Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhademHosseini, Vahideh; Dideban, Daryoosh; Ahmadi, MohammadTaghi; Ismail, Razali

    2018-05-01

    Single-electron transistors (SETs) are nano devices which can be used in low-power electronic systems. They operate based on coulomb blockade effect. This phenomenon controls single-electron tunneling and it switches the current in SET. On the other hand, co-tunneling process increases leakage current, so it reduces main current and reliability of SET. Due to co-tunneling phenomenon, main characteristics of fullerene SET with multiple islands are modelled in this research. Its performance is compared with silicon SET and consequently, research result reports that fullerene SET has lower leakage current and higher reliability than silicon counterpart. Based on the presented model, lower co-tunneling current is achieved by selection of fullerene as SET island material which leads to smaller value of the leakage current. Moreover, island length and the number of islands can affect on co-tunneling and then they tune the current flow in SET.

  4. Quantum tunneling and field electron emission theories

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is an essential issue in quantum physics. Especially, the rapid development of nanotechnology in recent years promises a lot of applications in condensed matter physics, surface science and nanodevices, which are growing interests in fundamental issues, computational techniques and potential applications of quantum tunneling. The book involves two relevant topics. One is quantum tunneling theory in condensed matter physics, including the basic concepts and methods, especially for recent developments in mesoscopic physics and computational formulation. The second part is the f

  5. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Nazin, G. V.; Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2005-01-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks correspondi...

  6. Microwave-induced co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, M.; Savolainen, M.; Manscher, M.

    2002-01-01

    on rubber bellows. Cross-talk was minimized by using individual coaxial lines between the sample and the room temperature electronics: The co-tunneling experiments were performed at zero DC bias current by measuring the voltage response to a very small amplitude 2 Hz current modulation with the gate voltage......The influence of microwaves on the co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors has been investigated as function of frequency and power in the temperature range from 150 to 500 mK. All 20 low frequency connections and the RF line were filtered, and the whole cryostat was suspended...

  7. Quantum tunneling recombination in a system of randomly distributed trapped electrons and positive ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Kulp, Christopher; Chaney, Charity-Grace; Tachiya, M

    2017-09-13

    During the past 10 years, quantum tunneling has been established as one of the dominant mechanisms for recombination in random distributions of electrons and positive ions, and in many dosimetric materials. Specifically quantum tunneling has been shown to be closely associated with two important effects in luminescence materials, namely long term afterglow luminescence and anomalous fading. Two of the common assumptions of quantum tunneling models based on random distributions of electrons and positive ions are: (a) An electron tunnels from a donor to the nearest acceptor, and (b) the concentration of electrons is much lower than that of positive ions at all times during the tunneling process. This paper presents theoretical studies for arbitrary relative concentrations of electrons and positive ions in the solid. Two new differential equations are derived which describe the loss of charge in the solid by tunneling, and they are solved analytically. The analytical solution compares well with the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out in a random distribution of electrons and positive ions. Possible experimental implications of the model are discussed for tunneling phenomena in long term afterglow signals, and also for anomalous fading studies in feldspars and apatite samples.

  8. Single-electron tunneling in double-barrier nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, V.J.; Su, B.; Cunningham, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review experimental study of charge transport in nanometer double-barrier resonant tunneling devices. Heterostructure material is asymmetric: one barrier is substantially less transparent than the other. Resonant tunneling through size-quantized well states and single-electron charging of the well are thus largely separated in the two bias polarities. When the emitter barrier is more transparent than the collector barrier, electrons accumulate in the well; incremental electron occupation of the well is accompanied by Coulomb blockade leading to sharp steps of the tunneling current. When the emitter barrier is less transparent, the current reflects resonant tunneling of just one electron at a time through size-quantized well states; the current peaks and/or steps (depending on experimental parameters) appear in current-voltage characteristics. Magnetic field and temperature effects are also reviewed. Good agreement is achieved in comparison of many features of experimental data with simple theoretical models

  9. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy on Electron-Boson Interactions in Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  10. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  11. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  12. Hard-rock tunneling using pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.; Brekke, T.L.; Finnie, I.

    1975-01-01

    Intense sub-microsecond bursts of energetic electrons cause significant pulverization and surface spalling of a variety of rock types. The spall debris generally consists of sand, dust, and small flakes. If carried out at rapid repetition rate, this technique appears promising for increasing the speed and reducing the cost of underground excavation of tunnels, mines, and storage spaces. The conceptual design features of a pulsed electron tunnel excavator, capable of tunneling approximately ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods, is presented. (auth)

  13. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  14. The theory of coherent resonance tunneling of interacting electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V. F.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for a two-barrier structure (resonance-tunnel diode) with open boundary conditions are found within the model of coherent tunneling of interacting electrons. Simple expressions for resonance current are derived which enable one to analyze the current-voltage characteristics, the conditions of emergence of hysteresis, and singularities of the latter depending on the parameters of resonance-tunnel diode. It is demonstrated that the hysteresis is realized if the current exceeds some critical value proportional to the square of resonance level width.

  15. Single-electron tunneling in InP nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, De S.; Dam, Van J.A.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Feiner, L.F.; Gurevich, L.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2003-01-01

    A study was performed on single-electron tunneling in InP nanowires. The contact resistances as low as ~10 k¿, with minor temperature dependence were obtained. The Coulomb-blockade behavior was shown with single-electron charging energies of ~1 meV.

  16. Spin inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy on local spin adsorbed on surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, J

    2009-06-01

    The recent experimental conductance measurements taken on magnetic impurities on metallic surfaces, using scanning tunneling microscopy technique and suggesting occurrence of inelastic scattering processes, are theoretically addressed. We argue that the observed conductance signatures are caused by transitions between the spin states that have opened due to, for example, exchange coupling between the local spins and the tunneling electrons, and are directly interpretable in terms of inelastic transitions energies. Feasible measurements using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that would enable new information about the excitation spectrum of the local spins are discussed.

  17. Efficient spin transitions in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Nicolás; Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre

    2009-10-23

    The excitation of the spin degrees of freedom of an adsorbed atom by tunneling electrons is computed using strong coupling theory. Recent measurements [Heinrich, Science 306, 466 (2004)] reveal that electron currents in a magnetic system efficiently excite its magnetic moments. Our theory shows that the incoming electron spin strongly couples with that of the adsorbate so that memory of the initial spin state is lost, leading to large excitation efficiencies. First-principles transmissions are evaluated in quantitative agreement with the experiment.

  18. Reduction of charge trapping and electron tunneling in SIMOX by supplemental implantation of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlbush, R.E.; Hughes, H.L.; Krull, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon-on-insulator, SOI, technologies are being aggressively pursued to produce high density, high speed, radiation tolerant electronics. The dielectric isolation of the buried oxide makes it possible to design integrated circuits that greatly minimize single event upset and eliminate dose-rate induced latchup and upset. The reduction of excess-silicon related defects in SIMOX by the supplemental implantation of oxygen has been examined. The supplemental implant is 6% of the oxygen dose used to form the buried oxide, and is followed by a 1,000 C anneal, in contrast to the >1,300 C anneal used to form the buried oxide layer of SIMOX. The defects examined include shallow electron traps, deep hole traps, and silicon clusters. The radiation-induced shallow electron and deep hole trapping are measured by cryogenic detrapping and isothermal annealing techniques. The low-field (3 to 6 MV/cm) electron tunneling is interpreted as due to a two phase mixture of stoichiometric SiO 2 and Si clusters a few nm in size. Single and triple SIMOS samples have been examined. All of the defects are reduced by the supplemental oxygen processing. Shallow electron trapping is reduced by an order of magnitude. Because of the larger capture cross section for hole trapping, hole trapping is not reduced as much. The low-field electron tunneling due to Si clusters is also significantly reduced. Both uniform and nonuniform electron tunneling have been observed in SIMOX samples without supplement processing. In samples exhibiting only uniform tunneling, electron capture at holes has been observed. The nonuniform tunneling is superimposed upon the uniform tunneling and is characterized by current spiking

  19. Efficient evaluation of atom tunneling combined with electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásgeirsson, Vilhjálmur; Arnaldsson, Andri; Jónsson, Hannes

    2018-03-14

    Methodology for finding optimal tunneling paths and evaluating tunneling rates for atomic rearrangements is described. First, an optimal JWKB tunneling path for a system with fixed energy is obtained using a line integral extension of the nudged elastic band method. Then, a calculation of the dynamics along the path is used to determine the temperature at which it corresponds to an optimal Feynman path for thermally activated tunneling (instanton) and a harmonic approximation is used to estimate the transition rate. The method is illustrated with calculations for a modified two-dimensional Müller-Brown surface but is efficient enough to be used in combination with electronic structure calculations of the energy and atomic forces in systems containing many atoms. An example is presented where tunneling is the dominant mechanism well above room temperature as an H 3 BNH 3 molecule dissociates to form H 2 . Also, a solid-state example is presented where density functional theory calculations of H atom tunneling in a Ta crystal give close agreement with experimental measurements on hydrogen diffusion over a wide range in temperature.

  20. Simulation of single-electron tunnelling circuits using SPICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Haar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Single-electron tunnelling (SET) devices have very promising properties, like their extremely low power consumption, their extremely high switching speeds and their extremely small physical dimensions. Since the field of SET devices is far from being fully exploited, and their device properties seem

  1. Interaction between electrons and tunneling levels in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.L.; Gyorffy, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple model in which the conduction electrons of a metallic glass experience a local time-dependent potential due to two-level tunneling states is considered. The model exhibits interesting divergent behavior which is quite different from that predicted by an earlier ''s-d Kondo'' model

  2. Subelectron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel M.; Sverdlov, Victor A.; Likharev, Konstantin K.

    2002-05-01

    We have shown that a special distribution of background charges in islands of single-electron-tunneling arrays can completely suppress its Coulomb blockade and at the same time reduce substantially its shot noise at low applied voltages. In particular the Fano factor F can approach the minimum value Fmin=1/Nopalescence.

  3. Delayed electron emission in strong-field driven tunnelling from a metallic nanotip in the multi-electron regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Hirofumi; Schnepp, Sascha; Hafner, Christian; Hengsberger, Matthias; Kim, Dong Eon; Kling, Matthias F.; Landsman, Alexandra; Gallmann, Lukas; Osterwalder, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Illuminating a nano-sized metallic tip with ultrashort laser pulses leads to the emission of electrons due to multiphoton excitations. As optical fields become stronger, tunnelling emission directly from the Fermi level becomes prevalent. This can generate coherent electron waves in vacuum leading to a variety of attosecond phenomena. Working at high emission currents where multi-electron effects are significant, we were able to characterize the transition from one regime to the other. Specifically, we found that the onset of laser-driven tunnelling emission is heralded by the appearance of a peculiar delayed emission channel. In this channel, the electrons emitted via laser-driven tunnelling emission are driven back into the metal, and some of the electrons reappear in the vacuum with some delay time after undergoing inelastic scattering and cascading processes inside the metal. Our understanding of these processes gives insights on attosecond tunnelling emission from solids and should prove useful in designing new types of pulsed electron sources. PMID:27786287

  4. Tunneling explains efficient electron transport via protein junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereiro, Jerry A; Yu, Xi; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Cahen, David

    2018-05-15

    Metalloproteins, proteins containing a transition metal ion cofactor, are electron transfer agents that perform key functions in cells. Inspired by this fact, electron transport across these proteins has been widely studied in solid-state settings, triggering the interest in examining potential use of proteins as building blocks in bioelectronic devices. Here, we report results of low-temperature (10 K) electron transport measurements via monolayer junctions based on the blue copper protein azurin (Az), which strongly suggest quantum tunneling of electrons as the dominant charge transport mechanism. Specifically, we show that, weakening the protein-electrode coupling by introducing a spacer, one can switch the electron transport from off-resonant to resonant tunneling. This is a consequence of reducing the electrode's perturbation of the Cu(II)-localized electronic state, a pattern that has not been observed before in protein-based junctions. Moreover, we identify vibronic features of the Cu(II) coordination sphere in transport characteristics that show directly the active role of the metal ion in resonance tunneling. Our results illustrate how quantum mechanical effects may dominate electron transport via protein-based junctions.

  5. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of a single nuclear spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2011-08-12

    Detection of a single nuclear spin constitutes an outstanding problem in different fields of physics such as quantum computing or magnetic imaging. Here we show that the energy levels of a single nuclear spin can be measured by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We consider two different systems, a magnetic adatom probed with scanning tunneling microscopy and a single Bi dopant in a silicon nanotransistor. We find that the hyperfine coupling opens new transport channels which can be resolved at experimentally accessible temperatures. Our simulations evince that IETS yields information about the occupations of the nuclear spin states, paving the way towards transport-detected single nuclear spin resonance.

  6. First Principles Study of Electron Tunneling through Ice

    KAUST Repository

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.

    2012-10-25

    With the aim of understanding electrochemical scanning tunnel microscopy experiments in an aqueous environment, we investigate electron transport through ice in the coherent limit. This is done by using the nonequilibrium Greens functions method, implemented within density functional theory, in the self-interaction corrected local density approximation. In particular, we explore different ice structures and different Au electrode surface orientations. By comparing the decay coefficient for different thicknesses to the ice complex band structure, we find that the electron transport occurs via tunneling with almost one-dimensional character. The slow decay of the current with the ice thickness is largely due to the small effective mass of the conduction electrons. Furthermore, we find that the calculated tunneling decay coefficients at the Fermi energy are not sensitive to the structural details of the junctions and are at the upper end of the experimental range for liquid water. This suggests that linear response transport measurements are not capable of distinguishing between different ordered ice structures. However, we also demonstrate that a finite bias measurement may be capable of sorting polar from nonpolar interfaces due to the asymmetry of the current-voltage curves for polar interfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Thin-film chemical sensors based on electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.; Leduc, H. G.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying a novel chemical sensor based on electron tunneling in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions were studied. Chemical sensors based on electron tunneling were shown to be sensitive to a variety of substances that include iodine, mercury, bismuth, ethylenedibromide, and ethylenedichloride. A sensitivity of 13 parts per billion of iodine dissolved in hexane was demonstrated. The physical mechanisms involved in the chemical sensitivity of these devices were determined to be the chemical alteration of the surface electronic structure of the top metal electrode in the MIM structure. In addition, electroreflectance spectroscopy (ERS) was studied as a complementary surface-sensitive technique. ERS was shown to be sensitive to both iodine and mercury. Electrolyte electroreflectance and solid-state MIM electroreflectance revealed qualitatively the same chemical response. A modified thin-film structure was also studied in which a chemically active layer was introduced at the top Metal-Insulator interface of the MIM devices. Cobalt phthalocyanine was used for the chemically active layer in this study. Devices modified in this way were shown to be sensitive to iodine and nitrogen dioxide. The chemical sensitivity of the modified structure was due to conductance changes in the active layer.

  8. First Principles Study of Electron Tunneling through Ice

    KAUST Repository

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of understanding electrochemical scanning tunnel microscopy experiments in an aqueous environment, we investigate electron transport through ice in the coherent limit. This is done by using the nonequilibrium Greens functions method, implemented within density functional theory, in the self-interaction corrected local density approximation. In particular, we explore different ice structures and different Au electrode surface orientations. By comparing the decay coefficient for different thicknesses to the ice complex band structure, we find that the electron transport occurs via tunneling with almost one-dimensional character. The slow decay of the current with the ice thickness is largely due to the small effective mass of the conduction electrons. Furthermore, we find that the calculated tunneling decay coefficients at the Fermi energy are not sensitive to the structural details of the junctions and are at the upper end of the experimental range for liquid water. This suggests that linear response transport measurements are not capable of distinguishing between different ordered ice structures. However, we also demonstrate that a finite bias measurement may be capable of sorting polar from nonpolar interfaces due to the asymmetry of the current-voltage curves for polar interfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Theory of inelastic electron tunneling from a localized spin in the impulsive approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mats

    2009-07-31

    A simple expression for the conductance steps in inelastic electron tunneling from spin excitations in a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic metal surface is derived. The inelastic coupling between the tunneling electron and the spin is via the exchange coupling and is treated in an impulsive approximation using the Tersoff-Hamann approximation for the tunneling between the tip and the sample.

  10. Electron Heating and Quasiparticle Tunnelling in Superconducting Charge Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, M. D.; Bueno, J.; Delsing, P.; Echternach, P. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have directly measured non-equilibrium quasiparticle tunnelling in the time domain as a function of temperature and RF carrier power for a pair of charge qubits based on the single Cooper-pair box, where the readout is performed with a multiplexed quantum capacitance technique. We have extracted an effective electron temperature for each applied RF power, using the data taken at the lowest power as a reference curve. This data has been fit to a standard T? electron heating model, with a reasonable correspondence with established material parameters.

  11. Electron tunneling in nanoscale electrodes for battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hidenori; Narayanan, Rajaram; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that the electrical current that may be obtained from a nanoscale electrochemical system is sensitive to the dimensionality of the electrode and the density of states (DOS). Considering the DOS of lower dimensional systems, such as two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional nanotubes, or zero-dimensional quantum dots, yields a distinct variation of the current-voltage characteristics. Such aspects go beyond conventional Arrhenius theory based kinetics which are often used in experimental interpretation. The obtained insights may be adapted to other devices, such as solid-state batteries. It is also indicated that electron transport in such devices may be considered through electron tunneling.

  12. Non-equilibrium quasiparticle processes in superconductor tunneling structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perold, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    A broad overview is presented of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The tunneling of quasiparticles in superconducter-insulator structures is described. Related non-equilibrium processes, such as superconductor bandgap suppresion, quasiparticle diffusion and recombination, and excess quasiparticle collection are discussed. The processes are illustrated with numerical computer simulation data. The importance of the inter-relationship between these processes in practical multiple tunneling junction superconducting device structures is also emphasized. 14 refs., 8 figs

  13. Conductance enhancement due to interface magnons in electron-beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with CoFeB free layer deposited at different pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, P.; Yu, G. Q.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kurt, H. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Department of Engineering Physics, Istanbul Medeniyet University, 34720 Istanbul (Turkey); Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-10-21

    Electron-beam evaporated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions have been fabricated with the CoFeB free layer deposited at Ar pressure from 1 to 4 mTorr, and their tunneling process has been studied as a function of temperature and bias voltage. By changing the growth pressure, the junction dynamic conductance dI/dV, inelastic electron tunneling spectrum d²I/dV², and tunneling magnetoresistance vary with temperature. Moreover, the low-energy magnon cutoff energy E{sub C} derived from the conductance versus temperature curve agrees with interface magnon energy obtained directly from the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum, which demonstrates that interface magnons are involved in the electron tunneling process, opening an additional conductance channel and thus enhancing the total conductance.

  14. Electron-attachment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Christodoulides, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) modes of production of negative ions, (2) techniques for the study of electron attachment processes, (3) dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules, (4) dissociative electron attachment to hot molecules (effects of temperature on dissociative electron attachment), (5) molecular parent negative ions, and (6) negative ions formed by ion-pair processes and by collisions of molecules with ground state and Rydberg atoms

  15. Field enhanced luminescence of irradiated organics due to electron tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1981-01-01

    Many organic materials, following exposure to high energy radiation at low temperatures, continue to emit light for long periods. One possible mechanism is that electrons trapped near their parent cations can tunnel back over long times depending on trap depth and distance. This luminescence can be greatly enhanced by the post-radiation application of an external electric field. Calculations on the kinetics of recombination by tunnelling for various trap depths and distances are extended to allow for the effect of an electrical field subsequently applied. The quantitative results lead to two methods of assessing trap depth, depending on immediate light enhancement and on its subsequent decay. The effect of field reversal is also explained. (author)

  16. Electron Tunneling in Junctions Doped with Semiconductors and Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lloyd Douglas, II

    In this study, tunnel junctions incorporating thin layers of semiconductors and metals have been analyzed. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) was employed to yield high-resolution vibrational spectra of surface species deposited at the oxide-M_2 interface of M_1-M_1O _{rm x}-M _2 tunneling samples. Analysis was also performed on the elastic component of the tunneling current, yielding information on the tunnel barrier shape. The samples in this research exhibit a wide range of behavior. The IETS for Si, SiO_2, and Ge doped samples show direct evidence of SiH _{rm x} and GeH_ {rm x} formation. The particular species formed is shown to depend on the form of the evaporated dopant. Samples were also made with organic dopants deposited over the evaporated dopants. Many such samples show marked effects of the evaporated dopants on the inelastic peak intensities of the organic dopants. These alterations are correlated with the changed reactivity of the oxide surface coupled with a change in the OH dipole layer density on the oxide. Thicker organic dopant layers cause large changes in the elastic tunneling barrier due to OH layer alterations or the low barrier attributes of the evaporated dopant. In the cases of the thicker layers an extra current-carrying mechanism is shown to be contributing. Electron ejection from charge traps is proposed as an explanation for this extra current. The trend of barrier shape with dopant thickness is examined. Many of these dopants also produce a voltage-induced shift in the barrier shape which is stable at low temperature but relaxes at high temperature. This effect is similar to that produced by certain organic dopants and is explained by metastable bond formation between the surface OH and dopant. Other dopants, such as Al, Mg, and Fe, produce different effects. These dopants cause large I-V nonlinearity at low voltages. This nonlinearity is modeled as a giant zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) and fits are presented which show good

  17. Proximity effect and hot-electron diffusion in Ag/Al2O3/Al tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netel, H.; Jochum, J.; Labov, S.E.; Mears, C.A.; Frank, M.; Chow, D.; Lindeman, M.A.; Hiller, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    We have fabricated Ag/Al 2 O 3 /Al tunnel junctions on Si substrates using a new process. This process was developed to fabricate superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) on the surface of a superconductor. These junctions allow us to study the proximity effect of a superconducting Al film on a normal metal trapping layer. In addition, these devices allow us to measure the hot-electron diffusion constant using a single junction. Lastly these devices will help us optimize the design and fabrication of tunnel junctions on the surface of high-Z, ultra-pure superconducting crystals. 5 refs., 8 figs

  18. Scanning tunnelling microscope imaging of nanoscale electron density gradients on the surface of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, B; Jacobs, J; Missous, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the scanning tunnelling microscope tunnelling conditions needed to produce constant current images dominated either by surface topology or by electronic effects. A model experimental structure was produced by cleaving a GaAs multiδ-doped layer in UHV and so projecting a spatially varying electron gas density onto the (110) surface. This cross sectional electron density varies on a nanometre scale in the [100] growth direction. The electronic structure and tunnelling properties of this system were modelled, and the tunnelling conditions favouring sensitivity to the surface electron gas density determined

  19. Electron holography study on the microstructure of magnetic tunnelling junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.Y.; Wang, Y.G.; You, B.; Du, J.; Hu, A.; Zhang, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Electron holography was applied to study the microstructure evolution of magnetic tunnelling junctions (MTJs) CoFe/AlO x /Co annealed at different temperatures. A mean inner potential barrier was observed in the as-deposited MTJ sample, while it was changed to a potential well after a 200 deg. C or a 400 deg. C annealing. It is suggested that the oxygen atoms were redistributed during the annealing, which left metallic atoms acting as acceptors to confine the electrons, leading to the decrease of the potential of the AlO x barrier layer. The results suggest that the electron holography may be a useful tool for the study of the microstructure of amorphous materials

  20. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    tunneling microscope (STM). Especially at low temperatures the Kondo resonance is used to probe magnetic interaction with ferromagnetic islands and between two atoms. The latter showing a crossover between Kondo screened atoms and antiferromagnetically coupled atoms close to the quantum critical point....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...

  1. Interferometry of Klein tunnelling electrons in graphene quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, D. J. P.; Chaves, Andrey; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a current switch that exploits the phase acquired by a charge carrier as it tunnels through a potential barrier in graphene. The system acts as an interferometer based on an armchair graphene quantum ring, where the phase difference between interfering electronic wave functions for each path can be controlled by tuning either the height or the width of a potential barrier in the ring arms. By varying the parameters of the potential barriers, the interference can become completely destructive. We demonstrate how this interference effect can be used for developing a simple graphene-based logic gate with a high on/off ratio.

  2. Crossover in tunneling hops in systems of strongly localized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien Nguyen, V.; Gamietea, A.D.

    1995-11-01

    Accurate Monte-Carlo simulation data show a consistent crossover in different characters of tunneling hops in two-dimensional systems of strongly localized electrons in the presence of scattering and quantum interference of hopping paths. The results also suggest a negative answer to the question whether there is a two-dimensional sign phase transition. The fractal behaviour observed in the direction perpendicular to the hopping direction is found to be similar to that for eigenstates in one-dimensional localized systems. (author). 16 refs, 6 figs

  3. One Hair Postulate for Hawking Radiation as Tunneling Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hui; Sun Chang-Pu; Cai Qing-Yu; Liu Xu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    For Hawking radiation, treated as a tunneling process, the no-hair theorem of black hole together with the law of energy conservation is utilized to postulate that the tunneling rate only depends on the external qualities (e.g., the mass for the Schwarzschild black hole) and the energy of the radiated particle. This postulate is justified by the WKB approximation for calculating the tunneling probability. Based on this postulate, a general formula for the tunneling probability is derived without referring to the concrete form of black hole metric. This formula implies an intrinsic correlation between the successive processes of the black hole radiation of two or more particles. It also suggests a kind of entropy conservation and thus resolves the puzzle of black hole information loss in some sense. (general)

  4. Electron tunneling in tantalum surface layers on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, S.T.; Track, E.K.; Prober, D.E.; Arnold, G.B.; DeWeert, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    We have performed electron tunneling measurements on tantalum surface layers on niobium. The tunnel junctions comprise 2000-A-circle Nb base electrodes with 10--100-A-circle in situ--deposited Ta overlayers, an oxide barrier, and Ag, Pb, or Pb-Bi alloy counterelectrodes. The base electrodes were prepared by ion-beam sputter deposition. The characteristics of these junctions have been studied as a function of Ta-layer thickness. These include the critical current, bound-state energy, phonon structure, and oxide barrier shape. We have compared our results for the product I/sub c/R versus tantalum-layer thickness with an extended version of the Gallagher theory which accounts for both the finite mean free path in the Ta overlayers and suppression of the I/sub c/R product due to strong-coupling effects. Excellent fits to the data yield a value of the intrinsic scattering probability for electrons at the Ta/Nb interface of r 2 = 0.01. This is consistent with the value expected from simple scattering off the potential step created by the difference between the Fermi energies of Ta and Nb. We have found a universal empirical correlation in average barrier height phi-bar and width s in the form phi-bar = 6 eV/(s-10 A-circle) for measured junctions which holds both for our data and results for available data in the literature for oxide-barrier junctions. The latter are composed of a wide variety of base and counterelectrode materials. These results are discussed in the general context of oxide growth and compared with results for artificial tunnel barriers

  5. Inelastic tunneling of electrons through a quantum dot with an embedded single molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Liang, J.-Q.

    2010-06-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron transport through a quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet (SMM) based on mapping of the many-body interaction-system onto a one-body problem by means of the non-equilibrium Green function technique. It is found that the conducting current exhibits a stepwise behavior and the nonlinear differential conductance displays additional peaks with variation of the sweeping speed and the magnitude of magnetic field. This observation can be interpreted by the interaction of electron-spin with the SMM and the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The inelastic conductance and the corresponding tunneling processes are investigated with normal as well as ferromagnetic electrodes. In the case of ferromagnetic configuration, the coupling to the SMM leads to an asymmetric tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), which can be enhanced or suppressed greatly in certain regions. Moreover, a sudden TMR-switch with the variation of magnetic field is observed, which is seen to be caused by the inelastic tunneling.

  6. Inelastic tunneling of electrons through a quantum dot with an embedded single molecular magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Bo [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Liang, J.-Q., E-mail: jqliang@sxu.edu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2010-06-28

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron transport through a quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet (SMM) based on mapping of the many-body interaction-system onto a one-body problem by means of the non-equilibrium Green function technique. It is found that the conducting current exhibits a stepwise behavior and the nonlinear differential conductance displays additional peaks with variation of the sweeping speed and the magnitude of magnetic field. This observation can be interpreted by the interaction of electron-spin with the SMM and the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The inelastic conductance and the corresponding tunneling processes are investigated with normal as well as ferromagnetic electrodes. In the case of ferromagnetic configuration, the coupling to the SMM leads to an asymmetric tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), which can be enhanced or suppressed greatly in certain regions. Moreover, a sudden TMR-switch with the variation of magnetic field is observed, which is seen to be caused by the inelastic tunneling.

  7. Two-photon-induced hot-electron transfer to a single molecule in a scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2010-01-01

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photoexcited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron-transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization measurement. Spatial dependence of the electron-transfer rate exhibits atomic-scale variations. A two-pulse correlation experiment reveals the ultrafast dynamic nature of photoinduced charging process in the STM junction. Results from these experiments are important for understanding photoinduced interfacial charge transfer in many nanoscale inorganic-organic structures.

  8. Effects of tunnel oxide process on SONOS flash memory characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dong Hua; Park, Il Han; Yun, Jang-Gn; Park, Byung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various process conditions of tunnel oxides are applied in SONOS flash memory to investigate their effects on charge transport during the program/erase operations. We focus the key point of analysis on Fermi-level (E F ) variation at the interface of silicon substrate and tunnel oxide. The Si-O chemical bonding information which describes the interface oxidation states at the Si/SiO 2 is obtained by the core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, relative E F position is determined by measuring the Si 2p energy shift from XPS spectrums. Experimental results from memory characteristic measurement show that MTO tunnel oxide structure exhibits faster erase speed, and larger memory window during P/E cycle compared to FTO and RTO tunnel oxide structures. Finally, we examine long-term charge retention characteristic and find that the memory windows of all the capacitors remain wider than 2 V after 10 5 s.

  9. Electronic structure classifications using scanning tunneling microscopy conductance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, K.M.; Swartzentruber, B.S.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bouchard, A.; Bartholomew, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The electronic structure of atomic surfaces is imaged by applying multivariate image classification techniques to multibias conductance data measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. Image pixels are grouped into classes according to shared conductance characteristics. The image pixels, when color coded by class, produce an image that chemically distinguishes surface electronic features over the entire area of a multibias conductance image. Such open-quotes classedclose quotes images reveal surface features not always evident in a topograph. This article describes the experimental technique used to record multibias conductance images, how image pixels are grouped in a mathematical, classification space, how a computed grouping algorithm can be employed to group pixels with similar conductance characteristics in any number of dimensions, and finally how the quality of the resulting classed images can be evaluated using a computed, combinatorial analysis of the full dimensional space in which the classification is performed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Out-of-equilibrium catalysis of chemical reactions by electronic tunnel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhioev, Alan A; Kosov, Daniel S; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-04-07

    We present an escape rate theory for current-induced chemical reactions. We use Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions to derive a Langevin equation for the reaction coordinate. Due to the out of equilibrium electronic degrees of freedom, the friction, noise, and effective temperature in the Langevin equation depend locally on the reaction coordinate. As an example, we consider the dissociation of diatomic molecules induced by the electronic current from a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. In the resonant tunnelling regime, the molecular dissociation involves two processes which are intricately interconnected: a modification of the potential energy barrier and heating of the molecule. The decrease of the molecular barrier (i.e., the current induced catalytic reduction of the barrier) accompanied by the appearance of the effective, reaction-coordinate-dependent temperature is an alternative mechanism for current-induced chemical reactions, which is distinctly different from the usual paradigm of pumping vibrational degrees of freedom.

  11. Investigating tunneling process of atom exposed in circularly polarized strong-laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, MingHu; Xin, PeiPei; Chu, TianShu; Liu, HongPing

    2017-03-01

    We propose a method for studying the tunneling process by analyzing the instantaneous ionization rate of a circularly polarized laser. A numerical calculation shows that, for an atom exposed to a long laser pulse, if its initial electronic state wave function is non-spherical symmetric, the delayed phase shift of the ionization rate vs the laser cycle period in real time in the region close to the peak intensity of the laser pulse can be used to probe the tunneling time. In this region, an obvious time delay phase shift of more than 190 attoseconds is observed. Further study shows that the atom has a longer tunneling time in the ionization under a shorter wavelength laser pulse. In our method, a Wigner rotation technique is employed to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a single-active electron in a three-dimensional spherical coordinate system.

  12. Investigating tunneling process of atom exposed in circularly polarized strong-laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, MingHu; Xin, PeiPei; Liu, HongPing; Chu, TianShu

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method for studying the tunneling process by analyzing the instantaneous ionization rate of a circularly polarized laser. A numerical calculation shows that, for an atom exposed to a long laser pulse, if its initial electronic state wave function is non-spherical symmetric, the delayed phase shift of the ionization rate vs the laser cycle period in real time in the region close to the peak intensity of the laser pulse can be used to probe the tunneling time. In this region, an obvious time delay phase shift of more than 190 attoseconds is observed. Further study shows that the atom has a longer tunneling time in the ionization under a shorter wavelength laser pulse. In our method, a Wigner rotation technique is employed to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a single-active electron in a three-dimensional spherical coordinate system. (paper)

  13. Effect of an Interfacial Layer on Electron Tunneling through Atomically Thin Al2O3 Tunnel Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Jamie; Sakidja, Ridwan; Goul, Ryan; Wu, Judy Z

    2017-10-25

    Electron tunneling through high-quality, atomically thin dielectric films can provide a critical enabling technology for future microelectronics, bringing enhanced quantum coherent transport, fast speed, small size, and high energy efficiency. A fundamental challenge is in controlling the interface between the dielectric and device electrodes. An interfacial layer (IL) will contain defects and introduce defects in the dielectric film grown atop, preventing electron tunneling through the formation of shorts. In this work, we present the first systematic investigation of the IL in Al 2 O 3 dielectric films of 1-6 Å's in thickness on an Al electrode. We integrated several advanced approaches: molecular dynamics to simulate IL formation, in situ high vacuum sputtering atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize Al 2 O 3 on Al films, and in situ ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling spectroscopy to probe the electron tunneling through the Al 2 O 3 . The IL had a profound effect on electron tunneling. We observed a reduced tunnel barrier height and soft-type dielectric breakdown which indicate that defects are present in both the IL and in the Al 2 O 3 . The IL forms primarily due to exposure of the Al to trace O 2 and/or H 2 O during the pre-ALD heating step of fabrication. As the IL was systematically reduced, by controlling the pre-ALD sample heating, we observed an increase of the ALD Al 2 O 3 barrier height from 0.9 to 1.5 eV along with a transition from soft to hard dielectric breakdown. This work represents a key step toward the realization of high-quality, atomically thin dielectrics with electron tunneling for the next generation of microelectronics.

  14. Tunneling emission of electrons from semiconductors' valence bands in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalganov, V. D.; Mileshkina, N. V.; Ostroumova, E. V.

    2006-01-01

    Tunneling emission currents of electrons from semiconductors to vacuum (needle-shaped GaAs photodetectors) and to a metal (silicon metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes with a tunneling-transparent insulator layer) are studied in high and ultrahigh electric fields. It is shown that, in semiconductors with the n-type conductivity, the major contribution to the emission current is made by the tunneling emission of electrons from the valence band of the semiconductor, rather than from the conduction band

  15. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Mingsen [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China); Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jiangj1@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Cai, Shaohong, E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory of Economic System Simulation, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang, 550004 (China); Sun, Guangyu [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  16. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz ..., we find the same input charge noise, typically QN = 5 × 10–4 e/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz, with and without the HF shielding. At lower frequencies, the noise is due to charge trapping, and the voltage noise pattern superimposed on the V(Vg) curve (voltage across transistor versus gate voltage) strongly depends...... when ramping the junction voltage. Dynamic trapping may limit the high frequency applications of the SET transistor. Also reported on are the effects of rf irradiation and the dependence of the SET transistor noise on bias voltage. ©1998 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Ultralarge area MOS tunnel devices for electron emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Nielsen, Gunver; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm

    2007-01-01

    density. Oxide thicknesses have been extracted by fitting a model based on Fermi-Dirac statistics to the C-V characteristics. By plotting I-V characteristics in a Fowler plot, a measure of the thickness of the oxide can be extracted from the tunnel current. These apparent thicknesses show a high degree......A comparative analysis of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics has been employed to characterize the thickness variations of the oxide on different length scales. Ultralarge area (1 cm(2)) ultrathin (similar to 5 nm oxide......) MOS capacitors have been fabricated to investigate their functionality and the variations in oxide thickness, with the use as future electron emission devices as the goal. I-V characteristics show very low leakage current and excellent agreement to the Fowler-Nordheim expression for the current...

  18. Electron-Electron and Electron-Phonon interactions effects on the tunnel electronic spectrum of PbS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyue; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Yu, Qian; Mottaghizadeh, Alireza; Ulysse, Christian; Zimmers, Alexandre; Dubertret, Benoit; Aubin, Herve

    2015-03-01

    We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of the electronic spectrum of single PbS Quantum Dots (QDs) trapped between nanometer-spaced electrodes, measured at low temperature T=5 K. The carrier filling of the QD can be controlled either by the drain voltage in the shell filling regime or by a gate voltage. In the empty QD, the tunnel spectrum presents the expected signature of the 8x degenerated excited levels. In the drain controlled shell filling regime, the levels degeneracies are lifted by the global electrostatic Coulomb energy of the QD; in the gate controlled shell filling regime, the levels degeneracies are lifted by the intra-Coulomb interactions. In the charged quantum dot, electron-phonons interactions lead to the apparition of Franck-Condon side bands on the single excited levels and possibly Franck Condon blockade at low energy. The sharpening of excited levels at higher gate voltage suggests that the magnitude of electron-phonon interactions is decreased upon increasing the electron filling in the quantum dot. This work was supported by the French ANR Grants 10-BLAN-0409-01, 09-BLAN-0388-01, by the Region Ile-de-France in the framework of DIM Nano-K and by China Scholarship Council.

  19. Electron beam processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam Processing Systems (EPS) are used as useful and powerful tools in many industrial application fields such as the production of cross-linked wire, rubber tire, heat shrinkable film and tubing, curing, degradation of polymers, sterilization and environmental application. In this paper, the feature and application fields, the selection of machine ratings and safety measures of EPS will be described. (author)

  20. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    represent the substrate and tip in electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. An equivalent three-electrode configuration represents a molecular single-electron transistor in which the enclosing electrodes constitute source and drain, and the reference electrode the gate. Current-bias voltage...... relations at fixed electrochemical overpotential or gate voltage, and current-overpotential or current-gate voltage relations at fixed bias voltage are equivalent in the two systems. Due to the activation-less nature of the processes, electron flow between the electrodes through the molecular redox levels...... level(s) subsequent to electron transfer. Several physical mechanisms can be distinguished and distinctive current-overpotential/gate voltage or current-bias voltage relations obtained. These reflect electronic level separation, environmental nuclear reorganisation, and coherent or incoherent multi...

  1. Electron-spin polarization in tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic EuS barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, X.; Moodera, J.S.; Meservey, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report here spin-polarized tunneling experiments using non-ferromagnetic electrodes and ferromagnetic EuS barriers. Because of the conduction band in EuS splits into spin-up and spin-down subbands when the temperature is below 16.7 K, the Curie temperature of EuS, the tunnel barrier for electrons with different spin directions is different, therefore giving rise to tunnel current polarization. The spin-filter effect, as it may be called, was observed earlier, directly or indirectly, by several groups: Esaki et al. made a tunneling study on junctions having EuS and EuSe barriers; Thompson et al. studied Schottky barrier tunneling between In and doped EuS; Muller et al. and Kisker et al. performed electron field emission experiments on EuS-coated tungsten tips. The field emission experiments gave a maximum polarization of (89 + 7)% for the emitted electrons. Although the previous tunneling studies did not directly show electron polarization, their results were explained by the same spin- filter effect. This work uses the spin-polarized tunneling technique to show directly that tunnel current is indeed polarized and polarization can be as high as 85%

  2. Effect of superconducting electrons on the energy splitting of tunneling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.C.; Granato, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    We consider the effect of superconducting electrons on the magnitude of the energy splitting of a tunneling system. A specific example is a hydrogen atom tunneling in niobium. We find that in this case the splitting is roughly 20% smaller in the normal state than in the superconducting state. This difference in the splitting should be observable in neutron scattering and ultrasonic measurements

  3. Quantum mechanic tunneling and efficiency of Faraday current-generating process in porous nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Grygorchak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamics and kinetics of lithium intercalation into C-SiO2 nanocomposites are investigated. Dependencies of both differential capacity and intercalation kinetics on the nanocomposite size are established. The processes are analyzed in terms of the impedance model. The obtained results are explained based on the quantum effect of interference blockade of electron tunneling into a nonmetallic nanoparticle. Propositions for the new electrochemical energy storage technology are presented.

  4. Fabrication of tunnel junction-based molecular electronics and spintronics devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Tunnel junction-based molecular devices (TJMDs) are highly promising for realizing futuristic electronics and spintronics devices for advanced logic and memory operations. Under this approach, ∼2.5 nm molecular device elements bridge across the ∼2-nm thick insulator of a tunnel junction along the exposed side edge(s). This paper details the efforts and insights for producing a variety of TJMDs by resolving multiple device fabrication and characterization issues. This study specifically discusses (i) compatibility between tunnel junction test bed and molecular solutions, (ii) optimization of the exposed side edge profile and insulator thickness for enhancing the probability of molecular bridging, (iii) effect of fabrication process-induced mechanical stresses, and (iv) minimizing electrical bias-induced instability after the device fabrication. This research will benefit other researchers interested in producing TJMDs efficiently. TJMD approach offers an open platform to test virtually any combination of magnetic and nonmagnetic electrodes, and promising molecules such as single molecular magnets, porphyrin, DNA, and molecular complexes.

  5. Detecting stray microwaves and nonequilibrium quasiparticles in thin films by single-electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saira, Olli-Pentti; Maisi, Ville; Kemppinen, Antti; Möttönen, Mikko; Pekola, Jukka

    2013-03-01

    Superconducting thin films and tunnel junctions are the building blocks of many state-of-the-art technologies related to quantum information processing, microwave detection, and electronic amplification. These devices operate at millikelvin temperatures, and - in a naive picture - their fidelity metrics are expected to improve as the temperature is lowered. However, very often one finds in the experiment that the device performance levels off around 100-150 mK. In my presentation, I will address three common physical mechanisms that can cause such saturation: stray microwaves, nonequilibrium quasiparticles, and sub-gap quasiparticle states. The new experimental data I will present is based on a series of studies on quasiparticle transport in Coulomb-blockaded normal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction devices. We have used a capacitively coupled SET electrometer to detect individual quasiparticle tunneling events in real time. We demonstrate the following record-low values for thin film aluminum: quasiparticle density nqp < 0 . 033 / μm3 , normalized density of sub-gap quasiparticle states (Dynes parameter) γ < 1 . 6 ×10-7 . I will also discuss some sample stage and chip designs that improve microwave shielding.

  6. On the role of electron quantum tunneling in charging of dust grains in complex plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyshetskiy, Yu.O.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is calculate ion additional current associated with the quantum tunneling of plasma electrons, that are classically forbidden to overcome the repulsive potential barrier, onto the negatively charged grain. We compare this additional quantum tunneling current with the classical electron current from plasma onto the grain and analyze how this additional current affects the self-consistent equilibrium grain charge for different plasma parameters and grain sizes.

  7. Electron tunnelling through single azurin molecules can be on/off switched by voltage pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, Chiara [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy); Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, CNR, I-05010 Porano (Italy); Kumar, Vivek; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore, E-mail: cannistr@unitus.it [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy)

    2015-05-04

    Redox metalloproteins are emerging as promising candidates for future bio-optoelectronic and nano-biomemory devices, and the control of their electron transfer properties through external signals is still a crucial task. Here, we show that a reversible on/off switching of the electron current tunnelling through a single protein can be achieved in azurin protein molecules adsorbed on gold surfaces, by applying appropriate voltage pulses through a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. The observed changes in the hybrid system tunnelling properties are discussed in terms of long-sustained charging of the protein milieu.

  8. When does an electron exit a tunneling barrier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov M. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We probe the dynamics of tunnel ionization via high harmonic generation. We characterize the ionization dynamics in helium atoms, and apply our approach to resolve subtle differences in ionization from different orbitals of a CO2 molecule.

  9. Observation of negative differential resistance and single-electron tunneling in electromigrated break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Ueda, Rieko; Kubota, Tohru; Kamikado, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Nagase, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We observed a negative differential resistance (NDR) along with single-electron tunneling (SET) in the electron transport of electromigrated break junctions with metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 BSTBPP) at a temperature of 11 K. The NDR strongly depended on the applied gate voltages, and appeared only in the electron tunneling region of the Coulomb diamond. We could explain the mechanism of this new type of electron transport by a model assuming a molecular Coulomb island and local density of states of the source and the drain electrodes

  10. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  11. Tip-induced local strain on Mo S2/graphite detected by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonhee; Hus, Saban M.; Li, Xufan; Berlijn, Tom; Nguyen, Giang D.; Xiao, Kai; Li, An-Ping

    2018-03-01

    We report the detection of tip-induced local strain applied to the monolayer Mo S2 grown on a graphite substrate by scanning tunneling microscope. Monolayer Mo S2 behaves as both mechanical and tunneling barriers that prevent the tip from contacting the graphite while maintaining the tunneling current. Inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy (IETS) is utilized to probe the phonon modes in graphite. As the tip pushes the sample, IETS reveals a continuous phonon softening in graphite, corroborated by a downward shift of the phonon energy as calculated by density-functional theory. Our results demonstrate a way to apply local mechanical strain and simultaneously detect the induced change in phonon modes by unitizing IETS with two-dimensional materials as a tunneling barrier.

  12. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Hongying; Fu Jieying; Wang Xiaoli; Zheng Shi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Irradiation of photons with energies more than the band gap generates electron–hole pairs. ► Electron tunneling probability is dependent on the electron mobility. ► Tunneling electrons are captured by charge deficient atoms. ► Unpaired electrons induce cleavages of chemical bonds. - Abstract: Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ = 355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO 2 nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry.

  13. Gate-controlled current and inelastic electron tunneling spectrum of benzene: a self-consistent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y Y; Chen, H; Mizuseki, H; Kawazoe, Y

    2011-04-14

    We use density functional theory based nonequilibrium Green's function to self-consistently study the current through the 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). The elastic and inelastic tunneling properties through this Au-BDT-Au molecular junction are simulated, respectively. For the elastic tunneling case, it is found that the current through the tilted molecule can be modulated effectively by the external gate field, which is perpendicular to the phenyl ring. The gate voltage amplification comes from the modulation of the interaction between the electrodes and the molecules in the junctions. For the inelastic case, the electron tunneling scattered by the molecular vibrational modes is considered within the self-consistent Born approximation scheme, and the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum is calculated.

  14. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...... constants display tunneling features with distance-decay factors of 0.83 and 0.91 angstrom(-1) in H2O and D2O, respectively. Redox-gated tunneling resonance is observed in situ at the single-molecule level by using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, exhibiting an asymmetric dependence...

  15. Metal-Insulator-Metal Single Electron Transistors with Tunnel Barriers Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Karbasian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Single electron transistors are nanoscale electron devices that require thin, high-quality tunnel barriers to operate and have potential applications in sensing, metrology and beyond-CMOS computing schemes. Given that atomic layer deposition is used to form CMOS gate stacks with low trap densities and excellent thickness control, it is well-suited as a technique to form a variety of tunnel barriers. This work is a review of our recent research on atomic layer deposition and post-fabrication treatments to fabricate metallic single electron transistors with a variety of metals and dielectrics.

  16. Electronic processes in organic electronics bridging nanostructure, electronic states and device properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kudo, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Takashi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    The book covers a variety of studies of organic semiconductors, from fundamental electronic states to device applications, including theoretical studies. Furthermore, innovative experimental techniques, e.g., ultrahigh sensitivity photoelectron spectroscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, spin-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and a material processing method with optical-vortex and polarization-vortex lasers, are introduced. As this book is intended to serve as a textbook for a graduate level course or as reference material for researchers in organic electronics and nanoscience from electronic states, fundamental science that is necessary to understand the research is described. It does not duplicate the books already written on organic electronics, but focuses mainly on electronic properties that arise from the nature of organic semiconductors (molecular solids). The new experimental methods introduced in this book are applicable to various materials (e.g., metals, inorganic and organic mater...

  17. Electronic-Reconstruction-Enhanced Tunneling Conductance at Terrace Edges of Ultrathin Oxide Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfei; Kim, Rokyeon; Kim, Yoonkoo; Kim, Choong H; Hwang, Sangwoon; Cho, Myung Rae; Shin, Yeong Jae; Das, Saikat; Kim, Jeong Rae; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kim, Miyoung; Yang, Sang Mo; Noh, Tae Won

    2017-11-01

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of electrons across ultrathin insulating oxide barriers has been studied extensively for decades due to its great potential in electronic-device applications. In the few-nanometers-thick epitaxial oxide films, atomic-scale structural imperfections, such as the ubiquitously existed one-unit-cell-high terrace edges, can dramatically affect the tunneling probability and device performance. However, the underlying physics has not been investigated adequately. Here, taking ultrathin BaTiO 3 films as a model system, an intrinsic tunneling-conductance enhancement is reported near the terrace edges. Scanning-probe-microscopy results demonstrate the existence of highly conductive regions (tens of nanometers wide) near the terrace edges. First-principles calculations suggest that the terrace-edge geometry can trigger an electronic reconstruction, which reduces the effective tunneling barrier width locally. Furthermore, such tunneling-conductance enhancement can be discovered in other transition metal oxides and controlled by surface-termination engineering. The controllable electronic reconstruction can facilitate the implementation of oxide electronic devices and discovery of exotic low-dimensional quantum phases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Bias voltage effect on electron tunneling across a junction with a ferroelectric–ferromagnetic two-phase composite barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Ju Sheng; Li, Z.Y.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of bias voltage on electron tunneling across a junction with a ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite barrier is investigated theoretically. Because of the inversion symmetry breaking of the spontaneous ferroelectric polarization, bias voltage dependence of the electron tunneling shows significant differences between the positive bias and the negative one. The differences of spin filtering or tunnel magnetoresistance increase with the increasing absolute value of bias voltage. Such direction preferred electron tunneling is found intimately related with the unusual asymmetry of the electrical potential profile in two-phase composite barrier and provides a unique change to realize rectifying functions in spintronics. - Highlights: ► Electron tunneling across a ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite barrier junction. ► TMR effect is different under the same value but opposite direction bias voltage. ► This directionality of the electron tunneling enhances with increasing bias voltage.

  19. Precision Electron Density Measurements in the SSX MHD Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen-Lewis, Emma M.; Barbano, Luke J.; Shrock, Jaron E.; Kaur, Manjit; Schaffner, David A.; Brown, Michael R.

    2017-10-01

    We characterize fluctuations of the line averaged electron density of Taylor states produced by the magnetized coaxial plasma gun of the SSX device using a 632.8 nm HeNe laser interferometer. The analysis method uses the electron density dependence of the refractive index of the plasma to determine the electron density of the Taylor states. Typical magnetic field and density values in the SSX device approach about B ≅ 0.3 T and n = 0 . 4 ×1016 cm-3 . Analysis is improved from previous density measurement methods by developing a post-processing method to remove relative phase error between interferometer outputs and to account for approximately linear phase drift due to low-frequency mechanical vibrations of the interferometer. Precision density measurements coupled with local measurements of the magnetic field will allow us to characterize the wave composition of SSX plasma via density vs. magnetic field correlation analysis, and compare the wave composition of SSX plasma with that of the solar wind. Preliminary results indicate that density and magnetic field appear negatively correlated. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  20. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of radiation produced trapped electrons and hydrogen atoms in aqueous and organic glassy matrices. Modulation of electron nuclear dipolar interaction by tunnelling modes in a glassy matrix. [. gamma. rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, M K; Kevan, L [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, Mich. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    The spin lattice relaxation of trapped electrons in aqueous and organic glasses and trapped hydrogen atoms in phosphoric acid glass has been directly studied as a function of temperature by the saturation recovery method. Below 50 to 100 K, the major spin lattice relaxation mechanism involves modulation of the electron nuclear dipolar (END) interaction with nuclei in the radical's environment by tunnelling of those nuclei between two or more positions. This relaxation mechanism occurs with high efficiency and has a characteristic linear temperature dependence. The tunnelling nuclei around trapped electrons do not seem to involve the nearest neighbor nuclei which are oriented by the electron in the process of solvation. Instead the tunnelling nuclei typically appear to be next nearest neighbors to the trapped electron. The identities of the tunnelling nuclei have been deduced by isotopic substitution and are attributed to: Na in 10 mol dm/sup -3/ NaOH aqueous glass, ethyl protons in ethanol glass, methyl protons in methanol glass and methyl protons in MTHF glass. For trapped hydrogen atoms in phosphoric acid, the phosphorus nuclei appear to be the effective tunnelling nuclei. Below approximately 10 K the spin lattice relaxation is dominated by a temperature independent cross relaxation term for H atoms in phosphoric acid glass and for electrons in 10 mol dm/sup -3/ NaOH aqueous glass, but not for electrons in organic glasses. This is compared with recent electron-electron double resonance studies of cross relaxation in these glasses. The spin lattice relaxation of O/sup -/ formed in 10 mol dm/sup -3/ NaOH aqueous glass was also studied and found to be mainly dominated by a Raman process with an effective Debye temperature of about 100 K.

  1. Probing Nitrosyl Ligation of Surface-Confined Metalloporphyrins by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Complexes obtained by the ligation of nitric oxide (NO) to metalloporphyrins represent important model systems with biological relevance. Herein we report a molecular-level investigation of surface-confined cobalt tetraphenyl porphyrin (Co-TPP) species and their interaction with NO under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. It is demonstrated that individual NO adducts can be desorbed using the atomically sharp tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, whereby a writing process is implemented for fully saturated regular metalloporphyrin arrays. The low-energy vibrational characteristics of individual Co-TPP-nitrosyl complexes probed by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) reveal a prominent signature at an energy of ≃31 meV. Using density functional theory-based IETS simulations—the first to be performed on such an extensive interfacial nanosystem—we succeed to reproduce the low-frequency spectrum for the NO-ligated complex and explain the absence of IETS activity for bare Co-TPP. Moreover, we can conclusively assign the IETS peak of NO-Co-TPP to a unique vibration mode involving the NO complexation site, namely, the in-plane Co–N–O rocking mode. In addition, we verify that the propensity rules previously designed on small aromatic systems and molecular fragments hold true for a metal–organic entity. This work notably permits one to envisage IETS spectroscopy as a sensitive tool to chemically characterize hybrid interfaces formed by complex metal–organic units and gaseous adducts. PMID:23718257

  2. The study of optimal conditions of electrochemical etching of tunnel electron microscopy tungsten tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguiano, E.; Aguilar, M.; Olivar, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    We present the experimental results obtained during the study made in the electrochemical etching of tunneling electron microscopy tungsten tips. The experiments was made using DC and two usual electrolytes: KOH and NaOH. For the tip preparation we used a electrochemical cell with stainless steel cathode and the tungsten wire as anode. the electrodes was introduced in a glass recipient containing the electrolytic solution. We study the effects of applied voltage, polish time, tip length and electrolyte concentration as process relevant parameters. The best condition for tip preparation was obtained with a metallurgical microscope and with a SEM.EDX and Auger analysis was made. The results shown the better tips was made with KOH as electrolyte with a limited concentration range (2-4 normal) and applied voltage (2-6 volts) (Author) 20 refs

  3. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C., E-mail: clayton@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  4. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (MOE), and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Shiwei, E-mail: swwu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (MOE), and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world.

  5. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    2016-06-01

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world.

  6. Point-contact electron tunneling into the high-Tc superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, M. D.; Smith, D. P. E.; Mitzi, D. B.; Sun, J. Z.; Webb, D. J.

    1987-06-01

    Results are reported from a study of electron tunneling into bulk samples of the new high-Tc superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O using point-contact tunneling. Based on a superconductive tunneling interpretation, the results show exceptionally large energy gaps in these materials (roughly 2Delta = 100 MeV), implying 2Delta/kBTc = about 13. Similar values were found for La-Sr-Cu-O. The structure in the I-V curves is also similar to that seen in La-Sr-Cu-O. From the asymmetries observed in the I-V characteristics, it is inferred that the natural tunneling barrier on this material is of the Schottky type.

  7. Electron accelerators for waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon'kov, N.G.

    1976-01-01

    The documents of the International symposium on radiation vaste processing are presented. Questions on waste utilization with the help of electron accelerators are considered. The electron accelerators are shown to have an advantage over some other ionizing radiation sources. A conclusion is made that radiation methods of waste processing are extensively elaborated in many developed countries. It has been pointed out that an electron accelerator is a most cheap and safe ionizing radiation source primarily for processing of gaseous and liquid wastes

  8. Electron flux during pericyclic reactions in the tunneling limit: Quantum simulation for cyclooctatetraene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hege, Hans-Christian; Manz, Joern; Marquardt, Falko; Paulus, Beate; Schild, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In the limit of coherent tunneling, double bond shifting (DBS) of cyclooctatetraene from a reactant (R) to a product (P) is associated with pericyclic electron fluxes from double to single bonds, corresponding to a pincer-motion-type set of arrows in the Lewis structures, each representing a transfer of 0.19 electrons. - Abstract: Pericyclic rearrangement of cyclooctatetraene proceeds from equivalent sets of two reactants to two products. In the ideal limit of coherent tunneling, these reactants and products may tunnel to each other by ring inversions and by double bond shifting (DBS). We derive simple cosinusoidal or sinusoidal time evolutions of the bond-to-bond electron fluxes and yields during DBS, for the tunneling scenario. These overall yields and fluxes may be decomposed into various contributions for electrons in so called pericyclic, other valence, and core orbitals. Pericyclic orbitals are defined as the subset of valence orbitals which describe the changes of Lewis structures during the pericyclic reaction. The quantum dynamical results are compared with the traditional scheme of fluxes of electrons in pericyclic orbitals, as provided by arrows in Lewis structures.

  9. Quantum tunneling of electron snake states in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoodbhoy, Pervez

    2018-05-01

    In a two dimensional free electron gas subjected to a perpendicular spatially varying magnetic field, the classical paths of electrons are snake-like trajectories that weave along the line where the field crosses zero. But quantum mechanically this system is described by a symmetric double well potential which, for low excitations, leads to very different electron behavior. We compute the spectrum, as well as the wavefunctions, for states of definite parity in the limit of nearly degenerate states, i.e. for electrons sufficiently far from the B z   =  0 line. Transitions between the states are shown to give rise to a tunneling current. If the well is made asymmetrical by a time-dependent parity breaking perturbation then Rabi-like oscillations between parity states occur. Resonances can be excited and used to stimulate the transfer of electrons from one side of the potential barrier to the other through quantum tunneling.

  10. Quantum tunneling of electron snake states in an inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoodbhoy, Pervez

    2018-05-10

    In a two dimensional free electron gas subjected to a perpendicular spatially varying magnetic field, the classical paths of electrons are snake-like trajectories that weave along the line where the field crosses zero. But quantum mechanically this system is described by a symmetric double well potential which, for low excitations, leads to very different electron behavior. We compute the spectrum, as well as the wavefunctions, for states of definite parity in the limit of nearly degenerate states, i.e. for electrons sufficiently far from the B z   =  0 line. Transitions between the states are shown to give rise to a tunneling current. If the well is made asymmetrical by a time-dependent parity breaking perturbation then Rabi-like oscillations between parity states occur. Resonances can be excited and used to stimulate the transfer of electrons from one side of the potential barrier to the other through quantum tunneling.

  11. Band electron spectrum and thermodynamic properties of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ya.Farenyuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels is considered. Generalization of dynamic mean-field method for systems with correlated hopping was applied to the investigation of the model. Electron spectra, electron concentrations, average values of pseudospins and grand canonical potential were calculated within the alloy-analogy approximation. Electron spectrum and dependencies of the electron concentrations on chemical potential were obtained. It was shown that in the alloy-analogy approximation, the model possesses the first order phase transition to ferromagnetic state with the change of chemical potential and the second order phase transition with the change of temperature.

  12. Enhancement of tunnel conductivity by Cooper pair fluctuations in electron-hole bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimkin, D K; Lozovik, Yu E

    2012-01-01

    Influence of Cooper pair fluctuations that are precursor of pairing of electrons and holes located on opposite surfaces of topological insulator film on tunnel conductivity between the surfaces is investigated. Due to restrictions caused by momentum and energy conservation dependence of tunnel conductivity on external bias voltage has peak that becomes more prominent with decreasing of disorder and temperature. We have shown that Cooper pair fluctuations considerably enhance tunneling and height of the peak diverges in vicinity of critical temperature with critical index ν = 2. Width of the peak tends to zero in proximity of critical temperature. Pairing of electrons and holes can be suppressed by disorder and in vicinity of quantum critical point height of the peak also diverges as function of Cooper pair damping with critical index μ = 2.

  13. Introduction to electron beam processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Waichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1994-12-31

    The contents are general features in the irradiation of polymers, electron beam machines - low energy, medium energy, high energy; application of EB machine in industries, engineering of EB processing, dosimetry of EB (electron beam) safe operation of EB machine, recent topics on EB processing under development. 3 tabs., 4 figs., 17 refs.

  14. Introduction to electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waichiro Kawakami

    1994-01-01

    The contents are general features in the irradiation of polymers, electron beam machines - low energy, medium energy, high energy; application of EB machine in industries, engineering of EB processing, dosimetry of EB (electron beam) safe operation of EB machine, recent topics on EB processing under development. 3 tabs., 4 figs., 17 refs

  15. Trapped electron decay by the thermally-assisted tunnelling to electron acceptors in glassy matrices. A computer simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feret, B.; Bartczak, W.M.; Kroh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Redi-Hopefield quantum mechanical model of the thermally-assisted electron transfer has been applied to simulate the decay of trapped electrons by tunnelling to electron acceptor molecules added to the glassy matrix. It was assumed that the electron energy levels in donors and acceptors are statistically distributed and the electron excess energy after transfer is dissipated in the medium by the electron-phonon coupling. The electron decay curves were obtained by the method of computer simulation. It was found that for a given medium there exists a certain preferred value of the electronic excess energy which can be effectively converted into the matrix vibrations. If the mismatch of the electron states on the donor and acceptor coincides with the ''resonance'' energy the overall kinetics of electron transfer is accelerated. (author)

  16. Direct, coherent and incoherent intermediate state tunneling and scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1997-01-01

    Theory and experiment in tunneling are still qualitative in nature, which hold true also for the latest developments in direct-, resonant-, coherent- and incoherent-tunneling. Those tunnel processes have recently branched out of the field of ''solid state tunnel junctions'' into the fields of scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), single electron tunneling (SET) and semiconducting resonant tunnel structures (RTS). All these fields have promoted the understanding of tunneling in different ways reaching from the effect of coherence, of incoherence and of charging in tunneling, to spin flip or inelastic effects. STM allows not only the accurate measurements of the tunnel current and its voltage dependence but, more importantly, the easy quantification via the (quantum) tunnel channel conductance and the distance dependence. This new degree of freedom entering exponentially the tunnel current allows an unique identification of individual tunnel channels and their quantification. In STM measurements large tunnel currents are observed for large distances d > 1 nm explainable by intermediate state tunneling. Direct tunneling with its reduced tunnel time and reduced off-site Coulomb charging bridges distances below 1 nm, only. The effective charge transfer process with its larger off-site and on-site charging at intermediate states dominates tunnel transfer in STM, biology and chemistry over distances in the nm-range. Intermediates state tunneling becomes variable range hopping conduction for distances larger than d > 2 nm, for larger densities of intermediate states n 1 (ε) and for larger temperatures T or voltages U, still allowing high resolution imaging

  17. Process and device for producing a timber gear case for tunnels and mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foik, A

    1977-09-08

    A device is described for producing a timber gear case for tunnels and mines. Plank shaped pillars, partly overlapping one another are driven in parallel planes at an angle to the tunnel axis, close together and advancing relative to the face. The pillars are taken through supports erected one after the other in the longitudinal direction of the tunnel, and are supported. The process can be extended by producing a timber gear case to secure any type of underground space. The process produces further mechanisation of tunnelling and mining and also ensures greater safety for the miners.

  18. Revisiting the role of trap-assisted-tunneling process on current-voltage characteristics in tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yoshiaki; Sato, Shingo; Mallik, Abhijit

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the role of trap-assisted-tunneling process in controlling the ON- and OFF-state current levels and its impacts on the current-voltage characteristics of a tunnel field-effect transistor. Significant impacts of high-density traps in the source region are observed that are discussed in detail. With regard to recent studies on isoelectronic traps, it has been discovered that deep level density must be minimized to suppress the OFF-state leakage current, as is well known, whereas shallow levels can be utilized to control the ON-state current level. A possible mechanism is discussed based on simulation results.

  19. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelliccione, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sciambi, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  20. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou...

  1. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  2. Tunneling Characteristics of an Electron-Hole Trilayer in a Parallel Magnetic Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Y

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the tunneling properties of GaSb/AlSb/InAs/AlSb/GaSb heterostructures in which electrons- and boles accumulate in the InAs and GaSb regions respectively under a magnetic field parallel...

  3. Probing the longitudinal momentum spread of the electron wave packet at the tunnel exit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Pfeiffer, Adrian; Cirelli, Claudio; S. Landsman, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    We present an ellipticity resolved study of momentum distributions arising from strong-field ionization of Helium at constant intensity. The influence of the ion potential on the departing electron is considered within a semi-classical model consisting of an initial tunneling step and subsequent...

  4. Electron tunneling and the energy gap in Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark; Mitzi, D. B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Beasley, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Results of electron tunneling on single crystals of the Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox superconductor are reported. The junctions show a gap structure with Δ~=25 meV, whose temperature dependence exhibits a qualitatively Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like behavior with a gap-closing Tc~=81-85 K. Comparisons of these tunneling spectra to those obtained on YBa2Cu3O7-x are made. Evidence that 2Δ/kTc~7 for both Ba2Sr2CaCu2Ox and YBa2Cu3O7-x is also discussed.

  5. Scanning tunnel microscope with large vision field compatible with a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, A.P.; Stepanyan, G.A.; Khajkin, M.S.; Ehdel'man, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    A scanning tunnel microscope (STM) with the 20μm vision field and 1nm resolution, designed to be compatible with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is described. The sample scanning area is chosen within the 3x10mm limits with a 0.1-1μm step. The STM needle is moved automatically toward the sample surface from the maximum distance of 10mm until the tunneling current appears. Bimorphous elements of the KP-1 piezocorrector are used in the STM design. The device is installed on a table of SEM object holders

  6. Strong overtones modes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with cross-conjugated molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    . With this in mind, we investigate a spectroscopic method capable of providing insight into these junctions for cross-conjugated molecules: inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). IETS has the advantage that the molecule interface is probed directly by the tunneling current. Previously, it has been thought...... and leading to suppressed levels of elastic current. In most theoretical studies, only the elastic contributions to the current are taken into account. In this paper, we study the inelastic contributions to the current in cross-conjugated molecules and find that while the inelastic contribution to the current...

  7. Plasma Wind Tunnel Testing of Electron Transpiration Cooling Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Colorado State University ETC Electron Transpiration Cooling LHTS Local Heat Transfer Simulation LTE Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium RCC Reinforced...ceramic electric material testing in plasma environment (not performed), 4. measurements and analysis of the Electron Transpiration Cooling (Sec. 4.2). 2...VKI 1D boundary layer code for computation of enthalpy and boundary layer parameters: a) iterate on ’virtually measured ’ heat flux, b) once enthalpy

  8. Spin current in an electron waveguide tunnel-coupled to a topological insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhanov, Aleksei A; Sablikov, Vladimir A

    2012-01-01

    We show that electron tunneling from edge states in a two-dimensional topological insulator into a parallel electron waveguide leads to the appearance of spin-polarized current in the waveguide. The spin polarization P can be very close to unity and the electron current passing through the tunnel contact splits in the waveguide into two branches flowing from the contact. The polarization essentially depends on the electron scattering by the contact and the electron-electron interaction in the one-dimensional edge states. The electron-electron interaction is treated within the Luttinger liquid model. The main effect of the interaction stems from the renormalization of the electron velocity, due to which the polarization increases with the interaction strength. Electron scattering by the contact leads to a decrease in P. A specific effect occurs when the bottom of the subbands in the waveguide crosses the Dirac point of the spectrum of edge states when changing the voltage or chemical potential. This leads to changing the direction of the spin current.

  9. Electron transport and noise spectroscopy in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA and Alq3 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Isidoro; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Prezioso, Mirko; Riminucci, Alberto; Dediu, Valentin A.; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2016-10-01

    The possible influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present investigation of the electron transport and low frequency noise at temperatures down to 0.3K in magnetic tunnel junctions with an organic PTCDA barriers with thickness up to 5 nm in the tunneling regime and with 200 nm thick Alq3 barrier in the hopping regime. We observed high tunneling magneto-resistance at low temperatures (15-40%) and spin dependent super-poissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions (OMTJs) with PTCDA. The Fano factor exceeds 1.5-2 values which could be caused by interfacial states controlled by spin dependent bunching in the tunneling events through the molecules.1 The bias dependence of the low frequency noise in OMTJs with PTCDA barriers which includes both 1/f and random telegraph noise activated at specific biases will also be discussed. On the other hand, the organic junctions with ferromagnetic electrodes and thick Alq3 barriers present sub-poissonian shot noise which depends on the temperature, indicative of variable range hopping.

  10. Electric-field effects on electronic tunneling transport in magnetic barrier structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yong; Wang Hao; Gu Binglin; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    Electronic transport properties in magnetic barrier structures under the influence of an electric field have been investigated. The results indicate that the characteristics of transmission resonance are determined not only by the structure and the incident wave vector but also strongly by the electric field. It is shown that the transmission coefficient at resonance in the low-energy range is suppressed by applying the electric field for electron tunneling through the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with identical magnetic barriers and wells. It is also shown that the transmission resonance is first enhanced up to optimal resonance, and then suppressed with further increased electric field for electron tunneling through the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with unidentical building blocks. Strong suppression of the current density is also found in the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with two different building blocks

  11. Electron beam processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Leonardo G. Andrade e; Dias, Djalma B.; Calvo, Wilson A.P.; Miranda, Leila F. de

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the use of electron beam produced by industrial electron accelerators to process polymers. There are several applications, such as, irradiation of wires and electric cables for automotive, aerospace, household appliance, naval and computing industries. The effect of different radiation doses in low density polyethylene (LDPE) was also studied. After irradiation and crosslinking it was thermally expanded forming LDPE foam. In addition, poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) hydrogels using electron beam processing were prepared. In all cases studied crosslinking percentages of the samples were determined. (author)

  12. Electron mobility variance in the presence of an electric field: Electron-phonon field-induced tunnel scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkonyan, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of electron mobility variance is discussed. It is established that in equilibrium semiconductors the mobility variance is infinite. It is revealed that the cause of the mobility variance infinity is the threshold of phonon emission. The electron-phonon interaction theory in the presence of an electric field is developed. A new mechanism of electron scattering, called electron-phonon field-induced tunnel (FIT) scattering, is observed. The effect of the electron-phonon FIT scattering is explained in terms of penetration of the electron wave function into the semiconductor band gap in the presence of an electric field. New and more general expressions for the electron-non-polar optical phonon scattering probability and relaxation time are obtained. The results show that FIT transitions have principle meaning for the mobility fluctuation theory: mobility variance becomes finite.

  13. Electron-assisted magnetization tunneling in single spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Timofey; Karlewski, Christian; Märkl, Tobias; Schön, Gerd; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic excitations of single atoms on surfaces have been widely studied experimentally in the past decade. Lately, systems with unprecedented magnetic stability started to emerge. Here, we present a general theoretical investigation of the stability of rare-earth magnetic atoms exposed to crystal or ligand fields of various symmetry and to exchange scattering with an electron bath. By analyzing the properties of the atomic wave function, we show that certain combinations of symmetry and total angular momentum are inherently stable against first or even higher-order interactions with electrons. Further, we investigate the effect of an external magnetic field on the magnetic stability.

  14. Spin-controlled nanomechanics induced by single-electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, D; Nordenfelt, A; Kadigrobov, A M; Shekhter, R I; Jonson, M; Gorelik, L Y

    2011-12-02

    We consider dc-electronic transport through a nanowire suspended between normal- and spin-polarized metal leads in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that magnetomotive coupling between the electrical current through the nanowire and vibrations of the wire may result in self-excitation of mechanical vibrations. The self-excitation mechanism is based on correlations between the occupancy of the quantized electronic energy levels inside the nanowire and the velocity of the nanowire. We derive conditions for the occurrence of the instability and find stable regimes of mechanical oscillations. © 2011 American Physical Society

  15. Tunneling between parallel two-dimensional electron liquids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A. H.

    361/362, - (1996), s. 167-170 ISSN 0039-6028. [International Conference on the Electronic Properties of Two Dimensional Systems /11./. Nottingham, 07.08.1995-11.08.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/94/1278 Grant - others:INT(XX) 9106888 Impact factor: 2.783, year: 1996

  16. Fragment molecular orbital study on electron tunneling mechanisms in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2012-11-01

    The tunneling mechanisms of electron transfers (ETs) in photosynthetic reaction center of Blastochloris viridis are studied by the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) and the bridge Green function (GF) calculations of the electronic coupling T(DA) and the tunneling current method for the ET pathway analysis at the fragment-based resolution. For the ET from batctriopheophytin (H(L)) to menaquinone (MQ), a major tunneling current through Trp M250 and a minor back flow via Ala M215, Ala M216, and His M217 are quantified. For the ET from MQ to ubiquinone, the major tunneling pathway via the nonheme Fe(2+) and His L190 is identified as well as minor pathway via His M217 and small back flows involving His L230, Glu M232, and His M264. At the given molecular structure from X-ray experiment, the spin state of the Fe(2+) ion, its replacement by Zn(2+), or its removal are found to affect the T(DA) value by factors within 2.2. The calculated T(DA) values, together with experimentally estimated values of the driving force and the reorganization energy, give the ET rates in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  17. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  18. Electronic states in tunneling semiconductor superlattices: Technical progress report for the period September 15, 1987-September 14, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This research project funded by DOE has concentrated in the systematic study of the effects of a gate voltage on the electronic structure of a tunneling superlattice system. The effects of strong magnetic fields and other various parameters on energy levels of tunneling superlattices have been investigated

  19. Hysteresis loops of spin-dependent electronic current in a paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wójcik, P; Spisak, B J; Wołoszyn, M; Adamowski, J

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of the spin-dependent electronic transport through a semiconductor resonant tunnelling diode with a paramagnetic quantum well are considered. The spin-dependent Wigner–Poisson model of the electronic transport and the two-current Mott’s formula for the independent spin channels are applied to determine the current–voltage curves of the nanodevice. Two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops are found in the current–voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current. The physical interpretation of these two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops is given based on the analysis of the spin-dependent electron densities and the potential energy profiles. The differences between the current–voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current allow us to explore the changes of the spin polarization of the current for different electric fields and determine the influence of the electronic current hysteresis on the spin polarization of the current flowing through the paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode. (paper)

  20. Electronic tunneling through a fullerene-like molecular bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaie, H.; Yaghobi, M.

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to consider the electronic transport properties of the N_{36} B_{36} molecule, using the Green's function method based on the GW model. The number, width, height and position of density of state peaks are dramatically dependent on the correlation effect, the contact type and symmetric properties of the molecule. Also, negative differential resistance behavior was observed for all modes in voltages 4.4 V (- 4.5 V) to 4.7 V (- 4.7 V). The N_{36} B_{36} molecule behaves as an insulator where the total current becomes zero for the same values of the gate voltages but acts as a metal at other values. Therefore, the physical picture of electron conduction may change in N_{36} B_{36}—based molecular devices and it could behave as a semiconductor.

  1. Experimental Evidence for Quantum Tunneling Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Fechner, Lutz; Klaiber, Michael; Laux, Martin; Mi, Yonghao; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The first hundred attoseconds of the electron dynamics during strong field tunneling ionization are investigated. We quantify theoretically how the electron's classical trajectories in the continuum emerge from the tunneling process and test the results with those achieved in parallel from attoclock measurements. An especially high sensitivity on the tunneling barrier is accomplished here by comparing the momentum distributions of two atomic species of slightly deviating atomic potentials (argon and krypton) being ionized under absolutely identical conditions with near-infrared laser pulses (1300 nm). The agreement between experiment and theory provides clear evidence for a nonzero tunneling time delay and a nonvanishing longitudinal momentum of the electron at the "tunnel exit."

  2. Limitations in cooling electrons using normal-metal-superconductor tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekola, J P; Heikkilä, T T; Savin, A M; Flyktman, J T; Giazotto, F; Hekking, F W J

    2004-02-06

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally two limiting factors in cooling electrons using biased tunnel junctions to extract heat from a normal metal into a superconductor. First, when the injection rate of electrons exceeds the internal relaxation rate in the metal to be cooled, the electrons do not obey the Fermi-Dirac distribution, and the concept of temperature cannot be applied as such. Second, at low bath temperatures, states within the gap induce anomalous heating and yield a theoretical limit of the achievable minimum temperature.

  3. Electronic tunneling through a potential barrier on the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the tunneling transport for electrons on the surface of a topological insulator (TI) through an electrostatic potential barrier. By using the Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the transmission probability and conductance for the system. It is demonstrated that, the Klein paradox can also been observed in the system same as in graphene system. Interestingly, the conductance reaches the minimum value when the incident electron energy is equal to the barrier strength. Moreover, with increasing barrier width, the conductance turns up some tunneling oscillation peaks, and larger barrier strength can cause lower conductance, shorter period but larger oscillation amplitude. The oscillation amplitude decreases as the barrier width increases, which is similar as that of the system consisting of the compressive uniaxial strain applied on a TI, but somewhat different from that of graphene system where the oscillation amplitude is a constant. The findings here imply that an electrostatic barrier can greatly influence the electron tunneling transport of the system, and may provide a new way to realize directional filtering of electrons.

  4. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  5. Spin-polarized electron tunneling in bcc FeCo/MgO/FeCo(001) magnetic tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, F; Hauet, T; Andrieu, S; Bertran, F; Le Fèvre, P; Calmels, L; Tejeda, A; Montaigne, F; Warot-Fonrose, B; Belhadji, B; Nicolaou, A; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A

    2012-04-27

    In combining spin- and symmetry-resolved photoemission, magnetotransport measurements and ab initio calculations we detangled the electronic states involved in the electronic transport in Fe(1-x)Co(x)(001)/MgO/Fe(1-x)Co(x)(001) magnetic tunnel junctions. Contrary to previous theoretical predictions, we observe a large reduction in TMR (from 530 to 200% at 20 K) for Co content above 25 atomic% as well as anomalies in the conductance curves. We demonstrate that these unexpected behaviors originate from a minority spin state with Δ(1) symmetry that exists below the Fermi level for high Co concentration. Using angle-resolved photoemission, this state is shown to be a two-dimensional state that occurs at both Fe(1-x)Co(x)(001) free surface, and more importantly at the interface with MgO. The combination of this interface state with the peculiar density of empty states due to chemical disorder allows us to describe in details the complex conduction behavior in this system.

  6. Energy transfer between two vacuum-gapped metal plates: Coulomb fluctuations and electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zu-Quan; Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    Recent experimental measurements for near-field radiative heat transfer between two bodies have been able to approach the gap distance within 2 nm , where the contributions of Coulomb fluctuation and electron tunneling are comparable. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method in the G0W0 approximation, based on a tight-binding model, we obtain for the energy current a Caroli formula from the Meir-Wingreen formula in the local equilibrium approximation. Also, the Caroli formula is consistent with the evanescent part of the heat transfer from the theory of fluctuational electrodynamics. We go beyond the local equilibrium approximation to study the energy transfer in the crossover region from electron tunneling to Coulomb fluctuation based on a numerical calculation.

  7. Weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization: benchmark analytical results for two-electron atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh, Vinh H; Morishita, Toru; Tolstikhin, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed many-electron weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization of atoms and molecules in an external static electric field (Tolstikhin et al 2014, Phys. Rev. A 89, 013421) is extended to the first-order terms in the asymptotic expansion in field. To highlight the results, here we present a simple analytical formula giving the rate of tunneling ionization of two-electron atoms H − and He. Comparison with fully-correlated ab initio calculations available for these systems shows that the first-order theory works quantitatively in a wide range of fields up to the onset of over-the-barrier ionization and hence is expected to find numerous applications in strong-field physics. (fast track communication)

  8. Electron-tunneling observation of local excited states in manganese-doped indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, J.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    We have measured the electron-tunneling characteristics of a dilute indium-manganese alloy. Well-defined structure was observed, corresponding to a band of local excited states within the energy gap. The measurements were made on two samples, and were quantitatively compared with the theory of Shiba and of Rusinov. We obtained good agreement of the tunneling data with the theory by taking into account only s-wave scattering of conduction electrons from the magnetic-impurity atoms. Even better agreement was obtained by including p- and d-wave scattering. Only by including these higher partial waves could we account for the magnitude of the observed depression of the transition temperature. The phase shifts used are in good agreement with band-theory values calculated recently

  9. Valley polarization due to trigonal warping on tunneling electrons in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Jr, J M; Peeters, F M; Costa Filho, R N; Farias, G A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of trigonal warping on the transmission of electrons tunneling through potential barriers in graphene is investigated. We present calculations of the transmission coefficient for single and double barriers as a function of energy, incidence angle and barrier heights. The results show remarkable valley-dependent directional effects for barriers oriented parallel to the armchair or parallel to the zigzag direction. These results indicate that electrostatic gates can be used as valley filters in graphene-based devices.

  10. Mapping the intramolecular contributions to the inelastic electron tunneling signal of a molecular junction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 4 (2016), 1-10, č. článku 045418. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19672S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : single molecule transport * inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy * DFT-NEGF * inelastic selection rules Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  11. Multichannel model of magneto tunneling in disordered electron nanodevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, M.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Diez, E.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multichannel model of magnetotunneling transport in unintentionally disordered double-barrier GaAs-Al x Ga 1-x As heterostructures. The source of disorder comes from interface roughness at the heterojunctions. Disorder break translational symmetry along the lateral direction and therefore electrons can be scattered off the growth direction. The model correctly describes channel mixing due to these elastic scattering events. The magnetic field applied to the double-barrier heterostructure splits the resonant level into a set of equally-spaced resonances, the level spacing increasing with the magnetic field. We discuss the influence of the various parameters (epilayer widths and magnitude or disorder) on the lineshape of the resonant levels

  12. Tunneling of electrons via rotor–stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ohanesjan, Vladimir [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Pejov, Ljupčo [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Arhimedova 5, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Kocarev, Ljupčo [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Krste Misirkov 2, PO Box 428, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor–stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons’ formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green’s Function Formalism.

  13. METHOD OF ELECTRON BEAM PROCESSING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    As a rule, electron beam welding takes place in a vacuum. However, this means that the workpieces in question have to be placed in a vacuum chamber and have to be removed therefrom after welding. This is time−consuming and a serious limitation of a process the greatest advantage of which is the o......As a rule, electron beam welding takes place in a vacuum. However, this means that the workpieces in question have to be placed in a vacuum chamber and have to be removed therefrom after welding. This is time−consuming and a serious limitation of a process the greatest advantage of which...... is the option of welding workpieces of large thicknesses. Therefore the idea is to guide the electron beam (2) to the workpiece via a hollow wire, said wire thereby acting as a prolongation of the vacuum chamber (4) down to workpiece. Thus, a workpiece need not be placed inside the vacuum chamber, thereby...... exploiting the potential of electron beam processing to a greater degree than previously possible, for example by means of electron beam welding...

  14. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  15. Magnetic-Field Control Of Tunnel-Coupling In Strongly Confined One-Dimensional Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, S. F.; Apetrii, G.; Kunze, U.; Schuh, D.; Abstreiter, G.

    2007-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) ballistic electron transport is studied through stacked 1D quantum conductors separated by a thin tunneling barrier. The 1D electron systems of large 1D subband spacings (more than 10 meV) allow single mode operation. Degeneracies of 1D subbands of equal lateral mode index are lifted by the formation of symmetric and antisymmetric states and are depicted by anti-crossings of transconductance maxima. We observe a mode-dependent turnover from level anti-crossings to crossings in longitudinal magnetic fields.

  16. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Single-Electron Tunneling Devices with Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a single-electron source, modeled as a quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to an adjacent lead in time-dependent density-functional theory. Based on this system, we develop a time-nonlocal exchange-correlation potential by exploiting analogies with quantum-transport theory. The time nonlocality manifests itself in a dynamical potential step. We explicitly link the time evolution of the dynamical step to physical relaxation timescales of the electron dynamics. Finally, we discuss prospects for simulations of larger mesoscopic systems.

  17. Vibrational Properties of h-BN and h-BN-Graphene Heterostructures Probed by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Suyong; Park, Minkyu; Park, Jaesung; Jeong, Tae-Young; Kim, Ho-Jong; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ha, Dong Han; Hwang, Chanyong; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-11-13

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful technique for investigating lattice dynamics of nanoscale systems including graphene and small molecules, but establishing a stable tunnel junction is considered as a major hurdle in expanding the scope of tunneling experiments. Hexagonal boron nitride is a pivotal component in two-dimensional Van der Waals heterostructures as a high-quality insulating material due to its large energy gap and chemical-mechanical stability. Here we present planar graphene/h-BN-heterostructure tunneling devices utilizing thin h-BN as a tunneling insulator. With much improved h-BN-tunneling-junction stability, we are able to probe all possible phonon modes of h-BN and graphite/graphene at Γ and K high symmetry points by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. Additionally, we observe that low-frequency out-of-plane vibrations of h-BN and graphene lattices are significantly modified at heterostructure interfaces. Equipped with an external back gate, we can also detect high-order coupling phenomena between phonons and plasmons, demonstrating that h-BN-based tunneling device is a wonderful playground for investigating electron-phonon couplings in low-dimensional systems.

  18. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p z atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices

  19. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Tunneling electron induced molecular electroluminescence from individual porphyrin J-aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qiushi; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhyangnano@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zcdong@ustc.edu.cn; Zhang, Yao; Liao, Yuan; Dong, Zhenchao, E-mail: zhyangnano@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zcdong@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-07-27

    We investigate molecular electroluminescence from individual tubular porphyrin J-aggregates on Au(111) by tunneling electron excitations in an ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). High-resolution STM images suggest a spiral tubular structure for the porphyrin J-aggregate with highly ordered “brickwork”-like arrangements. Such aggregated nanotube is found to behave like a self-decoupled molecular architecture and shows red-shifted electroluminescence characteristics of J-aggregates originated from the delocalized excitons. The positions of the emission peaks are found to shift slightly depending on the excitation sites, which, together with the changes in the observed spectral profiles with vibronic progressions, suggest a limited exciton coherence number within several molecules. The J-aggregate electroluminescence is also found unipolar, occurring only at negative sample voltages, which is presumably related to the junction asymmetry in the context of molecular excitations via the carrier injection mechanism.

  1. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  2. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun, E-mail: xuck@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xjun@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-08-15

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  3. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  4. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  5. Fragment-orbital tunneling currents and electronic couplings for analysis of molecular charge-transfer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang-Yeon; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2018-04-04

    In theoretical charge-transfer research, calculation of the electronic coupling element is crucial for examining the degree of the electronic donor-acceptor interaction. The tunneling current (TC), representing the magnitudes and directions of electron flow, provides a way of evaluating electronic couplings, along with the ability of visualizing how electrons flow in systems. Here, we applied the TC theory to π-conjugated organic dimer systems, in the form of our fragment-orbital tunneling current (FOTC) method, which uses the frontier molecular-orbitals of system fragments as diabatic states. For a comprehensive test of FOTC, we assessed how reasonable the computed electronic couplings and the corresponding TC densities are for the hole- and electron-transfer databases HAB11 and HAB7. FOTC gave 12.5% mean relative unsigned error with regard to the high-level ab initio reference. The shown performance is comparable with that of fragment-orbital density functional theory, which gave the same error by 20.6% or 13.9% depending on the formulation. In the test of a set of nucleobase π stacks, we showed that the original TC expression is also applicable to nondegenerate cases under the condition that the overlap between the charge distributions of diabatic states is small enough to offset the energy difference. Lastly, we carried out visual analysis on the FOTC densities of thiophene dimers with different intermolecular alignments. The result depicts an intimate topological connection between the system geometry and electron flow. Our work provides quantitative and qualitative grounds for FOTC, showing it to be a versatile tool in characterization of molecular charge-transfer systems.

  6. A graphical method for estimating the tunneling factor for mode conversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    The fundamental parameter characterizing the strength of any mode conversion process is the tunneling parameter, which is typically determined from a model dispersion relation which is transformed into a differential equation. Here a graphical method is described which gives the tunneling parameter from quantities directly measured from a simple graph of the dispersion relation. The accuracy of the estimate depends only on the accuracy of the measurements

  7. Temperature Dependent Electron Transport Properties of Gold Nanoparticles and Composites: Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sumati; Datar, Suwarna; Dharmadhikari, C V

    2018-03-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) is used for investigating variations in electronic properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and its composite with urethane-methacrylate comb polymer (UMCP) as function of temperature. Films are prepared by drop casting AuNPs and UMCP in desired manner on silicon substrates. Samples are further analyzed for morphology under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). STS measurements performed in temperature range of 33 °C to 142 °C show systematic variation in current versus voltage (I-V) curves, exhibiting semiconducting to metallic transition/Schottky behavior for different samples, depending upon preparation method and as function of temperature. During current versus time (I-t) measurement for AuNPs, random telegraphic noise is observed at room temperature. Random switching of tunneling current between two discrete levels is observed for this sample. Power spectra derived from I-t show 1/f2 dependence. Statistical analysis of fluctuations shows exponential behavior with time width τ ≈ 7 ms. Local density of states (LDOS) plots derived from I-V curves of each sample show systematic shift in valance/conduction band edge towards/away from Fermi level, with respect to increase in temperature. Schottky emission is best fitted electron emission mechanism for all samples over certain range of bias voltage. Schottky plots are used to calculate barrier heights and temperature dependent measurements helped in measuring activation energies for electron transport in all samples.

  8. Preliminary design of CERN Future Circular Collider tunnel: first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantino, Angelo; Alía, Rubén García; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Brugger, Markus; Cerutti, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    As part of its post-LHC high energy physics program, CERN is conducting a study for a new proton-proton collider, called Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh), running at center-of-mass energies of up to 100 TeV in a new 100 km tunnel. The study includes a 90-350 GeV lepton collider (FCC-ee) as well as a lepton-hadron option (FCC-he). In this work, FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation was extensively used to perform a first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics in the FCC-hh tunnel. The model of the tunnel was created based on the original civil engineering studies already performed and further integrated in the existing FLUKA models of the beam line. The radiation levels in critical areas, such as the racks for electronics and cables, power converters, service areas, local tunnel extensions was evaluated.

  9. Preliminary design of CERN Future Circular Collider tunnel: first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Infantino Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of its post-LHC high energy physics program, CERN is conducting a study for a new proton-proton collider, called Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh, running at center-of-mass energies of up to 100 TeV in a new 100 km tunnel. The study includes a 90-350 GeV lepton collider (FCC-ee as well as a lepton-hadron option (FCC-he. In this work, FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation was extensively used to perform a first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics in the FCC-hh tunnel. The model of the tunnel was created based on the original civil engineering studies already performed and further integrated in the existing FLUKA models of the beam line. The radiation levels in critical areas, such as the racks for electronics and cables, power converters, service areas, local tunnel extensions was evaluated.

  10. Peculiarities of resonant tunneling of electrons through the triply degenerate state of a quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermakov, V.M.

    1997-01-01

    In the case of low transparency of barriers, tunneling of electrons through a double barrier system with account their Coulomb interaction in the inter barrier space (quantum well) is considered. The quantum state of the well is supposed to be triply degenerated. It was shown that the dependence of quantum well accupation on the applied bias has a step like character at low temperatures, and there is a threshold value in the region of small applied bias. These properties can be explained by splitting of states in the well due to the electron interaction. The considered system also has bistability properties. This is due to the possibility for electrons to occupy upper levels in the well while lower levels remain empty. Charge fluctuations in the well are also discussed

  11. Electron and hole photoemission detection for band offset determination of tunnel field-effect transistor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Qin; Kirillov, Oleg A.; Levin, Igor; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J.; Nguyen, N. V.; Bijesh, R.; Datta, S.; Liang, Yiran; Peng, Lian-Mao; Liang, Xuelei

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental methods to ascertain a complete energy band alignment of a broken-gap tunnel field-effect transistor based on an InAs/GaSb hetero-junction. By using graphene as an optically transparent electrode, both the electron and hole barrier heights at the InAs/GaSb interface can be quantified. For a Al 2 O 3 /InAs/GaSb layer structure, the barrier height from the top of the InAs and GaSb valence bands to the bottom of the Al 2 O 3 conduction band is inferred from electron emission whereas hole emissions reveal the barrier height from the top of the Al 2 O 3 valence band to the bottom of the InAs and GaSb conduction bands. Subsequently, the offset parameter at the broken gap InAs/GaSb interface is extracted and thus can be used to facilitate the development of predicted models of electron quantum tunneling efficiency and transistor performance

  12. Transport of electrons in the tunnel of an ion sensitive probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Adámek, Jiří; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Pekárek, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2011), 015005-015005 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430901; GA MŠk 7G09042; GA MŠk LA08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * plasma * katsumata probe * ExB drift * ion temperature * tunnel * electron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/1/015005/pdf/0741-3335_53_1_015005.pdf

  13. A hybrid instrument combining electronic and photonic tunnelling for surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechou, R.; Ajustron, F.; Seine, G.; Coratger, R.; Maurel, C.; Beauvillain, J.

    2004-01-01

    A PSTM working in the collection mode and based on an STM probe-sample regulation scheme has been developed. This original hybrid instrument for surface analysis uses apertureless metal-coated chemically etched optical fibres. The use of an electronic tunnelling-based feedback loop significantly reduces tip-sample distance and leads to the collection of a high level near-field optical (NFO) signal. A simple amplified photodiode is thus used to perform optical signal acquisition and to draw electromagnetic field maps of sample surfaces. Experimental results on nanostructured gold surfaces are presented

  14. Electron tunneling into superconducting indium and lead films containing the magnetic impurity manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    Tunneling measurements of quench-condensed In-Mn and Pb-Mn alloy films were made. The results were compared with Shiba's theory of superconductors containing magnetic impurities. The localized excited impurity states predicted by Shiba's theory were observed in both alloys. In addition to s-wave scattering, it was necessary to include p- and d-wave scattering of the conduction electrons in the theory in order to explain the experimental data. Partial agreement between the theory and the experimental data was obtained using phase shifts from band calculations by A.B. Kunz. The results on In-Mn also agree with thermal conductivity data

  15. Electron-tunneling observation of localized excited states in superconducting manganese-doped lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, J.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    We have made electron-tunneling measurements on a dilute, superconducting lead-manganese alloy. A well-defined structure was observed in the ac-conductance--voltage curves, indicating excited states within the BCS energy gap. These states were partially accounted for by Shiba theory when spin-dependent s-, p-, and d-wave scattering were included. The phase shifts used in doing that were the results of band calculations. The experimental data also show the existence of a broad background density of states in the energy gap, which cannot be accounted for by the theory

  16. Exploring the Tilt-Angle Dependence of electron tunneling across Molecular junction of Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Munuera, C.; Ocal, C.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic transport mechanisms in molecular junctions are investigated by a combination of first-principles calculations and current−voltage measurements of several well-characterized structures. We study self-assembled layers of alkanethiols grown on Au(111) and form tunnel junctions...... for the longer molecular chains. Our calculations confirm the observed trends and explain them as a result of two mechanisms, namely, a previously proposed intermolecular tunneling enhancement as well as a hitherto overlooked tilt-dependent molecular gate effect....

  17. Scanning tunnel microscopic image of tungsten (100) and (110) real surfaces and nature of conduction electron reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryadkin, S.L.; Tsoj, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The electrically polished (100) and (110) surfaces of tungsten are studied with the aid of a scanning tunnel microscope at atmospheric pressure. The (110) surface consists of a large number of atomically plane terraces whereas the (100) surface is faceted. The scanning tunnel microscope data can explain such results of experiments on transverse electron focussing as the strong dependence of the probability for specular reflection of conduction electrons scattered by the (100) surface on the electron de Broglie wavelength and the absence of a dependence of the probability for specular reflection on the wavelength for the (110) surface

  18. Selective scanning tunnelling microscope electron-induced reactions of single biphenyl molecules on a Si(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Damien; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Lesnard, Hervé; Lastapis, Mathieu; Lorente, Nicolas; Sonnet, Philippe; Dujardin, Gérald

    2009-06-03

    Selective electron-induced reactions of individual biphenyl molecules adsorbed in their weakly chemisorbed configuration on a Si(100) surface are investigated by using the tip of a low-temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) as an atomic size source of electrons. Selected types of molecular reactions are produced, depending on the polarity of the surface voltage during STM excitation. At negative surface voltages, the biphenyl molecule diffuses across the surface in its weakly chemisorbed configuration. At positive surface voltages, different types of molecular reactions are activated, which involve the change of adsorption configuration from the weakly chemisorbed to the strongly chemisorbed bistable and quadristable configurations. Calculated reaction pathways of the molecular reactions on the silicon surface, using the nudge elastic band method, provide evidence that the observed selectivity as a function of the surface voltage polarity cannot be ascribed to different activation energies. These results, together with the measured threshold surface voltages and the calculated molecular electronic structures via density functional theory, suggest that the electron-induced molecular reactions are driven by selective electron detachment (oxidation) or attachment (reduction) processes.

  19. Coulomb Repulsion Effect in Two-electron Non-adiabatic Tunneling through a One-level redox Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medvedev, Igor M.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We investigated Coulomb repulsion effects in nonadiabatic (diabatic) two-electron tunneling through a redox molecule with a single electronic level in a symmetric electrochemical contact under ambient conditions, i.e., room temperature and condensed matter environment. The electrochemical contact...

  20. Electronic Handbooks Simplify Process Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Getting a multitude of people to work together to manage processes across many organizations for example, flight projects, research, technologies, or data centers and others is not an easy task. Just ask Dr. Barry E. Jacobs, a research computer scientist at Goddard Space Flight Center. He helped NASA develop a process management solution that provided documenting tools for process developers and participants to help them quickly learn, adapt, test, and teach their views. Some of these tools included editable files for subprocess descriptions, document descriptions, role guidelines, manager worksheets, and references. First utilized for NASA's Headquarters Directives Management process, the approach led to the invention of a concept called the Electronic Handbook (EHB). This EHB concept was successfully applied to NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs, among other NASA programs. Several Federal agencies showed interest in the concept, so Jacobs and his team visited these agencies to show them how their specific processes could be managed by the methodology, as well as to create mockup versions of the EHBs.

  1. Direct exchange between silicon nanocrystals and tunnel oxide traps under illumination on single electron photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatbouri, S., E-mail: Samir.chatbouri@yahoo.com; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Aimez, V. [Université de Sherbrooke, Laboratoire Nanotechnologies et Nanosystémes (UMI-LN2 3463), Université de Sherbrooke—CNRS—INSA de Lyon-ECL-UJF-CPE Lyon, Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (Canada); Drouin, D. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Souifi, A. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon—site INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270 (France)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present the trapping of photogenerated charge carriers for 300 s resulted by their direct exchange under illumination between a few silicon nanocrystals (ncs-Si) embedded in an oxide tunnel layer (SiO{sub x} = 1.5) and the tunnel oxide traps levels for a single electron photodetector (photo-SET or nanopixel). At first place, the presence of a photocurrent limited in the inversion zone under illumination in the I–V curves confirms the creation of a pair electron/hole (e–h) at high energy. This photogenerated charge carriers can be trapped in the oxide. Using the capacitance-voltage under illumination (the photo-CV measurements) we show a hysteresis chargement limited in the inversion area, indicating that the photo-generated charge carriers are stored at traps levels at the interface and within ncs-Si. The direct exchange of the photogenerated charge carriers between the interface traps levels and the ncs-Si contributed on the photomemory effect for 300 s for our nanopixel at room temperature.

  2. Resonant tunneling assisted propagation and amplification of plasmons in high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, Shubhendu; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi; Xing, Huili Grace; Rajan, Siddharth; Volakis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    A rigorous theoretical and computational model is developed for the plasma-wave propagation in high electron mobility transistor structures with electron injection from a resonant tunneling diode at the gate. We discuss the conditions in which low-loss and sustainable plasmon modes can be supported in such structures. The developed analytical model is used to derive the dispersion relation for these plasmon-modes. A non-linear full-wave-hydrodynamic numerical solver is also developed using a finite difference time domain algorithm. The developed analytical solutions are validated via the numerical solution. We also verify previous observations that were based on a simplified transmission line model. It is shown that at high levels of negative differential conductance, plasmon amplification is indeed possible. The proposed rigorous models can enable accurate design and optimization of practical resonant tunnel diode-based plasma-wave devices for terahertz sources, mixers, and detectors, by allowing a precise representation of their coupling when integrated with other electromagnetic structures

  3. Superluminescence from an optically pumped molecular tunneling junction by injection of plasmon induced hot electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Braun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate a bias-driven superluminescent point light-source based on an optically pumped molecular junction (gold substrate/self-assembled molecular monolayer/gold tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, operating at ambient conditions and providing almost three orders of magnitude higher electron-to-photon conversion efficiency than electroluminescence induced by inelastic tunneling without optical pumping. A positive, steadily increasing bias voltage induces a step-like rise of the Stokes shifted optical signal emitted from the junction. This emission is strongly attenuated by reversing the applied bias voltage. At high bias voltage, the emission intensity depends non-linearly on the optical pump power. The enhanced emission can be modelled by rate equations taking into account hole injection from the tip (anode into the highest occupied orbital of the closest substrate-bound molecule (lower level and radiative recombination with an electron from above the Fermi level (upper level, hence feeding photons back by stimulated emission resonant with the gap mode. The system reflects many essential features of a superluminescent light emitting diode.

  4. An extended model of electrons: experimental evidence from high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Werner A

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper we introduced a model of extended electrons, which is fully compatible with quantum mechanics in the formulation of Schrödinger. However, it contradicts the current interpretation of electrons as point-particles. Here, we show by a statistical analysis of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, that the interpretation of electrons as point particles and, consequently, the interpretation of the density of electron charge as a statistical quantity will lead to a conflict with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Given the precision in these experiments we find that the uncertainty principle would be violated by close to two orders of magnitude, if this interpretation were correct. We are thus forced to conclude that the density of electron charge is a physically real, i.e. in principle precisely measurable quantity, as derived in a recent paper. Experimental evidence to the contrary, in particular high-energy scattering experiments, is briefly discussed. The finding is expected to have wide implications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, and biology, scientific disciplines which are based on the properties and interactions of electrons.

  5. Magnetooscillations of the tunneling current between two-dimensional electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichev, O.E.; Vasko, F.T.

    1995-08-01

    We calculate electric current caused by electron tunnelling between two-dimensional layers in the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the layers. An elastic scattering of the electrons is taken into account. Analytical results are obtained for two regimes: i) small magnetic field, when the Landau quantization is suppressed by the scattering and the oscillatory part of the current shows nearly harmonic behaviour; ii) high magnetic field, when the Landau levels are well-defined and the conductivity shows series of sharp peaks corresponding to resonant magnetotunneling. In the last case, we used two alternative approaches: self-consistent Born approximation and path integral method, and compared obtained results. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  6. Inelastic electron tunneling through degenerate and nondegenerate ground state polymeric junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golsanamlou, Z.; Bagheri Tagani, M.; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Current–voltage characteristics of two polymeric junctions are studied. • Current is reduced in phonon assistant tunneling regime. • Behavior of current is independent of temperature. • Elastic energy changes current drastically. - Abstract: The inelastic electron transport properties through two polymeric (trans-polyacetylene and polythiophene) molecular junctions are studied using Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function formalism. The Hamiltonian of the polymers is described via Su–Schrieffer–Heeger model and the metallic electrodes are modeled by the wide-band approximation. Results show that the step-like behavior of the current–voltage characteristics is deformed in presence of strong electron–phonon interaction. Also, the magnitude of current is slightly decreased in the phonon assistant electron transport regime. In addition, it is observed that the I–V curves are independent of temperature

  7. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2016-01-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics...

  8. Magnetic field manipulation of spin current in a single-molecule magnet tunnel junction with two-electron Coulomb interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Yao, Hui; Nie, Yi-Hang; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Niu, Peng-Bin

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we study the generation of spin-current in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) tunnel junction with Coulomb interaction of transport electrons and external magnetic field. In the absence of field the spin-up and -down currents are symmetric with respect to the initial polarizations of molecule. The existence of magnetic field breaks the time-reversal symmetry, which leads to unsymmetrical spin currents of parallel and antiparallel polarizations. Both the amplitude and polarization direction of spin current can be controlled by the applied magnetic field. Particularly when the magnetic field increases to a certain value the spin-current with antiparallel polarization is reversed along with the magnetization reversal of the SMM. The two-electron occupation indeed enhances the transport current compared with the single-electron process. However the increase of Coulomb interaction results in the suppression of spin-current amplitude at the electron-hole symmetry point. We propose a scheme to compensate the suppression with the magnetic field.

  9. Point-contact electron tunneling into the high-T/sub c/ superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.D.; Smith, D.P.E.; Mitzi, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    We report results of a study of electron tunneling into bulk samples of the new high-T/sub c/ superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O using point-contact tunneling. Based on a superconductive tunneling interpretation, the results show exceptionally large energy gaps in these materials (roughly 2Δ = 100 meV), implying 2Δ/k/sub C/T/sub c/--13. Similar values were found previously by us for La-Sr-Cu-O. We also see Structure in the I-V curves similar to that seen in La-Sr-Cu-O. On the basis of the asymmetries observed in the I-V characteristics, we believe that the natural tunneling barrier on this material is of the Schottky type

  10. A study of inelastic electron-phonon interactions on tunneling magnetoresistance of a nano-scale device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarresi, M.; Roknabadi, M.R.; Shahtahmasbi, N.; Vahedi Fakhrabad, D.; Arabshahi, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we have studied the effect of inelastic electron-phonon interactions on current-voltage characteristic and tunneling magnetoresistance of a polythiophene molecule that is sandwiched between two cobalt electrodes using modified Green's function method as proposed by Walczak. The molecule is described with a modified Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian. The ground state of the molecule is obtained by Hellman-Feynman theorem. Electrodes are described in the wide-band approximation and spin-flip is neglected during conduction. Our calculation results show that with increase in voltage the currents increase and tunneling magnetoresistance decreases. Change in tunneling magnetoresistance due to inelastic interactions is limited in a small bias voltage interval and can be neglected in the other bias voltages. -- Research Highlights: →We investigate the effect of inelastic interaction on transport properties. →Due to inelastic interactions tunneling magnetoresistance decreases. →Decrease in TMR is restricted in a small voltage interval.

  11. Electronic structure properties of the In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dot–quantum well tunnel-injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sęk, Grzegorz; Andrzejewski, Janusz; Ryczko, Krzysztof; Poloczek, Przemysław; Misiewicz, Jan; Semenova, Elizaveta S; Lemaitre, Aristide; Patriarche, Gilles; Ramdane, Aberrahim

    2009-01-01

    We report on the electronic properties of GaAs-substrate-based structures designed as a tunnel-injection system composed of self-assembled InAs quantum dots and an In 0.3 Ga 0.7 As quantum well separated by a GaAs barrier. We have performed photoluminescence and photoreflectance measurements which have allowed the determination of the optical transitions in the QW–QD tunnel structure and its respective references with just quantum dots or a quantum well. The effective mass calculations of the band structure dependence on the tunnelling barrier thickness have shown that in spite of an expected significant tunnelling between both parts of the system, its strong asymmetry and the strain distribution cause that the quantum-mechanical-coupling-induced energy shift of the optical transitions is almost negligible for the lowest energy states and weakly sensitive to the width of the barrier, which finds confirmation in the existing experimental data

  12. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  13. The effects of changing the electrodes temperature on the tunnel magnetoresistance in the ferromagnetic single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, N.; Pourali, N.; Kavaz, E.

    2018-01-01

    Ferromagnetic single electron transistor with electrodes having different temperatures is investigated and the effects of changing electrodes temperature on TMR of system are studied. A modified orthodox theory is used to study the system and to calculate the electron tunneling transition rate. The results show that the temperature of electrodes can be an effective tool to control and tune the tunnel magnetoresistance of FM-SET. Also, the effects of parameters such as resistance ratio of junctions, magnetic polarization and spin relaxation time on the behaviour of the system are studied.

  14. Effect of the δ-potential on spin-dependent electron tunneling in double barrier semiconductor heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, L. Bruno; Gnanasekar, K.; Karunakaran, M.

    2018-06-01

    The effect of δ-potential was studied in GaAs/Ga0.6Al0·4As double barrier heterostructure with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction. The role of barrier height and position of the δ- potential in the well region was analysed on spin-dependent electron tunneling using transfer matrix method. The spin-separation between spin-resonances on energy scale depends on both height and position of the δ- potential, whereas the tunneling life time of electrons highly influenced by the position of the δ- potential and not on the height. These results might be helpful for the fabrication of spin-filters.

  15. Development of a scanning tunneling potentiometry system for measurement of electronic transport at short length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozler, Michael

    It is clear that complete understanding of macroscopic properties of materials is impossible without a thorough knowledge of behavior at the smallest length scales. While the past 25 years have witnessed major advances in a variety of techniques that probe the nanoscale properties of matter, electrical transport measurements -- the heart of condensed matter research -- have lagged behind, never progressing beyond bulk measurements. This thesis describes a scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) system developed to simultaneously map the transport-related electrochemical potential distribution of a biased sample along with its surface topography, extending electronic transport measurements to the nanoscale. Combining a novel sample biasing technique with a continuous current-nulling feedback scheme pushes the noise performance of the measurement to its fundamental limit - the Johnson noise of the STM tunnel junction. The resulting 130 nV voltage sensitivity allows us to spatially resolve local potentials at scales down to 2 nm, while maintaining atomic scale STM imaging, all at scan sizes of up to 15 microns. A mm-range two-dimensional coarse positioning stage and the ability to operate from liquid helium to room temperature with a fast turn-around time greatly expand the versatility of the instrument. Use of carefully selected model materials, combined with excellent topographic and voltage resolution has allowed us to distinguish measurement artifacts caused by surface roughness from true potentiometric features, a major problem in previous STP measurements. The measurements demonstrate that STP can produce physically meaningful results for homogeneous transport as well as non-uniform conduction dominated by material microstructures. Measurements of several physically interesting materials systems are presented as well, revealing new behaviors at the smallest length sales. The results establish scanning tunneling potentiometry as a useful tool for physics and

  16. Single molecule manipulation at low temperature and laser scanning tunnelling photo-induced processes analysis through time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, Damien

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes, firstly, the statistical analysis used to determine the processes that occur during the manipulation of a single molecule through electronically induced excitations with a low temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Various molecular operation examples are described and the ability to probe the ensuing molecular manipulation dynamics is discussed within the excitation context. It is, in particular, shown that such studies can reveal reversible manipulation for tuning dynamics through variation of the excitation energy. Secondly, the photo-induced process arising from the irradiation of the STM junction is also studied through feedback loop dynamics analysis, allowing us to distinguish between photo-thermally and photo-electronically induced signals.

  17. Electron backscattering for process control in electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardenne, T. von; Panzer, S.

    1983-01-01

    A number of solutions to the automation of electron beam welding is presented. On the basis of electron backscattering a complex system of process control has been developed. It allows an enlarged imaging of the material's surface, improved adjustment of the beam focusing and definite focus positioning. Furthermore, both manual and automated positioning of the electron beam before and during the welding process has become possible. Monitoring of the welding process for meeting standard welding requirements can be achieved with the aid of a control quantity derived from the results of electronic evaluation of the high-frequency electron backscattering

  18. Tunneling conductance of a two-dimensional electron gas with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srisongmuang, B.; Ka-oey, A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically studied the spin-dependent charge transport in a two-dimensional electron gas with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) and metal junctions. It is shown that the DSOC energy can be directly measured from the tunneling conductance spectrum. We found that spin polarization of the conductance in the propagation direction can be obtained by injecting from the DSOC system. We also considered the effect of the interfacial scattering barrier (both spin-flip and non-spin-flip scattering) on the overall conductance and the spin polarization of the conductance. It is found that the increase of spin-flip scattering can enhance the conductance under certain conditions. Moreover, both types of scattering can increase the spin polarization below the branches crossing of the energy band. - Highlights: → DSOC energy can be directly measured from tunneling conductance spectrum. → Spin polarization of conductance in the propagation direction can be obtained by injecting from DSOC system. → Both types of scattering can increase spin polarization.

  19. Numerical simulations of resonant tunneling with the presence of inelastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauho, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    We describe simulations of resonant tunneling through a time-modulated double barrier potential. The harmonic modulation frequency ω leads to emission and/or absorption of modulation quanta of energy ℎω in close analogy with emission and/or absorption of dispersionless bosons (optical phonons, photons, plasmons etc.). The transmission coefficient shows satellite peaks in addition to the main resonance. Momentum space snap-shots can be used to extract detailed information of the dynamics of the inelastic tunneling processes, such as opening and closing boson mediated resonant channels, their relative importance, and related time-scales. (orig.)

  20. Oxidation process of AlOx-based magnetic tunnel junctions studied by photoconductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koller, P.H.P.; Vanhelmont, F.W.M.; Boeve, H.; Lumens, P.G.E.; Jonge, de W.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation process of Co/AlOx/Co magnetic tunnel junctions has been investigated by photoconductance, in addition to traditional transport measurements. The shape of the photoconductance curves is explained within the framework of a simple qualitative model, assuming an oxidation time dependent

  1. A New XOR Structure Based on Resonant-Tunneling High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Sharifi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new structure for an exclusive-OR (XOR gate based on the resonant-tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT is introduced which comprises only an RTHEMT and two FETs. Calculations are done by utilizing a new subcircuit model for simulating the RTHEMT in the SPICE simulator. Details of the design, input, and output values and margins, delay of each transition, maximum operating frequency, static and dynamic power dissipations of the new structure are discussed and calculated and the performance is compared with other XOR gates which confirm that the presented structure has a high performance. Furthermore, to the best of authors' knowledge, it has the least component count in comparison to the existing structures.

  2. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  3. Electron tunneling studies of ultrathin films near the superconductor-to-insulator transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, J.M. Jr.; Garno, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Electron tunneling measurements on ultrathin quench-condensed films near the superconductor-to-insulator (SI) transition reveal that the superconducting state degrades with increasing normal state sheet resistance, R □ , in a manner that depends strongly on film morphology. In homogeneously disordered films, the superconducting energy gap Δ 0 decreases continuously and appears to go to zero at the SI transition. In granular films the transport properties degrade while Δ 0 remains constant. Measurements in the normal state reveal disorder enhanced e - -e - interaction corrections to the density of states. These effects are strong and depend on morphology in a manner that is consistent with their playing an important role in driving the SI transition. (orig.)

  4. Excitation of bond-alternating spin-1/2 Heisenberg chains by tunnelling electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauyacq, J-P; Lorente, N

    2014-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectra (IETS) are evaluated for spin-1/2 Heisenberg chains showing different phases of their spin ordering. The spin ordering is controlled by the value of the two different Heisenberg couplings on the two sides of each of the chain's atoms (bond-alternating chains). The perfect anti-ferromagnetic phase, i.e. a unique exchange coupling, marks a topological quantum phase transition (TQPT) of the bond-alternating chain. Our calculations show that the TQPT is recognizable in the excited states of the chain and hence that IETS is in principle capable of discriminating the phases. We show that perfectly symmetric chains, such as closed rings mimicking infinite chains, yield the same spectra on both sides of the TQPT and IETS cannot reveal the nature of the spin phase. However, for finite size open chains, both sides of the TQPT are associated with different IETS spectra, especially on the edge atoms, thus outlining the transition. (paper)

  5. Calculating electronic tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles by mapping networks to arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud [CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2014-10-21

    We have shown both theoretically and experimentally that tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles (NPs) can be calculated by considering the networks as arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors. Each resistor is described by a one-dimensional or a two-dimensional array of equal size nanoparticles that the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles in each resistor is assumed to be equal. The number of tunnel junctions between two contact electrodes and the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles are found to be functions of Coulomb blockade energies. In addition, the tunnel barriers between nanoparticles were considered to be tilted at high voltages. Furthermore, the role of thermal expansion coefficient of the tunnel junction gaps on the tunnel current is taken into account. The model calculations fit very well to the experimental data of a network of disordered gold nanoparticles, a forest of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and a network of few-layer graphene nanoplates over a wide temperature range (5-300 K) at low and high DC bias voltages (0.001 mV–50 V). Our investigations indicate, although electron cotunneling in networks of disordered irregularly shaped NPs may occur, non-Arrhenius behavior at low temperatures cannot be described by the cotunneling model due to size distribution in the networks and irregular shape of nanoparticles. Non-Arrhenius behavior of the samples at zero bias voltage limit was attributed to the disorder in the samples. Unlike the electron cotunneling model, we found that the crossover from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius behavior occurs at two temperatures, one at a high temperature and the other at a low temperature.

  6. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  7. Multiparticle tunneling in the field electron emission from Bi2CaSr2Cu2O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.I.

    2001-01-01

    The studies results on the statistics of the field electron emission (FEE) from the Bi 2 CaSr 2 Cu 2 O 8 oxide superconductor are considered. The multielectron tunneling by FEE is identified. The analysis of the spectral curves and FEE statistics dependence on the experimental conditions is carried out. The possible mechanism of the multiparticle effect is discussed [ru

  8. Chiral-like tunneling of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Yee Sin; Ma, Zhongshui; Zhang, C

    2014-01-21

    The unusual tunneling effects of massless chiral fermions (mCF) and massive chiral fermions (MCF) in a single layer graphene and bilayer graphene represent some of the most bizarre quantum transport phenomena in condensed matter system. Here we show that in a two-dimensional semiconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (R2DEG), the real-spin chiral-like tunneling of electrons at normal incidence simultaneously exhibits features of mCF and MCF. The parabolic branch of opposite spin in R2DEG crosses at a Dirac-like point and has a band turning point. These features generate transport properties not found in usual two-dimensional electron gas. Albeit its π Berry phase, electron backscattering is present in R2DEG. An electron mimics mCF if its energy is in the vicinity of the subband crossing point or it mimics MCF if its energy is near the subband minima.

  9. Simulating Policy Processes through Electronic Mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on the use of electronic mail for teaching and learning about social welfare policy processes and compares electronic mail as a simulation medium to more structured computer applications. (Author)

  10. The dependence of the tunneling characteristic on the electronic energy bands and the carrier’s states of Graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. H.; Shen, G. Z.; Ao, Z. M.; Xu, Y. W.

    2016-09-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the carrier tunneling properties in graphene superlattice generated by the Thue-Morse sequence and Kolakoski sequence are investigated. The positions and strength of the transmission can be modulated by the barrier structures, the incident energy and angle, the height and width of the potential. These carriers tunneling characteristic can be understood from the energy band structures in the corresponding superlattice systems and the carrier’s states in well/barriers. The transmission peaks above the critical incident angle rely on the carrier’s resonance in the well regions. The structural diversity can modulate the electronic and transport properties, thus expanding its applications.

  11. Electron and Cooper-pair transport across a single magnetic molecule explored with a scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Gozdzik, S.; Néel, N.; Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Kröger, J.

    2018-05-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope is used to explore the evolution of electron and Cooper-pair transport across single Mn-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Pb(111) from tunneling to contact ranges. Normal-metal as well as superconducting tips give rise to a gradual transition of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer energy gap in the tunneling range into a zero-energy resonance close to and at contact. Supporting transport calculations show that in the normal-metal-superconductor junctions this resonance reflects the merging of in-gap Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states as well as the onset of Andreev reflection. For the superconductor-superconductor contacts, the zero-energy resonance is rationalized in terms of a finite Josephson current that is carried by phase-dependent Andreev and Yu-Shiba-Rusinov levels.

  12. Tunneling and migration of the dumbbell defect in electron-irradiated aluminum-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements on irradiated Al-Zn alloys (0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 at %) indicate a tunneling relaxation of the predominant mixed dumbbell defect at low temperatures, and mixed dumbbell migration at the Stage II anneal temperature. The effect of an internal strain varying with the zinc concentration on the measured decrement and modulus change is striking. Evaluated in the framework of a six-level system, this reveals the simultaneous action of resonance and nonclassical relaxation processes. Using Fe as a probe atom, it is shown that mixed dumbbell dissociation is in an insignificant component of the annealing of this defect. The decrease of the annealing temperature at higher zinc concentrations provides evidence that the mixed dumbbell migrates as a unit during annealing. The energies associated with dumbbell migration and interstitial escape are derived. Further evidence for the migration mechanism is obtained from successive irradiation and annealing

  13. Predicting the Rate Constant of Electron Tunneling Reactions at the CdSe-TiO2 Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Douglas A; Forrest, Ryan P; Corcelli, Steven A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2015-06-18

    Current interest in quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) motivates an understanding of the electron transfer dynamics at the quantum dot (QD)-metal oxide (MO) interface. Employing transient absorption spectroscopy, we have monitored the electron transfer rate (ket) at this interface as a function of the bridge molecules that link QDs to TiO2. Using mercaptoacetic acid, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, 8-mercaptooctanoic acid, and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid, we observe an exponential attenuation of ket with increasing linker length, and attribute this to the tunneling of the electron through the insulating linker molecule. We model the electron transfer reaction using both rectangular and trapezoidal barrier models that have been discussed in the literature. The one-electron reduction potential (equivalent to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) of each molecule as determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to estimate the effective barrier height presented by each ligand at the CdSe-TiO2 interface. The electron transfer rate (ket) calculated for each CdSe-ligand-TiO2 interface using both models showed the results in agreement with the experimentally determined trend. This demonstrates that electron transfer between CdSe and TiO2 can be viewed as electron tunneling through a layer of linking molecules and provides a useful method for predicting electron transfer rate constants.

  14. a Novel Image Acquisition and Processing Procedure for Fast Tunnel Dsm Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncella, R.; Umili, G.; Forlani, G.

    2012-07-01

    In mining operations the evaluation of the stability condition of the excavated front are critic to ensure a safe and correct planning of the subsequent activities. The procedure currently used to this aim has some shortcomings: safety for the geologist, completeness of data collection and objective documentation of the results. In the last decade it has been shown that the geostructural parameters necessary to the stability analysis can be derived from high resolution digital surface models (DSM) of rock faces. With the objective to overcome the limitation of the traditional survey and to minimize data capture times, so reducing delays on mining site operations, a photogrammetric system to generate high resolution DSM of tunnels has been realized. A fast, effective and complete data capture method has been developed and the orientation and restitution phases have been largely automated. The survey operations take no more than required to the traditional ones; no additional topographic measurements other than those available are required. To make the data processing fast and economic our Structure from Motion procedure has been slightly modified to adapt to the peculiar block geometry while, the DSM of the tunnel is created using automatic image correlation techniques. The geomechanical data are sampled on the DSM, by using the acquired images in a GUI and a segmentation procedure to select discontinuity planes. To allow an easier and faster identification of relevant features of the surface of the tunnel, using again an automatic procedure, an orthophoto of the tunnel is produced. A case study where a tunnel section of ca. 130 m has been surveyed is presented.

  15. A NOVEL IMAGE ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING PROCEDURE FOR FAST TUNNEL DSM PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roncella

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In mining operations the evaluation of the stability condition of the excavated front are critic to ensure a safe and correct planning of the subsequent activities. The procedure currently used to this aim has some shortcomings: safety for the geologist, completeness of data collection and objective documentation of the results. In the last decade it has been shown that the geostructural parameters necessary to the stability analysis can be derived from high resolution digital surface models (DSM of rock faces. With the objective to overcome the limitation of the traditional survey and to minimize data capture times, so reducing delays on mining site operations, a photogrammetric system to generate high resolution DSM of tunnels has been realized. A fast, effective and complete data capture method has been developed and the orientation and restitution phases have been largely automated. The survey operations take no more than required to the traditional ones; no additional topographic measurements other than those available are required. To make the data processing fast and economic our Structure from Motion procedure has been slightly modified to adapt to the peculiar block geometry while, the DSM of the tunnel is created using automatic image correlation techniques. The geomechanical data are sampled on the DSM, by using the acquired images in a GUI and a segmentation procedure to select discontinuity planes. To allow an easier and faster identification of relevant features of the surface of the tunnel, using again an automatic procedure, an orthophoto of the tunnel is produced. A case study where a tunnel section of ca. 130 m has been surveyed is presented.

  16. Tunneling Mode of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: Probing Electrochemical Processes at Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Wang, Dengchao; Mirkin, Michael V

    2018-06-18

    Electrochemical experiments at individual nanoparticles (NPs) can provide new insights into their structure-activity relationships. By using small nanoelectrodes as tips in a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), we recently imaged individual surface-bound 10-50 nm metal NPs. Herein, we introduce a new mode of SECM operation based on tunneling between the tip and a nanoparticle immobilized on the insulating surface. The obtained current vs. distance curves show the transition from the conventional feedback response to electron tunneling between the tip and the NP at separation distances of less than about 3 nm. In addition to high-resolution imaging of the NP topography, the tunneling mode enables measurement of the heterogeneous kinetics at a single NP without making an ohmic contact with it. The developed method should be useful for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and geometry on electrocatalytic activity in real-world applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Single-electron charging effects and implications for tunneling measurements of the high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.B.; Honkanen, M.J.; Ruggiero, S.T.; Mullen, K.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Pelton, A.R.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a theory for the dynamics of two voltage-biased, ultra-small-capacitance tunnel junctions connected in series when one or more electrodes are superconducting and experiments performed on parallel arrays of such junctions. Using the semiclassical model, they find that the I-V characteristics display steps and therefore multiple peaks in dI/dV, corresponding to the time-average occupation of the interjunction region by integral numbers of electrons. The voltage at which the first step is located depends on the superconducting gap, Δ(T), and the capacitances of the junctions. The spacing between subsequent steps depends solely on the capacitances. They discuss electron tunneling results performed on metal/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//2-10 nm-diameter metal particles/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//metal junctions where this multiple-peak structure is observed. They present preliminary tunneling results in junctions employing Pb-particles, where they observe a shift of the peaks when the sample is cooled below T/sub c/ of Pb consistent with theory. Taken together, these results indicate that the multiple-peak structure commonly observed in tunneling data of high-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors can be explained in terms of charging effects in a material with a single superconducting gap. Finally, they discuss possible applications in a new type of transistor element

  18. Fundamentals of electronic image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Weeks, Arthur R

    1996-01-01

    This book is directed to practicing engineers and scientists who need to understand the fundamentals of image processing theory and algorithms to perform their technical tasks. It is intended to fill the gap between existing high-level texts dedicated to specialists in the field and the need for a more practical, fundamental text on image processing. A variety of example images are used to enhance reader understanding of how particular image processing algorithms work.

  19. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination

  20. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination.

  1. The weak π − π interaction originated resonant tunneling and fast switching in the carbon based electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the nonequilibrium Green's functions and the density functional theory, we have investigated the electronic transport properties of C60 based electronic device with different intermolecular interactions. It is found that the electronic transport properties vary with the types of the interaction between two C60 molecules. A fast electrical switching behavior based on negative differential resistance has been found when two molecules are coupled by the weak π − π interaction. Compared to the solid bonding, the weak interaction is found to induce resonant tunneling, which is responsible for the fast response to the applied electric field and hence the velocity of switching.

  2. Reactive tunnel junctions in electrically driven plasmonic nanorod metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Nasir, Mazhar E.; Dickson, Wayne; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2018-02-01

    Non-equilibrium hot carriers formed near the interfaces of semiconductors or metals play a crucial role in chemical catalysis and optoelectronic processes. In addition to optical illumination, an efficient way to generate hot carriers is by excitation with tunnelling electrons. Here, we show that the generation of hot electrons makes the nanoscale tunnel junctions highly reactive and facilitates strongly confined chemical reactions that can, in turn, modulate the tunnelling processes. We designed a device containing an array of electrically driven plasmonic nanorods with up to 1011 tunnel junctions per square centimetre, which demonstrates hot-electron activation of oxidation and reduction reactions in the junctions, induced by the presence of O2 and H2 molecules, respectively. The kinetics of the reactions can be monitored in situ following the radiative decay of tunnelling-induced surface plasmons. This electrically driven plasmonic nanorod metamaterial platform can be useful for the development of nanoscale chemical and optoelectronic devices based on electron tunnelling.

  3. Structural details of Al/Al 2O3 junctions and their role in the formation of electron tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koberidze, M.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of the adhesive and structural properties of the Al/Al 2O3 interfaces as building blocks of the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel devices, where electron transport is accomplished via tunneling mechanism through the sandwiched insulating barrier. The main goal of this paper is to understand, on the atomic scale, the role of the geometrical details in the formation of the tunnel barrier profiles. Initially, we concentrate on the adhesive properties of the interfaces. To provide reliable results, we carefully assess the accuracy of the traditional methods used to examine Al/Al 2O3 systems. These are the most widely employed exchange-correlation functionals—local-density approximation and two different generalized gradient approximations; the universal binding-energy relation for predicting equilibrium interfacial distances and adhesion energies; and the ideal work of separation as a measure of junction stability. In addition, we show that the established interpretation of the computed ideal work of separation might be misleading in predicting the optimal interface structures. Finally, we perform a detailed analysis of the atomic and interplanar relaxations in each junction, and identify their contributions to the tunnel barrier parameters. Our results imply that the structural irregularities on the surface of the Al film have a significant contribution to lowering the tunnel barrier height, while atomic relaxations at the interface and interplanar relaxations in Al2O3 may considerably change the width of the barrier and, thus, distort its uniformity. Both the effects may critically influence the performance of the MIM tunnel devices.

  4. The InP - SiO2 interface: Electron tunneling into oxide traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.J.; Owen, S.J.T.

    1985-01-01

    Indium Phosphide is an attractive material for high-speed devices. Though many successful devices have been built and demonstrated, InP MISFET's still suffer from drain current drift. From the data current drift measurements, the shift in the threshold voltage ΔV was computed for different times. It was found that a linear relationship exists between √ΔV and log(t). When a positive bias-stress was applied to the gate of an MIS capacitor for a time t, the C-V cure shifted by an amount ΔV and again, a linear relationship was observed between √ΔV and log(t). This was verified on four different gate insulators: pyrolytic SiO 2 at 320 0 C and 360 0 C, plasma oxide at 300 0 C and photo CVD oxide at 225 0 C. These results can only be explained by a model in which electrons tunnel from the substrate into oxide traps

  5. Design and simulation of a novel GaN based resonant tunneling high electron mobility transistor on a silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Subhra; Biswas, Dhrubes; Chattaraj, Swarnabha

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, we have introduced a novel GaN based resonant tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT) on a silicon substrate. A monolithically integrated GaN based inverted high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) and a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) are designed and simulated using the ATLAS simulator and MATLAB in this study. The 10% Al composition in the barrier layer of the GaN based RTD structure provides a peak-to-valley current ratio of 2.66 which controls the GaN based HEMT performance. Thus the results indicate an improvement in the current–voltage characteristics of the RTHEMT by controlling the gate voltage in this structure. The introduction of silicon as a substrate is a unique step taken by us for this type of RTHEMT structure. (paper)

  6. Integrated control system for electron beam processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, L.; Koleva, E.; Batchkova, I.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    The ISO/IEC 62264 standard is widely used for integration of the business systems of a manufacturer with the corresponding manufacturing control systems based on hierarchical equipment models, functional data and manufacturing operations activity models. In order to achieve the integration of control systems, formal object communication models must be developed, together with manufacturing operations activity models, which coordinate the integration between different levels of control. In this article, the development of integrated control system for electron beam welding process is presented as part of a fully integrated control system of an electron beam plant, including also other additional processes: surface modification, electron beam evaporation, selective melting and electron beam diagnostics.

  7. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...... confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...... exchanging organisms have major biogeochemical importance as they allow widely separated electron donors and acceptors to react with one another....

  8. Atom Tunneling in the Hydroxylation Process of Taurine/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase Identified by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase is one of the most studied α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (αKGDs), involved in several biotechnological applications. We investigated the key step in the catalytic cycle of the αKGDs, the hydrogen transfer process, by a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (B3LYP/CHARMM22). Analysis of the charge and spin densities during the reaction demonstrates that a concerted mechanism takes place, where the H atom transfer happens simultaneously with the electron transfer from taurine to the Fe═O cofactor. We found the quantum tunneling of the hydrogen atom to increase the rate constant by a factor of 40 at 5 °C. As a consequence, a quite high kinetic isotope effect close to 60 is obtained, which is consistent with the experimental value.

  9. Characterization and Properties of Oligothiophenes Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy for Possible Use in Organic Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishara, E.M.El.

    2009-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy study has been made on a group of alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes. The self-assembled monolayers of this type of semi-conducting oligomers on graphite were observed and characterized. To control the self-assembly, it is important to first understand the forces that drive the spontaneous ordering of molecules at interfaces. For the identification of the forces, several substituted oligothiophenes were examined: carboxylic acid groups, methyl ester carboxylic acid, and iodine atoms at one end and benzyl esters at the other end of the oligomers this is in addition to the non-functionalized oligothiophehens, Self-assembled monolayers of these molecules were then examined by STM. A detailed analysis of the driving forces and parameters controlling the formation of the self-assembled 2- D crystal monolayers was carried out by performing modeling of the experimental observations. The theoretical calculations gave us a conclusive insight into the intermolecular interactions, which lead to the observed conformation of molecules on the surface. An attempt to react two iodinated oligomers on the surface after the formation of the monolayer has been done; a topochemical reaction studies using UV/Vis light irradiation has been preceded. The targeted reaction was achieved. This can be considered as a great step towards the formation of nano-wires and other organic electronic devices. The applicability of the above method of force-driven self organisation in different patterns was examined as template for building donor-nano structures for electronic devices. It was necessary to examine the stability of the formed templates in air. The monolayers were left to dry and STM images were taken; C60 was then added to the monolayer, and the complexation of the C60 (as acceptor) with the formed monolayer template was examined.

  10. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, M.L.; Chien, T.Y.; Preissner, C.; Madhavan, V.; Diesing, D.; Bode, M.; Freeland, J.W.; Rose, V.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  11. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  12. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-10-18

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  13. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Electronics for Large Superconducting Tunnel Junction Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Soft X-ray Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, William K

    2009-03-06

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors offer a an approach to detecting soft x-rays with energy resolutions 4-5 times better and at rates 10 faster than traditions semiconductor detectors. To make such detectors feasible, however, then need to be deployed in large arrays of order 1000 detectors, which in turn implies that their processing electronics must be compact, fully computer controlled, and low cost per channel while still delivering ultra-low noise performance so as to not degrade the STJ's performance. We report on our progress in designing a compact, low cost preamplifier intended for this application. In particular, we were able to produce a prototype preamplifier of 2 sq-cm area and a parts cost of less than $30 that matched the energy resolution of the best conventional system to date and demonstrated its ability to acquire an STJ I-V curve under computer control, the critical step for determining and setting the detectors' operating points under software control.

  14. Tunneling spectroscopy on grain boundary junctions in electron-doped high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welter, B.

    2007-01-01

    Some methods are developed anf presented, by means of which from experimental tunnel spectra, especially on symmetric SIS contacts, informations about the properties of electrodes and tunnel barriers can be obtained. Especially a procedure for the numerical unfolding of symmetric SIS spectra is proposed. Furthermore a series of models is summarized, which can explain the linear background conductivity observed in many spectra on high-temperature superconductors. The results of resistance measurements on film bridges are presented. Especially different methods for the determination of H c2 (T) respectively H c2 (0) are presented and applied to the experimental data. Finally the results of the tunnel-spectroscopy measurements are shown

  15. Infinite dwell time and group delay in resonant electron tunneling through double complex potential barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacak, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2017-12-01

    Tunneling times in complex potentials are investigated. Analytical expressions for dwell time, self-interference time and group delay are obtained for the case of complex double delta potentials. It is shown that we can always find a set of parameters of the potential so that the tunneling times achieve very large values and even approach infinity for the case of resonance. The phenomenon of infinite tunneling times occurs for only one particular positive value of the imaginary part of the potential, if all other parameters are given.

  16. Photons emission processes in electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Vargas, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    The investigations involving the scattering sections arising in virtual an real photon emission processes of electron and positron scattering by an atomic nucleus, have the need for thorough and complete calculations of the virtual photon spectrum and then introduce the distorted wave formulation, which is mathematically involved an numerically elaborated, but accessible to its use in experimental electron scattering facilities. (author) [es

  17. Influence of quasiparticle multi-tunneling on the energy flow through the superconducting tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samedov, V. V.; Tulinov, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector consists of two layers of superconducting material separated by thin insulating barrier. An incident particle produces in superconductor excess nonequilibrium quasiparticles. Each quasiparticle in superconductor should be considered as quantum superposition of electron-like and hole-like excitations. This duality nature of quasiparticle leads to the effect of multi-tunneling. Quasiparticle starts to tunnel back and forth through the insulating barrier. After tunneling from biased electrode quasiparticle loses its energy via phonon emission. Eventually, the energy that equals to the difference in quasiparticle energy between two electrodes is deposited in the signal electrode. Because of the process of multi-tunneling, one quasiparticle can deposit energy more than once. In this work, the theory of branching cascade processes was applied to the process of energy deposition caused by the quasiparticle multi-tunneling. The formulae for the mean value and variance of the energy transferred by one quasiparticle into heat were derived. (authors)

  18. Tunable valley polarization by a gate voltage when an electron tunnels through multiple line defects in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2015-02-04

    By means of an appropriate wave function connection condition, we study the electronic structure of a line defect superlattice of graphene with the Dirac equation method. We obtain the analytical dispersion relation, which can simulate well the tight-binding numerical result about the band structure of the superlattice. Then, we generalize this theoretical method to study the electronic transmission through a potential barrier where multiple line defects are periodically patterned. We find that there exists a critical incident angle which restricts the electronic transmission through multiple line defects within a specific incident angle range. The critical angle depends sensitively on the potential barrier height, which can be modulated by a gate voltage. As a result, non-trivial transmissions of K and K' valley electrons are restricted, respectively, in two distinct ranges of the incident angle. Our theoretical result demonstrates that a gate voltage can act as a feasible measure to tune the valley polarization when electrons tunnel through multiple line defects.

  19. Search for Spin Filtering By Electron Tunneling Through Ferromagnetic EuS Barriers in Pbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figielski, T.; Morawski, A.; Wosinski, T.; Wrotek, S.; Makosa, A.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu.; Szczerbakow, A.; Grasza, K.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Perpendicular transport through single- and double-barrier heterostructures consisting of ferromagnetic EuS layers embedded into PbS matrix was investigated. Manifestations of both resonant tunneling and spin filtering through EuS barrier have been observed.

  20. Tunnel vision for US X-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Construction can begin on a major upgrade to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US after the tunnel that will house the facility was cleared of equipment.

  1. Compact design of a transmission electron microscope-scanning tunneling microscope holder with three-dimensional coarse motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, K.; Jompol, Y.; Olin, H.; Olsson, E.

    2003-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a compact, three-dimensional, inertial slider design is presented. Inertial sliding of the STM tip, in three dimensions, enables coarse motion and scanning using only one piezoelectric tube. Using the same electronics both for scanning and inertial sliding, step lengths of less than 5% of the piezo range were achieved. The compact design, less than 1 cm3 in volume, ensures a low mechanical noise level and enables us to fit the STM into the sample holder of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), while maintaining atomic scale resolution in both STM and TEM imaging

  2. Scanning-tunneling microscope imaging of single-electron solitons in a material with incommensurate charge-density waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazovskii, Serguei; Brun, Christophe; Wang, Zhao-Zhong; Monceau, Pierre

    2012-03-02

    We report on scanning-tunneling microscopy experiments in a charge-density wave (CDW) system allowing visually capturing and studying in detail the individual solitons corresponding to the self-trapping of just one electron. This "Amplitude Soliton" is marked by vanishing of the CDW amplitude and by the π shift of its phase. It might be the realization of the spinon--the long-sought particle (along with the holon) in the study of science of strongly correlated electronic systems. As a distinct feature we also observe one-dimensional Friedel oscillations superimposed on the CDW which develop independently of solitons.

  3. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  4. Improvement Of Search Process In Electronic Catalogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titas Savickas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation on search in electronic catalogues. The chosen problem domain is the search system in the electronic catalogue of Lithuanian Academic Libraries. The catalogue uses ALEPH system with MARC21 bibliographic format. The article presents analysis of problems pertaining to the current search engine and user expectations related to the search system of the electronic catalogue of academic libraries. Subsequent to analysis, the research paper presents the architecture for a semantic search system in the electronic catalogue that uses search process designed to improve search results for users.

  5. Tunneling and migration of the dumbbell defect in electron irradiated aluminum-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements have been made on irradiated Al-Zn alloys (Zn concentrations of .01%, .1%, and .5% atomic). They provide strong evidence for a tunneling relaxation of the predominant mixed dumbbell defect at low temperatures and for mixed dumbbell migration at the Stage II anneal temperature. The effect of an internal strain varying with the zinc concentration of the measured decrement and modulus change is striking. Evaluated in the framework of a six level system, this reveals the simultaneous action of resonance and non-classical relaxation processes. Using Fe as a probe atom, it is shown that mixed dumbbell dissociation is in an insignificant component of the annealing of this defect. The decrease of the annealing temperature at higher zinc concentrations provides evidence that the mixed dumbbell migrates as a unit during annealing. The energies associated with dumbbell migration and interstitial escape are derived. Further evidence for the migration mechanism is obtained from successive irradiation and annealing measurements on the Al-Zn .01% alloy, and from a comparison of these results with published radiation damage rate measurements of dilute Al-Zn alloys

  6. Electron dynamics of Cs covered Cu(111). A scanning tunneling spectroscopy inverstigation at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofe, T. von

    2005-01-01

    During this Ph.D. a scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra-high vacuum and at low temperatures was assembled and modified to allow operation at variable temperatures. Also, an additional vibration isolation stage was conceived and mounted. Measurements were performed on Cu(111)-Cs for different coverages. For a coverage of Θ=0:05 ML, the layer shows a commensurate (√(19) x √(19)R23.4 ) structure which may be stabilized by surface-state mediated adatom interactions. For higher coverages, the layer is incommensurate and rotated with respect to the substrate, where the angle of rotation depends on the coverage. At the saturation coverage Θ=0:25 ML, the layer, although commensurate, reveals many defects. The binding energy of the quantum well state (QWS) confined to the Cs layer decreases with increasing coverage as has been observed before for other systems. The lifetime of the QWS decreases with increasing binding energy. The comparatively short lifetime for Cu(111)-p(2 x 2)Cs led to the introduction of Brillouin Zone Backfolding as a new lifetime-limiting process. Acquisition of dispersion relations of the QWS for different coverages revealed that the effective mass of the excitations increases with decreasing binding energy. (Orig.)

  7. Electron beam processing of wastewater in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulkafli Ghazali; Khairul Zaman Dahlan; Ting Teo Ming; Khomsaton A. Bakar

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing technology started in Malaysia in 1991 when two accelerators were installed through JICA cooperation to perform medical product sterilization project. Since then several private companies have installed electron accelerators to develop in removing volatile organic materials and to demonstrate flue gas treatment. In this country report, effort on electron beam processing of wastewater or contaminated groundwater is presented: After de-coloration tests using gamma rays as function of radiation doses, electron beam treatment of textile industry wastewater as function of beam energy and current intensity as well as with combined treatment such as aeration or biological treatment to examine the effectiveness in color and BOD or COD change has been carried out and the main results are reported. Furthermore, the present technique was examined to apply in river water treatment for use as drinking water. Techno-economic feasibility study for recycling of industrial waste water using electron beam technology is now underway. (S. Ohno)

  8. Electronic devices for analog signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Rybin, Yu K

    2012-01-01

    Electronic Devices for Analog Signal Processing is intended for engineers and post graduates and considers electronic devices applied to process analog signals in instrument making, automation, measurements, and other branches of technology. They perform various transformations of electrical signals: scaling, integration, logarithming, etc. The need in their deeper study is caused, on the one hand, by the extension of the forms of the input signal and increasing accuracy and performance of such devices, and on the other hand, new devices constantly emerge and are already widely used in practice, but no information about them are written in books on electronics. The basic approach of presenting the material in Electronic Devices for Analog Signal Processing can be formulated as follows: the study with help from self-education. While divided into seven chapters, each chapter contains theoretical material, examples of practical problems, questions and tests. The most difficult questions are marked by a diamon...

  9. Electron tunneling and the energy gap in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O/sub x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Mitzi, D.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Beasley, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Results of electron tunneling on single crystals of the Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O/sub x/ superconductor are reported. The junctions show a gap structure with Δ≅25 meV, whose temperature dependence exhibits a qualitatively Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like behavior with a gap-closing T/sub c/≅81--85 K. Comparisons of these tunneling spectra to those obtained on YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-//sub x/ are made. Evidence that 2Δ/kT/sub c/∼7 for both Ba 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O/sub x/ and YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-//sub x/ is also discussed

  10. The Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Blocker, Jill N.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Marín, Antonio J.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to prospectively assess 287 Latino poultry processing workers and 226 Latinos in other manual labor occupations. Results The prevalence of CTS was higher in poultry processing (8.7%) compared to non-poultry manual workers (4.0%, p poultry workers was 2.51 (95% CI of 1.80 to 3.50) compared to non-poultry workers. Within the poultry workers, those who performed packing, sanitation, and chilling had a trend toward less CTS than those who performed tasks requiring more repetitive and strenuous hand movements. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have a high prevalence of CTS, which likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of the work. PMID:22258161

  11. Electron beam flue gas treatment process. Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkonen, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The basis of the process for electron beam flue gas treatment are presented in the report. In tabular form the history of the research is reviewed. Main dependences of SO 2 and NO x removal efficiencies on different physico-chemical parameters are discussed. Trends concerning industrial process implementation are presented in the paper,finally. (author). 74 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  12. Electron beam processing of combustion flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This report contains the papers presented at the consultants' meeting on electron beam processing of combustion flue gases. The meeting provided an excellent opportunity for exchanging information and reviewing the current status of technology development. Characteristics of the electron beam processing recognized by the meeting are: capability of simultaneous removals of SO 2 and NO x , safe technology and simplicity of control, dry process without waste water to be treated, cost benefit of electron beam processing compared with conventional technology and the conversion of SO 2 and NO x to a by-product that can be used as agricultural fertilizer. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 22 papers in this technical report

  13. Process and device integration for silicon tunnel FETs utilizing isoelectronic trap technology to enhance the ON current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takahiro; Asai, Hidehiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    A tunnel FET (TFET) is a candidate replacement for conventional MOSFETs to realize low-power LSI. The most significant issue with the practical application of TFETs concerns their low tunneling current. Si is an indirect-gap material with a low band-to-band tunneling probability and is not favored for the channel. However, a new technology has recently been proposed to enhance the tunneling current in Si-TFETs by utilizing isoelectronic trap (IET) technology. IET technology provides an innovative approach to realizing low-power LSI with TFETs. In this paper, state-of-the-art research on Si-TFETs with IET technology from the viewpoint of process and device integration is reviewed.

  14. Band-to-Band Tunneling-Dominated Thermo-Enhanced Field Electron Emission from p-Si/ZnO Nanoemitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhizhen; Huang, Yifeng; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2018-06-13

    Thermo-enhancement is an effective way to achieve high performance field electron emitters, and enables the individually tuning on the emission current by temperature and the electron energy by voltage. The field emission current from metal or n-doped semiconductor emitter at a relatively lower temperature (i.e., current saturation was observed in the thermo-enhanced field emission measurements. The emission current density showed about ten-time enhancement (from 1.31 to 12.11 mA/cm 2 at 60.6 MV/m) by increasing the temperature from 323 to 623 K. The distinctive performance did not agree with the interband excitation mechanism but well-fit to the band-to-band tunneling model. The strong thermo-enhancement was proposed to be benefit from the increase of band-to-band tunneling probability at the surface portion of the p-Si/ZnO nanojunction. This work provides promising cathode for portable X-ray tubes/panel, ionization vacuum gauges and low energy electron beam lithography, in where electron-dose control at a fixed energy is needed.

  15. Construction of a four tip scanning tunneling microscope/scanning electron microscope combination and conductivity measurements of silicide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkov, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    In this work the combination of a four-tip scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning electron microscope is presented. By means of this apparatus it is possible to perform the conductivity measurements on the in-situ prepared nanostructures in ultra-high vacuum. With the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), it becomes possible to position the tunneling tips of the four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), so that an arrangement for a four-point probe measurement on nanostructures can be obtained. The STM head was built according to the novel coaxial Beetle concept. This concept allows on the one hand, a very compact arrangement of the components of the STM and on the other hand, the new-built STM head has a good mechanical stability, in order to achieve atomic resolution with all four STM units. The atomic resolution of the STM units was confirmed by scanning a Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. The thermal drift during the STM operation, as well as the resonant frequencies of the mechanical structure of the STM head, were determined. The scanning electron microscope allows the precise and safe navigation of the tunneling tips on the sample surface. Multi tip spectroscopy with up to four STM units can be performed synchronously. To demonstrate the capabilities of the new-built apparatus the conductivity measurements were carried out on metallic yttrium silicide nanowires. The nanowires were prepared by the in-situ deposition of yttrium on a heated Si(110) sample surface. Current-voltage curves were recorded on the nanowires and on the wetting layer in-between. The curves indicate an existence of the Schottky barrier between the yttrium silicide nanowires and the silicon bulk. By means of the two-tip measurements with a gate, the insulating property of the Schottky barrier has been confirmed. Using this Schottky barrier, it is possible to limit the current to the nanowire and to prevent it from flowing through the silicon bulk. A four-tip resistance measurement

  16. Comparison of Electron Transmittance and Tunneling Current through a Trapezoidal Potential Barrier with Spin Polarization Consideration by using Analytical and Numerical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, Ezra; Noor, Fatimah A.; Khairurrijal

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we report an analytical calculation of electron transmittance and polarized tunneling current in a single barrier heterostructure of a metal-GaSb-metal by considering the Dresselhaus spin orbit effect. Exponential function, WKB method and Airy function were used in calculating the electron transmittance and tunneling current. A Transfer Matrix Method, as a numerical method, was utilized as the benchmark to evaluate the analytical calculation. It was found that the transmittances calculated under exponential function and Airy function is the same as that calculated under TMM method at low electron energy. However, at high electron energy only the transmittance calculated under Airy function approach is the same as that calculated under TMM method. It was also shown that the transmittances both of spin-up and spin-down conditions increase as the electron energy increases for low energies. Furthermore, the tunneling current decreases with increasing the barrier width.

  17. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... a broad tunnelling current-overpotential range at a constant (large) bias voltage of +0.2 V. The current is found to be constant over a 0.25 V overpotential range, which covers roughly the range where the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the energy tip. STM contrast and apparent...... of previous theoretical work on in situ STM of redox molecules, to large bias voltages, \\eV(bias)\\ > E-r. Large bias voltages give tunnelling contrasts independent of the overpotential over a broad range, as both the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the 'energy tip' between the substrate...

  18. Hard rock tunnel boring machine penetration test as an indicator of chipping process efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Villeneuve

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The transition from grinding to chipping can be observed in tunnel boring machine (TBM penetration test data by plotting the penetration rate (distance/revolution against the net cutter thrust (force per cutter over the full range of penetration rates in the test. Correlating penetration test data to the geological and geomechanical characteristics of rock masses through which a penetration test is conducted provides the ability to reveal the efficiency of the chipping process in response to changing geological conditions. Penetration test data can also be used to identify stress-induced tunnel face instability. This research shows that the strength of the rock is an important parameter for controlling how much net cutter thrust is required to transition from grinding to chipping. It also shows that the geological characteristics of a rock will determine how efficient chipping occurs once it has begun. In particular, geological characteristics that lead to efficient fracture propagation, such as fabric and mica contents, will lead to efficient chipping. These findings will enable a better correlation between TBM performance and geological conditions for use in TBM design, as a basis for contractual payments where penetration rate dominates the excavation cycle and in further academic investigations into the TBM excavation process.

  19. Electron tunneling measurements in LaSrCuO and YBaCuO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreland, J.; Ekin, J.W.; Goodrich, L.F.; Capobianco, T.E.; Clark, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    The break junction technique whereby vacuum tunneling occurs within the fracture of a bulk sample is used to study the LaSrCuO and YBaCuO perovskite superconductors. Structure in the current versus voltage characteristics is reminiscent of previous quasiparticle curves obtained for BCS superconducting materials. Some curves have anomalous qualities, including large dips in the junction conductance with increasing voltage just above a well defined tunneling gap edge linearly increasing junction conductance with an applied bias, along with features occurring near the voltage intervals with the 1, 3, 5 pattern

  20. Thermally processed titanium oxides film on Si(0 0 1) surface studied with scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, T.; Shudo, K.; Sato, K.; Ohno, S.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal structural changes of TiO x films built on a Si(0 0 1) surface were investigated at the nanometer scale with scanning tunneling microscopy. Electronic properties of individual clusters were classified by means of scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The differential conductance (dI/dV) near the Fermi energy showed that nano-clusters were transformed from semiconducting Ti-silicates into metallic Ti-silicides after heating to 970 K. Peaks of normalized differential conductance (dI/dV/(I/V)) of the clusters shifted after heating to about 1070 K, indicating exclusion of oxygen from the clusters.

  1. Penning ionization processes studied by electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yencha, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The technique of measuring the kinetic energy of electrons ejected from atomic or molecular species as a result of collisional energy transfer between a metastable excited rare gas atom and an atom or molecule is known as Penning ionization spectroscopy. Like the analogous photoionization process of photoelectron spectroscopy, a considerable amount of information has been gained about the ionization potentials of numerous molecular systems. It is, in fact, through the combined analyses of photoelectron and Penning electron spectra that affords a probe of the particle-particle interactions that occur in the Penning process. In this paper a short survey of the phenomenon of Penning ionization, as studied by electron spectroscopy, will be presented as it pertains to the ionization processes of simple molecules by metastable excited atoms. (author)

  2. Recognition tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindsay, S.; He, J.; Sankey, O.; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Zhang, P.; Chang, S.; Huang, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2010), 262001/1-262001/12 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : STM * tunneling current * molecular electronics * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  3. Revealing energy level structure of individual quantum dots by tunneling rate measured by single-electron sensitive electrostatic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Gobeil, Antoine; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2015-04-08

    We present theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of the density of states of a quantum dot (QD) on the rate of single-electron tunneling that can be directly measured by electrostatic force microscopy (e-EFM) experiments. In e-EFM, the motion of a biased atomic force microscope cantilever tip modulates the charge state of a QD in the Coulomb blockade regime. The charge dynamics of the dot, which is detected through its back-action on the capacitavely coupled cantilever, depends on the tunneling rate of the QD to a back-electrode. The density of states of the QD can therefore be measured through its effect on the energy dependence of tunneling rate. We present experimental data on individual 5 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles that exhibit a near continuous density of state at 77 K. In contrast, our analysis of already published data on self-assembled InAs QDs at 4 K clearly reveals discrete degenerate energy levels.

  4. Multi-band tight-binding calculation of electronic transport in Fe/trans-polyacetylene/Fe tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedi Ravan, B

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the electronic transport characteristics of Fe/trans-polyacetylene/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) are investigated using multi-band tight-binding calculations within the framework of nonequilibrium Green function theory. A CH 2 radical is added to different positions on the polymer chain and its effects on the tunnelling magnetoresistance of the MTJ are studied. The ferromagnetic electrodes are assumed to be single-band and their tight-binding parameters are chosen in such a way as to simulate the ab initio density functional calculations of the band structure of bcc-Fe along its [001] crystallographic direction. In building the Hamiltonian of the trans-polyacetylene (t-PA) chain, we have assumed an s orbital on the H atoms and one s and three p(p x ,p y ,p z ) orbitals on the C atoms, and the dimerization effects are taken into account. It is found that moving the radical out of the centre of the polymer chain enhances the tunnelling magnetoresistance of the MTJ.

  5. Process variation in electron beam sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The qualification and control of electron beam sterilization can be improved by the application of proven statistical analysis techniques such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Statistical Tolerance Limits. These statistical techniques can be useful tools in: •Locating and quantifying the minimum and maximum absorbed dose in a product. •Estimating the expected process maximum dose, given a minimum sterilizing dose. •Setting a process minimum dose target, based on an allowance for random measurement and process variation. •Determining the dose relationship between a reference dosimeter and process minimum and maximum doses. This study investigates and demonstrates the application of these tools in qualifying electron beam sterilization, and compares the conclusions obtained with those obtained using practices recommended in Guide for Process Control in Radiation Sterilization. The study supports the following conclusions for electron beam processes: 1.ANOVA is a more effective tool for evaluating the equivalency of absorbed doses than methods suggested in . 2.Process limits computed using statistical tolerance limits more accurately reflect actual process variability than the AAMI method, which applies +/−2 sample standard deviations (s) regardless of sample size. 3.The use of reference dose ratios lends itself to qualification using statistical tolerance limits. The current AAMI recommended approach may result in an overly optimistic estimate of the reference dose adjustment factor, as it is based on application of +/−2(s) tolerances regardless of sample size.

  6. Proposed alteration of images of molecular orbitals obtained using a scanning tunneling microscope as a probe of electron correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroz, Dimitrios; Rontani, Massimo; Corni, Stefano

    2013-01-04

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) allows us to image single molecules decoupled from the supporting substrate. The obtained images are routinely interpreted as the square moduli of molecular orbitals, dressed by the mean-field electron-electron interaction. Here we demonstrate that the effect of electron correlation beyond the mean field qualitatively alters the uncorrelated STS images. Our evidence is based on the ab initio many-body calculation of STS images of planar molecules with metal centers. We find that many-body correlations alter significantly the image spectral weight close to the metal center of the molecules. This change is large enough to be accessed experimentally, surviving to molecule-substrate interactions.

  7. Resonant tunneling and persistent current of a non-interacting and weakly interacting one-dimensional electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Sandstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The persistent current for a one-dimensional ring with two tunneling barriers is considered in the limit of weakly interacting electrons. In addition to small off-resonance current, there are two kinds of resonant behaviour; (i) a current independent of the barrier transparency (true resonance) and (ii) a current analogous to the one for a ring with only single barrier (''semi''-resonance). For a given barrier transparency the realization of this or that type of resonant behaviour depends both on the geometrical factor (the ratio of interbarrier distance to a ring circumference) and on the strength of electron-electron interaction. It is shown that repulsive interaction favours the ''semi''-resonance behaviour. For a small barrier transparency the ''semi''-resonance peaks are easily washed out by temperature whereas the true resonance peaks survive. (author). 22 refs, 2 figs

  8. Interplay between barrier width and height in electron tunneling: photoinduced electron transfer in porphyrin-based donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Karin; Wiberg, Joanna; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Mårtensson, Jerker; Albinsson, Bo

    2006-01-12

    The rate of electron tunneling in molecular donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems is determined both by the tunneling barrier width and height, that is, both by the distance between the donor and acceptor as well as by the energy gap between the donor and bridge moieties. These factors are therefore important to control when designing functional electron transfer systems, such as constructs for photovoltaics, artificial photosynthesis, and molecular scale electronics. In this paper we have investigated a set of D-B-A systems in which the distance and the energy difference between the donor and bridge states (DeltaEDB) are systematically varied. Zinc(II) and gold(III) porphyrins were chosen as electron donor and acceptor because of their suitable driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (-0.9 eV in butyronitrile) and well-characterized photophysics. We have previously shown, in accordance with the superexchange mechanism for electron transfer, that the electron transfer rate is proportional to the inverse of DeltaEDB in a series of zinc/gold porphyrin D-B-A systems with bridges of constant edge to edge distance (19.6 A) and varying DeltaEDB (3900-17 600 cm(-1)). Here, we use the same donor and acceptor but the bridge is shortened or extended giving a set of oligo-p-phenyleneethynylene bridges (OPE) with four different edge to edge distances ranging from 12.7 to 33.4 A. These two sets of D-B-A systems-ZnP-RB-AuP+ and ZnP-nB-AuP+-have one bridge in common, and hence, for the first time both the distance and DeltaEDB dependence of electron transfer can be studied simultaneously in a systematic way.

  9. Optical detection of ballistic electrons injected by a scanning-tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemerink, M.; Sauthoff, K.; Koenraad, P.M.; Gerritsen, J.W.; Kempen, van H.; Wolter, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a spectroscopic technique which is based on ballistic injection of minority carriers from the tip of a scanning-tunneling microscope into a semiconductor heterostructure. By analyzing the resulting electroluminescence spectrum as a function of tip-sample bias, both the injection

  10. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...

  11. Analysis on the Rock-Cutter Interaction Mechanism During the TBM Tunneling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiqing; Wang, He; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    The accurate prediction of rock cutting forces of disc cutters is crucial for tunnel boring machine (TBM) design and construction. Disc cutter wear, which affects TBM penetration performance, has frequently been found at TBM sites. By considering the operating path and wear of the disc cutter, a new model is proposed for evaluating the cutting force and wear of the disc cutter in the tunneling process. The circular path adopted herein, which is the actual running path of the TBM disc cutter, shows that the lateral force of the disc cutter is asymmetric. The lateral forces on the sides of the disc cutter are clearly different. However, traditional solutions are obtained by assuming a linear path, where the later forces are viewed as equal. To simulate the interaction between the rock and disc cutter, a simple brittle damage model for rock mass is introduced here. Based on the explicit dynamic finite element method, the cutting force acting on the rock generated by a single disc cutter is simulated. It is shown that the lateral cutting force of the disc cutter strongly affects the wear extent of disc cutter. The wear mechanism is thus underestimated by the classical model, which was obtained by linear cutting tests. The simulation results are discussed and compared with other models, and these simulation results agree well with the results of present ones.

  12. 78 FR 14233 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... as the private key, is used to verify the signature. Digitized signature means a graphical image of a... recipients of the electronic document. Smart card means a plastic card, typically the size of a credit card, containing an embedded integrated circuit or ``chip'' that can generate, store, or process data. A smart card...

  13. Process mining for electronic data interchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, R.; Krathu, W.; Zapletal, M.; Pichler, C.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Werthner, H.; Huemer, C.; Setzer, T.

    2011-01-01

    Choreography modeling and service integration received a lot of attention in the last decade. However, most real-world implementations of inter-organizational systems are still realized by traditional Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. In traditional EDI standards, the notion of process or

  14. Accelerators in industrial electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    High power electron beam accelerators are being used for a variety of industrial processes. Such machines can process a wide range of products at very high thruput rates and at very low unit processing costs. These industrial accelerators are now capable of producing up to 200 kW of electron beam power at 4.0 MV and 100 kW at 5.0 MV. At this writing, even larger units are contemplated. The reliability of these high power devices also makes it feasible to consider bremsstrahlung (x-ray) processing as well. In addition to the advance of accelerator technology, microprocessor control systems now provide the capability to coordinate all the operations of the irradiation facility, including the accelerator, the material handling system, the personnel safety system and various auxiliary services. Facility designs can be adapted to many different industrial processes, including use of the dual purpose electron/x-ray accelerator, to ensure satisfactory product treatment with good dose uniformity, high energy efficiency and operational safety and simplicity. In addition, equipment manufacturers like RDI are looking beyond their conventional DC accelerator technology; looking at high power 10-12 MeV linear accelerators with power levels up to 25 kW or more. These high power linear accelerators could be the ideal processing tool for many sterilization and food irradiation applications. (author)

  15. Electronic band alignment and electron transport in Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenkevich, A. [NRNU ' Moscow Engineering Physics Institute,' 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Minnekaev, M.; Matveyev, Yu.; Lebedinskii, Yu. [NRNU ' Moscow Engineering Physics Institute,' 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bulakh, K.; Chouprik, A.; Baturin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Maksimova, K. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, 236041 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Thiess, S.; Drube, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-02-11

    Electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions is controlled by changes in the electrostatic potential profile across the junction upon polarization reversal of the ultrathin ferroelectric barrier layer. Here, hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is used to reconstruct the electric potential barrier profile in as-grown Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}(001)/Pt(001) heterostructures. Transport properties of Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt junctions with a sub-{mu}m Cr top electrode are interpreted in terms of tunneling electroresistance with resistance changes of a factor of {approx}30 upon polarization reversal. By fitting the I-V characteristics with the model employing an experimentally determined electric potential barrier we derive the step height changes at the BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt (Cr/BaTiO{sub 3}) interface +0.42(-0.03) eV following downward to upward polarization reversal.

  16. Electronic band alignment and electron transport in Cr/BaTiO3/Pt ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenkevich, A.; Minnekaev, M.; Matveyev, Yu.; Lebedinskii, Yu.; Bulakh, K.; Chouprik, A.; Baturin, A.; Maksimova, K.; Thiess, S.; Drube, W.

    2013-01-01

    Electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions is controlled by changes in the electrostatic potential profile across the junction upon polarization reversal of the ultrathin ferroelectric barrier layer. Here, hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is used to reconstruct the electric potential barrier profile in as-grown Cr/BaTiO 3 (001)/Pt(001) heterostructures. Transport properties of Cr/BaTiO 3 /Pt junctions with a sub-μm Cr top electrode are interpreted in terms of tunneling electroresistance with resistance changes of a factor of ∼30 upon polarization reversal. By fitting the I-V characteristics with the model employing an experimentally determined electric potential barrier we derive the step height changes at the BaTiO 3 /Pt (Cr/BaTiO 3 ) interface +0.42(−0.03) eV following downward to upward polarization reversal.

  17. New insights on SOI Tunnel FETs with low-temperature process flow for CoolCube™ integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Llorente, C.; Le Royer, C.; Batude, P.; Fenouillet-Beranger, C.; Martinie, S.; Lu, C.-M. V.; Allain, F.; Colinge, J.-P.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.; Vinet, M.

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and electrical characterization of planar SOI Tunnel FETs (TFETs) made using a Low-Temperature (LT) process designed for 3D sequential integration. These proof-of-concept TFETs feature junctions obtained by Solid Phase Epitaxy Regrowth (SPER). Their electrical behavior is analyzed and compared to reference samples (regular process using High-Temperature junction formation, HT). Dual ID-VDS measurements verify that the TFET structures present Band-to-Band tunnelling (BTBT) carrier injection and not Schottky Barrier tunnelling. P-mode operating LT TFETs deliver an ON state current similar to that of the HT reference, opening the door towards optimized devices operating with very low threshold voltage VTH and low supply voltage VDD.

  18. Electron beam processing - status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of commercial products now on the market are being produced by electron beam processing, which involves the treatment of materials with high-energy electrons to obtain beneficial effects. Ongoing applications include the high-speed curing of printing inks, clear and pigmented coatings, release coatings and adhesive films, the crosslinking of plastic film, foam, tubing, pipe, molded parts, electrical wire and cable, the cold vulcanization of rubber sheets for automobile tires and factory roofing as well as the sterilization of medical devices and packaging materials, and the preservation of food. Continuing growth is being driven by some inherent advantages of electron beam processing over alternative chemical and thermal treatment processes, such as enhanced product quality and lower unit costs that result from higher production rates, dynamic process control, quicker process start-up and shutdown, and reductions in scrap loss, energy consumption, floor space requirements, and toxic residues. Other potential applications that have not yet reached commercial fruition are focused on environmental protection and the reclamation of waste materials. These include the disinfection of potable water supplies, municipal waste water, sewage sludge, and the infectious wastes from hospitals and airports, the modification of toxic chemicals, the degradation of cellulosic materials, the cracking of crude oil and residual tars from refineries, and the extraction of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from combustion gases to reduce the effects of acid rain

  19. Electronic single-molecule identification of carbohydrate isomers by recognition tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jongone; Biswas, Sovan; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-12-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the four main building blocks of life, and are categorized as monosaccharides (sugars), oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Each sugar can exist in two alternative anomers (in which a hydroxy group at C-1 takes different orientations) and each pair of sugars can form different epimers (isomers around the stereocentres connecting the sugars). This leads to a vast combinatorial complexity, intractable to mass spectrometry and requiring large amounts of sample for NMR characterization. Combining measurements of collision cross section with mass spectrometry (IM-MS) helps, but many isomers are still difficult to separate. Here, we show that recognition tunnelling (RT) can classify many anomers and epimers via the current fluctuations they produce when captured in a tunnel junction functionalized with recognition molecules. Most importantly, RT is a nanoscale technique utilizing sub-picomole quantities of analyte. If integrated into a nanopore, RT would provide a unique approach to sequencing linear polysaccharides.

  20. Quantum interference effect in electron tunneling through a quantum-dot-ring spin valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing-Min; Zhao, Jia; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Peng, Ya-Jing; Chi, Feng

    2011-03-28

    Spin-dependent transport through a quantum-dot (QD) ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is studied theoretically. Tunneling current, current spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as functions of the bias voltage and the direct coupling strength between the two leads are analyzed by the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. It is shown that the magnitudes of these quantities are sensitive to the relative angle between the leads' magnetic moments and the quantum interference effect originated from the inter-lead coupling. We pay particular attention on the Coulomb blockade regime and find the relative current magnitudes of different magnetization angles can be reversed by tuning the inter-lead coupling strength, resulting in sign change of the TMR. For large enough inter-lead coupling strength, the current spin polarizations for parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations will approach to unit and zero, respectively.PACS numbers:

  1. Quantum interference effect in electron tunneling through a quantum-dot-ring spin valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jing-Min

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spin-dependent transport through a quantum-dot (QD ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is studied theoretically. Tunneling current, current spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR as functions of the bias voltage and the direct coupling strength between the two leads are analyzed by the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. It is shown that the magnitudes of these quantities are sensitive to the relative angle between the leads' magnetic moments and the quantum interference effect originated from the inter-lead coupling. We pay particular attention on the Coulomb blockade regime and find the relative current magnitudes of different magnetization angles can be reversed by tuning the inter-lead coupling strength, resulting in sign change of the TMR. For large enough inter-lead coupling strength, the current spin polarizations for parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations will approach to unit and zero, respectively. PACS numbers:

  2. An array of cold-electron bolometers with SIN tunnel junctions and JFET readout for cosmology instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, L

    2008-01-01

    A novel concept of the parallel/series array of Cold-Electron Bolometers (CEB) with Superconductor-Insulator-Normal (SIN) Tunnel Junctions has been proposed. The concept was developed specially for matching the CEB with JFET amplifier at conditions of high optical power load. The CEB is a planar antenna-coupled superconducting detector with high sensitivity. For combination of effective HF operation and low noise properties the current-biased CEBs are connected in series for DC and in parallel for HF signal. A signal is concentrated from an antenna to the absorber through the capacitance of the tunnel junctions and through additional capacitance for coupling of superconducting islands. Using array of CEBs the applications can be considerably extended to higher power load by distributing the power between N CEBs and decreasing the electron temperature. Due to increased responsivity the noise matching is so effective that photon NEP could be easily achieved at 300 mK with a room temperature JFET for wide range of optical power loads. The concept of the CEB array has been developed for the BOOMERanG balloon telescope and other Cosmology instruments

  3. Time-dependent exchange and tunneling: detection at the same place of two electrons emitted simultaneously from different sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marian, D; Colomés, E; Oriols, X

    2015-01-01

    Two-particle scattering probabilities in tunneling scenarios with exchange interaction are analyzed with quasi-particle wave packets. Two initial one-particle wave packets (with opposite central momentums) are spatially localized at each side of a barrier. After impinging upon a tunneling barrier, each wave packet splits into transmitted and reflected components. When the initial two-particle anti-symmetrical state is defined as a Slater determinant of any type of (normalizable) one-particle wave packet, it is shown that the probability of detecting two (identically injected) electrons at the same side of the barrier is different from zero in very common (single or double barrier) scenarios. In some particular scenarios, the transmitted and reflected components become orthogonal and the mentioned probabilities reproduce those values associated to distinguishable particles. These unexpected non-zero probabilities are still present when non-separable Coulomb interaction or non-symmetrical potentials are considered. On the other hand, for initial wave packets close to Hamiltonian eigenstates, the usual zero two-particle probability for electrons at the same side of the barrier found in the literature is recovered. The generalization to many-particle scattering probabilities with quasi-particle wave packets for low and high phase-space density are also analyzed. The far-reaching consequences of these non-zero probabilities in the accurate evaluation of quantum noise in mesoscopic systems are briefly indicated. (paper)

  4. Process of long-term tunnel instability by temperature and humidity variation in sedimentary rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka; Okada, Tetsuji; Nakata, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    It is concerned that tunnels in the sedimentary rock are seriously damaged during the long operation after excavation, while there are various plans to construct significant underground facilities such as a high-level radioactive waste disposal facility. A case history study on tunnel instability is important in order to assess and evaluate tunnel instability behavior. In this respect, an accelerated tunnel deformation test by removing tunnel supports was conducted. Instability of tunnel wall was observed before and after this test in the summer, when it is warm and humid in the test tunnel. Fiber optic sensing detected the instability. Scale of collapsed rock was evaluated from the variation of shape of tunnel cross-section measured by a 3-D lazar measurement tool. The maximum size of collapsed rock block is 1m in diameter. Surrounding sandstone has such a characteristic that crack growth is much faster and its strength decreases gradually in the condition of high relative humidity. Numerical simulation considering this decrease of rock strength reproduced the instable zone around the test tunnel. (author)

  5. Equipment concept design and development plans for microgravity science and applications research on space station: Combustion tunnel, laser diagnostic system, advanced modular furnace, integrated electronics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhran, M. L.; Youngblood, W. W.; Georgekutty, T.; Fiske, M. R.; Wear, W. O.

    1986-01-01

    Taking advantage of the microgravity environment of space NASA has initiated the preliminary design of a permanently manned space station that will support technological advances in process science and stimulate the development of new and improved materials having applications across the commercial spectrum. Previous studies have been performed to define from the researcher's perspective, the requirements for laboratory equipment to accommodate microgravity experiments on the space station. Functional requirements for the identified experimental apparatus and support equipment were determined. From these hardware requirements, several items were selected for concept designs and subsequent formulation of development plans. This report documents the concept designs and development plans for two items of experiment apparatus - the Combustion Tunnel and the Advanced Modular Furnace, and two items of support equipment the Laser Diagnostic System and the Integrated Electronics Laboratory. For each concept design, key technology developments were identified that are required to enable or enhance the development of the respective hardware.

  6. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  7. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  8. Electronic equipment for spectrometric data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, L.J.; Trenev, A.M.; Todorova, E.I.; Dimitrov, V.D.

    1978-01-01

    Electronic equipment carrying out logical operations and a full set of the arithmetic operations was developed for spectrometric data processing. The flowsheet of the computing part of the device, made on the basis of a specialized integral circuit, is given. The device includes input registers, multiplexor, matrix commutator, arithmetic unit and indication unit. The equipment is rated to carry out calculations according to comparatively complex formulae in several seconds

  9. Digital processing of ionospheric electron content data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ionospheric electron content data contain periodicities that are produced by a diversity of sources including hydromagnetic waves, gravity waves, and lunar tides. Often these periodicities are masked by the strong daily variation in the data. Digital filtering can be used to isolate the weaker components. The filtered data can then be further processed to provide estimates of the source properties. In addition, homomorphic filtering may be used to identify nonlinear interactions in the ionosphere.

  10. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Friedman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  11. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  12. Liquid phase epitaxy of abrupt junctions in InAs and studies of injection radiative tunneling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The p-n junction in a InAs crystal, by liquid phase epitaxy is obtained. The processes of injection and tunneling radiative recombination by emitted radiation from active region of p-n junction for low injection current are studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Zurek–Kibble Symmetry Breaking Process in Superconducting Rings; Spontaneous Fluxon Formation in Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, Roberto; Dmitriev, P

    2007-01-01

    We report on new investigations of spontaneous symmetry breaking in non-adiabatic phase transitions. This Zurek-Kibble (ZK) process is mimicked in solid state systems by trapping of magnetic flux quanta, fluxons, in a long annular Josephson tunnel junction quenched through the normal-superconducting...

  14. Electron - ion recombination processes - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Yukap

    1997-01-01

    Extensive theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out for the past 20 years on electron - ion recombination processes, as they are applied to the analysis of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We review the basic understanding gained through these efforts, with emphasis on some of the more recent progress made in recombination theory as the recombining system is affected by time-dependent electric fields and plasma particles at low temperature. Together with collisional ionization and excitation processes, recombination is important in determining ionization balance and excited-state population in non-equilibrium plasmas. The radiation emitted by plasmas is usually the principal medium with which to study the plasma condition, as it is produced mainly during the recombination and decay of excited states of ions inside the plasma. This is especially true when the plasma under study is not readily accessible by direct probes, as in astrophysical plasmas. Moreover, external probes may sometimes cause undesirable disturbances of the plasma. Electron-ion recombination proceeds in several different modes. The direct modes include three-body recombination (TBR) and one-step radiative recombination (RR), all to the ground- and singly-excited states of the target ions. By contrast, the indirect resonant mode is a two-step dielectronic recombination (DR), which proceeds first with the formation of doubly-excited states by radiationless excitation/capture. The resonant states thus formed may relax by autoionization and/or radiative cascades. For more exotic modes of recombination, we consider off-shell dielectronic recombination (radiative DR = RDR), in which an electron capture is accompanied by simultaneous radiative emission and excitation of the target ion. Some discussion on attachment of electrons to neutral atoms, resulting in the formation of negative ions, is also given. When resonance states involve one or more electrons in high Rydberg states

  15. Development of a process control computer device for the adaptation of flexible wind tunnel walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, J.

    1982-01-01

    In wind tunnel tests, the problems arise of determining the wall pressure distribution, calculating the wall contour, and controlling adjustment of the walls. This report shows how these problems have been solved for the high speed wind tunnel of the Technical University of Berlin.

  16. Bilateral widespread mechanical pain sensitivity in carpal tunnel syndrome: evidence of central processing in unilateral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Cuadrado, María Luz; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether bilateral widespread pressure hypersensitivity exists in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 20 females with carpal tunnel syndrome (aged 22-60 years), and 20 healthy matched females (aged 21-60 years old) were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, the carpal tunnel and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. The results showed that pressure pain threshold levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the carpal tunnel, the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, and the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome as compared to healthy controls (all, P < 0.001). Pressure pain threshold was negatively correlated to both hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms (all, P < 0.001). Our findings revealed bilateral widespread pressure hypersensitivity in subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome, which suggest that widespread central sensitization is involved in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The generalized decrease in pressure pain thresholds associated with pain intensity and duration of symptoms supports a role of the peripheral drive to initiate and maintain central sensitization. Nevertheless, both central and peripheral sensitization mechanisms are probably involved at the same time in carpal tunnel syndrome.

  17. Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with in Superconductors Measured by Electron Tunneling; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 4: 147 - 148 ; August 15, 1960 Electron Tunneling Between Two Superconductors; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 10

  18. Statistical process control for electron beam monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Tarjuelo, Juan; Luquero-Llopis, Naika; García-Mollá, Rafael; Quirós-Higueras, Juan David; Bouché-Babiloni, Ana; Juan-Senabre, Xavier Jordi; de Marco-Blancas, Noelia; Ferrer-Albiach, Carlos; Santos-Serra, Agustín

    2015-07-01

    To assess the electron beam monitoring statistical process control (SPC) in linear accelerator (linac) daily quality control. We present a long-term record of our measurements and evaluate which SPC-led conditions are feasible for maintaining control. We retrieved our linac beam calibration, symmetry, and flatness daily records for all electron beam energies from January 2008 to December 2013, and retrospectively studied how SPC could have been applied and which of its features could be used in the future. A set of adjustment interventions designed to maintain these parameters under control was also simulated. All phase I data was under control. The dose plots were characterized by rising trends followed by steep drops caused by our attempts to re-center the linac beam calibration. Where flatness and symmetry trends were detected they were less-well defined. The process capability ratios ranged from 1.6 to 9.3 at a 2% specification level. Simulated interventions ranged from 2% to 34% of the total number of measurement sessions. We also noted that if prospective SPC had been applied it would have met quality control specifications. SPC can be used to assess the inherent variability of our electron beam monitoring system. It can also indicate whether a process is capable of maintaining electron parameters under control with respect to established specifications by using a daily checking device, but this is not practical unless a method to establish direct feedback from the device to the linac can be devised. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid prototyping of magnetic tunnel junctions with focused ion beam processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Anders; Thornell, Greger; Nguyen, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Submicron-sized magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) are most often fabricated by time-consuming and expensive e-beam lithography. From a research and development perspective, a short lead time is one of the major concerns. Here, a rapid process scheme for fabrication of micrometre size MTJs with focused ion beam processes is presented. The magnetic properties of the fabricated junctions are investigated in terms of magnetic domain structure, tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) and coercivity, with extra attention given to the effect of Ga implantation from the ion beam. In particular, the effect of the implantation on the minimum junction size and the magnetization of the sensing layer are studied. In the latter case, magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, with the object-oriented micromagnetic framework (OOMMF), are used to study the magnetization reversal. The fabricated junctions show considerable coercivity both along their hard and easy axes. Interestingly, the sensing layer exhibits two remanent states: one with a single and one with a double domain. The hard axis TMR loop has kinks at about ±20 mT which is attributed to a non-uniform lateral coercivity, where the rim of the junctions, which is subjected to Ga implantation from the flank of the ion beam, is more coercive than the unirradiated centre. The width of the coercive rim is estimated to be 160 nm from the hard axis TMR loop. The easy axis TMR loop shows more coercivity than an unirradiated junction and, this too, is found to stem from the coercive rim, as seen from the simulations. It is concluded that the process scheme has three major advantages. Firstly, it has a high lateral and depth resolution—the depth resolution is enhanced by end point detection—and is capable of making junctions of sizes down towards the limit set by the width of the irradiated rim. Secondly, the most delicate process steps are performed in the unbroken vacuum enabling the use of materials prone to

  20. Modeling of Electronic Transport in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tip-Carbon Nanotube Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in a recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube. We claim that there are two mechanical contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube (semiconductor) junction (1) with or (2) without a tiny vacuum gap (0.1 - 0.2 nm). With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube; the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in I does not equal 0 only with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, and the bias polarities would be reversed for a p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type.

  1. Tunneling Kinetics and Nonadiabatic Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Proteins: The Effect of Electric Fields and Anharmonic Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Russo, Douglas; Champion, Paul M

    2017-07-20

    A proper description of proton donor-acceptor (D-A) distance fluctuations is crucial for understanding tunneling in proton-coupled electron transport (PCET). The typical harmonic approximation for the D-A potential results in a Gaussian probability distribution, which does not appropriately reflect the electronic repulsion forces that increase the energetic cost of sampling shorter D-A distances. Because these shorter distances are the primary channel for thermally activated tunneling, the analysis of tunneling kinetics depends sensitively on the inherently anharmonic nature of the D-A interaction. Thus, we have used quantum chemical calculations to account for the D-A interaction and developed an improved model for the analysis of experimental tunneling kinetics. Strong internal electric fields are also considered and found to contribute significantly to the compressive forces when the D-A distance distribution is positioned below the van der Waals contact distance. This model is applied to recent experiments on the wild type (WT) and a double mutant (DM) of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO). The compressive force necessary to prepare the tunneling-active distribution in WT SLO is found to fall in the ∼ nN range, which greatly exceeds the measured values of molecular motor and protein unfolding forces. This indicates that ∼60-100 MV/cm electric fields, aligned along the D-A bond axis, must be generated by an enzyme conformational interconversion that facilitates the PCET tunneling reaction. Based on the absolute value of the measured tunneling rate, and using previously calculated values of the electronic matrix element, the population of this tunneling-active conformation is found to lie in the range 10 -5 -10 -7 , indicating this is a rare structural fluctuation that falls well below the detection threshold of recent ENDOR experiments. Additional analysis of the DM tunneling kinetics leads to a proposal that a disordered (high entropy) conformation could be

  2. Radiation processing with the Messina electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auditore, L.; Barna, R.C.; De Pasquale, D.; Emanuele, U.; Loria, D.; Morgana, E.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the last decades radiation processing has been more and more applied in several fields of industrial treatments and scientific research as a safe, reliable and economic technique. In order to improve existing industrial techniques and to develop new applications of this technology, at the Physics Department of Messina University a high power 5 MeV electron linac has been studied and set-up. The main features of the accelerating structure will be described together with the distinctive features of the delivered beam and several results obtained by electron beam irradiations, such as improvement of the characteristics of polymers and polymer composite materials, synthesis of new hydrogels for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, reclaim of culture ground, sterilization of medical devices, development of new dosimeters for very high doses and dose rates required for monitoring of industrial irradiations

  3. Final technical brief / DOE grant DE-FG03-96 ER 62219. Computational study of electron tunneling in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey J. Regan

    1999-03-03

    Electron transfer (ET) processes in proteins are characterized by the motion of a single electron between centers of localization (such as the chlorophyll dimer in photosynthetic reaction centers). An electronic donor state D is created by the injection of an electron or by photo-excitation, after which the system makes a radiationless transition to an acceptor state A., resulting in the effective transfer of an electron over several angstroms. The experimental and theoretical understanding of the rate of this process has been the focus of much attention in physics, chemistry and biology.

  4. Instabilities in thin tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkin, M.K.; Adler, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Tunnel junctions prepared for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy are often plagued by instabilities in the 0-500-meV range. This paper relates the bias at which the instability occurs to the barrier thickness

  5. Investigation of physico-chemical processes in hypervelocity MHD-gas acceleration wind tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfyorov, V.I.; Dmitriev, L.M.; Yegorov, B.V.; Markachev, Yu.E.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation results for nonequilibrium physicochemical processes in the circuit of the hypersonic MHD-gas acceleration wind tunnel are presented. The flow in the primary nozzle is shown to be in thermodynamic equilibrium at To=3400 K, Po=(2∼3)x10 5 Pa, M=2 used in the plenum chamber. Variations in the static pressure due to oxidation reaction of Na, K are pointed out. The channels of energy transfer from the electric field to different degrees of freedom of an accelerated gas with Na, K seeds are considered. The calculation procedure for gas dynamic and kinetic processes in the MHD-channel using measured parameters is suggested. The calculated results are compared with the data obtained in a thermodynamic gas equilibrium assumption. The flow in the secondary nozzle is calculated under the same assumptions and the gas parameters at its exit are evaluated. Particular attention is given to the influence of seeds on flows over bodies. It is shown that the seeds exert a very small influence on the flow behind a normal shock wave. The seeds behind an oblique shock wave accelerate deactivation of vibrations of N 2 , but this effect is insignificant

  6. Imaging the electron-boson coupling in superconducting FeSe films using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Can-Li; Wang, Yi-Lin; Jiang, Ye-Ping; Li, Zhi; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Chen, Xi; Hoffman, Jennifer E; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-02-07

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy has been used to reveal signatures of a bosonic mode in the local quasiparticle density of states of superconducting FeSe films. The mode appears below Tc as a "dip-hump" feature at energy Ω∼4.7kBTc beyond the superconducting gap Δ. Spectra on strained regions of the FeSe films reveal simultaneous decreases in Δ and Ω. This contrasts with all previous reports on other high-Tc superconductors, where Δ locally anticorrelates with Ω. A local strong coupling model is found to reconcile the discrepancy well, and to provide a unified picture of the electron-boson coupling in unconventional superconductors.

  7. Preliminary Performance Data on Westinghouse Electronic Power Regulator Operating on J34-WE-32 Turbojet Engine in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, James R.; Blivas, Darnold; Pack, George J.

    1950-01-01

    The behavior of the Westinghouse electronic power regulator operating on a J34-WE-32 turbojet engine was investigated in the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Department of the Navy. The object of the program was to determine the, steady-state stability and transient characteristics of the engine under control at various altitudes and ram pressure ratios, without afterburning. Recordings of the response of the following parameters to step changes in power lever position throughout the available operating range of the engine were obtained; ram pressure ratio, compressor-discharge pressure, exhaust-nozzle area, engine speed, turbine-outlet temperature, fuel-valve position, jet thrust, air flow, turbine-discharge pressure, fuel flow, throttle position, and boost-pump pressure. Representative preliminary data showing the actual time response of these variables are presented. These data are presented in the form of reproductions of oscillographic traces.

  8. Pendant unit effect on electron tunneling in U-shaped molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Chakrabarti, Subhasis; Waldeck, David H.; Oliver, Anna M.; Paddon-Row, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    The electron transfer reactions of three U-shaped donor-bridge-acceptor molecules with different pendant groups have been studied in different solvents as a function of temperature. Analysis of the electron transfer kinetics in nonpolar and weakly polar solvents provides experimental reaction Gibbs energies that are used to parameterize a molecular solvation model. This solvation model is then used to predict energetic parameters in the electron transfer rate constant expression and allow the electronic coupling between the electron donor and electron acceptor groups to be determined from the rate data. The U-shaped molecules differ by alkylation of the aromatic pendant group, which lies in the 'line-of-sight' between the donor and acceptor groups. The findings show that the electronic coupling through the pendant group is similar for these molecules

  9. Controlled assembly and single electron charging of monolayer protected Au144 clusters: an electrochemistry and scanning tunneling spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodappa, Nataraju; Fluch, Ulrike; Fu, Yongchun; Mayor, Marcel; Moreno-García, Pavel; Siegenthaler, Hans; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Single gold particles may serve as room temperature single electron memory units because of their size dependent electronic level spacing. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study by electrochemically controlled scanning probe experiments performed on tailor-made Au particles of narrow dispersity. In particular, the charge transport characteristics through chemically synthesized hexane-1-thiol and 4-pyridylbenzene-1-thiol mixed monolayer protected Au144 clusters (MPCs) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical scanning tunneling spectroscopy (EC-STS) are reported. The pyridyl groups exposed by the Au-MPCs enable their immobilization on Pt(111) substrates. By varying the humidity during their deposition, samples coated by stacks of compact monolayers of Au-MPCs or decorated with individual, laterally separated Au-MPCs are obtained. DPV experiments with stacked monolayers of Au144-MPCs and EC-STS experiments with laterally separated individual Au144-MPCs are performed both in aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes. Lower capacitance values were observed for individual clusters compared to ensemble clusters. This trend remains the same irrespective of the composition of the electrolyte surrounding the Au144-MPC. However, the resolution of the energy level spacing of the single clusters is strongly affected by the proximity of neighboring particles.Single gold particles may serve as room temperature single electron memory units because of their size dependent electronic level spacing. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study by electrochemically controlled scanning probe experiments performed on tailor-made Au particles of narrow dispersity. In particular, the charge transport characteristics through chemically synthesized hexane-1-thiol and 4-pyridylbenzene-1-thiol mixed monolayer protected Au144 clusters (MPCs) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical scanning tunneling spectroscopy (EC-STS) are reported. The pyridyl groups

  10. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Marcelo E.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo; Kremer, German; Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simón; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos; Munoz, Raul C.

    2012-01-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, δ and the lateral correlation length, ξ corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using (δ, ξ) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low temperatures.

  11. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations of cutting edge quality in lamellar keratotomy using the Wavelight femtosecond laser (FS-200) : What influence do spot distance and an additional tunnel have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, T; Höche, T; Heichel, J

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) are established cutting instruments for the creation of LASIK flaps. Previous studies often showed even rougher surfaces after application of fs-laser systems compared to lamellar keratotomy with mechanical microkeratomes. When cutting the cornea with fs-lasers, an intrastromal gas development occurs, which has a potentially negative influence on the cutting quality if the gas cannot be dissipated; therefore, manufacturers have chosen the way of gas assimilation in so-called pockets. The investigated system creates a tunnel which opens under the conjunctiva. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a tunnel as well as the influence of different spot distances on the quality of cut surfaces and edges. In this experimental study on freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 15), the following cuts were carried out with the FS-200 (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany): 1. standard setting (spot and line separation 8 µm), 2. with tunnel for gas drainage, 3. without gas-conducting tunnel, 4. with increased spot spacing (spot and line separation 9 μm instead of 8 μm) and 5. with reduced spot spacing (spot and line separation 7 μm instead of 8 μm). Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (FEI Quanta 650, Hillsboro, OR) of the cut edges and surfaces as well as the gas drain tunnel were performed. The evaluation was based on an established score. The current fs-laser system (200 Hz) is able to create smooth cutting surfaces and sharp edges. The changed density of laser pulses compared to the standard settings with a reduced or increased distance between the pulses, did not achieve any further improvement in the surface quality. The gas-conducting tunnel could be detected by scanning electron microscope. In the case of cutting without a tunnel, roughened surfaces and irregularities on the cutting edges were found. When the FS-200 fs-laser is used, LASIK cuts with very smooth cut surfaces and sharp cutting

  12. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  13. A specific 2,4-disubstituted-adamantane interaction with plasma-grown aluminum oxide. Inelastic-electron-tunneling spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.W.; Raas, M.C.; Velzen, van P.N.T.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of several mono- and disubstituted adamantanes with plasma-grown aluminum oxide has been studied using inelastic-electron-tunneling (IET) spectroscopy. The IET spectra evidence the chemisorption of 2,4-adamantanedione onto the aluminum oxide surface as the carboxylate anion of

  14. Assessment of pseudo-bilayer structures in the heterogate germanium electron-hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, J. L.; Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M.; Medina-Bailón, C.; Gámiz, F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pseudo-bilayer configurations at low operating voltages (≤0.5 V) in the heterogate germanium electron-hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor (HG-EHBTFET) compared to the traditional bilayer structures of EHBTFETs arising from semiclassical simulations where the inversion layers for electrons and holes featured very symmetric profiles with similar concentration levels at the ON-state. Pseudo-bilayer layouts are attained by inducing a certain asymmetry between the top and the bottom gates so that even though the hole inversion layer is formed at the bottom of the channel, the top gate voltage remains below the required value to trigger the formation of the inversion layer for electrons. Resulting benefits from this setup are improved electrostatic control on the channel, enhanced gate-to-gate efficiency, and higher I ON levels. Furthermore, pseudo-bilayer configurations alleviate the difficulties derived from confining very high opposite carrier concentrations in very thin structures

  15. Assessment of pseudo-bilayer structures in the heterogate germanium electron-hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, J. L., E-mail: jose.padilladelatorre@epfl.ch; Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M. [Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Medina-Bailón, C.; Gámiz, F. [Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de los Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the effect of pseudo-bilayer configurations at low operating voltages (≤0.5 V) in the heterogate germanium electron-hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor (HG-EHBTFET) compared to the traditional bilayer structures of EHBTFETs arising from semiclassical simulations where the inversion layers for electrons and holes featured very symmetric profiles with similar concentration levels at the ON-state. Pseudo-bilayer layouts are attained by inducing a certain asymmetry between the top and the bottom gates so that even though the hole inversion layer is formed at the bottom of the channel, the top gate voltage remains below the required value to trigger the formation of the inversion layer for electrons. Resulting benefits from this setup are improved electrostatic control on the channel, enhanced gate-to-gate efficiency, and higher I{sub ON} levels. Furthermore, pseudo-bilayer configurations alleviate the difficulties derived from confining very high opposite carrier concentrations in very thin structures.

  16. Josephson tunneling and nanosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Kresin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Josephson tunneling between nanoclusters is analyzed. The discrete nature of the electronic energy spectra, including their shell ordering, is explicitly taken into account. The treatment considers the two distinct cases of resonant and non-resonant tunneling. It is demonstrated that the current density greatly exceeds the value discussed in the conventional theory. Nanoparticles are shown to be promising building blocks for nanomaterials-based tunneling networks.

  17. 1,8-Naphthyridine-2,7-diamine: a potential universal reader of Watson-Crick base pairs for DNA sequencing by electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2012-11-21

    With the aid of Density Functional Theory (DFT), we designed 1,8-naphthyridine-2,7-diamine as a recognition molecule to read DNA base pairs for genomic sequencing by electron tunneling. NMR studies show that it can form stable triplets with both A : T and G : C base pairs through hydrogen bonding. Our results suggest that the naphthyridine molecule should be able to function as a universal base pair reader in a tunneling gap, generating distinguishable signatures under electrical bias for each of DNA base pairs.

  18. Electronic transport through EuO spin-filter tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Jutong, Nuttachai

    2012-11-12

    Epitaxial spin-filter tunnel junctions based on the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium monoxide (EuO) are investigated by means of density functional theory. In particular, we focus on the spin transport properties of Cu(100)/EuO(100)/Cu(100) junctions. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and the current-voltage curves on the interface spacing and EuO thickness is explained in terms of the EuO density of states and the complex band structure. Furthermore, we also discuss the relation between the spin transport properties and the Cu-EuO interface geometry. The level alignment of the junction is sensitively affected by the interface spacing, since this determines the charge transfer between EuO and the Cu electrodes. Our calculations indicate that EuO epitaxially grown on Cu can act as a perfect spin filter, with a spin polarization of the current close to 100%, and with both the Eu-5d conduction-band and the Eu-4f valence-band states contributing to the coherent transport. For epitaxial EuO on Cu, a symmetry filtering is observed, with the Δ1 states dominating the transmission. This leads to a transport gap larger than the fundamental EuO band gap. Importantly, the high spin polarization of the current is preserved up to large bias voltages.

  19. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  20. Energy-Filtered Tunnel Transistor: A New Device Concept Toward Extremely-Low Energy Consumption Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...excellent agreement with experimental findings. The energy filtering has been applied to single-electron transport and clear Coulomb staircases and... Coulomb oscillations have been demonstrated at room temperature. A new architecture of energy-filtered cold electron transistors has been designed and

  1. Quantum-well charge and voltage distribution in a metal–insulator–semiconductor structure upon resonant electron Tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vexler, M. I., E-mail: vexler@mail.ioffe.ru; Illarionov, Yu. Yu.; Grekhov, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The prerequisites for electron storage in the quantum well of a metal–oxide–p{sup +}-Si resonant-tunneling structure and the effect of the stored charge on the voltage distribution are theoretically investigated. Systems with SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2} insulators are studied. It is demonstrated that the occurrence of a charge in the well in the case of resonant transport can be expected in structures on substrates with an acceptor concentration from (5–6) × 10{sup 18} to (2–3) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –3} in the range of oxide thicknesses dependent on this concentration. In particular, the oxide layer thickness in the structures with SiO{sub 2}/p{sup +}-Si(10{sup 19} cm{sup –3}) should exceed ~3 nm. The electron density in the well can reach ~10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} and higher. However, the effect of this charge on the electrostatics of the structure becomes noticeable only at relatively high voltages far above the activation of resonant transport through the first subband.

  2. Physiological Evidence for Isopotential Tunneling in the Electron Transport Chain of Methane-Producing Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszenko, Nikolas; Buan, Nicole R

    2017-09-15

    Many, but not all, organisms use quinones to conserve energy in their electron transport chains. Fermentative bacteria and methane-producing archaea (methanogens) do not produce quinones but have devised other ways to generate ATP. Methanophenazine (MPh) is a unique membrane electron carrier found in Methanosarcina species that plays the same role as quinones in the electron transport chain. To extend the analogy between quinones and MPh, we compared the MPh pool sizes between two well-studied Methanosarcina species, Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A and Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro, to the quinone pool size in the bacterium Escherichia coli We found the quantity of MPh per cell increases as cultures transition from exponential growth to stationary phase, and absolute quantities of MPh were 3-fold higher in M. acetivorans than in M. barkeri The concentration of MPh suggests the cell membrane of M. acetivorans , but not of M. barkeri , is electrically quantized as if it were a single conductive metal sheet and near optimal for rate of electron transport. Similarly, stationary (but not exponentially growing) E. coli cells also have electrically quantized membranes on the basis of quinone content. Consistent with our hypothesis, we demonstrated that the exogenous addition of phenazine increases the growth rate of M. barkeri three times that of M. acetivorans Our work suggests electron flux through MPh is naturally higher in M. acetivorans than in M. barkeri and that hydrogen cycling is less efficient at conserving energy than scalar proton translocation using MPh. IMPORTANCE Can we grow more from less? The ability to optimize and manipulate metabolic efficiency in cells is the difference between commercially viable and nonviable renewable technologies. Much can be learned from methane-producing archaea (methanogens) which evolved a successful metabolic lifestyle under extreme thermodynamic constraints. Methanogens use highly efficient electron transport systems and

  3. Optimization of equipment for electron radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartz, M.; Hartmann, E.; Lenk, M.; Mehnert, R.

    1999-05-01

    In the course of the last decade, IOM Leipzig has developed low-energy electron accelerators for electron beam curing of polymer coatings and printing inks. In order to optimize the electron irradiation field, electron optical calculations have been carried out using the commercially available EGUN code. The present study outlines the design of the diode-type low-energy electron accelerators LEA and EBOGEN, taking into account the electron optical effects of secondary components such as the retaining rods installed in the cathode assembly.

  4. Optimization of equipment for electron radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tartz, M.; Hartmann, E.; Lenk, M.; Mehnert, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the course of the last decade, IOM Leipzig has developed low-energy electron accelerators for electron beam curing of polymer coatings and printing inks. In order to optimize the electron irradiation field, electron optical calculations have been carried out using the commercially available EGUN code. The present study outlines the design of the diode-type low-energy electron accelerators LEA and EBOGEN, taking into account the electron optical effects of secondary components such as the retaining rods installed in the cathode assembly

  5. Dopant induced single electron tunneling within the sub-bands of single silicon NW tri-gate junctionless n-MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Wasi; Georgiev, Yordan M.; Maity, Sarmistha; Das, Samaresh

    2017-09-01

    We report 1D electron transport of silicon junctionless tri-gate n-type transistor at 4.2 K. The step like curve observed in the current voltage characteristic suggests 1D transport. Besides the current steps for 1D transport, we found multiple spikes within individual steps, which we relate to inter-band single electron tunneling, mediated by the charged dopants available in the channel region. Clear Coulomb diamonds were observed in the stability diagram of the device. It is shown that a uniformly doped silicon nanowire can provide us the window for the single electron tunnelling. Back-gate versus front-gate color plot, where current is in a color scale, shows a crossover of the increased conduction region. This is a clear indication of the dopant-dopant interaction. It has been shown that back-gate biasing can be used to tune the coupling strength between the dopants.

  6. Identifying highly conducting Au–C links through inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foti, G.; Vázquez, Héctor; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Arnau, A.; Frederiksen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, OCT (2014), s. 27106-27112 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : molecular electronics * alkanes * tin-functionalization * anchoring groups * vibrational spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.772, year: 2014

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of the heavy-electron superconductor TlNi2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfert, Stefan; Schmitt, Martin; Schmidt, Henrik; Mauerer, Tobias; Sessi, Paolo; Wang, Hangdong; Mao, Qianhui; Fang, Minghu; Bode, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    We report on the structural and superconducting electronic properties of the heavy-electron superconductor TlNi2Se2 . By using a variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (VT-STM) the coexistence of (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ and (2 ×1 ) surface reconstructions is observed. Similar to earlier observations on the "122" family of Fe-based superconductors, we find that their respective surface fraction strongly depends on the temperature during cleavage, the measurement temperature, and the sample's history. Cleaving at low temperature predominantly results in the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ -reconstructed surface. A detailed analysis of the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ -reconstructed domains identifies (2 ×1 ) -ordered dimers, tertramers, and higher order even multimers as domain walls. Higher cleaving temperatures and the warming of low-temperature-cleaved samples increases the relative weight of the (2 ×1 ) surface reconstruction. By slowly increasing the sample temperature Ts inside the VT-STM we find that the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ surface reconstructions transforms into the (2 ×1 ) structure at Ts=123 K. We identify the polar nature of the TlNi2Se2 (001) surface as the most probable driving mechanism of the two reconstructions, as both lead to a charge density ρ =0.5 e- , thereby avoiding divergent electrostatic potentials and the resulting "polar catastrophe." Low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) performed with normal metal and superconducting probe tips shows a superconducting gap which is best fit with an isotropic s wave. We could not detect any correlation between the local surface reconstruction, suggesting that the superconductivity is predominantly governed by TlNi2Se2 bulk properties. Correspondingly, temperature- and field-dependent data reveal that both the critical temperature and critical magnetic field are in good agreement with bulk values obtained earlier from transport measurements. In the superconducting state

  8. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M., E-mail: champ@neu.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems,Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  9. Effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery in pain processing due to carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, C; Cleland, J; Palacios-Ceña, M; Fuensalida-Novo, S; Alonso-Blanco, C; Pareja, J A; Alburquerque-Sendín, F

    2017-08-01

    People with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) exhibit widespread pressure pain and thermal pain hypersensitivity as a manifestation of central sensitization. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving pain and nociceptive gain processing in people with CTS. The trial was conducted at a local regional Hospital in Madrid, Spain from August 2014 to February 2015. In this randomized parallel-group, blinded, clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either manual therapy (n = 50), who received three sessions (once/week) of manual therapies including desensitization manoeuvres of the central nervous system, or surgical intervention (n = 50) group. Outcomes including pressure pain thresholds (PPT), thermal pain thresholds (HPT or CPT), and pain intensity which were assessed at baseline, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the intervention by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat with mixed ANCOVAs adjusted for baseline scores. At 12 months, 95 women completed the follow-up. Patients receiving manual therapy exhibited higher increases in PPT over the carpal tunnel at 3, 6 and 9 months (all, p < 0.01) and higher decrease of pain intensity at 3 month follow-up (p < 0.001) than those receiving surgery. No significant differences were observed between groups for the remaining outcomes. Manual therapy and surgery have similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted in changes in thermal pain sensitivity. The current study found that manual therapy and surgery exhibited similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with carpal tunnel syndrome at medium- and long-term follow-ups investigating changes in nociceptive gain processing after treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  10. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  11. Tunable electronic transport properties of silicon-fullerene-linked nanowires: Semiconductor, conducting wire, and tunnel diode

    OpenAIRE

    Nishio, Kengo; Ozaki, Taisuke; Morishita, Tetsuya; Mikami, Masuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We explore the possibility of controllable tuning of the electronic transport properties of silicon-fullerene-linked nanowires by encapsulating guest atoms into their cages. Our first-principles calculations demonstrate that the guest-free nanowires are semiconductors, and do not conduct electricity. The iodine or sodium doping improves the transport properties, and makes the nanowires metallic. In the junctions of I-doped and Na-doped NWs, the current travels through the boundary by quantum ...

  12. Tunnel probes for measurements of the electron and ion temperature in fusion plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunn, J. P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Balan, P.; Ionita, C.; Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Pánek, Radomír; Bařina, O.; Hrach, R.; Vicher, M.; Van Oost, G.; Van Rompuy, T.; Martines, E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 10 (2004), s. 4328-4330 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/15th./. San Diego, 19.04.2004-22.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0786 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Tokamak * electron temperature * ion temperature * plasma diagnostics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  13. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  14. The application and processing of paints hardened by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Electron beam hardening is a process for changing liquid surface coatings of different thicknesses by irradiation with electrons of high energy into solid, hard, elastic films. In contrast to the UV process, one can harden pigmented paints with electron beams. An electron accelerator, which remits free electrons is used as the energy source for starting the chemical reaction in the coating material. In order to irradiate flat parts, which were coated with liquid paint by rolling, pouring or spraying, equally with electrons, one must produce an 'electron curtain', similar to that in a paint pouring machine. (orig./PW) [de

  15. Flexible MgO Barrier Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Li Ming; Lee, Wonho; Qiu, Xuepeng; Yang, Ping; Kawai, Hiroyo; Saeys, Mark; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-07-01

    Flexible MgO barrier magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices are fabricated using a transfer printing process. The flexible MTJ devices yield significantly enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance of ≈300% and improved abruptness of switching, as residual strain in the MTJ structure is released during the transfer process. This approach could be useful for flexible electronic systems that require high-performance memory components. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Elastic tunneling identification through crossings, anti-crossings and splitting of states in the complex electronic current of systems based on mesoscopic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Luis I. A.; Mendoza, Michel; Ujevic, Sebastian

    2013-09-01

    We have systematically studied the conductance σ( E,B) and the electronic current line shapes J( V ex ) through complex mesoscopic molecules in an elastic resonant tunneling regime. The studied systems are based on GaAs/AlGaAs hetero-structures, with several discrete states in each coupled mesoscopic molecule. The molecules were formed using different wells and barrier widths. These systems allow effective couplings and uncouplings that lead to elastic processes as a function of the electronic potential V ex and magnetic field B. In this situation, the J( V ex ) and σ( E, B) curves exhibit a sequence of peaks of difficult interpretation, in which crossings and anti-crossings (a splitting if it is generated in the resonance condition) of states contribute in a way that they cannot be easily identified. Performing a systematic analysis of the evolution of these states (before the resonance condition), we were able to determine the origin of these current peaks. We have found that the coupling of states (anti-crossing) around the resonance region can be identified as a broad mirrored- D line shape in the J( V ex ) curves. The mirrored- D line shape peaks can be clearly differentiated from the neighboring peaks because the last ones follow a very defined increasing sequence in their intensities and widths. Also, this behavior (fingerprint) can be used to identify possible splitting of states in the J( V ex ). The splittings that are generated between states with different quantum numbers (quantum numbers associated to the individual well) follow an unexpected opposite behavior when compared with those generated between states with the same quantum numbers (quasi-miniband). All these results are also observed in the conductance σ( E, B) associated with complex mesoscopic molecules based on a two-dimensional electron gas.

  17. Proximity electron tunneling study of superconductivity in transition metals and as induced in a normal metal, Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnell, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Conventional Nb tunneling junction have been fabricated by completely oxidizing a 10-15 Angstrom layer of deposited Al avoiding thermal oxidation of the Nb. Comparison of the resulting conventional Nb pair potential and Eliashberg spectral function, α 2 F(omega), with those of proximity (PETS) analyses shows excellent agreement confirming the appropriateness and accuracy of the PETS analytic procedure. The PET methodology is further adapted to proximity systems employing Mg as the N-layer backed by Nb and Ta foils S. A detailed study of C-MgO/sub x/-MgNb systems for Mg thicknesses ranging from 25 Angstrom to 1100 Angstrom and C-MgO/sub x/-MgTa systems over a narrower thickness range shows anomalous thickness dependence for the junction conductance resulting from an increased scattering presence over that seen in Al Nb systems. As a result the Nb phonon contributions are completely damped for Mg thicknesses greater than 400 Angstrom, allowing unimpeded determination of the Mg α 2 F(omega). The resulting Eliashberg spectral function reveals the electron-phonon coupling, α 2 (omega), to be greatly reduced for transverse phonon frequencies relative to its longitudinal phonon value. In preface to the presentation of these studies, a detailed summary of the underlying theory and description of the experimental techniques and analytic methods are presented

  18. Dispersion of a layered electron gas with nearest neighbour-tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miesenboeck, H.M.

    1988-09-01

    The dispersion of the first plasmon band is calculated within the Random Phase Approximation for a superlattice of two-dimensional electron-gases, mutually interacting, and with nearest neighbour hopping between the planes. It is further shown that the deviations of this dispersion from the one in systems with zero interplane motion are very small in commonly realized experimental situations and that they are expected to be observable only in samples with plane distances of 100A and less. (author). 15 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  19. Proton transfer processes in selenourea: UV-induced selenone → selenol photoreaction and ground state selenol → selenone proton tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostkowska, Hanna; Lapinski, Leszek; Khvorostov, Artem; Nowak, Maciej J.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared spectrum of selenourea isolated in low temperature Ar matrix indicates that monomers of this compound adopt exclusively the selenone tautomeric form. UV irradiation (λ>345 nm) of matrix-isolated selenourea leads to generation of the selenol tautomer (isoselenourea). Two conformers of the selenol tautomer with imino N-H bond oriented anti or syn with respect to the Se-H group were photoproduced. For the matrix kept at 10 K and in darkness, a proton tunneling transforming the photoproduced selenol anti form back into the initial selenone tautomer was observed. The time constant of this process was 16 h. The asymmetric barrier for the selenol → selenone proton tunneling was estimated at MP2/6-311++G(2d,p) level to be as high as 95 kJ mol -1 (7940 cm -1 ). The relation between the height of the barrier and the time constant of proton tunneling was discussed by comparing the current case with that previously studied for thiourea [J. Phys. Chem. A 107 (2003) 6373

  20. Nanoscale magnetic characterization of tunneling magnetoresistance spin valve head by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Soon; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-12-07

    Nanostructured magnetic materials play an important role in increasing miniaturized devices. For the studies of their magnetic properties and behaviors, nanoscale imaging of magnetic field is indispensible. Here, using electron holography, the magnetization distribution of a TMR spin valve head of commercial design is investigated without and with a magnetic field applied. Characterized is the magnetic flux distribution in complex hetero-nanostructures by averaging the phase images and separating their component magnetic vectors and electric potentials. The magnetic flux densities of the NiFe (shield and 5 nm-free layers) and the CoPt (20 nm-bias layer) are estimated to be 1.0 T and 0.9 T, respectively. The changes in the magnetization distribution of the shield, bias, and free layers are visualized in situ for an applied field of 14 kOe. This study demonstrates the promise of electron holography for characterizing the magnetic properties of hetero-interfaces, nanostructures, and catalysts. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Electron tunneling transport across heterojunctions between europium sulfide and indium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallaher, Raymond L.

    This dissertation presents research done on utilizing the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium sulfide (EuS) to inject spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic semiconductor indium arsenide (InAs). There is great interest in expanding the functionality of modern day electronic circuits by creating devices that depend not only on the flow of charge in the device, but also on the transport of spin through the device. Within this mindset, there is a concerted effort to establish an efficient means of injecting and detecting spin polarized electrons in a two dimensional electron system (2DES) as the first step in developing a spin based field effect transistor. Thus, the research presented in this thesis has focused on the feasibility of using EuS, in direct electrical contact with InAs, as a spin injecting electrode into an InAs 2DES. Doped EuS is a concentrated ferromagnetic semiconductor, whose conduction band undergoes a giant Zeeman splitting when the material becomes ferromagnetic. The concomitant difference in energy between the spin-up and spin-down energy bands makes the itinerant electrons in EuS highly spin polarized. Thus, in principle, EuS is a good candidate to be used as an injector of spin polarized electrons into non-magnetic materials. In addition, the ability to adjust the conductivity of EuS by varying the doping level in the material makes EuS particularly suited for injecting spins into non-magnetic semiconductors and 2DES. For this research, thin films of EuS have been grown via e-beam evaporation of EuS powder. This growth technique produces EuS films that are sulfur deficient; these sulfur vacancies act as intrinsic electron donors and the resulting EuS films behave like heavily doped ferromagnetic semiconductors. The growth parameters and deposition procedures were varied and optimized in order to fabricate films that have minimal crystalline defects. Various properties and characteristics of these EuS films were measured and compared to

  2. Forecasting and prevention of water inrush during the excavation process of a diversion tunnel at the Jinping II Hydropower Station, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tian-Xing; Yang, Xing-Guo; Xing, Hui-Ge; Huang, Kang-Xin; Zhou, Jia-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Estimating groundwater inflow into a tunnel before and during the excavation process is an important task to ensure the safety and schedule during the underground construction process. Here we report a case of the forecasting and prevention of water inrush at the Jinping II Hydropower Station diversion tunnel groups during the excavation process. The diversion tunnel groups are located in mountains and valleys, and with high water pressure head. Three forecasting methods are used to predict the total water inflow of the #2 diversion tunnel. Furthermore, based on the accurate estimation of the water inrush around the tunnel working area, a theoretical method is presented to forecast the water inflow at the working area during the excavation process. The simulated results show that the total water flow is 1586.9, 1309.4 and 2070.2 m(3)/h using the Qshima method, Kostyakov method and Ochiai method, respectively. The Qshima method is the best one because it most closely matches the monitoring result. According to the huge water inflow into the #2 diversion tunnel, reasonable drainage measures are arranged to prevent the potential disaster of water inrush. The groundwater pressure head can be determined using the water flow velocity from the advancing holes; then, the groundwater pressure head can be used to predict the possible water inflow. The simulated results show that the groundwater pressure head and water inflow re stable and relatively small around the region of the intact rock mass, but there is a sudden change around the fault region with a large water inflow and groundwater pressure head. Different countermeasures are adopted to prevent water inrush disasters during the tunnel excavation process. Reasonable forecasting the characteristic parameters of water inrush is very useful for the formation of prevention and mitigation schemes during the tunnel excavation process.

  3. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  4. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  5. Work function and temperature dependence of electron tunneling through an N-type perylene diimide molecular junction with isocyanide surface linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher E; Xie, Zuoti; Bâldea, Ioan; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2018-01-18

    Conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) was employed to examine electron tunneling in self-assembled monolayer (SAM) junctions. A 2.3 nm long perylene tetracarboxylic acid diimide (PDI) acceptor molecule equipped with isocyanide linker groups was synthesized, adsorbed onto Ag, Au and Pt substrates, and the current-voltage (I-V) properties were measured by CP-AFM. The dependence of the low-bias resistance (R) on contact work function indicates that transport is LUMO-assisted ('n-type behavior'). A single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) was employed to analyze the experimental I-V curves and to extract the effective LUMO position ε l = E LUMO - E F and the effective electronic coupling (Γ) between the PDI redox core and the contacts. This analysis revealed a strong Fermi level (E F ) pinning effect in all the junctions, likely due to interface dipoles that significantly increased with increasing contact work function, as revealed by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM). Furthermore, the temperature (T) dependence of R was found to be substantial. For Pt/Pt junctions, R varied more than two orders of magnitude in the range 248 K tunneling mechanism and allow independent determination of ε l , giving values compatible with estimates of ε l based on analysis of the full I-V data. Theoretical analysis revealed a general criterion to unambiguously rule out a two-step transport mechanism: namely, if measured resistance data exhibit a pronounced Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, a two-step electron transfer scenario should be excluded in cases where the activation energy depends on contact metallurgy. Overall, our results indicate (1) the generality of the Fermi level pinning phenomenon in molecular junctions, (2) the utility of employing the single level tunneling model for determining essential electronic structure parameters (ε l and Γ), and (3) the importance of changing the nature of the contacts to

  6. Sharp transition between thermal and quantum tunneling regimes in magnetization relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J.; Zhang, X. X.; Barbara, B.

    1993-03-01

    In this paper we describe experiments involving measurements of the dependence on time of the thermoremanence magnetization of 2-dimensional random magnets. The low temperature values for the magnetic viscosity agree well with both current theories of tunneling of the magnetization vector (Chudnovsky et al.) and the work of Grabert et al. who predicted that the transition from classical to quantum regime is rather sharp for undamped systems.

  7. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Single Molecular Magnets Coupled to Ferromagnetic Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction with tunneling electrons is shown to affect the spin reversal due to QTM. ...

  8. Experimental Evidence for Wigner’s Tunneling Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, N.; Yakaboylu, E.; Fechner, L.; Klaiber, M.; Laux, M.; Mi, Y.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Pfeifer, T.; Keitel, C. H.; Moshammer, R.

    2018-04-01

    Tunneling of a particle through a barrier is one of the counter-intuitive properties of quantum mechanical motion. Thanks to advances in the generation of strong laser fields, new opportunities to dynamically investigate this process have been developed. In the so-called attoclock measurements the electron’s properties after tunneling are mapped on its emission direction. We investigate the tunneling dynamics and achieve a high sensitivity thanks to two refinements of the attoclock principle. Using near-IR wavelength we place firmly the ionization process in the tunneling regime. Furthermore, we compare the electron momentum distributions of two atomic species of slightly different atomic potentials (argon and krypton) being ionized under absolutely identical conditions. Experimentally, using a reaction microscope, we succeed in measuring the 3D electron momentum distributions for both targets simultaneously. Theoretically, the time resolved description of tunneling in strong-field ionization is studied using the leading quantum-mechanical Wigner treatment. A detailed analysis of the most probable photoelectron emission for Ar and Kr allows testing the theoretical models and a sensitive check of the electron initial conditions at the tunnel exit. The agreement between experiment and theory provides a clear evidence for a non-zero tunneling time delay and a non-vanishing longitudinal momentum at this point.

  9. Current gain above 10 in sub-10 nm base III-Nitride tunneling hot electron transistors with GaN/AlN emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhichao, E-mail: zcyang.phys@gmail.com; Zhang, Yuewei; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-05-09

    We report on a tunneling hot electron transistor amplifier with common-emitter current gain greater than 10 at a collector current density in excess of 40 kA/cm{sup 2}. The use of a wide-bandgap GaN/AlN (111 nm/2.5 nm) emitter was found to greatly improve injection efficiency of the emitter and reduce cold electron leakage. With an ultra-thin (8 nm) base, 93% of the injected hot electrons were collected, enabling a common-emitter current gain up to 14.5. This work improves understanding of the quasi-ballistic hot electron transport and may impact the development of high speed devices based on unipolar hot electron transport.

  10. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and plan to implement similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The investigation described in this report is intended to acquire more knowledge regarding the behavior of some of the candidate backfilling materials. Blocks made of three different materials (Friedland clay, Asha 230 or a bentonite/ballast 30/70 mixture) as well as different bentonite pellets have been examined. The backfill materials will be exposed to an environment simulating that in a tunnel, with high relative humidity and water inflow from the rock. The processes and properties investigated are: 1. Erosion properties of blocks and pellets (Friedland blocks, MX-80 pellets, Cebogel QSE pellets, Minelco and Friedland granules). 2. Displacements of blocks after emplacement in a deposition drift (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 and Mixture 30/70). 3. The ability of these materials to seal a leaking in-situ cast plug cement/rock but also other fractures in the rock (MX-80 pellets). 4. The self healing ability after a piping scenario (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 Mixture 30/70 and also MX-80 pellets). 5. Swelling and cracking of the compacted backfill blocks caused by relative humidity. The erosion properties of Friedland blocks were also investigated in Phase 2 of the joint SKBPosiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository, BACLO, which included laboratory scale experiments. In this phase of the project (3) some completing tests were performed with new blocks produced for different field tests. These blocks had a lower density than intended and this has an influence on the erosion properties measured. The erosion properties of MX-80 pellets were also investigated earlier in the project but

  11. The strain effect on the Dirac electrons tunneling through the time-periodic scalar and vector barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Weixian, E-mail: wxyansxu@gmail.com

    2017-01-01

    The tunneling of the massless and massive Dirac particle through the strained barriers driven by the time-periodic scalar potentials and the static vector potentials is investigated, where the interrelationships among the strain, the incidence angle, the dynamic scalar potential, the magnetic field and the transmission of the Dirac particle have been discussed. In either massless or massive case, the intersection angle between the obliquely incident Dirac particle and strain determines the extent of deviation of the tunneling profiles from the strainless case. The time-periodic scalar potentials can enhance the capability of the Dirac particle to surmount the energy gap induced by the mass, reflecting quantum nature of the photon-assisted tunneling. When the magnetic field is switched on, the transmission overall presents a remarkably different profile, and decreases with the increase of the magnetic fields due to the conservation of the transverse momentum, which reduces the number of the side-band channels for tunneling.

  12. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs

  13. Aeolian process of the dried-up riverbeds of the Hexi Corridor, China: a wind tunnel experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Xunming; Dong, Zhibao; Hua, Ting

    2017-08-01

    Wind tunnel studies, which remain limited, are an important tool to understand the aeolian processes of dried-up riverbeds. The particle size, chemical composition, and the mineral contents of sediments arising from the dried river beds are poorly understood. Dried-up riverbeds cover a wide area in the Hexi Corridor, China, and comprise a complex synthesis of different land surfaces, including aeolian deposits, pavement surfaces, and Takyr crust. The results of the present wind tunnel experiment suggest that aeolian transport from the dried-up riverbeds of the Hexi Corridor ranges from 0 to 177.04 g/m 2 /min and that dry riverbeds could be one of the main sources of dust emissions in this region. As soon as the wind velocity reaches 16 m/s and assuming that there are abundant source materials available, aeolian transport intensity increases rapidly. The dried-up riverbed sediment and the associated aeolian transported material were composed mainly of fine and medium sands. However, the transported samples were coarser than the bed samples, because of the sorting effect of the aeolian processes on the sediment. The aeolian processes also led to regional elemental migration and mineral composition variations.

  14. Investigations on the electronic surface properties of the stoichiometric superconductor LiFeAs using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    This work presents scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy investigations on the stoichiometric superconductor lithium iron arsenide (LiFeAs). To reveal the electronic properties, measurements on defect-free surfaces as well as near defects have been performed. The former shows a shift of atomic position with respect to the applied bias voltage. Furthermore, temperature dependent spectroscopic measurements indicate the coupling of quasiparticles in the vicinity of the superconducting coherence peaks. LiFeAs surfaces influenced by atomic defects show a spacial variation of the superconducting gap. The defects can be characterized by their symmetry and thus can be assigned to a position in the atomic lattice. Detailed spectroscopic investigations of defects reveal their influence on the quasiparticle density of states. In particular, Fe-defects show a small effect on the superconductivity while As-defects strongly disturb the superconducting gap. Measurements in magnetic field have been performed for the determination of the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length ξ GL . For this purpose, a suitable fit-function has been developed in this work. This function allows to fit the differential conductance of a magnetic vortex at E F . The fit results in a coherence length of ξ GL = 3,9 nm which corresponds to an upper critical field of 21 Tesla. Besides measurements on a single vortex, investigation on the vortex lattice have been performed. The vortex lattice constant follows thereby the predicted behavior of a trigonal vortex lattice. However, for magnetic fields larger than 6 Tesla an increasing lattice disorder sets in, presumably due to vortex-vortex-interactions.

  15. Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Minho

    2017-11-06

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.

  16. Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Minho; Min, Sung-Wook; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Yong Uk; Oh, Min Suk; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Park, Sung Ha; Im, Seongil

    2017-01-01

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.

  17. Electronics and data processing for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Industrial installations, and in particular installations involving risk, are more and more monitored and controlled by computerized systems. The use of such systems raises questions about their contribution to the installation safety and about the qualities required in these systems to avoid additional risk. The February 1995 Electronics Days were organized by the CEA-LETI Department of Electronics and Nuclear Instrumentation to try to answer these questions. Four sessions were organized on the following topics: computerized systems and functioning safety, components and architectures, softwares and norms, and tools and methods. Only the communications dealing with the safety of computerized systems and components involved in nuclear applications have been retained (17 over 36). (J.S.)

  18. NOx reduction by compact electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Wallman, P.H.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-combustion removal of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) are based on non-thermal plasmas. These plasmas can be produced by electrical discharge methods or electron beam irradiation. The application of electron beam irradiation for NO x removal in power plant flue gases has been investigated since the early 1970's in both laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments. Electrical discharge methods are relatively new entrants in the field of flue gas cleanup. Pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge techniques are two of the more commonly used electrical discharge methods for producing nonthermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure. There are basically two types of reactions responsible for the depletion of NO by non-thermal plasmas: oxidation and reduction

  19. LEOS 2002: summer electronics and signal processing symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadzhinov, Ljupcho; Ivanovski, Zoran

    2002-01-01

    LEOS 2002 was the first Macedonian symposium on electronics and signal processing. It was organized in recognition to a growing need to exchange the research results as well as to raise competent discussions among different research groups from both academic and industrial environment in Macedonia. The topics covered in this meeting were defined by the IEEE experts as follows: Power Electronics, Industrial Electronics, Signal Processing, Image and Video Processing, Instrumentation and Measurements, Engineering in Medicine and Biology, Electron Devices and Automatic Control. Papers were mainly from Macedonia, but there was one invited lecture

  20. Electronic repository and standardization of processes and electronic documents in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DĘBICKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the idea of the use of electronic repository to store standardised scheme of processes between a Logistics Service Provider and its business partners. Application of repository for automatic or semi-automatic configuration of interoperability in electronic data interchange between information systems of differentcompanies based on transport (road, rail, sea and combined related processes. Standardisation includes processes, scheme of cooperation and related to them, electronic messages.

  1. Derivation of the tunnelling exchange time for the model of trap-assisted tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racko, J.; Ballo, P.; Benko, P.; Harmatha, L.; Grmanova, A.; Breza, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present derivation of the tunnelling exchange times that play the key role in the model of trap assisted tunnelling (TAT) considering the electron and hole exchange processes between the trapping centre lying in the forbidden band of the semiconductor and the conduction band, valence band or a metal. All exchange processes are quantitatively described by respective exchange times. The reciprocal values of these exchange times represent the frequency with which the exchange processes contribute to the probability of occupation of the trap by free charge carriers. The crucial problem in any model of TAT is the calculation of the occupation probability. In our approach this probability is expressed in terms of only thermal and tunnelling exchange times. The concept of tunnelling exchange times presents a dominant contribution to our model of TAT. The new approach allows to simply calculate the probability of occupation of the trapping centre by a free charge carrier and subsequently to get the thermal and tunnelling generation-recombination rates occurring in the continuity equations. This is why the TAT model based on thermal and tunnelling exchange times is suitable for simulating the electrical properties of semiconductor nanostructures in which quantum mechanical phenomena play a key role. (authors)

  2. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  3. Shake-off processes at the electron transitions in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.; Parilis, Eh.S.

    1982-01-01

    Elementary processes in multielectron atoms - radiative and Auger transitions, photoionization and ionization by an electron impact etc. are usually followed by the relaxation of electron shells. The conditions under which such multielectron problem could be solved in the shake-off approximation are considered. The shake-off processes occurring. as a result of the electron transitions are described from the general point of view. The common characteristics and peculiar features of this type of excitation in comparison with the electron shake-off under nuclear transformations are pointed out. Several electron shake-off processes are considered, namely: radiative Auger effect, the transition ''two electrons-one photon'', dipole ionization, spectral line broadening, post collision interaction, Auger decay stimulated by collision with fast electrons, three-electron Auger transitions: double and half Auger effect. Their classification is given according to the type of the electron transition causing the shake-off process. The experimental data are presented and the methods of theoretical description are reviewed. Other similar effects, which could follow the transitions in electron shells are pointed out. The deduction of shake-off approximation is presented, and it is pointed out that this approach is analogous to the distorted waves approximation in the theory of scattering. It was shown that in atoms the shake-off approximation is a very effective method, which allows to obtain the probability of different electronic effects

  4. Vacuum phonon tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2010-10-15

    Field-induced phonon tunneling, a previously unknown mechanism of interfacial thermal transport, has been revealed by ultrahigh vacuum inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using thermally broadened Fermi-Dirac distribution in the STM tip as in situ atomic-scale thermometer we found that thermal vibrations of the last tip atom are effectively transmitted to sample surface despite few angstroms wide vacuum gap. We show that phonon tunneling is driven by interfacial electric field and thermally vibrating image charges, and its rate is enhanced by surface electron-phonon interaction.

  5. Applications of cross sections for electron-molecule collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of electron-molecule collision cross sections is discussed for the study of the ionospheric and auroral processes in planetary atmospheres and of discharge-pumped lasers. These two areas emphasize the importance of further theoretical and experimental studies concerning electron-impact processes. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Tunneling works. Tunnel koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, M [Hazam Gumi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-10-25

    A mountain tunneling method for rock-beds used to be applied mainly to construction works in the mountains under few restrictions by environmental problems. However, construction works near residential sreas have been increasing. There are such enviromental problems due to tunneling works as vibration, noise, lowering of ground-water level, and influences on other structures. This report mainly describes the measurement examples of vibration and noise accompanied with blasting and the effects of the measures to lessen such influences. When the tunneling works for the railroad was carried out on the natural ground mainly composed of basalt, vibration of the test blasting was measured at three stations with piezoelectric accelerometers. Then, ordinary blasting, mutistage blasting, and ABM blasting methods were used properly besed on the above results, and only a few complaints were made. In the different works, normal noise and low-frequency sound were mesured at 22 stations around the pit mouth. As countermeasures for noise, sound-proof sheets, walls, and single and double doors were installed and foundto be effective. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Electron transfer and decay processes of highly charged iodine ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Danjo, Atsunori; Hosaka, Kazumoto

    2005-01-01

    In the present experimental work we have investigated multi-electron transfer processes in I q+ (q=10, 15, 20 and 25) + Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe collisions at 1.5q keV energy. The branching ratios between Auger and radiative decay channels have been measured in decay processes of multiply excited states formed by multi-electron transfer collisions. It has been shown that, in all the multi-electron transfer processes investigated, the Auger decays are far dominant over the radiative decay processes and the branching ratios are clearly characterized by the average principal quantum number of the initial excited states of projectile ions. We could express the branching ratios in high Rydberg states formed in multi-electron transfer processes by using the decay probability of one Auger electron emission. (author)

  8. IMPELA electron accelerators for industrial radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    IMPELA electron accelerators are derived from a common basic design of rf accelerating structure which is capable of handling beams with powers from 20 to 250 kW at 5 to 18 MeV. A prototype has been built which operates at 50 kW and 10 MeV. The paper describes the major elements of the system with particular reference to features which assist in maintaining irradiation quality, simple operation and high reliability. A cost model based on the prototype is used to demonstrate the economies of scale available and the impact of local prices for utilities. (author)

  9. Electron spectroscopy in the fundamental process of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel

    2013-07-01

    Within the scope of this thesis the fundamental process of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung was studied in inverse kinematics at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR at GSI. For the system U 88+ + N 2 at 90 MeV/u it was shown, that by using inverse kinematics coincidence measurements between the scattered electron and the emitted photon can be performed for the case, in which the incoming electron transfers almost all of its kinetic energy onto the emitted photon. The sensitivity to the fundamental process could be achieved by measuring triple differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle of the photon and the scattered electron as well as the energy of the scattered electron. The optics of the magnetic electron spectrometer used were thoroughly revised and optimized to the experimental requirements. Analyzing different coincidences in this collision system, it was possible to determine the contributions to the electron distribution arising from radiative electron capture to the projectile continuum, nonradiative electron capture to the projectile continuum, and electron loss to the projectile continuum. The experimental results of each of these processes were compared to theoretical calculations. The electron spectra for the radiative and the nonradiative electron capture to continuum clearly reproduce the opposite asymmetry predicted by theory. Furthermore electron spectra for collisions of U 28+ with different gases were measured.

  10. Radiation processing of carrageenan using electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, L.V.; Aranilla, C.T.; Relleve, L.; Dela Rosa, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron beam accelerator has been widely employed in the modification of natural polymers for the development of materials used in biomedical and agricultural applications. The carrageenans are among these materials that show a vast potential for these types of applications. Previous studies at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute focused on the utilization of gamma radiation to modify the carrageenans. Radiation degradation of carrageenan found valuable use as plant growth promoter. Hydrogels for burn dressing using blends of carrageenan and synthetic polymers have also been made using gamma radiation. While previous studies have been focused on the use of gamma radiation to modify the carrageenans, recent studies expanded the technology to electron beam. Concretely, researches are along the following two areas: a) Degradation studies of aqueous carrageenan using the LEEB and b) Preparation of blend polysaccharide derivatives such as carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) with kappa-carrageenan (KC) by EB radiation. These works were done at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) by two PNRI colleagues under the nuclear researcher exchange program of the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The first area had already been reported and discussed in the last project meeting held in Malaysia. (author)

  11. Martian Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Process and Associated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Telana L.; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Gregory T.; Nithianandam, Jeyasingh

    2010-01-01

    Mars' dynamic atmosphere displays localized dust devils and larger, global dust storms. Based on terrestrial analog studies, electrostatic modeling, and laboratory work these features will contain large electrostatic fields formed via triboelectric processes. In the low-pressure Martian atmosphere, these fields may create an electron avalanche and collisional plasma due to an increase in electron density driven by the internal electrical forces. To test the hypothesis that an electron avalanche is sustained under these conditions, a self-consistent atmospheric process model is created including electron impact ionization sources and electron losses via dust absorption, electron dissociation attachment, and electron/ion recombination. This new model is called the Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Model (DDEAM). This model solves simultaneously nine continuity equations describing the evolution of the primary gaseous chemical species involved in the electrochemistry. DDEAM monitors the evolution of the electrons and primary gas constituents, including electron/water interactions. We especially focus on electron dynamics and follow the electrons as they evolve in the E field driven collisional gas. When sources and losses are self-consistently included in the electron continuity equation, the electron density grows exponentially with increasing electric field, reaching an equilibrium that forms a sustained time-stable collisional plasma. However, the character of this plasma differs depending upon the assumed growth rate saturation process (chemical saturation versus space charge). DDEAM also shows the possibility of the loss of atmospheric methane as a function of electric field due to electron dissociative attachment of the hydrocarbon. The methane destruction rates are presented and can be included in other larger atmospheric models.

  12. Temperature dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation of radiation-produced silver atoms in polycrystalline aqueous and glassy organic matrices. Importance of relaxation by tunneling modes in disordered matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Kevan, L.

    1978-01-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation of trapped silver atoms in polycrystalline ice matrices and in methanol, ethanol, propylene carbonate, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran organic glasses has been directly studied as a function of temperature by the saturation-recovery method. Below 40 K the dominant electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanism involves modulation of the electron nuclear dipolar interaction with nuclei in the radical's environment by tunneling of those nuclei between two nearly equal energy configurations. This relaxation mechanism occurs with high efficiency, has a characteristic linear temperature dependence, and is typically found in highly disordered matrices. The efficiency of this relaxation mechanism seems to decrease with decreasing polarity of the matrix. Deuteration experiments show that the tunneling nuclei are protons and in methanol it is shown that the methyl protons have more tunneling modes available than the hydroxyl protons. In polycrystalline ice matrices silver atoms can be stabilized with two different orientations of surrounding water molecules; the efficiency of the tunneling relaxation reflects this difference. From these and previous results on tunneling relaxation of trapped electrons in glassy matrices it appears that tunneling relaxation may be used to distinguish models with different geometrical configurations and to determine the relative rigidity of such configurations around trapped radicals in disordered solids. (author)

  13. HMI Data Processing and Electronics Departmenmt. Scientific report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Data Processing and Electronics Department carries out application-centered R+D work in the fields of general and process-related data processing, digital and analog measuring systems, and electronic elements. As part of the HMI infrastructure, the Department carries out central data processing and electronics functions. The R+D activities of the Department and its infrastructural tasks were carried out in seven Working Groups and one Project Group: Computer systems; Mathematics and graphical data processing; Software developments; Process computer systems, hardware; Nuclear electronics, measuring and control systems; Research on structural elements and irradiation testing; Computer center and cooperation in the 'Central Project Leader Group of the German Research Network' (DFN). (orig./RB) [de

  14. Attoclock reveals natural coordinates of the laser-induced tunnelling current flow in atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Adrian N.; Cirelli, Claudio; Smolarski, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    the attoclock technique4 to obtain experimental information about the electron tunnelling geometry (the natural coordinates of the tunnelling current flow) and exit point. We confirm vanishing tunnelling delay time, show the importance of the inclusion of Stark shifts5, 6 and report on multi-electron effects......In the research area of strong-laser-field interactions and attosecond science1, tunnelling of an electron through the barrier formed by the electric field of the laser and the atomic potential is typically assumed to be the initial key process that triggers subsequent dynamics1, 2, 3. Here we use...... clearly identified by comparing results in argon and helium atoms. Our combined theory and experiment allows us to single out the geometry of the inherently one-dimensional tunnelling problem, through an asymptotic separation of the full three-dimensional problem. Our findings have implications for laser...

  15. Significance of fundamental processes of radiation chemistry in hot atom chemical processes: electron thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the current understanding of the course of electron thermalization. An outline is given of the physical picture without going into mathematical details. The analogy of electron thermalization with hot atom processes is taken as guiding principle in this paper. Content: secondary electrons (generation, track structure, yields); thermalization (mechanism, time, spatial distribution); behaviour of hot electrons. (Auth.)

  16. 78 FR 68981 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    .... Digitized signature means a graphical image of a handwritten signature usually created using a special... document. Smart card means a plastic card, typically the size of a credit card, containing an embedded integrated circuit or ``chip'' that can generate, store, or process data. A smart card can be used to...

  17. Superconductivity and electronic structure in single-layer FeSe on SrTiO{sub 3} probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandke, Jasmin; Dressner, Jonas; Wulfhekel, Wulf [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Yang, Fang; Gao, Chunlei [Fudan Universitaet, Shanghai (China)

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to study single-layer FeSe on Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (001). Features of bosonic excitations were observed in the measured quasiparticle density of states. Furthermore, using STS, quasiparticle interference (QPI) imaging was performed in order to map the multiband electronic structure of FeSe. Compared to previous measurements, an additional feature is visible in our measured QPI maps on a single-layer FeSe/SrTiO{sub 3}. The origin of this feature will be discussed.

  18. Signatures of tunneling and multiphoton ionization in the electron-momentum distributions of atoms by intense few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickenhauser, M.; Tong, X. M.; Arbo, D. G.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Lin, C. D.

    2006-01-01

    Electron-momentum distributions for above-threshold ionization of argon in a few-cycle, linearly polarized laser pulse are investigated. Spectral features characteristic of multiphoton as well as tunneling ionization coexist over a range of the Keldysh parameter γ in the transition regime γ∼1. Surprisingly, the simple strong-field approximation (SFA) is capable of reproducing the key features of the two-dimensional momentum distributions found in the full solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, despite the fact that SFA is known to severely underestimate the total ionization probability

  19. Computer Simulation of Electron Positron Annihilation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, y

    2003-10-02

    With the launching of the Next Linear Collider coming closer and closer, there is a pressing need for physicists to develop a fully-integrated computer simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation process at center-of-mass energy of 1TeV. A simulation program acts as the template for future experiments. Either new physics will be discovered, or current theoretical uncertainties will shrink due to more accurate higher-order radiative correction calculations. The existence of an efficient and accurate simulation will help us understand the new data and validate (or veto) some of the theoretical models developed to explain new physics. It should handle well interfaces between different sectors of physics, e.g., interactions happening at parton levels well above the QCD scale which are described by perturbative QCD, and interactions happening at much lower energy scale, which combine partons into hadrons. Also it should achieve competitive speed in real time when the complexity of the simulation increases. This thesis contributes some tools that will be useful for the development of such simulation programs. We begin our study by the development of a new Monte Carlo algorithm intended to perform efficiently in selecting weight-1 events when multiple parameter dimensions are strongly correlated. The algorithm first seeks to model the peaks of the distribution by features, adapting these features to the function using the EM algorithm. The representation of the distribution provided by these features is then improved using the VEGAS algorithm for the Monte Carlo integration. The two strategies mesh neatly into an effective multi-channel adaptive representation. We then present a new algorithm for the simulation of parton shower processes in high energy QCD. We want to find an algorithm which is free of negative weights, produces its output as a set of exclusive events, and whose total rate exactly matches the full Feynman amplitude calculation. Our strategy is to create

  20. Analytical expression for the tunnel current through the redox-mediated tunneling contact in the case of the adiabatic electron transfer at one of the working electrodes and any possible type of the electron transfer at the other electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Igor G

    2017-11-21

    We study the tunnel current through a one-level redox molecule immersed into the electrolyte solution for the case when the coupling of the molecule to one of the working electrodes is strong while it is arbitrary to the other electrode. Using the Feynman-Vernon influence functional theory and the perturbation expansion of the effective action of the classical oscillator coupled both to the valence level of the redox molecule and to the thermal bath representing the classical fluctuations of the polarization of the solvent, we obtain, following the canonical way, the Langevin equation for the oscillator. It is found that for the aqueous electrolyte solution, the damping and the stochastic forces which arise due to the tunnel current are much smaller than those due to the thermal bath and therefore can be neglected. We estimate the higher-order corrections to the effective action and show that the Langevin dynamics takes place in this case for arbitrary parameters of the tunneling junction under the condition of the strong coupling of the redox molecule to one of the working electrodes. Then the steady-state coordinate distribution function of the oscillator resulting from the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is the Boltzmann distribution function which is determined by the adiabatic free energy surface arising from the mean current-induced force. It enables us to obtain the expression for the tunnel current in the case when the coupling of the redox molecule to one of the working electrodes is strong while it is arbitrary to the other electrode.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  3. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  4. Simulation of electron transmittance and tunnel current in n{sup +} Poly-Si/HfSiO{sub x}N/Trap/SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) capacitors using analytical and numerical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, Fatimah A., E-mail: fatimah@fi.itb.ac.id; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal [Physics of Electronic Materials Research Division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    In this paper, we discuss the electron transmittance and tunneling current in high-k-based-MOS capacitors with trapping charge by including the off-diagonal effective-mass tensor elements and the effect of coupling between transverse and longitudinal energies represented by an electron velocity in the gate. The HfSiO{sub x}N/SiO{sub 2} dual ultrathin layer is used as the gate oxide in an n{sup +} poly- Si/oxide/Si capacitor to replace SiO{sub 2}. The main problem of using HfSiO{sub x}N is the charge trapping formed at the HfSiO{sub x}N/SiO{sub 2} interface that can influence the performance of the device. Therefore, it is important to develop a model taking into account the presence of electron traps at the HfSiO{sub x}N/SiO{sub 2} interface in the electron transmittance and tunneling current. The transmittance and tunneling current in n{sup +} poly- Si/HfSiO{sub x}N/trap/SiO2/Si(100) capacitors are calculated by using Airy wavefunctions and a transfer matrix method (TMM) as analytical and numerical approaches, respectively. The transmittance and tunneling current obtained from the Airy wavefunction are compared to those computed by the TMM. The effects of the electron velocity on the transmittance and tunneling current are also discussed.

  5. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanik, T. M.; Ewing, D. E.; Whitehouse, R.

    2000-03-01

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology.

  6. Effect of the density of the electronic states at the valence orbital of the bridge redox molecule on the dependence of the tunnel current on the overvoltage in the case of fully adiabatic electron transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Igor G.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of the density of the electronic states at the valence orbital of the bridge redox molecule on the dependence of the tunnel current on the overvoltage and on the width at half maximum of the current-overvoltage curve is studied. A number of the approximate expressions for the density of states, the tunnel current and the width are obtained in the fully adiabatic limit for different particular cases. It is shown that at small values of the coupling of the electronic levels of the electrodes with the valence orbital of the redox molecule and the small values of the bias voltage two regions of the reorganization Gibbs energy exist with different dependence of the width on the reorganization Gibbs energy. The results of calculations of the density of states, the tunnel current and the width are presented and used for the interpretation of the experimental data [N.G. Tao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4066, I. Visoly-Fisher, K. Daie, Y. Terazono, C. Herrero, F. Fungo, L. Otero, E. Durantini, J.J. Silber, L. Sereno, D. Gust, T.A. Moore, A.L. Moore, S.M. Lindsay, PNAS 103 (2006) 8686

  7. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  8. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  9. Materials, Processes, and Facile Manufacturing for Bioresorbable Electronics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaowei; Shou, Wan; Mahajan, Bikram K; Huang, Xian; Pan, Heng

    2018-05-07

    Bioresorbable electronics refer to a new class of advanced electronics that can completely dissolve or disintegrate with environmentally and biologically benign byproducts in water and biofluids. They have provided a solution to the growing electronic waste problem with applications in temporary usage of electronics such as implantable devices and environmental sensors. Bioresorbable materials such as biodegradable polymers, dissolvable conductors, semiconductors, and dielectrics are extensively studied, enabling massive progress of bioresorbable electronic devices. Processing and patterning of these materials are predominantly relying on vacuum-based fabrication methods so far. However, for the purpose of commercialization, nonvacuum, low-cost, and facile manufacturing/printing approaches are the need of the hour. Bioresorbable electronic materials are generally more chemically reactive than conventional electronic materials, which require particular attention in developing the low-cost manufacturing processes in ambient environment. This review focuses on material reactivity, ink availability, printability, and process compatibility for facile manufacturing of bioresorbable electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Characterization of Neutral Radicals from a Dissociative Electron Attachment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2017-08-01

    Despite decades of gas-phase studies on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to various molecules, as yet there has been no direct detection and characterization of the neutral radical species produced by this process. In this study, we performed stepwise electron spectroscopy to directly measure and characterize the neutrals produced upon zero-electron-energy DEA to the model molecule, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ). We observed the direct yield of the trichloromethyl radical (CCl3. ) formed by DEA to CCl4 and measured the appearance energies of all the other neutral species. By combining these experimental findings with high-level quantum chemical calculations, we performed a complete analysis of both the DEA to CCl4 and the subsequent electron-impact ionization of CCl3. . This work paves the way toward a complete experimental characterization of DEA processes, which will lead to a better understanding of the low-energy electron-induced formation of radical species.

  11. Electron processing of fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.; Barnard, J.W.; Lopata, V.J.; Kremers, W.; McDougall, T.E.; Chung, M.; Tateishi, Miyoko

    1996-01-01

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxies, are used in the aircraft, aerospace, sporting goods, and transportation industries. Though thermal curing is the dominant industrial process for advanced composites, electron curing of similar composites containing acrylated epoxy matrices has been demonstrated by our work. The main attraction of electron processing technology over thermal technology is the advantages it offers which include ambient temperature curing, reduced curing times, reduced volatile emissions, better material handling, and reduced costs. Electron curing technology allows for the curing of many types of products, such as complex shaped, those containing different types of fibres and up to 15 cm thick. Our work has been done principally with the AECL's 10 MeV, 1 kW electron accelerator; we have also done some comparative work with an AECL Gammacell 220. In this paper we briefly review our work on the various aspects of electron curing of advanced composites and their properties. (Author)

  12. Electron processing of fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.; Barnard, J.W.; Lopata, V.J.; Kremers, W.; McDougall, T.E.; Chung, M.; Tateishi, Miyoko [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-08-01

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxies, are used in the aircraft, aerospace, sporting goods, and transportation industries. Though thermal curing is the dominant industrial process for advanced composites, electron curing of similar composites containing acrylated epoxy matrices has been demonstrated by our work. The main attraction of electron processing technology over thermal technology is the advantages it offers which include ambient temperature curing, reduced curing times, reduced volatile emissions, better material handling, and reduced costs. Electron curing technology allows for the curing of many types of products, such as complex shaped, those containing different types of fibres and up to 15 cm thick. Our work has been done principally with the AECL`s 10 MeV, 1 kW electron accelerator; we have also done some comparative work with an AECL Gammacell 220. In this paper we briefly review our work on the various aspects of electron curing of advanced composites and their properties. (Author).

  13. Recent advances in electron beam processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueven, Olgun

    2005-01-01

    The synergy achieved through developments on the design and manufacturing of new low, medium and high energy electron accelerators with relatively high powers and innovative solutions in material formulation better responding to radiation processing has opened new application opportunities in electron beam treatment of polymers. All these developments are still based however, on the major ultimate effects of ionizing radiation on polymers namely, crosslinking, curing, grafting and chain scissionning. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of recent developments and emerging applications toward commercialization of electron beam processing of polymers. (author)

  14. Effect of interlayer tunneling on the electronic structure of bilayer cuprates and quantum phase transitions in carrier concentration and high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Makarov, I. A.; Shneyder, E. I.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of bilayer HTSC cuprates and its evolution under doping and in a high magnetic field. Analysis is based on the t-t′-t″-J* model in the generalized Hartree-Fock approximation. Possibility of tunneling between CuO2 layers is taken into account in the form of a nonzero integral of hopping between the orbitals of adjacent planes and is included in the scheme of the cluster form of perturbation theory. The main effect of the coupling between two CuO 2 layers in a unit cell is the bilayer splitting manifested in the presence of antibonding and bonding bands formed by a combination of identical bands of the layers themselves. A change in the doping level induces reconstruction of the band structure and the Fermi surface, which gives rise to a number of quantum phase transitions. A high external magnetic field leads to a fundamentally different form of electronic structure. Quantum phase transitions in the field are observed not only under doping, but also upon a variation of the field magnitude. Because of tunneling between the layers, quantum transitions are also split; as a result, a more complex sequence of the Lifshitz transitions than in single-layer structures is observed.

  15. Evaluation of electron beam stabilization for ion implant processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffat, Stephen J.; Kickel, Bee; Philipps, B.; Adams, J.; Ross, Matthew F.; Minter, Jason P.; Marlowe, Trey; Wong, Selmer S.

    1999-06-01

    With the integration of high energy ion implant processes into volume CMOS manufacturing, the need for thick resist stabilization to achieve a stable ion implant process is critical. With new photoresist characteristics, new implant end station characteristics arise. The resist outgassing needs to be addressed as well as the implant profile to ensure that the dosage is correct and the implant angle does not interfere with other underlying features. This study compares conventional deep-UV/thermal with electron beam stabilization. The electron beam system used in this study utilizes a flood electron source and is a non-thermal process. These stabilization techniques are applied to a MeV ion implant process in a CMOS production process flow.

  16. Fabrication of nano-sized magnetic tunnel junctions using lift-off process assisted by atomic force probe tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ku Youl; Min, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Chiyui; Choi, Gyung-Min; Shin, Il-Jae; Park, Seung-Young; Rhie, Kungwon; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We present a fabrication method for nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), employing e-beam lithography and lift-off process assisted by the probe tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). It is challenging to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates because it is difficult to use chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. The AFM-assisted lift-off process enables us to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates (12.5 mm x 12.5 mm) without CMP process. The e-beam patterning has been done using bi-layer resist, the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)/ hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). The PMMA/HSQ resist patterns are used for both the etch mask for ion milling and the self-aligned mask for top contact formation after passivation. The self-aligned mask buried inside a passivation oxide layer, is readily lifted-off by the force exerted by the probe tip. The nano-MTJs (160 nm x 90 nm) fabricated by this method show clear current-induced magnetization switching with a reasonable TMR and critical switching current density.

  17. Utilization of electron beam accelerators for polymer processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, K.S.S.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, electron beam processing has been amply demonstrated to the Indian cable industry by BARC using 2 MeV/20 kW electron beam (EB) accelerator (ILU-6 EBA facility) located at BARC-BRIT complex, Vashi. The electron beam accelerator is a machine producing high energy electrons which are made to impinge on the materials for inducing physical, chemical and biological modifications. The process is carried out at room temperature and in ambient atmospheric conditions. Lately, quite a few numbers of accelerators have been installed by the private cable industry and carrying out cross-linking of cable insulations for high performance viz. high temperature stability, good flame retardancy, lesser solvent-swelling, thinner insulations etc. The indigenously made accelerators at EB centre, particularly the 3 MeV/30 kW accelerator will be of much help for Indian industry for polymer processing as the market is poised to grow by adapting the technology

  18. Electronic dipole moment and tunneling state of hydrogen atom in hydrogen-bond materials revealed by neutron and X-ray structure analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Noda, Yukio; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The isolated hydrogen-bonded materials, 5-methyl-9-hydroxyphenalenone (MeHPLN) and 5-bromo-9-hydroxyphenalenone (Br-HPLN), were studied by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. It was found that the position of the nucleus of the hydrogen atom in the hydrogen-bond region does not agree with the center of mass of the electron cloud of the hydrogen atom. This leads to a local electronic dipole moment in the hydrogen-bond region. Using the experimentally obtained dipole moment, phase transition temperatures for MeHPLN and BrHPLN were calculated based on a tunneling model. Result shows good agreement with the ones obtained by a dielectric measurement. (author)

  19. Semiclassical description of resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolny, E.B.; Rouben, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A semiclassical formula is calculated for the tunneling current of electrons trapped in a potential well which can tunnel into and across a wide quantum well. The tunneling current is measured at the second interface of this well and the calculations idealized an experimental situation where a strong magnetic field tilted with respect to an electric field was used. It is shown that the contribution to the tunneling current, due to trajectories which begin at the first interface and end on the second, is dominant for periodic orbits which hit both walls of the quantum well. (author)

  20. The study of optimal conditions of electrochemical etching of tunnel electron microscopy tungsten tips; Estudio de las condiciones optimas para la preparacion electroquimica de puntas de tungsteno para el Microscopio de Efecto Tunel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguiano, E; Aguilar, M [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales del SCIC, Madrid (Spain); Olivar, A I [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN Unidad Merida. Departamento de fisica Aplicada, Yucatan, Mexico (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    We present the experimental results obtained during the study made in the electrochemical etching of tunneling electron microscopy tungsten tips. The experiments was made using DC and two usual electrolytes: KOH and NaOH. For the tip preparation we used a electrochemical cell with stainless steel cathode and the tungsten wire as anode. the electrodes was introduced in a glass recipient containing the electrolytic solution. We study the effects of applied voltage, polish time, tip length and electrolyte concentration as process relevant parameters. The best condition for tip preparation was obtained with a metallurgical microscope and with a SEM.EDX and Auger analysis was made. The results shown the better tips was made with KOH as electrolyte with a limited concentration range (2-4 normal) and applied voltage (2-6 volts) (Author) 20 refs.

  1. Progress of electron processing system useful for environmental preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Yasuhisa

    1998-01-01

    Electron Processing has been used in the field of industrial application, mainly to process plastics or polymers, which is represented by the cross-linking of Polyethylene to improve heat resistance. On the other hand, there has been many research studies to use Electron Beam for an environmental preservation. Typical examples are Sterilization of Food, Flue Gas Treatment, Sterilization of Waste Water Sludge, Purification of Water, Removal of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), etc. These research works have been done in the USA, Germany, Austria, Japan, etc. They reported some of the features of electron beam method. In addition, there is an unique report that the combination of Ozone and Electron Beam provides a better efficiency of the purification of the water. Recently, they have started the investigation for the practical use of Electron Beam in the environmental application. Flue gas treatment is a remarkable example of the investigation. They built the demonstration plant last year and they started the operation last fall. Presently, the system is in a demonstrative operation. This paper will report an outline of the R and D works of environmental applications of Electron Beam and also will introduce the latest technologies of Electron Processing Systems which will be available for the environmental preservation. (author)

  2. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references

  3. Quality control of the documentation process in electronic economic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutova A.S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that the main tool that will provide adequate information resources e economic activities of social and economic relations are documenting quality control processes as the basis of global information space. Directions problems as formation evaluation information resources in the process of documentation, namely development tools assess the efficiency of the system components – qualitative assessment; development of mathematical modeling tools – quantitative evaluation. A qualitative assessment of electronic documentation of economic activity through exercise performance, efficiency of communication; document management efficiency; effectiveness of flow control operations; relationship management effectiveness. The concept of quality control process documents electronically economic activity to components which include: the level of workflow; forms adequacy of information; consumer quality documents; quality attributes; type of income data; condition monitoring systems; organizational level process documentation; attributes of quality, performance quality consumer; type of management system; type of income data; condition monitoring systems. Grounded components of the control system electronic document subjects of economic activity. Detected components IT-audit management system economic activity: compliance audit; audit of internal control; detailed multilevel analysis; corporate risk assessment methodology. The stages and methods of processing electronic transactions economic activity during condition monitoring of electronic economic activity.

  4. Materials of the Regional Training Course on Validation and Process Control for Electron Beam Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluska, I.; Gluszewski, W.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation with electron beams is used in the polymer industry, food, pharmaceutical and medical device industries for sterilization of surfaces. About 20 lectures presented during the Course were devoted to all aspects of control and validation of low energy electron beam processes. They should help the product manufacturers better understand the application of the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 11137 norm, which defines the requirements and standard practices for validation of the irradiation process and the process controls required during routine processing

  5. Study of the niobium dehydrogenation process by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhoes, I.A.M.; Akune, K.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of the micro-structure of Nb-H, during the dehydrogenation process through thermal treatment, has been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results are used in order to interpret the variation of the line resolution of Electron Channeling Pattern (ECP) of Nb-H as a function of isochronous annealing temperature. It is concluded that the improvement of the ECP line resolution is enhanced of β hydrate in Nb. (Author) [pt

  6. Adhesives technology for electronic applications materials, processing, reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture and assembly of electronic circuits and products. Generally, electronics design engineers and manufacturing engineers are not well versed in adhesives, while adhesion chemists have a limited knowledge of electronics. This book bridges these knowledge gaps and is useful to both groups. The book includes chapters covering types of adhesive, the chemistry on which they are based, and their properties, applications, processes, specifications, and reliability. Coverage of toxicity, environmental impacts and the regulatory framework make this book par

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave ion sources for thin film processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Plasmas created by microwave absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) are increasingly used for a variety of plasma processes, including both etching and deposition. ECR sources efficiently couple energy to electrons and use magnetic confinement to maximize the probability of an electron creating an ion or free radical in pressure regimes where the mean free path for ionization is comparable to the ECR source dimensions. The general operating principles of ECR sources are discussed with special emphasis on their use for thin film etching. Data on source performance during Cl base etching of Si using an ECR system are presented. 32 refs., 5 figs

  8. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  9. Superconducting electron tunneling as detection method for low frequency resonant vibration modes of interstitials in fcc lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrian, H.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of crystal defects on the phonon spectra was studied for fcc lead using superconducting tunneling spectroscopy. The theory predicts low frequency modes for the vibrational states of interstitials in (100) dumbbell configuration. Low temperature irradiation of superconducting point contacts with fast ions (point contact thickness small compared to the average ion range) showed radiation-induced structures in the low-energy part of the Eliashberg function for lead. These resonant modes are reduced by annealing at 18.5 K; they are attributed to small interstitial clusters. The radiation-induced structures are completely removed by room temperature annealing. (orig.)

  10. High-Throughput Printing Process for Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Woo Jin

    Printed electronics is an emerging field for manufacturing electronic devices with low cost and minimal material waste for a variety of applications including displays, distributed sensing, smart packaging, and energy management. Moreover, its compatibility with roll-to-roll production formats and flexible substrates is desirable for continuous, high-throughput production of flexible electronics. Despite the promise, however, the roll-to-roll production of printed electronics is quite challenging due to web movement hindering accurate ink registration and high-fidelity printing. In this talk, I will present a promising strategy for roll-to-roll production using a novel printing process that we term SCALE (Self-aligned Capillarity-Assisted Lithography for Electronics). By utilizing capillarity of liquid inks on nano/micro-structured substrates, the SCALE process facilitates high-resolution and self-aligned patterning of electrically functional inks with greatly improved printing tolerance. I will show the fabrication of key building blocks (e.g. transistor, resistor, capacitor) for electronic circuits using the SCALE process on plastics.

  11. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure.

  12. The scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A newly conceived microscope, based on a pure quantum phenomenon, is an ideal tool to study atom by atom the topography and properties of surfaces. Applications are presented: surface ''reconstruction'' of silicon, lamellar compound study, etc... Spectroscopy by tunnel effect will bring important information on electronic properties; it is presented with an application on silicon [fr

  13. Multiple electron processes of He and Ne by proton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhin, Pavel Nikolaevich; Montenegro, Pablo; Quinto, Michele; Monti, Juan; Fojon, Omar; Rivarola, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    A detailed investigation of multiple electron processes (single and multiple ionization, single capture, transfer-ionization) of He and Ne is presented for proton impact at intermediate and high collision energies. Exclusive absolute cross sections for these processes have been obtained by calculation of transition probabilities in the independent electron and independent event models as a function of impact parameter in the framework of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. A binomial analysis is employed to calculate exclusive probabilities. The comparison with available theoretical and experimental results shows that exclusive probabilities are needed for a reliable description of the experimental data. The developed approach can be used for obtaining the input database for modeling multiple electron processes of charged particles passing through the matter.

  14. Personal and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in meat processing industry workers in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccò, Matteo; Signorelli, Carlo

    2017-03-24

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a musculoskeletal condition that often impairs the fitness to work. Our aim is to retrospectively evaluate the association between physical exposures in meat processing industry in Northern Italy and the CTS, taking into account non-occupational factors. A cross-sectional study was performed to include 434 workers (236 males, 198 females, 37.0±10.6 years old, working age: 12.6±10.8 years) from meat processing industries. Signs and symptoms were collected at the compulsory occupational medical surveillance. Occupational risk factors were assessed through a questionnaire and direct assessment by investigators. Adjusted odds ratios (ORadj) for factors of interest were estimated through binary logistic regression. Diagnosis of the CTS was reported for 61 out of 434 subjects (14.1%) for an incidence of 11.3/1000 person- years. In general, signs and symptoms for the CTS were associated with the following demographic factors: smoking history (OR = 1.909, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.107-3.293), previous traumas of the upper limb (OR = 3.533, 95% CI: 1.743-7.165), hypothyroidism status (OR = 7.897, 95% CI: 2.917-21.38) and, in the case of female participants only, previous pregnancies (OR = 2.807, 95% CI: 1.200-6.566) as well as a personal history of oral contraceptive therapy and/or steroidal replacement therapy (OR = 11.57, 95% CI: 4.689-28.56). The carpal tunnel syndrome cases were associated with the following occupational factors (> 4 h/day): forceful hand exertion (ORadj = 3.548, 95% CI: 1.379-9.131), repeated trauma of the hand (ORadj = 3.602, 95% CI: 1.248- 10.395), repeated movements of the wrist (ORadj = 2.561, 95% CI: 1.100-5.960). Increasing levels of hand activity and force were associated with the increased CTS prevalence among participants. Recommendations have to be provided in order to reduce occupational exposure to these risk factors and improve medical surveillance. Med Pr 2017;68(2):199-209. This work is available

  15. Personal and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in meat processing industry workers in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Riccò

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a musculoskeletal condition that often impairs the fitness to work. Our aim is to retrospectively evaluate the association between physical exposures in meat processing industry in Northern Italy and the CTS, taking into account non-occupational factors. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed to include 434 workers (236 males, 198 females, 37.0±10.6 years old, working age: 12.6±10.8 years from meat processing industries. Signs and symptoms were collected at the compulsory occupational medical surveillance. Occupational risk factors were assessed through a questionnaire and direct assessment by investigators. Adjusted odds ratios (ORadj for factors of interest were estimated through binary logistic regression. Results: Diagnosis of the CTS was reported for 61 out of 434 subjects (14.1% for an incidence of 11.3/1000 person- years. In general, signs and symptoms for the CTS were associated with the following demographic factors: smoking history (OR = 1.909, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.107–3.293, previous traumas of the upper limb (OR = 3.533, 95% CI: 1.743–7.165, hypothyroidism status (OR = 7.897, 95% CI: 2.917–21.38 and, in the case of female participants only, previous pregnancies (OR = 2.807, 95% CI: 1.200–6.566 as well as a personal history of oral contraceptive therapy and/or steroidal replacement therapy (OR = 11.57, 95% CI: 4.689–28.56. The carpal tunnel syndrome cases were associated with the following occupational factors (> 4 h/day: forceful hand exertion (ORadj = 3.548, 95% CI: 1.379–9.131, repeated trauma of the hand (ORadj = 3.602, 95% CI: 1.248– 10.395, repeated movements of the wrist (ORadj = 2.561, 95% CI: 1.100–5.960. Conclusions: Increasing levels of hand activity and force were associated with the increased CTS prevalence among participants. Recommendations have to be provided in order to reduce occupational exposure to these risk factors and

  16. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  17. Production processes of multiply charged ions by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Nobuo

    1980-02-01

    First, are compared the foil or gas stripper and the ion sources utilizing electron-atom ionizing collisions, which are practically used or are under development to produce multiply charged ions. A review is made of the fundamental physical parameters such as successive ionization potentials and various ionization cross sections by electron impact, as well as the primary processes in multiply charged ion production. Multiply charged ion production processes are described for the different existing ion sources such as high temperature plasma type, ion-trapping type and discharge type. (author)

  18. Processing scarce biological samples for light and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Taupin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy (LM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM aim at understanding the relationship structure-function. With advances in biology, isolation and purification of scarce populations of cells or subcellular structures may not lead to enough biological material, for processing for LM and TEM. A protocol for preparation of scarce biological samples is presented. It is based on pre-embedding the biological samples, suspensions or pellets, in bovine serum albumin (BSA and bis-acrylamide (BA, cross-linked and polymerized. This preparation provides a simple and reproducible technique to process biological materials, present in limited quantities that can not be amplified, for light and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Interpretation of resistivity of Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4-y using the electron-phonon spectral function determined from tunneling data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tralshawala, N.; Zasadzinski, J.F.; Coffey, L.; Huang, Q.

    1991-01-01

    Tunneling measurements of α 2 F(ω) of Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4-y are shown to be in good agreement with recent published results of the phonon density of states F(ω) from neutron scattering. The locations of peaks and valleys in both functions are similar, but the spectral weights differ, suggesting that α 2 has a strong energy dependence. We have used α 2 F(ω) to estimate the phonon contribution, ρ phonon (T), to published data of the temperature-dependent resistivity, ρ(T), for thin films and single crystals of Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4-y . When the phonon contribution is subtracted from the experimental data, a clear T 2 contribution remains over most of the temperature range. The T 2 contribution is interpreted to be due to three-dimensional electron-electron scattering, ρ e-e . There is also a correlation between the magnitude of ρ e-e , and the value of the plasma frequency, ω p [obtained from the determination of ρ phonon (T)], with a scaling which approximates ω p -10/3 . Such a scaling is expected from the carrier-concentration dependence of electron-electron scattering

  20. Phonon-assisted decoherence and tunneling in quantum dot molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Foerstner, Jens

    2011-01-01

    processes with relevant acoustic phonons. We show that the relaxation is dominated by phonon-assisted electron tunneling between constituent quantum dots and occurs on a picosecond time scale. The dependence of the time evolution of the quantum dot occupation probabilities on the energy mismatch between...

  1. Electron collision data for polyatomic molecules in plasma processing and environmental processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Kitajima, M.; Cho, H.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental studies for electron-polyatomic molecule collision are reviewed in connection with the plasma processing and environmental issues. Recent developments in electron scattering experiments on the differential cross section measurements for various processes such as elastic scattering, vibrational, and electronic excitations are summarized from high to low energy regions (1-100 eV). The need for cross-section data for a broad variety of molecular species is also discussed because there is an urgent need to develop an international program to provide the scientific and technological communities with authoritative cross sections for electron-molecule interactions

  2. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes. [Electron promotion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references.

  3. Use of mathematical modelling in electron beam processing: A guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The use of electron beam irradiation for industrial applications, like the sterilization of medical devices or cross-linking of polymers, has a long and successful track record and has proven itself to be a key technology. Emerging fields, including environmental applications of ionizing radiation, the sterilization of complex medical and pharmaceutical products or advanced material treatment, require the design and control of even more complex irradiators and irradiation processes. Mathematical models can aid the design process, for example by calculating absorbed dose distributions in a product, long before any prototype is built. They support process qualification through impact assessment of process variable uncertainties, and can be an indispensable teaching tool for technologists in training in the use of radiation processing. The IAEA, through various mechanisms, including its technical cooperation programme, coordinated research projects, technical meetings, guidelines and training materials, is promoting the use of radiation technologies to minimize the effects of harmful contaminants and develop value added products originating from low cost natural and human made raw materials. The need to publish a guidebook on the use of mathematical modelling for design processes in the electron beam treatment of materials was identified through the increased interest of radiation processing laboratories in Member States and as a result of recommendations from several IAEA expert meetings. In response, the IAEA has prepared this report using the services of an expert in the field. This publication should serve as both a guidebook and introductory tutorial for the use of mathematical modelling (using mostly Monte Carlo methods) in electron beam processing. The emphasis of this guide is on industrial irradiation methodologies with a strong reference to existing literature and applicable standards. Its target audience is readers who have a basic understanding of electron

  4. Influence of scattering processes on electron quantum states in nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozdnyakov Dmitry

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn the framework of quantum perturbation theory the self-consistent method of calculation of electron scattering rates in nanowires with the one-dimensional electron gas in the quantum limit is worked out. The developed method allows both the collisional broadening and the quantum correlations between scattering events to be taken into account. It is an alternativeper seto the Fock approximation for the self-energy approach based on Green’s function formalism. However this approach is free of mathematical difficulties typical to the Fock approximation. Moreover, the developed method is simpler than the Fock approximation from the computational point of view. Using the approximation of stable one-particle quantum states it is proved that the electron scattering processes determine the dependence of electron energy versus its wave vector.

  5. Resonant tunneling across a ferroelectric domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Tao, L. L.; Velev, J. P.; Tsymbal, E. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations, we explore electron transport properties of a ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) with an embedded head-to-head ferroelectric domain wall, using first-principles density-functional theory calculations. We consider a FTJ with L a0.5S r0.5Mn O3 electrodes separated by a BaTi O3 barrier layer and show that an in-plane charged domain wall in the ferroelectric BaTi O3 can be induced by polar interfaces. The resulting V -shaped electrostatic potential profile across the BaTi O3 layer creates a quantum well and leads to the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas, which stabilizes the domain wall. The confined electronic states in the barrier are responsible for resonant tunneling as is evident from our quantum-transport calculations. We find that the resonant tunneling is an orbital selective process, which leads to sharp spikes in the momentum- and energy-resolved transmission spectra. Our results indicate that domain walls embedded in FTJs can be used to control the electron transport.

  6. Dynamics of tunneling ionization using Bohmian mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Bartschat, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Recent attoclock experiments and theoretical studies regarding the strong-field ionization of atoms by few-cycle infrared pulses revealed features that have attracted much attention. Here we investigate tunneling ionization and the dynamics of the electron probability using Bohmian mechanics. We consider a one-dimensional problem to illustrate the underlying mechanisms of the ionization process. It is revealed that in the major part of the below-the-barrier ionization regime, in an intense and short infrared pulse, the electron does not tunnel through the entire barrier, but rather starts already from the classically forbidden region. Moreover, we highlight the correspondence between the probability of locating the electron at a particular initial position and its asymptotic momentum. Bohmian mechanics also provides a natural definition of mean tunneling time and exit position, taking account of the time dependence of the barrier. Finally, we find that the electron can exit the barrier with significant kinetic energy, thereby corroborating the results of a recent study [N. Camus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 023201 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.023201].

  7. Surface flattening processes of metal layer and their effect on transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with Al-N barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, S.; Nozawa, T.; Shoyama, T.; Tsunoda, M.; Takahashi, M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to form ultrathin insulating layer in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), two surface flatting processes of metal films are investigated. Oxygen-additive sputter-deposition process was applied to the bottom Cu electrode and the Al layer to be nitrided. Dry-etching process was applied for the surface treatment of lower Co-Fe layer. As a result, the surface roughness of stacked ultrathin Al layer to be nitrided is reduced from 3.2A to 1.7A, and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of the MTJs increases from 1% to 26% while maintaining resistance-area product (RxA) less than 5x10 2 Ω μm 2 in the Co-Fe/Al(6A)-N/Co-Fe MTJs. We conclude that the decrease of the surface roughness of Al layer is one of the key factors to realize high performance MTJs with low RxA and high TMR ratio

  8. Tunneling of heat: Beyond linear response regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Kamil; Saroka, David

    2018-02-01

    We examine nanoscale processes of heat (energy) transfer as carried by electrons tunneling via potential barriers and molecular interconnects between two heat reservoirs (thermal baths). For that purpose, we use Landauer-type formulas to calculate thermal conductance and quadratic correction to heat flux flowing via quantum systems. As an input, we implement analytical expressions for transmission functions related to simple potential barriers and atomic bridges. Our results are discussed with respect to energy of tunneling electrons, temperature, the presence of resonant states, and specific parameters characterizing potential barriers as well as heat carriers. The simplicity of semi-analytical models developed by us allows to fit experimental data and extract crucial information about the values of model parameters. Further investigations are expected for more realistic transmission functions, while time-dependent aspects of nanoscale heat transfer may be addressed by using the concept of wave packets scattered on potential barriers and point-like defects within regular (periodic) nanostructures.

  9. Measurement of Electronic States of PbS Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Using Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy: The Role of Parity Selection Rules in Optical Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Bogdan; Padilha, Lazaro A.; Nagpal, Prashant; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2013-03-01

    We study the structure of electronic states in individual PbS nanocrystal quantum dots by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) using one-to-two monolayer nanocrystal films treated with 1, 2-ethanedithiols (EDT). Up to six individual valence and conduction band states are resolved for a range of quantum dot sizes. The measured states’ energies are in good agreement with calculations using the k·p four-band envelope function formalism. A comparison of STS and optical absorption spectra indicates that some of the absorption features can only be explained by asymmetric transitions involving the states of different symmetries (e.g., S and P or P and D), which points towards the relaxation of the parity selection rules in these nanostructures. STS measurements also reveal a midgap feature, which is likely similar to one observed in previous charge transport studies of EDT-treated quantum dot films.

  10. Low energy electron beam processing of YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chromik, Š., E-mail: stefan.chromik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Camerlingo, C. [CNR-SPIN, Istituto Superconduttori, Materiali Innovativi e Dispositivi, via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Sojková, M.; Štrbík, V.; Talacko, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Malka, I.; Bar, I.; Bareli, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Jung, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of superconducting properties of irradiated bridges under certain conditions. • 30 keV irradiation influence CuO{sub 2} planes as well as oxygen chains. • Direct confirmation of changes in oxygen chains using micro-Raman spectroscopy. • Possibility of electron writing. - Abstract: Effects of low energy 30 keV electron irradiation of superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin films have been investigated by means of transport and micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The critical temperature and the critical current of 200 nm thick films initially increase with increasing fluency of the electron irradiation, reach the maximum at fluency 3 − 4 × 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}, and then decrease with further fluency increase. In much thinner films (75 nm), the critical temperature increases while the critical current decreases after low energy electron irradiation with fluencies below 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The Raman investigations suggest that critical temperature increase in irradiated films is due to healing of broken Cu−O chains that results in increased carrier’s concentration in superconducting CuO{sub 2} planes. Changes in the critical current are controlled by changes in the density of oxygen vacancies acting as effective pinning centers for flux vortices. The effects of low energy electron irradiation of YBCO turned out to result from a subtle balance of many processes involving oxygen removal, both by thermal activation and kick-off processes, and ordering of chains environment by incident electrons.

  11. Impact of electron-electron Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2018-03-01

    Generation of high harmonics in a monolayer graphene initiated by a strong coherent radiation field, taking into account electron-electron Coulomb interaction, is investigated. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear optical response of graphene is developed. The Coulomb interaction of electrons is treated in the scope of dynamic Hartree-Fock approximation. The closed set of integrodifferential equations for the single-particle density matrix of a graphene quantum structure is solved numerically. The obtained solutions show the significance of many-body Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene.

  12. Two-process approach to electron beam welding control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lastovirya, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis and synthesis of multi-dimensional welding control systems, which require the usage of computers, should be conducted within the temporal range. From the general control theory point two approaches - one-process and two-process - are possible to electron beam welding. In case of two-process approach, subprocesses of heat source formation and direct metal melting are separated. Two-process approach leads to two-profile control system and provides the complete controlability of electron beam welding within the frameworks of systems with concentrated, as well as, with distributed parameters. Approach choice for the given problem solution is determined, first of all, by stability degree of heat source during welding

  13. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  14. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Tunneling Current in an Anisotropic Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairurrijal khairurrijal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have developed a model of the tunneling currents through a high-k dielectric stack in MOS capacitors with anisotropic masses. The transmittance was numerically calculated by employing a transfer matrix method and including longitudinal-transverse kinetic energy coupling which is represented by an electron phase velocity in the gate. The transmittance was then applied to calculate tunneling currents in TiN/HfSiOxN/SiO2/p-Si MOS capacitors. The calculated results show that as the gate electron velocity increases, the transmittance decreases and therefore the tunneling current reduces. The tunneling current becomes lower as the effective oxide thickness (EOT of HfSiOxN layer increases. When the incident electron passed through the barriers in the normal incident to the interface, the electron tunneling process becomes easier. It was also shown that the tunneling current was independent of the substrate orientation. Moreover, the model could be used in designing high speed MOS devices with low tunneling currents.

  16. Spin-flip tunneling in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, Lars; Braakman, Floris; Meunier, Tristan; Calado, Victor; Vandersypen, Lieven [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft (Netherlands); Wegscheider, Werner [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Electron spins in a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a GaAs/(Al,Ga)As 2DEG are promising candidates for quantum information processing as coherent single spin rotation and spin swap has been demonstrated recently. In this system we investigate the two-electron spin dynamics in the presence of microwaves (5.20 GHz) applied to one side gate. During microwave excitation we observe characteristic photon assisted tunneling (PAT) peaks at the (1,1) to (0,2) charge transition. Some of the PAT peaks are attributed to photon tunneling events between the singlet S(0,2) and the singlet S(1,1) states, a spin-conserving transition. Surprisingly, other PAT peaks stand out by their different external magnetic field dependence. They correspond to tunneling involving a spin-flip, from the (0,2) singlet to a (1,1) triplet. The full spectrum of the observed PAT lines is captured by simulations. This process offers novel possibilities for 2-electron spin manipulation and read-out.

  17. Intelligent workflow driven processing for electronic mail management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Email has become one of the most efficient means of electronics communication for many years and email management has become a critical issue due to congestion. Different client/individuals encounter problems while processing their emails due to large volume of email being received and lot of request to be replied.

  18. MODELING OF ELECTRONIC GASOLINE INJECTION PROCESSES IN TWO STROKE ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hraivoronskyi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic provision of the processes developed mode, occurring in ignition fuel system with electronically controlled two stroke engine with positive ignition are given. Fuel injection process’ calculation results for the case of placing fuel injector into intake system presented.

  19. Radiosterilization process control in plants using electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuglik, Z.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam parameters deciding the irradiation dose in radiosterilization plants should be continuously controlled during the process. Dosimetric procedure suitable to irradiated material and dose range should be chosen. The practical advice and directions in this subject have been done. 7 refs

  20. austenitic stainless steel by electron beam welding process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Electron beam welding (EBW) is a fusion joining process that produces a ... fabrication of engineering parts with low-distortion joints, although its application to large assemblies is often restricted by the ... speed, focal point location, focal spot size, etc. ... Experimental data were collected as per central composite design and ...

  1. Scaling laws in high energy electron-nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemtob, M.

    1980-11-01

    We survey the parton model description of high momentum transfer electron scattering processes with nuclei. We discuss both nucleon and quark parton models and confront the patterns of scaling laws violations, induced by binding effects, in the former, and perturbative QCD effects, in the latter

  2. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manikandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The image processing is one of the leading technologies of computer applications. Image processing is a type of signal processing, the input for image processor is an image or video frame and the output will be an image or subset of image [1]. Computer graphics and computer vision process uses an image processing techniques. Image processing systems are used in various environments like medical fields, computer-aided design (CAD, research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP [2]. Loan approval process has been tedious process, the E-LAP system attempts to reduce the complexity of loan approval process. Customers have to login to fill the loan application form online with all details and submit the form. The loan department then processes the submitted form and then sends an acknowledgement mail via the E-LAP to the requested customer with the details about list of documents required for the loan approval process [3]. The approaching customer can upload the scanned copies of all required documents. All this interaction between customer and bank take place using an E-LAP system.

  3. On-line monitoring of food fermentation processes using electronic noses and electronic tongues: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peris, Miguel, E-mail: mperist@qim.upv.es [Departamento de Química, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Escuder-Gilabert, Laura [Departamento de Química Analítica, Universitat de Valencia, C/ Vicente Andrés Estellés s/n, E-46100 Burjasot, Valencia (Spain)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •This review paper deals with the applications of electronic noses and electronic tongues to the monitoring of fermentation processes. •Positive and negative aspects of the different approaches reviewed are analyzed. •Current and future endeavors in this field are also commented. -- Abstract: Fermentation processes are often sensitive to even slight changes of conditions that may result in unacceptable end-product quality. Thus, close follow-up of this type of processes is critical for detecting unfavorable deviations as early as possible in order to save downtime, materials and resources. Nevertheless the use of traditional analytical techniques is often hindered by the need for expensive instrumentation and experienced operators and complex sample preparation. In this sense, one of the most promising ways of developing rapid and relatively inexpensive methods for quality control in fermentation processes is the use of chemical multisensor systems. In this work we present an overview of the most important contributions dealing with the monitoring of fermentation processes using electronic noses and electronic tongues. After a brief description of the fundamentals of both types of devices, the different approaches are critically commented, their strengths and weaknesses being highlighted. Finally, future trends in this field are also mentioned in the last section of the article.

  4. On-line monitoring of food fermentation processes using electronic noses and electronic tongues: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peris, Miguel; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •This review paper deals with the applications of electronic noses and electronic tongues to the monitoring of fermentation processes. •Positive and negative aspects of the different approaches reviewed are analyzed. •Current and future endeavors in this field are also commented. -- Abstract: Fermentation processes are often sensitive to even slight changes of conditions that may result in unacceptable end-product quality. Thus, close follow-up of this type of processes is critical for detecting unfavorable deviations as early as possible in order to save downtime, materials and resources. Nevertheless the use of traditional analytical techniques is often hindered by the need for expensive instrumentation and experienced operators and complex sample preparation. In this sense, one of the most promising ways of developing rapid and relatively inexpensive methods for quality control in fermentation processes is the use of chemical multisensor systems. In this work we present an overview of the most important contributions dealing with the monitoring of fermentation processes using electronic noses and electronic tongues. After a brief description of the fundamentals of both types of devices, the different approaches are critically commented, their strengths and weaknesses being highlighted. Finally, future trends in this field are also mentioned in the last section of the article

  5. Probing spin-polarized tunneling at high bias and temperature with a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) is a three terminal hybrid device that consists of a tunnel emitter, a ferromagnetic (FM) base, and a semiconductor collector. In the MTT with a FM emitter and a single FM base, spin-polarized hot electrons are injected into the base by tunneling. After

  6. The future of focused electron beam-induced processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    A perspective is sketched for the field of focused electron beam-induced processing (FEBIP). The FEBIP lithography technique is compared to the very successful resist-based electron beam lithography (EBL) technique. The advantages of FEBIP over EBL are identified, the main advantage being its high spatial resolution. This will enable FEBIP to become an important lithography technique for the fabrication of devices with critical dimension in the range between 1 and 20 nm and serve as a complementary technique to EBL. It will be discussed what needs to be done to achieve this and what the potential applications are. (orig.)

  7. Digital signal processing in power electronics control circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sozanski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Many digital control circuits in current literature are described using analog transmittance. This may not always be acceptable, especially if the sampling frequency and power transistor switching frequencies are close to the band of interest. Therefore, a digital circuit is considered as a digital controller rather than an analog circuit. This helps to avoid errors and instability in high frequency components. Digital Signal Processing in Power Electronics Control Circuits covers problems concerning the design and realization of digital control algorithms for power electronics circuits using

  8. Application of electron and Bremsstrahlung beams for composite materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalyubovsky, I.I.; Avilov, A.M.; Popov, G.F.; Rudychev, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    In Kharkiv University the radiation process of obtaining composite polymer materials, CPM, with high strength properties and corrosion resistance was studied. CPM are manufactured by vacuum impregnating capillary-porous materials with synthetic monomers and oligomers or by molding granular waste and resins which are further treated by relativistic electron or Bremsstrahlung beam. Such radiation treatment yields new CPM in which capillary-porous structure acting as reinforcement is filled with polymer. The results of the applied research with industrial electron accelerator in the field of thick CPM formation are presented

  9. Theoretical approach to the scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, C.

    1990-01-01

    Within a one-electron approach, based on a Green's-function formalism, a nonperturbative expression for the tunneling current is obtained and used to discuss which spectroscopic information may be deduced from a scanning-tunneling-microscope experiment. It is shown up to which limits the voltage dependence of the tunneling current reproduces the local density of states at the surface, and how the reflection coefficients of the electronic waves at the surface may modify it

  10. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  11. Potential ceramics processing applications with high-energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy, high-current electron beams may offer unique features for processing of ceramics that are not available with any other heat source. These include the capability to instantaneously heat to several centimeters in depth, to preferentially deposit energy in dense, high-z materials, to process at atmospheric pressures in air or other gases, to have large control over heating volume and heating rate, and to have efficient energy conversion. At a recent workshop organized by the authors to explore opportunities for electron beam processing of ceramics, several applications were identified for further development. These were ceramic joining, fabrication of ceramic powders, and surface processing of ceramics. It may be possible to join ceramics by either electron-beam brazing or welding. Brazing with refractory metals might also be feasible. The primary concern for brazing is whether the braze material can wet to the ceramic when rapidly heated by an electron beam. Raw ceramic powders, such as silicon nitride and aluminum nitride, which are difficult to produce by conventional techniques, could possibly be produced by vaporizing metals in a nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments need to be done to verify that the vaporized metal can fully react with the nitrogen. By adjusting beam parameters, high-energy beams can be used to remove surface flaws which are often sites of fracture initiation. They can also be used for surface cleaning. The advantage of electron beams rather than ion beams for this application is that the heat deposition can be graded into the material. The authors will discuss the capabilities of beams from existing machines for these applications and discuss planned experiments

  12. Spin-polarized electron tunneling across a Si delta-doped GaMnAs/n-GaAs interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, S.E.; Sørensen, B.S.; Lindelof, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Spin-polarized electron coupling across a Si delta-doped GaMnAs/n-GaAs interface was investigated. The injection of spin-polarized electrons was detected as circular polarized emission from a GaInAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode. The angular momentum selection rules were simplified...

  13. A Study of Vertical Transport through Graphene toward Control of Quantum Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Lei, Sidong; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Jun; Yin, Gen; Tang, Min; Torres, Carlos M; Navabi, Aryan; Jin, Zehua; Tsai, Shiao-Po; Qasem, Hussam; Wang, Yong; Vajtai, Robert; Lake, Roger K; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Wang, Kang L

    2018-02-14

    Vertical integration of van der Waals (vdW) materials with atomic precision is an intriguing possibility brought forward by these two-dimensional (2D) materials. Essential to the design and analysis of these structures is a fundamental understanding of the vertical transport of charge carriers into and across vdW materials, yet little has been done in this area. In this report, we explore the important roles of single layer graphene in the vertical tunneling process as a tunneling barrier. Although a semimetal in the lateral lattice plane, graphene together with the vdW gap act as a tunneling barrier that is nearly transparent to the vertically tunneling electrons due to its atomic thickness and the transverse momenta mismatch between the injected electrons and the graphene band structure. This is accentuated using electron tunneling spectroscopy (ETS) showing a lack of features corresponding to the Dirac cone band structure. Meanwhile, the graphene acts as a lateral conductor through which the potential and charge distribution across the tunneling barrier can be tuned. These unique properties make graphene an excellent 2D atomic grid, transparent to charge carriers, and yet can control the carrier flux via the electrical potential. A new model on the quantum capacitance's effect on vertical tunneling is developed to further elucidate the role of graphene in modulating the tunneling process. This work may serve as a general guideline for the design and analysis of vdW vertical tunneling devices and heterostructures, as well as the study of electron/spin injection through and into vdW materials.

  14. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  15. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  16. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  17. Interaction Driven Interband Tunneling of Bosons in the Triple Well

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Lushuai; Brouzos, Ioannis; Zöllner, Sascha; Schmelcher, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We study the tunneling of a small ensemble of strongly repulsive bosons in a one-dimensional triple-well potential. The usual treatment within the single-band approximation suggests suppression of tunneling in the strong interaction regime. However, we show that several windows of enhanced tunneling are opened in this regime. This enhanced tunneling results from higher band contributions, and has the character of interband tunneling. It can give rise to various tunneling processes, such as si...

  18. Polyelectrolytes processing at pilot scale level by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.; Cirstea, E.; Craciun, G.; Ighigeanu, D.; Marin, Gheorghe G.

    2002-01-01

    Three years of research, combined with engineering activities, have culminated in the development of a new method of electron beam processing applicable up to the pilot scale level, namely, the polyelectrolytes (acrylamide - acrylic acid copolymers) electron beam processing. This new radiation processing method has been achieved by bilateral co-operation between the National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (NILPRP) and the Electrical Design and Research Institute, EDRI - Bucharest. The polyelectrolytes electron beam (EB) processing was put in operation at EDRI, where, recently, an industrial electron accelerator of 2 MeV and 20 kW, manufactured by Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia was installed in a specially designed irradiation facility. Automatic start-up via computer control makes it compatible with industrial processing. According to the first conclusions, which resulted from our experimental research with regard to acrylamide - acrylic acid copolymers production by EB irradiation, the proper physical and chemical characteristics can be well controlled by chemical composition to be treated and by suitable adjustment of absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate. So, it was possible to obtain a very large area of characteristics and therefore a large area of applications. The conversion coefficient is very high (> 98%) and concentration of the residual monomer is under 0.05%. The tests applied to some wastewaters from the vegetable oil plants demonstrated that the fatty substances, matters in suspension, chemical oxygen demand and biological oxygen demand over 5 days were much reduced, in comparison with classical treatment. Also, sedimentation time was around four times smaller and sediment volume was 60% smaller than the values obtained in case of classical treatment. The necessary EB absorbed dose for the acrylamide - acrylic acid aqueous solution polymerization, established by optimization of chemical composition and irradiation

  19. Triboelectric effect: A new perspective on electron transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuaihang; Zhang, Zhinan

    2017-10-01

    As interest in the triboelectric effect increases in line with the development of tribo-electrification related devices, the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon require more systematic review from the dual perspectives of developed classical insights and emerging quantum understanding. In this paper, the clear energy changing and transferring process of electrons have been proposed from the quantum point of view as the trigger for the charging initiation process in the triboelectric effect, and the phonon modes on the friction surfaces are believed to hold great importance as one of the main driving forces. Compatible with Maxwell Displacement Current theory, the complete consideration for charging steady state, i.e., the competition mechanisms between the breakdown process and the continuously charging process, and the balance mechanisms of phonon-electron interaction, built voltage, and induced polarization, are illustrated. In brief, the proposed theory emphasizes the fundamental role of electron transferring in tribo-electrical fields. By comparing certain experimental results from the previous studies, the theory is justified.

  20. Tunneling from the past horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Subeom; Yeom, Dong-han

    2018-04-01

    We investigate a tunneling and emission process of a thin-shell from a Schwarzschild black hole, where the shell was initially located beyond the Einstein-Rosen bridge and finally appears at the right side of the Penrose diagram. In order to obtain such a solution, we should assume that the areal radius of the black hole horizon increases after the tunneling. Hence, there is a parameter range such that the tunneling rate is exponentially enhanced, rather than suppressed. We may have two interpretations regarding this. First, such a tunneling process from the past horizon is improbable by physical reasons; second, such a tunneling is possible in principle, but in order to obtain a stable Einstein-Rosen bridge, one needs to restrict the parameter spaces. If such a process is allowed, this can be a nonperturbative contribution to Einstein-Rosen bridges as well as eternal black holes.

  1. Guide for selection of dosimetry system for electron processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.

    1988-01-01

    Correct applications of radiation processing depend on accurate measurements of absorbed radiation dose. Radiation dosimetry plays several important roles in radiation processing. In particular, there are three stages for any radiation process during which dosimetry is a key to success: basic laboratory research, commissioning of the process and quality control. Radiation dosimeters may be divided into various classes depending upon their areas of applications and their relative quality: primary standard dosimeter, reference standard dosimeter, transfer standard dosimeter and routine in-house dosimeter. Several commercially available dosimeters are described under each class, and their advantages and limitations are discussed. Finally, recommendations are made as to which dosimeter is most suitable for each of the three stages of electron-beam processing. 124 refs

  2. Dosimetry study for electron beam irradiation in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaga, Hiromi; Haruyama, Yasuyuki; Takizawa, Haruki; Kojima, Takuji; Yotsumoto, Keiichi

    1995-01-01

    For certain critical applications such as medical device sterilization and food irradiation, accurate calibration of electron energy and absorbed dose is required to assure the quality of irradiated products. To meet this requirement, TRCRE, JAERI has carried out research and development on high dose radiation dosimetry for electron beams in the energy range used in radiation processing (0.15 - 3.0 MeV). JAERI has developed a simultaneous electron beam energy and dosimeter calibration system that consist of a total absorption calorimeter, an electron current density meter, and a stacked thin-film dosimeter set. For low energy electrons, where it is important to measure the depth-dose profile in materials with high depth resolution, we studied the feasibility of a method using Gafchromic film dosimeters. This film, which has an 8-μm thick sensitive layer, is combined with a stepped array of absorber films of the same thickness to produce a high-resolution depth-dose profile on the Gafchromic film. The depth-dose profile obtained in this manner has about five times greater resolution than conventional radiochromic film dosimetry. (author)

  3. Materials and processing approaches for foundry-compatible transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Kai; Fang, Hui; Bower, Christopher A.; Song, Enming; Yu, Xinge; Rogers, John A.

    2017-07-01

    Foundry-based routes to transient silicon electronic devices have the potential to serve as the manufacturing basis for “green” electronic devices, biodegradable implants, hardware secure data storage systems, and unrecoverable remote devices. This article introduces materials and processing approaches that enable state-of-the-art silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries to be leveraged for high-performance, water-soluble forms of electronics. The key elements are (i) collections of biodegradable electronic materials (e.g., silicon, tungsten, silicon nitride, silicon dioxide) and device architectures that are compatible with manufacturing procedures currently used in the integrated circuit industry, (ii) release schemes and transfer printing methods for integration of multiple ultrathin components formed in this way onto biodegradable polymer substrates, and (iii) planarization and metallization techniques to yield interconnected and fully functional systems. Various CMOS devices and circuit elements created in this fashion and detailed measurements of their electrical characteristics highlight the capabilities. Accelerated dissolution studies in aqueous environments reveal the chemical kinetics associated with the underlying transient behaviors. The results demonstrate the technical feasibility for using foundry-based routes to sophisticated forms of transient electronic devices, with functional capabilities and cost structures that could support diverse applications in the biomedical, military, industrial, and consumer industries.

  4. Unified semiclassical theory for the two-state system: an analytical solution for general nonadiabatic tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chaoyuan; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2006-07-28

    Unified semiclasical solution for general nonadiabatic tunneling between two adiabatic potential energy surfaces is established by employing unified semiclassical solution for pure nonadiabatic transition [C. Zhu, J. Chem. Phys. 105, 4159 (1996)] with the certain symmetry transformation. This symmetry comes from a detailed analysis of the reduced scattering matrix for Landau-Zener type of crossing as a special case of nonadiabatic transition and nonadiabatic tunneling. Traditional classification of crossing and noncrossing types of nonadiabatic transition can be quantitatively defined by the rotation angle of adiabatic-to-diabatic transformation, and this rotational angle enters the analytical solution for general nonadiabatic tunneling. The certain two-state exponential potential models are employed for numerical tests, and the calculations from the present general nonadiabatic tunneling formula are demonstrated in very good agreement with the results from exact quantum mechanical calculations. The present general nonadiabatic tunneling formula can be incorporated with various mixed quantum-classical methods for modeling electronically nonadiabatic processes in photochemistry.

  5. Tunneling junction as an open system. Normal tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The method of the tunneling Hamiltonian is reformulated in the case of normal tunneling by introducing two independent particle baths. Due to the baths, it becomes possible to realize a final stationary state where the electron numbers of the two electrodes in the tunneling system are maintained constant and where there exists a stationary current. The effect of the bath-system couplings on the current-voltage characteristics of the junction is discussed in relation to the usual expression of the current as a function of voltage. (Auth.)

  6. Phonon-electron coupling and tunneling effect on charge transport in organic semi-conductor crystals of Cn-BTBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yecheng; Deng, Wei-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2016-09-01

    Cn-[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]-benzothiophene (BTBT) crystals show very high hole mobilities in experiments. These high mobilities are beyond existing theory prediction. Here, we employed different quantum chemistry methods to investigate charge transfer in Cn-BTBT crystals and tried to find out the reasons for the underestimation in the theory. It was found that the hopping rate estimated by the Fermi Golden Rule is higher than that of the Marcus theory due to the high temperature approximation and failure at the classic limit. More importantly, molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the phonon induced fluctuation of electronic transfer integral is much larger than the average of the electronic transfer integral itself. Mobilities become higher if simulations implement the phonon-electron coupling. This conclusion indicates that the phonon-electron coupling promotes charge transfer in organic semi-conductors at room temperature.

  7. A new process of electron beam refining of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic equilibrium, the kinetic theory and experimental results of the metal-gas interaction in refractory metals is presented. N 2 , H 2 and CO absorption and desorption take place by a reversible process while O 2 takes place by a irreversible process with atom absorption and metal oxide desorption. A new technology of electron beam refining of Niobium is proposed based on four points: 1) preparation of the aluminothermic reduced electrode, 2) zone refining in the first melt, 3) kinetic theory of refining in the following melts and 4) design of a compact furnace. Experimental results in a pilot plant of 300 KW have shown complete agreement with the proposed technology yielding a productivity 2.4 times larger than the value predicted by the conventional technology of electron beam refining of Niobium. (Author) [pt

  8. Food processing using electrons and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouston, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The ionizing radiation which will be used as process energy for the preservation of food, will be limited to high energy electrons (less than 10 MeV), X-rays (less than 5 MeV) and gamma rays emitted by cobalt-60 (1.17;1.33 MeV) and cesium -137 (0.663 MeV). When a foodstuff is irradiated with any of these radiations absorption of the radiant energy will initiate a variety of reactions between its atomic and molecular constituents causing permanent chemical, physical and biological changes. This paper focusses on radiation processing using electron or X-ray generators in the range 2 to 10 MeV

  9. Studies of collision dynamics in electron capture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    This thesis presents some recent development in time-dependent coupled channel methods for one- and two-electron systems. The methods have been applied to detailed studies on several different aspects of charge transfer processes in ion-atom collisions at intermediate to low energies. Measurable quantities, such as partial and total cross sections, partial cross sections in projectile energy gain, orientation and alignment fractions, have been calculated. Confrontation with experiments has in general given good agreement. 29 refs

  10. Studies of collision dynamics in electron capture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.

    1989-12-01

    The thesis presents some recent development in time-dependent coupled channel methods for one- and two-electron systems. The methods have been applied to detailed studies on several different aspects of charge transfer processes in ion-atom collisions at intermediate to low energies. Measurable quantities, such as partial and total cross sections, partial cross sections in projectile energy gain, orientation and alignment fractions, have been calculated. Confrontation with experiments has in general given good agreement. 14 refs., 2 figs

  11. Low power signal processing electronics for wearable medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Custom designed microchips, known as Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), offer the lowest possible power consumption electronics. However, this comes at the cost of a longer, more complex and more costly design process compared to one using generic, off-the-shelf components. Nevertheless, their use is essential in future truly wearable medical devices that must operate for long periods of time from physically small, energy limited batteries. This presentation will demonstrate the state-of-the-art in ASIC technology for providing online signal processing for use in these wearable medical devices.

  12. New vision of magnetic tunnelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Jonathan R. [Amherst College, Amhurst, MA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments support the idea that crystal defects may be responsible for the quantum tunnelling of magnetic moments in molecular magnets at low temperatures. The magnetic moment of a typical bar magnet will never spontaneously reverse direction. However, thermal fluctuations can flip the moment of a magnetic particle just a few nanometres across. The particle can be cooled to nearly absolute zero to suppress this process, but the moment may still find a way to reverse via quantum tunnelling. Quantum tunnelling of magnetization has been the subject of decades of research. Until a few years ago, however, there had only been circumstantial evidence for the phenomenon. This is because most systems of small magnetic particles are hard to characterize - the particles have a variety of shapes, sizes and other properties, making it difficult to compare data with theory. Some real progress was made a few years ago through research into high-spin single-molecule magnets. With dimensions of about a nanometre, these magnets are usually composed of a magnetic core that is surrounded by organic complexes. When they crystallize into a regular lattice, the organic ions keep neighbouring magnets well separated so that they interact only weakly. Ideally all the molecules are identical because they have been built chemically, which means that they can be characterized precisely and that any data can be analysed quantitatively. The most studied of these molecules is manganese-12 acetate (Mn{sub 12}). Within each molecule, the spins of the eight Mn{sup 3+} ions (each with S=2) are antiparallel to the spins of the four Mn{sup 4+} ions (each with S=3/2), giving Mn{sub 12} a total spin of S=10. Or, to put it another way, the magnetic moment of Mn{sub 12} is 20 times larger than that of the electron. Now Eugene Chudnovsky of Lehman College in New York and Dmitry Garanin of the University of Mainz in Germany have suggested a new mechanism for producing tunnelling in Mn{sub 12

  13. Tunnel Face Stability & New CPT Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broere, W.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly all tunnels bored in soft soils have encountered problems with the stability of the tunnel face. In several cases these problems led to an extended stand-still of the boring process. A better understanding of the face stability, and of the soil conditions around the tunnel boring machine, can

  14. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in single molecular magnets coupled to ferromagnetic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Barnas, J.

    2007-04-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction of SMM and electrons in the leads is shown to affect the spin reversal due to quantum tunneling of magnetization. It is shown that the switching is associated with transfer of a certain charge between the leads.

  15. Quantum random number generator based on quantum tunneling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haihan; Li, Junlin; Pan, Dong; Zhang, Weixing; Long, Guilu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an experimental implementation of quantum random number generator(QRNG) with inherent randomness of quantum tunneling effect of electrons. We exploited InGaAs/InP diodes, whose valance band and conduction band shared a quasi-constant energy barrier. We applied a bias voltage on the InGaAs/InP avalanche diode, which made the diode works under Geiger mode, and triggered the tunneling events with a periodic pulse. Finally, after data collection and post-processing, our...

  16. Interpreting tunneling time in circularly polarized strong-laser ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, MingHu; Xin, PeiPei; Chu, TianShu; Liu, HongPing

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to study the tunneling process by analyzing the time-dependent ionization yield in circularly polarized laser. A numerical calculation shows that for an atom exposed to a long laser pulse, if its initial electronic state wave function is non-spherical symmetric, the delayed phase shift of the ionization rate vs. the laser cycle period in real time in the region close to the peak intensity of the laser pulse can be used to probe the tunneling time. In this region, an obviou...

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopic images and scanning tunneling spectra for coupled rectangular quantum corrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuoka, Shigenori; Tamura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Assuming that an electron confined by double δ-function barriers lies in a quasi-stationary state, we derived eigenstates and eigenenergies of the electron. Such an electron has a complex eigenenergy, and the imaginary part naturally leads to the lifetime of the electron associated with tunneling through barriers. We applied this point of view to the electron confined in a rectangular quantum corral (QC) on a noble metal surface, and obtained scanning tunneling microscopic images and a scanning tunneling spectrum consistent with experimental ones. We investigated the electron states confined in coupled QCs and obtained the coupled states constructed with bonding and anti-bonding states. Using those energy levels and wavefunctions we specified scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images and scanning tunneling spectra (STS) for the doubly and triply coupled QCs. In addition we pointed out the feature of resonant electron states associated with the same QCs at both ends of the triply coupled QCs.

  18. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes....... One derivative has additional methylene groups separating the thiols from the delocalized -electron system. The insertion of methylene groups changes the open state conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude and changes the transport mechanism from a coherent regime with finite zero-bias conductance...

  19. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eQuindeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8]O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us to develop a characteristic transfer function that has only one parameter viz. the characteristic switching time and fully predicts the resistive states of this type of memristor.

  20. Electron beam application in industrial polymer processing - Review and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gielenz, G.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The various established industrial electron beam (EB) applications as related to polymers, their corresponding material and process fundamentals are discussed in this paper. The basics of nowadays most common irradiation processes, which are for continuous stranded products: Single Beam, Rotary Technique; Single Beam, Multiple Pass Technique; Dual Beam, Multiple Pass Technique; and Single Beam, Single (Multiple) Pass Technique by means of a conveyor belt or cart system for discontinuous goods are briefly addressed together with some typical examples for illustration. Some comments on the (dis)advantages and the future economic optimization potential which EB processing technologies could provide to the respective polymer processing industries are presented with respect to material, accelerator equipment and related product handling hardware. The future competitiveness of irradiation crosslinking technologies, which offer numerous advantages in comparison to conventional CV curing and silane crosslinking technologies, only can be maintained by increasing their economic attractiveness, which is: high processing speeds, high material throughput at low production costs and comparatively low capital investment of the hardware involved. Other, more sophisticated irradiation process proposals found in the literature and respective patent publications will be briefly presented, although all of which lack more or less practical evidence for industrial economic and reliable application. Finally, the authors vision of a more efficient, economical EB-process design, by combining quasi state of the art EB-equipment components with a novel beam deflection system to practically achieve a 'Dual Beam, Four Side Crossfiring Process' for continuous strand-products, will be presented. (author)