WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron stimulated carbon

  1. Electron stimulated carbon adsorption in ultra high vacuum monitored by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES)

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C

    2001-01-01

    Electron stimulated carbon adsorption at room temperature (RT) has been studied in the context of radiation induced surface modifications in the vacuum system of particle accelerators. The stimulated carbon adsorption was monitored by AES during continuous irradiation by 2.5 keV electrons and simultaneous exposure of the sample surface to CO, CO2 or CH4. The amount of adsorbed carbon was estimated by measuring the carbon Auger peak intensity as a function of the electron irradiation time. Investigated substrate materials are technical OFE copper and TiZrV non-evaporable getter (NEG) thin film coatings, which are saturated either in air or by CO exposure inside the Auger electron spectrometer. On the copper substrate electron induced carbon adsorption from gas phase CO and CO2 is below the detection limit of AES. During electron irradiation of the non-activated TiZrV getter thin films, electron stimulated carbon adsorption from gas phase molecules is detected when either CO or CO2 is injected, whereas the CH4 ...

  2. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  3. Electronics with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avouris, P.

    2007-01-01

    From mobile phones and laptops to Xboxes and iPods, it is difficult to think of any aspect of modern life that has not been touched by developments in electronics, computing and communications over the last few decades. Many of these technological advances have arisen from our ability to create ever smaller electronic devices, in particular silicon-based field effect transistors (FETs), which has led to denser, faster and less power-hungry circuits. The problem is that this device miniaturization, or 'scaling', cannot continue forever. Fundamental scientific and technological limitations exist that will make it impossible to build better performing silicon devices below a certain size. This potential show-stopper has inspired a worldwide effort to develop alternative device technologies based on 1D materials or those that exploit the spin, as well as the charge, of electrons. One promising and, in principle, simpler approach is to maintain the operating concept of today's silicon-based FETs but to replace a key component of the device - the semiconducting silicon channel - with 1D nanostructures that have much more versatile electrical-transport properties. Among the different 1D materials that have been developed, those with the most desirable properties are 'single-walled' carbon nanotubes, which were first created in 1993 by Sumio Ijima at the NEC Fundamental Research Laboratory in Tsukuba, Japan, and by Donald Bethune of IBM's Almaden Research Center in California. These materials are hollow tubes made from rolled up sheets of carbon just one atom thick, otherwise known as graphene. In the March issue of Physics World, Phaedon Avouris discusses some of the many properties and applications of carbon nanotubes, which he describes as an 'engineer's dream' because of their exceptionally high strength and heat conduction. (U.K.)

  4. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  5. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett B. Lewis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IVMe3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  6. Carbon footprinting of electronic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasan, Arvind; Sood, Bhanu; Pecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Challenges in adopting existing CF standards for electronic products are discussed. • Carbon footprint of electronic products is underestimated using existing standards. • Multipronged approach is presented to overcome the identified challenges. • Multipronged approach demonstrated on commercial and military grade DC–DC converter system. - Abstract: In order to mitigate the effects of global warming, companies are being compelled by governments, investors, and customers to control their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Similar to the European Union’s legislation on the airline industry, legislation is expected to require the electronics industry to assess their product’s carbon footprint before sale or use, as the electronics industry’s contribution to global GHG emissions is comparable to the airline industry’s contribution. Thus, it is necessary for members of the electronics industry to assess their current GHG emission rates and identify methods to reduce environmental impacts. Organizations use Carbon Footprint (CF) analysis methods to identify and quantify the GHG emissions associated with the life cycle stages of their product or services. This paper discusses the prevailing methods used by organizations to estimate the CF of their electronics products and identifies the challenges faced by the electronics industry when adopting these methods in an environment of decreasing product development cycles with complex and diffuse supply chains. We find that, as a result of the inconsistencies arising from the system boundary selection methods and databases, the use of outdated LCA approaches, and the lack of supplier’s emissions-related data, the CFs of electronic products are typically underestimated. To address these challenges, we present a comprehensive approach to the carbon footprinting of electronic products that involves the use of product-group-oriented standards, hybrid life cycle assessment techniques, and the

  7. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  8. The role of electron-stimulated desorption in focused electron beam induced deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of our study about the deposition rate of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) as a function of the substrate temperature with the substrate being an electron-transparent amorphous carbon membrane. When W(CO)6 is used as a precursor it is observed that the growt......, the majority desorbs from the surface rather than dissociates to contribute to the deposit. It is important to take this into account during FEBIP experiments, for instance when determining fundamental process parameters such as the activation energy for desorption....... experiments compared to literature values is consistent with earlier findings by other authors. The discrepancy is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption, which is known to occur during electron irradiation. The data suggest that, of the W(CO)6 molecules that are affected by the electron irradiation...

  9. Carbon footprint of electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Marcin

    2013-07-01

    Paper assesses the greenhouse gas emissions related to the electronic sectors including information and communication technology and media sectors. While media often presents the carbon emission problem of other industries like petroleum industry, the airlines and automobile sectors, plastics and steel manufacturers, the electronics industry must include the increasing carbon footprints caused from their applications like media and entertainment, computers and cooling devices, complex telecommunications networks, cloud computing and powerful mobile phones. In that sense greenhouse gas emission of electronics should be studied in a life cycle perspective, including regular operational electricity use. Paper presents which product groups or processes are major contributors in emission. From available data and extrapolation of existing information we know that the information and communication technology sector produced 1.3% and media sector 1.7% of global gas emissions within production cycle, using the data from 2007.In the same time global electricity use of that sectors was 3.9% and 3.2% respectively. The results indicate that for both sectors operation leads to more gas emissions than manufacture, although impacts from the manufacture is significant, especially in the supply chain. Media electronics led to more emissions than PCs (manufacture and operation). Examining the role of electronics in climate change, including disposal of its waste, will enable the industry to take internal actions, leading to lowering the impact on the climate change within the sector itself.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  12. Electron emission mechanism of carbon fiber cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lie; Li Limin; Wen Jianchun; Wan Hong

    2005-01-01

    Models of electron emission mechanism are established concerning metal and carbon fiber cathodes. Correctness of the electron emission mechanism was proved according to micro-photos and electron scanning photos of cathodes respectively. The experimental results and analysis show that the surface flashover induces the electron emission of carbon fiber cathode and there are electron emission phenomena from the top of the carbon and also from its side surface. In addition, compared with the case of the stainless steel cathode, the plasma expansion velocity for the carbon fiber cathode is slower and the pulse duration of output microwave can be widened by using the carbon fiber cathode. (authors)

  13. Spontaneous and stimulated emission induced by an electron, electron bunch, and electron beam in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzelev, M V; Rukhadze, A A

    2008-01-01

    Two fundamental mechanisms - the Cherenkov effect and anomalous Doppler effect - underlying the emission by an electron during its superluminal motion in medium are considered. Cherenkov emission induced by a single electron and a small electron bunch is spontaneous. In the course of spontaneous Cherenkov emission, the translational motion of an electron is slowed down and the radiation energy grows linearly with time. As the number of radiating electrons increases, Cherenkov emission becomes stimulated. Stimulated Cherenkov emission represents a resonance beam instability. This emission process is accompanied by longitudinal electron bunching in the beam or by the breaking of an electron bunch into smaller bunches, in which case the radiation energy grows exponentially with time. In terms of the longitudinal size L e of the electron bunch there is a transition region λ e 0 -1 between the spontaneous and stimulated Cherenkov effects, where λ is the average radiation wavelength, and δ 0 is the dimensionless (in units of the radiation frequency) growth rate of the Cherenkov beam instability. The range to the left of this region is dominated by spontaneous emission, whereas the range to the right of this region is dominated by stimulated emission. In contrast to the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect, the anomalous Doppler effect should always (even for a single electron) be considered as stimulated, because it can only be explained by accounting for the reverse action of the radiation field on the moving electron. During stimulated emission in conditions where anomalous Doppler effect shows itself, an electron is slowed down and spins up; in this case, the radiation energy grows exponentially with time. (reviews of topical problems)

  14. Electron Stimulated Molecular Desorption of a NEG St 707 at Room Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2001-01-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a NEG St 707 (SAES GettersTM) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide2,13C18O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6 1015 electrons s-1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields h (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120oC. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be accessible to ESD.

  15. Two-dimensional electronic femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie J.P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with a femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering probe. The method reveals correlations between excitation energy and excited state vibrational structure following photoexcitation. We demonstrate the method in rhodamine 6G.

  16. Electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide coadsorbed with amorphous solid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, C. C.; Faradzhev, N. S.; Madey, T. E.; Fairbrother, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    The electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide (MeI) adsorbed on and suspended within amorphous solid water (ice) were studied using a combination of postirradiation temperature programmed desorption and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. For MeI adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water (ice), electron beam irradiation is responsible for both structural and chemical transformations within the overlayer. Electron stimulated reactions of MeI result principally in the formation of methyl radicals and solvated iodide anions. The cross section for electron stimulated decomposition of MeI is comparable to the gas phase value and is only weakly dependent upon the local environment. For both adsorbed MeI and suspended MeI, reactions of methyl radicals within MeI clusters lead to the formation of ethane, ethyl iodide, and diiodomethane. In contrast, reactions between the products of methyl iodide and water dissociation are responsible for the formation of methanol and carbon dioxide. Methane, formed as a result of reactions between methyl radicals and either parent MeI molecules or hydrogen atoms, is also observed. The product distribution is found to depend on the film's initial chemical composition as well as the electron fluence. Results from this study highlight the similarities in the carbon-containing products formed when monohalomethanes coadsorbed with amorphous solid water are irradiated by either electrons or photons

  17. Search for the dose-sensitive optically stimulated luminescence response in natural carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaek, Ivar; Huett, Galina; Rammo, Ilmar; Vasilchenko, Valeri

    2001-01-01

    Carbonates of different origin, such as Iceland spar, calcites, and mollusc shells, used as electron spin resonance and thermoluminescence paleodosimeters, were studied in order to determine their suitability for optically stimulated luminescence dating. The stimulation/excitation spectra of the afterglow of the samples were recorded in the wavelength range of 250-1100 nm. The results of the study show that these spectra present either excitation spectra of Mn 2+ ion fluorescence (samples of calcites and Iceland spar, red emission recorded) or the excitation spectra of primary phosphorescence (samples of carbonates, including molluscs shells; short-wave emission bands recorded). The recorded stimulation spectra revealed no spectral bands sensitive to stimulation by ionizing radiation, which would disappear as a result of heating and could thus be related to deep traps in carbonates, needed dating. The cause of this situation which is unusual in luminescent crystals, including luminescence (paleo)dosimeters, and the ways of overcoming the difficulties in optical dating of natural carbonates are discussed. (author)

  18. A monoenergetic electron source generated by nuclear stimulated desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelson, I.; Levy, Y.; Nir, D.; Haustein, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    A series of measurements of nuclear stimulated desorption was performed for 103 Ru, using thin ruthenium films irradiated by thermal neutrons. The magnitude, time dependence and electric charge state of the outgoing 103m Rh flux was investigated. The utilization of monoenergetic electrons accompanying the 103 Rh decay for thin film thickness measurement is considered. (Author)

  19. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  1. Low energy electron irradiation induced carbon etching: Triggering carbon film reacting with oxygen from SiO{sub 2} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wang, Chao, E-mail: cwang367@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn; Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: cwang367@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-08-01

    We report low-energy (50–200 eV) electron irradiation induced etching of thin carbon films on a SiO{sub 2} substrate. The etching mechanism was interpreted that electron irradiation stimulated the dissociation of the carbon film and SiO{sub 2}, and then triggered the carbon film reacting with oxygen from the SiO{sub 2} substrate. A requirement for triggering the etching of the carbon film is that the incident electron penetrates through the whole carbon film, which is related to both irradiation energy and film thickness. This study provides a convenient electron-assisted etching with the precursor substrate, which sheds light on an efficient pathway to the fabrication of nanodevices and nanosurfaces.

  2. Stimulated Raman scattering and hot-electron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.P.; Turner, R.E.; Lasinski, B.F.; Estabrook, K.G.; Campbell, E.M.; Wang, C.L.; Phillion, D.W.; Williams, E.A.; Kruer, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    High-intensity laser light can excite parametric instabilities that scatter or absorb it. One instability that can arise when laser light penetrates a plasma is sub-quarter-critical stimulated Raman (SQSR) scattering. It occurs below the quarter-critical density of the incident light and involves the decay of the incident light wave into a scattered light wave and electron plasma wave. The scattered-light wavelength ranges from 1 to 2 times that of the incident light, depending on the plasma density and temperature. This article reports studies of SQSR scattering and hot-electron production in plasmas produced by irradiating thick gold targets with up to 4 kJ of 0.53-μm light in 1-ns (FWHM) pulses. These studies have important implications for laser fusion. Hot electrons attributed to the SQSR instability can increase the difficulty of achieving high-gain implosions by penetrating and preheating the fusion fuel

  3. Electronic Properties of Disclinations in Carbon Nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, Yu.A.; Vlasii, N.D.; Sitenko, Yu.A.; Vlasii, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    The recent synthesis of strictly two-dimensional atomic crystals (monolayers of carbon atoms) is promising a wealth of new phenomena and possible applications in technology and industry. Such materials are characterized by the Dirac-type spectrum of quasiparticle excitations, yielding a unique example of the truly two-dimensional 'relativistic' electronic system which, in the presence of disclinations, possesses rather unusual properties. We consider the influence of disclinations on densities of states and induced vacuum quantum numbers in grapheme

  4. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  5. Inorganic carbon addition stimulates snow algae primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T. L.; Havig, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Earth has experienced glacial/interglacial oscillations throughout its history. Today over 15 million square kilometers (5.8 million square miles) of Earth's land surface is covered in ice including glaciers, ice caps, and the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, most of which are retreating as a consequence of increased atmospheric CO2. Glaciers are teeming with life and supraglacial snow and ice surfaces are often red due to blooms of photoautotrophic algae. Recent evidence suggests the red pigmentation, secondary carotenoids produced in part to thrive under high irradiation, lowers albedo and accelerates melt. However, there are relatively few studies that report the productivity of snow algae communities and the parameters that constrain their growth on snow and ice surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that snow algae primary productivity can be stimulated by the addition of inorganic carbon. We found an increase in light-dependent carbon assimilation in snow algae microcosms amended with increasing amounts of inorganic carbon. Our snow algae communities were dominated by typical cosmopolitan snow algae species recovered from Alpine and Arctic environments. The climate feedbacks necessary to enter and exit glacial/interglacial oscillations are poorly understood. Evidence and models agree that global Snowball events are accompanied by changes in atmospheric CO2 with increasing CO2 necessary for entering periods of interglacial time. Our results demonstrate a positive feedback between increased CO2 and snow algal productivity and presumably growth. With the recent call for bio-albedo effects to be considered in climate models, our results underscore the need for robust climate models to include feedbacks between supraglacial primary productivity, albedo, and atmospheric CO2.

  6. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  7. Electron stimulated desorption study of oxygen adsorption on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, R.H.; Floyd, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a polycrystalline tungsten surface at approximately 800 K has been studied by means of electron stimulated desorption (ESD). Although precision gas dosing was not employed, the initial sticking probability for dissociative adsorption appears to be essentially unity, while the variation with coverage suggests that a high degree of order exists and that precursor state kinetics are significant. A most noticeable and reproducible discontinuity in ESD parameters occurs at a fractional coverage theta approximately 0.8 (exposure approximately 1.4 X 10 15 molecules/cm 2 incident) which is interpreted as an order-disorder transition within a single (β 1 ) chemisorption state, and results in an increase in the ionic desorption cross-section by a factor of approximately 1.26. A discussion of the adsorption kinetics and the disorder transition is given in terms of current models of dissociative adsoption which include the effects of nearest neighbour lateral interactions. (Auth.)

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence in electronic components for emergency dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber-Bergstrand, T.; Bernhardsson, C.; Mattsson, S.; Raeaef, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Accidents and, luckily more rarely, attacks involving nuclear or radiological material do occur from time to time. A very possible consequence of an accident or attack of this kind is that nearby people might be exposed to ionising radiation. Since these types of exposure situations, unlike the ones occurring in medicine, are unplanned, there are no radiation-monitoring data available. For several reasons, it is nevertheless of value to find out the dose that these people have received. The first and most urgent reason is after-the-event triage, to be able to carry out proper medical treatments and also to focus the available medical assets to the persons needing it the most. This is where different retrospective dosimetry techniques, such as luminescence, can be employed. Various electronic components from mobile phones and other portable devices have been studied using optically stimulated luminescence for their potential use in retrospective dosimetry. Previous investigations have been performed in laboratory conditions and have showed very promising properties for emergency dosimetry. In this study, the more practical parts of using electronic components in retrospective dosimetry have been considered. In a triage situation, one of the key parameters to consider is time; thus, effort has been made to speed up the readout procedure, yet without the loss of too much accuracy. (authors)

  9. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K; Sato, C; Shimizu, N [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Toyo University, 1-1-1 Izumino, Itakura-machi, Ora-gun, Gunma 374-0193 (Japan); Naka, Y [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Center, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Whitby, R, E-mail: shimizu@toyonet.toyo.ac.jp [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Cockroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-19

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 {mu}g ml{sup -1} CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  10. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  11. Electron beam influence on the carbon contamination of electron irradiated hydroxyapatite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G.; Tranca, Denis E.; Stanciu, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon contamination mechanisms of electron-beam-irradiated hydroxyapatite. • Atomic force microscopy phase imaging used to detect carbon contamination. • Carbon contamination dependence on electron energy, irradiation time, beam current. • Simulation of backscattered electrons confirms the experimental results. - Abstract: Electron beam irradiation which is considered a reliable method for tailoring the surface charge of hydroxyapatite is hindered by carbon contamination. Separating the effects of the carbon contamination from those of irradiation-induced trapped charge is important for a wide range of biological applications. In this work we focus on the understanding of the electron-beam-induced carbon contamination with special emphasis on the influence of the electron irradiation parameters on this phenomenon. Phase imaging in atomic force microscopy is used to evaluate the influence of electron energy, beam current and irradiation time on the shape and size of the resulted contamination patterns. Different processes involved in the carbon contamination of hydroxyapatite are discussed

  12. Substrate dependence of electron-stimulated O - yields from dissociative electron attachment to physisorbed O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huels, M. A.; Parenteau, L.; Sanche, L.

    1994-03-01

    We present measurements of O- electron stimulated desorption yields obtained under identical experimental conditions from 0.15 monolayers (ML) of O2 deposited onto disordered substrates consisting of 4 ML of either Kr, Xe, C2H6, C2H4, N2O, CH3Cl, or H2O, all condensed on Pt (polycrystalline). The resulting O- yield functions, for incident electron energies below 20 eV, are compared to that obtained from the O2/Kr solid; this allows us to assess the order of magnitude effects of the local substrate environment on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) via the 2Πu and gas phase forbidden 2Σ+g,u resonances of O-2. We note that, in addition to electron energy losses in the substrate prior to DEA to O2 and post-dissociation interactions of the O- with the substrate molecules, charge or energy transfer from the O-2 transient anion to a substrate molecule, and capture of the incident electron into a dissociative anion resonance of the substrate molecule may contribute to a reduced O- yield from the physisorbed O2. In the case of O2 deposited on amorphous ice, we find that the O- signal from DEA to O2 is completely absent for electron energies below 14 eV; we attribute this to a complete quenching of the dissociative O-2(2Πu, 2Σ+) resonances by the adjacent water molecules.

  13. Electron tunneling in carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gau, C; Kuo, Cheng-Yung; Ko, H S

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites, such as polymer blending with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been shown to have a drastic reduction in the resistivity and become conductive when the CNTs concentration has reached a certain percolation threshold. The reduction could be more than a millionth of the original polymer material. This has been realized as the formation of an infinite cluster of connected CNTs or pathways. Therefore, the conductivity of a nanocomposite should follow that of CNTs. Here we show that the resistivity of a nanocomposite is not governed by the interconnected CNTs, but the polymer between neighboring CNTs. That is, polymer-CNTs exhibit the nature of a conducting polymer, which can be explained as the tunneling of electrons one by one from the first CNT electrode to the next-nearest CNT electrode, forming a CNT/polymer pathway. A conduction model based on the tunneling of electrons passing, one by one, through the polymer gap between two neighboring CNT electrodes is formulated and derived. This model can accurately predict the significant reduction of the polymer-CNTs' resistivity with the addition of CNTs. The temperature effect can be readily incorporated to account for resistivity variation with the temperature of this nanocomposites.

  14. New Insight into Carbon Nanotube Electronic Structure Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental role of aryl diazonium salts for post synthesis selectivity of carbon nanotubes is investigated using extensive electronic structure calculations. The resulting understanding for diazonium salt based selective separation of conducting and semiconducting carbon nanotubes shows how the primary contributions come from the interplay between the intrinsic electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes and that of the anion of the salt. We demonstrate how the electronic transport properties change upon the formation of charge transfer complexes and upon their conversion into covalently attached functional groups. Our results are found to correlate well with experiments and provide for the first time an atomistic description for diazonium salt based chemical separation of carbon nanotubes

  15. Electron stimulated molecular desorption of a non-evaporable Zr-V-Fe alloy getter at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, Frederic; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2002-01-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a non-evaporable getters (NEG) St 707 registered trademark (SAES Getters trademark ) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide (cf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press, 1994), **1**3C**1**8O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6 multiplied by 10**1**5 electrons s**-**1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm **2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields eta (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with **1**3C**1**8O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120 degree C. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be ...

  16. Stimulation of the anaerobic digestion of the dry organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with carbon-based conductive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yan; Sun, Dezhi; Woodard, Trevor L; Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P; Holmes, Dawn E

    2017-08-01

    Growth of bacterial and archaeal species capable of interspecies electron exchange was stimulated by addition of conductive materials (carbon cloth or granular activated carbon (GAC)) to anaerobic digesters treating dog food (a substitute for the dry-organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW)). Methane production (772-1428mmol vs carbon cloth than controls. OFMSW degradation was also significantly accelerated and VFA concentrations were substantially lower in reactors amended with conductive materials. These results suggest that both conductive materials (carbon cloth and GAC) can promote conversion of OFMSW to methane even in the presence of extremely high VFA concentrations (∼500mM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of optically and thermally stimulated electron emission from natural minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, C.; Murray, A.S.; Denby, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    to a Riso TL/OSL reader, enabling optically stimulated electrons (OSE) and thermally stimulated electrons (TSE) to be measured simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL). Repeated irradiation and measurement is possible without removing the sample from...... the counting chamber. Using this equipment both OSE and TSE from loose sand-sized grains of natural minerals has been recorded. It is shown that both the surface electron traps (giving rise to the OSE signals) and the bulk traps (giving rise to OSL) have the same dosimetric properties. A comparison of OSL...

  18. Stimulated emission of photoexcited polarized electrons from GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Melikyan, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of electric field on the emission of photoexcited polarized electrons is investigated. The thermalization of excited electrons is shown to be prevented at the field intensity in semiconductor of about 3 kV/cm. As a consequence the quantum yield grows up to unity. With the increase of the output energy of electrons the effective operation time of photocathode also increases

  19. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms. Key Words: Microbial iron reduction-Micropore-Electron transfer strategies-Microbial carbonate. Astrobiology 18, 28-36.

  20. Electron stimulated desorption of gases at technological surfaces of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.Q.; Williams, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release of gas by electron bombardment at aluminium alloy surfaces in vacuum -9 torr has been investigated for a range of treatments including bakeout and glow discharge cleaning. Particular attention has been given to the role of continuous electron bombardment, with current densities and electron energies of up to 1.5 mA cm -2 and 2.0 keV, respectively, over the 10 cm 2 of surface area under irradiation. The observations of desorption efficiency, defined as the number of desorbed molecules per incident electron, conform to a model involving a dynamic balance between adsorption and desorption, with contributions to adsorption from both surface and sub-surface gas. Continuous electron bombardment promotes a surface with low desorption efficiency, -5 mol/electron, however, the conditioning cycle is accelerated significantly by glow discharge treatment. There is evidence of some short-term memory when the samples are exposed to air. (author)

  1. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M.

    2012-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation...

  2. Electronically switchable sham transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Hoeft

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is increasingly being used to demonstrate the causal links between brain and behavior in humans. Further, extensive clinical trials are being conducted to investigate the therapeutic role of TMS in disorders such as depression. Because TMS causes strong peripheral effects such as auditory clicks and muscle twitches, experimental artifacts such as subject bias and placebo effect are clear concerns. Several sham TMS methods have been developed, but none of the techniques allows one to intermix real and sham TMS on a trial-by-trial basis in a double-blind manner. We have developed an attachment that allows fast, automated switching between Standard TMS and two types of control TMS (Sham and Reverse without movement of the coil or reconfiguration of the setup. We validate the setup by performing mathematical modeling, search-coil and physiological measurements. To see if the stimulus conditions can be blinded, we conduct perceptual discrimination and sensory perception studies. We verify that the physical properties of the stimulus are appropriate, and that successive stimuli do not contaminate each other. We find that the threshold for motor activation is significantly higher for Reversed than for Standard stimulation, and that Sham stimulation entirely fails to activate muscle potentials. Subjects and experimenters perform poorly at discriminating between Sham and Standard TMS with a figure-of-eight coil, and between Reverse and Standard TMS with a circular coil. Our results raise the possibility of utilizing this technique for a wide range of applications.

  3. Regeneration of used activated carbon by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, H.; Hosono, M.; Zhu, G.; Miyata, T.

    1992-01-01

    The adsorbing power of granular activated carbons which adsorbed sodium laurylsulfate were most effectively recovered by irradiation of high energy electron beams in nitrogen stream, and the carbon was hardly lost by irradiation. The regeneration was induced mainly by microscopic heating of adsorption sites. Regeneration was also confirmed by adsorption endotherms. Regeneration cost was tentatively evaluated. (author)

  4. Ionic molecular films. Applications. 3. Electron beam stimulated enhanced adherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, G; Montereali, R M; Scavarda do Carmo, L C

    1989-11-01

    This paper reports on the advantages of the use of the technique of electron beam lithography to imprint enhanced sensitive patterns on ionic molecular substrates (bulk crystals or films). With this technique, localized superficial defects are produced which change the chemical properties of surfaces. Sensitized surfaces react with absorbates providing enhanced adherence of such substances. The use of spacially controlled electron beams allows the construction of small (sub-micron) feature chemical and very localized enhanced adherence of absorbates.

  5. Acetaldehyde stimulation of net gluconeogenic carbon movement from applied malic acid in tomato fruit pericarp tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halinska, A.; Frenkel, C.

    1991-01-01

    Applied acetaldehyde is known to lead to sugar accumulation in fruit including tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) presumably due to stimulation of gluconeogenesis. This conjecture was examined using tomato fruit pericarp discs as a test system and applied l-[U- 14 C]malic acid as the source for gluconeogenic carbon mobilization. Results indicate that malic and perhaps other organic acids are carbon sources for gluconeogenesis occurring normally in ripening tomatoes. The process is stimulated by acetaldehyde apparently by attenuating the fructose-2,6-biphosphate levels. The mode of the acetaldehyde regulation of fructose-2,6-biphosphate metabolism awaits clarification

  6. Improvement of carbon fiber surface properties using electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, E.S.; Machado, L.D.B.; Giovedi, C.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced advance composites have been used for structural applications, mainly on account of their mechanical properties. The main factor for a good mechanical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composite is the interfacial interaction between its components, which are carbon fiber and polymeric matrix. The aim of this study is to improve the surface properties of the carbon fiber using ionizing radiation from an electron beam to obtain better adhesion properties in the resultant composite. EB radiation was applied on the carbon fiber itself before preparing test specimens for the mechanical tests. Experimental results showed that EB irradiation improved the tensile strength of carbon fiber samples. The maximum value in tensile strength was reached using doses of about 250 kGy. After breakage, the morphology aspect of the tensile specimens prepared with irradiated and non-irradiated car- bon fibers were evaluated. SEM micrographs showed modifications on the carbon fiber surface. (authors)

  7. Electron irradiation of carbon dioxide-carbon disulphide ice analog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    les and the reactions where they take part in making the complex molecules were studied in laboratory simu- lations in both the gas and ice phase.1 Indeed, in such experimental simulations it is observed that several other carbon and sulphur bearing molecules, so far not reported to be present in the ISM, were also synthe-.

  8. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  9. Development of Field-Emission Electron Gun from Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hozumi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Aiming to use a narrow energy-spread electron beam easily and low costly on injector electron guns, we have been tested field emission cathodes of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Experiments for these three years brought us important suggestions and a few rules of thumb. Now at last, anode current of 3.0 [A/cm2

  10. Simulation and Optimization of a Carbon Nanotube Electron Source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knápek, Alexandr; Radlička, Tomáš; Krátký, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 60-65 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : carbon nanotube * electron beam lithography Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  11. Electronic properties of bromine-doped carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Jhi, S H; Cohen, M L

    2002-01-01

    Intercalation of bromine molecules (Br2) into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes is studied using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. Electronic and vibrational properties of the SWNT and Br2 are studied for various bromine concentrations. A drastic change in the charge transfer, bromine stretching-mode, and bromine bond-length is observed when the bromine-bromine distance decreases. Calculated electronic structures show that, at high bromine concentrations, the bromine ppsigma level broadens due to the interbromine interaction. These states overlap with the electronic bands of the SWNT near the Fermi level which results in a substantial charge transfer from carbon to bromine.

  12. Electron momentum spectroscopy of the core state of solid carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caprari, R.S.; Clark, S.A.C.; McCarthy, I.E.; Storer, P.J.; Vos, M.; Weigold, E.

    1994-08-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy (binary encounter (e,2e)) experimental results are presented for the core state of an amorphous carbon allotrope. The (e,2e) cross section has two identifiable regions. One is a narrow energy width 'core band peak' that does not disperse with momentum. At higher binding energies there is an energy diffuse 'multiple scattering continuum', which is a consequence of (e,2e) collisions with core electrons that are accompanied by inelastic scattering of one or more of the incoming or outgoing electrons. Comparisons of experimental momentum distributions with the Hartree-Fock atomic carbon ls orbital are presented for both regions. 16 refs., 4 figs

  13. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  14. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kimberg

    2016-05-01

    → π * transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations.

  15. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  16. Electron-stimulated desorption from condensed branched alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, J.A.; Knotek, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Desorption of H + , CH 3+ , H 2+ , and D + have been measured as a function of electron excitation energy for solid neopentane, tetramethylsilane and two deuterated isomers of isobutane. The evidence shows that C-C (or Si-C) and C-H bonds are broken by electronic excitations localized on methyl groups, in contrast to CH 3+ production in gas-phase neopentane, and that these excitations are the final states of decay processes initiated by creation of a hole in the C2s level, or, in tetramethylsilane, the C2s/Si3s level. This is in accord with other evidence which shows that localized multi-valence hole states result in C-H, C-C, Si-C and Si-H dissociation, and that such states may be excited either directly or by shakeup, by decay from a C2s hole, or by decay for a C1s core hole. It is apparent then, that dissociation and desorption of ions from covalent materials is a multi (electron) hole mechanism, and that the means of localizing the excitation energy in such systems involves multi-hole correlation

  17. Dissolved organic carbon leaching from plastics stimulates microbial activity in the ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romera-Castillo, C.; Pinto, M.; Langer, T.M.; Alvarez-Salgado, X.A.; Herndl, G.

    2018-01-01

    Approximately 5.25 trillion plastic pieces are floating at the sea surface. The impact of plastic pollution on the lowest trophic levels of the food web, however, remains unknown. Here we show that plastics release dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the ambient seawater stimulating the activity of

  18. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes as electronic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopee, Vimal Chandra

    The drive for miniaturisation of electronic circuits provides new materials challenges for the electronics industry. Indeed, the continued downscaling of transistor dimensions, described by Moore’s Law, has led to a race to find suitable replacements for current interconnect materials to replace copper. Carbon nanotubes have been studied as a suitable replacement for copper due to its superior electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. One of the advantages of using carbon nanotubes is their high current carrying capacity which has been demonstrated to be three orders of magnitude greater than that of copper. Most approaches in the implementation of carbon nanotubes have so far focused on the growth in vias which limits their application. In this work, a process is described for the transfer of carbon nanotubes to substrates allowing their use for more varied applications. Arrays of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes were synthesised by photo-thermal chemical vapour deposition with high growth rates. Raman spectroscopy was used to show that the synthesised carbon nanotubes were of high quality. The carbon nanotubes were exposed to an oxygen plasma and the nature of the functional groups present was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Functional groups, such as carboxyl, carbonyl and hydroxyl groups, were found to be present on the surface of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes after the functionalisation process. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes were metallised after the functionalisation process using magnetron sputtering. Two materials, solder and sintered silver, were chosen to bind carbon nanotubes to substrates so as to enable their transfer and also to make electrical contact. The wettability of solder to carbon nanotubes was investigated and it was demonstrated that both functionalisation and metallisation were required in order for solder to bond with the carbon nanotubes. Similarly, functionalisation followed by metallisation

  19. Electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doore, Keith; Cook, Matthew; Clausen, Eric; Lukashev, Pavel V; Kidd, Tim E; Stollenwerk, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Despite an enormous amount of research on carbon based nanostructures, relatively little is known about the electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes, also known as carbon onions. In part, this is due to the very high computational expense involved in estimating electronic structure of large molecules. At the same time, experimentally, the exact crystal structure of the carbon onion is usually unknown, and therefore one relies on qualitative arguments only. In this work we present the results of a computational study on a series of multi-walled fullerenes and compare their electronic structures to experimental data. Experimentally, the carbon onions were fabricated using ultrasonic agitation of isopropanol alcohol and deposited onto the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using a drop cast method. Scanning tunneling microscopy images indicate that the carbon onions produced using this technique are ellipsoidal with dimensions on the order of 10 nm. The majority of differential tunneling spectra acquired on individual carbon onions are similar to that of graphite with the addition of molecular-like peaks, indicating that these particles span the transition between molecules and bulk crystals. A smaller, yet sizable number exhibited a semiconducting gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels. These results are compared with the electronic structure of different carbon onion configurations calculated using first-principles. Similar to the experimental results, the majority of these configurations are metallic with a minority behaving as semiconductors. Analysis of the configurations investigated here reveals that each carbon onion exhibiting an energy band gap consisted only of non-metallic fullerene layers, indicating that the interlayer interaction is not significant enough to affect the total density of states in these structures. (paper)

  20. Carbonate counter pump stimulated by natural iron fertilization in the Polar Frontal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Ian; Schiebel, Ralf; Ziveri, Patrizia; Movellan, Aurore; Lampitt, Richard; Wolff, George A.

    2014-12-01

    The production of organic carbon in the ocean's surface and its subsequent downward export transfers carbon dioxide to the deep ocean. This CO2 drawdown is countered by the biological precipitation of carbonate, followed by sinking of particulate inorganic carbon, which is a source of carbon dioxide to the surface ocean, and hence the atmosphere over 100-1,000 year timescales. The net transfer of CO2 to the deep ocean is therefore dependent on the relative amount of organic and inorganic carbon in sinking particles. In the Southern Ocean, iron fertilization has been shown to increase the export of organic carbon, but it is unclear to what degree this effect is compensated by the export of inorganic carbon. Here we assess the composition of sinking particles collected from sediment traps located in the Polar Frontal Zone of the Southern Ocean. We find that in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions that are characterized by naturally high iron concentrations, fluxes of both organic and inorganic carbon are higher than in regions with no iron fertilization. However, the excess flux of inorganic carbon is greater than that of organic carbon. We estimate that the production and flux of carbonate in naturally iron-fertilized waters reduces the overall amount of CO2 transferred to the deep ocean by 6-32%, compared to 1-4% at the non-fertilized site. We suggest that an increased export of organic carbon, stimulated by iron availability in the glacial sub-Antarctic oceans, may have been accompanied by a strengthened carbonate counter pump.

  1. Designing electronic anisotropy of three-dimensional carbon allotropes for the all-carbon device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li-Chun, E-mail: xulichun@tyut.edu.cn; Song, Xian-Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Li, Xiu-Yan [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Ru-Zhi; Yan, Hui [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2015-07-13

    Extending two-dimensional (2D) graphene nanosheets to a three-dimensional (3D) network can enhance the design of all-carbon electronic devices. Based on the great diversity of carbon atomic bonding, we have constructed four superlattice-type carbon allotrope candidates, containing sp{sup 2}-bonding transport channels and sp{sup 3}-bonding insulating layers, using density functional theory. It was demonstrated through systematic simulations that the ultra-thin insulating layer with only three-atom thickness can switch off the tunneling transport and isolate the electronic connection between the adjacent graphene strips, and these alternating perpendicular strips also extend the electron road from 2D to 3D. Designing electronic anisotropy originates from the mutually perpendicular π bonds and the rare partial charge density of the corresponding carriers in insulating layers. Our results indicate the possibility of producing custom-designed 3D all-carbon devices with building blocks of graphene and diamond.

  2. Self-grafting carbon nanotubes on polymers for stretchable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Piero; Moyanova, Slavianka; Pavone, Luigi; Fazi, Laura; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Rapone, Bruno; Gaglione, Anderson; Senesi, Roberto

    2018-06-01

    Elementary bidimensional circuitry made of single-wall carbon-nanotube-based conductors, self-grafted on different polymer films, is accomplished in an attempt to develop a simple technology for flexible and stretchable electronic devices. Unlike in other studies of polymer-carbon nanotube composites, no chemical functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes is necessary for stable grafting onto several polymeric surfaces, suggesting viable and cheap fabrication technologies for stretchable microdevices. Electrical characterization of both unstretched and strongly stretched conductors is provided, while an insight on the mechanisms of strong adhesion to the polymer is obtained by scanning electron microscopy of the surface composite. As a first example of technological application, the electrical functionality of a carbon-nanotube-based 6-sensor (electrode) grid was demonstrated by recording of subdural electrocorticograms in freely moving rats over approximately three months. The results are very promising and may serve as a basis for future work targeting clinical applications.

  3. Visible Light Neural Stimulation on graphitic-Carbon Nitride/Graphene Photocatalytic Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Xu, Ruodan; Wang, Zegao

    2017-01-01

    conversion, was for the first time investigated. Specifically, g-C3N4 was combined with graphene oxide (GO) in a 3D manner on the surfaces of electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin (PG) fibers and functioned as a biocompatible interface for visible-light stimulating neuronal differentiation. The enhanced......Light stimulation allows remote and spatiotemporally accurate operation that has been applied as effective, non-invasive means of therapeutic interventions. Here, visible light neural stimulation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), an emerging photocatalyst with visible-light optoelectronic...... was confirmed by the Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, live dead staining and colorimetric cell viability assay CCK-8. Under a bidaily, monochromatic light stimulation at a wavelength of 450 nm at 10mW/cm2, a 18.5-fold increase of neurite outgrowth of PC12 was found on g-C3N4 coated fibers; while AA reduced GO...

  4. The use of angle resolved electron and photon stimulated desorption for the determination of molecular structure at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, T.E.; Stockbauer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of recent data related to the use of angle-resolved electron stimulated desorption and photon stimulated desorption in determining the structures of molecules at surfaces is made. Examples include a variety of structural assignments based on ESIAD (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distributions), the observation of short-range local ordering effects induced in adsorbed molecules by surface impurities, and the application of photon stimulated desorption to both ionic and covalent adsorbate systems. (Author) [pt

  5. Electronic and molecular structure of carbon grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almloef, Jan; Luethi, Hans-Peter

    1990-01-01

    Clusters of carbon atoms have been studied with large-scale ab initio calculations. Planar, single-sheet graphite fragments with 6 to 54 atoms were investigated, as well as the spherical C(sub 60) Buckminsterfullerene molecule. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have also been considered. Thermodynamic differences between diamond- and graphite-like grains have been studied in particular. Saturation of the peripheral bonds with hydrogen is found to provide a smooth and uniform convergence of the properties with increasing cluster size. For the graphite-like clusters the convergence to bulk values is much slower than for the three-dimensional complexes.

  6. Carbon buildup monitoring using RBS: Correlation with secondary electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, E.F.; Rosales, P.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Murillo, G.; Fernandez, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The RBS technique is applied to solve the problem of on-line monitoring of the carbon deposited on a thin backed foil under ion bombardment. An iterative method is used to reliably extract quantities such as number of projectiles and target thickness in spite of beam energy changes and detector unstabilities. Experimental values for secondary electron yields are also deduced. Results are reported for the thickness variation of thin carbon foils bombarded with carbon ions of energies between 8.95 and 13 MeV. A linear correlation of this variation is found with both, the ion fluence at target and the number of secondary electrons emitted. The correlation exists even though a wide range of beam currents, beam energies and bombarding times was used during the experiment. The measured electron yields show evidence for a change in the emission process between the original foils and the deposited layer, possibly due to a texture change

  7. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  8. Electron emission induced modifications in amorphous tetrahedral diamondlike carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, T.W.; DiNardo, N.J.; Rothman, J.B.; Siegal, M.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The cold-cathode electron emission properties of amorphous tetrahedral diamondlike carbon are promising for flat-panel display and vacuum microelectronics technologies. The onset of electron emission is, typically, preceded by open-quotes conditioningclose quotes where the material is stressed by an applied electric field. To simulate conditioning and assess its effect, we combined the spatially localized field and current of a scanning tunneling microscope tip with high-spatial-resolution characterization. Scanning force microscopy shows that conditioning alters surface morphology and electronic structure. Spatially resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy indicates that the predominant bonding configuration changes from predominantly fourfold to threefold coordination. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  9. Electron beam induced emission from carbon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetstone, S.; Kammash, T.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma use as a lasing medium has many potential advantages over conventional techniques including increased power levels and greater wavelength ranges. The basic concept is to heat and then rapidly cool a plasma forcing inversion through bottleneck creation between the recombination reaction populating a given energy level and the subsequent decay processes. Much effort has been devoted to plasmas heated by lasers and pinch devices. The authors are concerned here with electron beam heated plasmas focusing on the CIV 5g-4f transition occurring at 2530 Angstroms. These studies were initiated to provide theoretical support for experiments being performed at the University of Michigan using the Michigan Electron Long-Pulse Beam Accelerator (MELBA)

  10. Application of carbon nanoclusters in electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachkovskaya, T. M.; Sahadji, G. V.; Emelyanov, A. S.; Silaeva, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    Nanocarbon material (Ugleron and Astralens) is used for the first time for the production of metal porous cathode (MPC). It can be assumed that its implementation in the MPC matrix can change the mechanism and rate of occurrence of three-phase reactions of formation of active elements and oxygen and, thereby, improve its emission properties. The new technology of manufacturing MPC is aimed at solving the problem of increasing the durability of electro vacuum devices - more than 100,000 hours. The obtained results are intended for use in technologies for manufacturing of electron sources for electro vacuum devices used in space communication and navigation systems. In addition, they can be useful for other areas of electronics that use a metal-porous thermal cathode as sources of electron emission. There are manufactured models with the use of Ugleron and Astralens in a sponge and emission substance. A layout using Ugleron in the emission substance is tested for durability and currently has an operating time of 40,000 hours. A model with the use of Astralens and Ugleron in a sponge and emission substance respectively is tested for maximum current density. To date, it shows results comparable to the standard cathode. However, there is a suggestion that cathodes with Astralens and Ugleron have a lower evaporation rate of the active substance. There is predicted longer durability than for the standard cathode at the same emissivity.

  11. Electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Mensah, N.G.; Nkrumah, G.

    2001-09-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube has been studied using the model based on infinitely long carbon atoms wrapped along a base helix of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs). The problem is solved semiclassically, and current density J, resistivity ρ, thermopower α z , and electrical power factor P calculated. It is noted that the current density j displays negative differential conductivity, whiles the resistivity ρ increases with increasing electrical field. ρ also slowly increases at low temperatures and then gradually increases with increasing temperature. The thermopower α z shows interesting behaviour. Very intriguing is the electrical power factor which shows relatively large values. (author)

  12. Stimulation of plasma waves by electron guns on the ISEE-1 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, J.P.; Anderson, R.; Harvey, C.; Torbert, R.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter describes typical observations of the waves stimulated during the electron injections, when the spacecraft is passing through the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath and the solar wind. Topics considered include orbits of gun electrons, an electric field antenna, gun operation in the magnetosphere, natural waves in the magnetosheath and the solar wind, gun operation magnetosheath, and gun operation in the solar wind. A coupling mechanism between the electron plasma mode and streaming electrons with energies higher than the thermal speed of the cold electron population is proposed to explain the observations above the electron plasma frequency. It is demonstrated that on board the ISEE-1 satellite, the injection of an electron beam current of the order of 10 to 60 251A with energies ranging from 0 to 40 eV produced enhancements in the electric wave spectrum

  13. Electron irradiation-induced destruction of carbon nanotubes in electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molhave, Kristian; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Horsewell, Andy; Boggild, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Observations of carbon nanotubes under exposure to electron beam irradiation in standard transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems show that such treatment in some cases can cause severe damage of the nanotube structure, even at electron energies far below the approximate 100 keV threshold for knock-on damage displacing carbon atoms in the graphene structure. We find that the damage we observe in one TEM can be avoided by use of a cold finger. This and the morphology of the damage imply that water vapour, which is present as a background gas in many vacuum chambers, can damage the nanotube structure through electron beam-induced chemical reactions. Though, the dependence on the background gas makes these observations specific for the presently used systems, the results demonstrate the importance of careful assessment of the level of subtle structural damage that the individual electron microscope system can do to nanostructures during standard use

  14. Low-energy positron and electron diffraction and positron-stimulated secondary electron emission from Cu(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two series of experiments are reported. In the first, an electrostatically guided beam of low-energy (40-400 eV) positrons, delta/sub p/ was used to study low-energy positron diffraction (LEPD) from a Cu(100) surface under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) data were obtained from the same sample in the same apparatus. Comparison of LEPD and LEED intensity versus energy data with model calculations made using computer programs developed by C.B. Duke and collaborators indicated that: LEPD data is adequately modeled using potentials with no exchange-correlation term. The inelastic mean free path, lambda/sub ee/, is shorter for positrons than for electrons at low (< approx.80 eV). LEED is better than LEPD at making a determination of the first-layer spacing of Cu(100) for the particular data set reported. In the second set of experiments, the same apparatus and sample were used to compare positron- and electron-stimulated secondary-electron emission (PSSEE and ESSEE). The results were found to be consistent with existing models of secondary-electron production for metals. The energy distributions of secondary-electrons had broad low-energy (<10 eV) peaks for both positron and electron stimulation. But the PSEE distribution showed no elastic peak. Measurements of secondary-electron angular distributions, found to be cosine-like in both the PSSEE and ESSEE case, were used to obtain total secondary yield ratios, delta, at four beam energies ranging from 40-400 eV. The secondary yield ratio for primary positrons and the yield for primary electrons, delta/sub e/, were similar at these energies. For 400-eV primary particles the secondary yields were found to be delta/sub p/ = 0.94 +/- 0.12 and delta/sub e/ = 0.94 +/- 0./12, giving a ratio of unity for positron-stimulated secondary yield to electron-stimulated secondary yield

  15. Observation of Electronic Raman Scattering in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farhat, H.; Berciaud, S.; Kalbáč, Martin; Saito, R.; Heinz, T. F.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kong, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 15 (2011), s. 157401 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : spectroscopy * electronic Raman scattering * metallic carbon nanotubes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  16. Three phase carbon EOS model with electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Thiel, M.; Ree, F.H.; Grover, R.

    1987-07-01

    A simple and rapid way for computing EOS data of multiphase solids with a liquid phase is described with emphasis on carbon. The method uses a scaling model for the liquid phase and includes a provision for electronic effects. The free energy minimum determines the stable phase

  17. An electrical bio-chip to transfer and detect electromagnetic stimulation on the cells based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafizadeh-Tafti, Saeed [Nanoelectronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haqiqatkhah, Mohammad Hossein [Center of Excellence on Applied Electromagnetic Systems, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saviz, Mehrdad [Antenna Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janmaleki, Mohsen [Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 1985717443, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faraji Dana, Reza [Center of Excellence on Applied Electromagnetic Systems, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zanganeh, Somayeh [Nanoelectronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolahad, Mohammad, E-mail: m.abdolahad@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive impedimetric bio-chip based on vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VAMWCNTs), was applied in direct interaction with lung cancer cells. Our tool provided both inducing and monitoring the bioelectrical changes in the cells initiated by electromagnetic (EM) wave stimulation. EM wave of 940 MHz frequency with different intensities was used. Here, wave ablation might accumulate electrical charge on the tips of nanotubes penetrated into cell's membrane. The charge might induce ionic exchanges into the cell and cause alterations in electrical states of the membrane. Transmembrane electrostatic/dynamic states would be strongly affected due to such exchanges. Our novel modality was that, the cells' vitality changes caused by charge inductions were electrically detected with the same nanotubes in the architecture of electrodes for impedance measurement. The responses of the sensor were confirmed by electron and florescent microscopy images as well as biological assays. In summation, our method provided an effective biochip for enhancing and detecting external EM stimulation on the cells useful for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as wave-guided drug-resistance breakage. - Highlights: • A CNT-chip is fabricated to stimulate cancer cells by electromagnetic wave. • Wave induced charges accumulation on the tip of CNTs penetrated into cells. • Transmembrane electrostatic states would be strongly affected due to such exchanges. • The cells' vitality changes could be happened and electrically detected with the same chip.

  18. Stimulation of plasma waves by electron guns on the ISEE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Torbert, R.; Anderson, R.; Harvey, C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the ISEE-1 satellite experiment relating to observations of the waves stimulated during electron injections, when the spacecraft is passing through the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath, and the solar wind, are discussed. It is shown that the injection of an electron beam current of the order of 10 to 60 microamperes with energies ranging from 0 to 40 eV produces enhancements in the electric wave spectrum. An attempt has been made to identify the low-frequency electrostatic wave observed below the ion plasma frequency as an ion acoustic mode, although the excitation mechanism is not clear. A coupling mechanism between the electron plasma mode and streaming electrons with energies higher than the thermal speed of the cold electron population has been proposed to explain the observations above the electron plasma frequency.

  19. Stimulation of plasma waves by electron guns on the ISEE-1 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, J.P.; Torbert, R.; Anderson, R.; Harvey, C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the ISEE-1 satellite experiment relating to observations of the waves stimulated during electron injections, when the spacecraft is passing through the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath, and the solar wind, are discussed. It is shown that the injection of an electron beam current of the order of 10 to 60 microamperes with energies ranging from 0 to 40 eV produces enhancements in the electric wave spectrum. An attempt has been made to identify the low-frequency electrostatic wave observed below the ion plasma frequency as an ion acoustic mode, although the excitation mechanism is not clear. A coupling mechanism between the electron plasma mode and streaming electrons with energies higher than the thermal speed of the cold electron population has been proposed to explain the observations above the electron plasma frequency. 9 references

  20. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate

  1. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Hye-Mi [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Jin Woo [Advanced Nano Technology Ltd., Seoul 132-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jinhyeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Department of Energy Science and School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok, E-mail: paul@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  2. Modelling of electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margine, Elena Roxana

    The main goals of this dissertation work are the analysis and prediction of the properties of nanoscale carbon materials which hold great potential for nanotechnological applications such as strong conductive composites, field-effect transistors, diodes, rechargeable batteries, etc. Some of these exciting applications are already being actively developed, however their design via trial-and-error experimentation is often difficult and expensive. State-of-the-art simulation methods can be used as a powerful tool to streamline the path to practical implementations. In this thesis I use ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations to explore the response of nanoscale carbon materials to doping. A brief overview of the theoretical methods and of some basic concepts on carbon nanotubes are given in the first two chapters. In Chapter 3 we study the effect of doping in double-walled carbon nanotubes. These systems can be considered as nanoscale capacitors since they have two conducting (or semi-conducting) shells. The experimental work of our collaborators demonstrated for the first time that such a capacitor can be realized by the adsorption of bromine anions at the surface of the outer tube. Our theoretical analysis of the experimental results revealed that this quantum system, surprisingly, behaves exactly as the classical Faraday cage: the electric charge always resides on the outside surface of the conductor, even when the pristine tubes are not metallic. In Chapter 4 I present our findings on the phonon frequencies' response to electron doping in single-walled carbon nanotubes. It is well established that when graphite is doped with electrons, carbon-carbon bonds lengthen and all vibrational frequencies soften. However, in semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the frequency of one mode increases at low levels of alkali doping. Having carefully modelled the process with ab initio methods we conclude that the unusual behavior of the vibrational mode depends on which electronic

  3. Recent advances in carbon nanotube-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prithu; Ahuja, Prerit

    2008-01-01

    CNT-electronics is a field involving synthesis of carbon nanotubes-based novel electronic circuits, comparable to the size of molecules, the practically fundamental size possible. It has brought a new paradigm in science as it has enabled scientists to increase the device integration density tremendously, hence achieving better efficiency and speed. Here we review the state-of-art current research on the applications of CNTs in electronics and present recent results outlining their potential along with illustrating some current concerns in the research field. Unconventional projects such as CNT-based biological sensors, transistors, field emitters, integrated circuits, etc. are taking CNT-based electronics to its extremes. The field holds a promise for mass production of high speed and efficient electronic devices. However, the chemical complexity, reproducibility and other factors make the field a challenging one, which need to be addressed before the field realizes its true potential

  4. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi, E-mail: nakahara@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2} sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  5. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  6. The use of stimulated electron emission (SEE) in homeland security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Facina, M.; Lee, W. T.; Niu, H. W.

    2012-06-01

    Certain insulating solids can store a fraction of the absorbed energy when irradiated by ionizing radiation. The stored energy can be released subsequently by heating or optical stimulation. As a result, light may be emitted through Thermoluminescence (TL) or Optically-Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and electrons may be emitted through Thermally-Stimulated Electron Emission (TSEE) or Optically-Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE). TL and OSL are widely used in current radiation dosimetry systems. However, despite considerable research effort during the early 1970s, SEE was not commonly adopted for dosimetry applications. One of the main reasons is that SEE is a surface phenomenon, while luminescence is a bulk phenomenon, making SEE more susceptible to humidity, absorption of gases, minor physical defects and handling, both before and after irradiation. Nevertheless, it has been recognized that SEE may be useful for homeland security applications in nuclear forensics, where dose accuracy is not the primary performance metric. In this research, we are investigating the use of SEE for nuclear forensic applications. Many common materials, both natural and man-made, exhibit the phenomenon, providing an opportunity to use the environment itself as an in-situ radiation detector. We have designed and constructed a unique prototype reader for conducting SEE measurements. We have demonstrated that the SEE measurements from a variety of materials are quantitatively reproducible and correlated to radiation exposure. Due to the broad applicability of SEE, significant additional studies are warranted to optimize this novel technique for nuclear forensic and other applications.

  7. Investigation of new superhard carbon allotropes with promising electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Yulia A.; Kvashnin, Alexander G. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Sorokin, Pavel B., E-mail: psorokin@iph.krasn.ru [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics of RAS, 4 Kosigina St., Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-14

    During the systematic search for a new superhard carbon allotrope, we predicted three structures with promising physical properties. Our electronic structure calculations show that these materials have a semiconducting band gap and a high carrier mobility comparable with diamond. The simulated x-ray diffraction patterns of the proposed materials are in a good agreement with the experimental X-ray spectra. Evaluated phase transition pressures from graphite to the new proposed carbon phases are smaller than 25 GPa and close to the experimental values.

  8. Structural, electronic and optical properties of carbon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M L [California Univ., Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    Carbon nitride was proposed as a superhard material and a structural prototype, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, was examined using several theoretical models. Some reports claiming experimental verifications have been made recently. The current status of the theory and experiment is reviewed, and a detailed discussion is presented of calculations of the electronic and optical properties of this material. These calculations predict that {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} will have a minimum gap which is indirect at 6.4{+-}0.5 eV. A discussion of the possibility of carbon nitride nanotubes is also presented. (orig.)

  9. Fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Julio R; Villalta-Cerdas, Adrián; Echegoyen, Luis

    2012-01-01

    With the constant growing complexity of electronic devices, the top-down approach used with silicon based technology is facing both technological and physical challenges. Carbon based nanomaterials are good candidates to be used in the construction of electronic circuitry using a bottom-up approach, because they have semiconductor properties and dimensions within the required physical limit to establish electrical connections. The unique electronic properties of fullerenes for example, have allowed the construction of molecular rectifiers and transistors that can operate with more than two logical states. Carbon nanotubes have shown their potential to be used in the construction of molecular wires and FET transistors that can operate in the THz frequency range. On the other hand, graphene is not only the most promising material for replacing ITO in the construction of transparent electrodes but it has also shown quantum Hall effect and conductance properties that depend on the edges or chemical doping. The purpose of this review is to present recent developments on the utilization carbon nanomaterials in molecular electronics.

  10. Dimension-dependent stimulated radiative interaction of a single electron quantum wavepacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, Avraham; Pan, Yiming

    2018-06-01

    In the foundation of quantum mechanics, the spatial dimensions of electron wavepacket are understood only in terms of an expectation value - the probability distribution of the particle location. One can still inquire how the quantum electron wavepacket size affects a physical process. Here we address the fundamental physics problem of particle-wave duality and the measurability of a free electron quantum wavepacket. Our analysis of stimulated radiative interaction of an electron wavepacket, accompanied by numerical computations, reveals two limits. In the quantum regime of long wavepacket size relative to radiation wavelength, one obtains only quantum-recoil multiphoton sidebands in the electron energy spectrum. In the opposite regime, the wavepacket interaction approaches the limit of classical point-particle acceleration. The wavepacket features can be revealed in experiments carried out in the intermediate regime of wavepacket size commensurate with the radiation wavelength.

  11. Stimulated Brillouin scattering during electron gyro-harmonic heating at EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Fu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations of secondary radiation, stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE, produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based, high-power, high-frequency (HF radio waves are considered. The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility is capable of generating narrowband SEE in the form of stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter (SIBS in the SEE spectrum. Such narrowband SEE spectral lines have not been reported using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT heater facility before. This work reports the first EISCAT results of narrowband SEE spectra and compares them to SEE previously observed at HAARP during electron gyro-harmonic heating. An analysis of experimental SEE data shows observations of emission lines within 100 Hz of the pump frequency, interpreted as SBS, during the 2012 July EISCAT campaign. Experimental results indicate that SBS strengthens as the pump frequency approaches the third electron gyro-harmonic. Also, for different heater antenna beam angles, the CUTLASS radar backscatter induced by HF radio pumping is suppressed near electron gyro-harmonics, whereas electron temperature enhancement weakens as measured by EISCAT/UHF radar. The main features of these new narrowband EISCAT observations are generally consistent with previous SBS measurements at HAARP.

  12. Optical Performance of Carbon-Nanotube Electron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, Niels de; Allioux, Myriam; Oostveen, Jim T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Milne, William I.

    2005-01-01

    The figure of merit for the electron optical performance of carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron sources is presented. This figure is given by the relation between the reduced brightness and the energy spread in the region of stable emission. It is shown experimentally that a CNT electron source exhibits a highly stable emission process that follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission, fixing the relationship among the energy spread, the current, and the radius. The performance of the CNT emitter under realistic operating conditions is compared with state-of-the-art electron point sources. It is demonstrated that the reduced brightness is a function of the tunneling parameter, a measure of the energy spread at low temperatures, only, independent of the geometry of the emitter

  13. A Carbon Nanotube Electron Source Based Ionization Vacuum Gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changkun Dong; Ganapati Myneni

    2003-10-01

    The results of fabrication and performance of an ionization vacuum gauge using a carbon nanotube (CNT) electron source are presented. The electron source was constructed with multi-wall nanotubes (MWNT), which were grown using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The electron emission of the source was stable in vacuum pressure up to 10-7 Torr, which is better than the metal field emitters. The measurement linearity of the gauge was better than {+-}10% from 10-6 to 10-10 Torr. The gauge sensitivity of 4 Torr-1 was achieved under 50 {micro}A electron emission in nitrogen. The gauge is expected to find applications in vacuum measurements from 10-7 Torr to below 10-11 Torr.

  14. Recent advances in molecular electronics based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Campidelli, Stéphane; Chenevier, Pascale; Derycke, Vincent; Filoramo, Arianna; Goffman, Marcelo F

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional physical properties that make them one of the most promising building blocks for future nanotechnologies. They may in particular play an important role in the development of innovative electronic devices in the fields of flexible electronics, ultra-high sensitivity sensors, high frequency electronics, opto-electronics, energy sources and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS). Proofs of concept of several high performance devices already exist, usually at the single device level, but there remain many serious scientific issues to be solved before the viability of such routes can be evaluated. In particular, the main concern regards the controlled synthesis and positioning of nanotubes. In our opinion, truly innovative use of these nano-objects will come from: (i) the combination of some of their complementary physical properties, such as combining their electrical and mechanical properties, (ii) the combination of their properties with additional benefits coming from other molecules grafted on the nanotubes, and (iii) the use of chemically- or bio-directed self-assembly processes to allow the efficient combination of several devices into functional arrays or circuits. In this article, we outline the main issues concerning the development of carbon nanotubes based electronics applications and review our recent results in the field.

  15. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; King, Todd T.; Bis, Rachael A.; Jones, Hollis H.; Herrero, Federico; Lynch, Bernard A.; Roman, Patrick; Mahaffy, Paul

    2007-04-01

    A cold cathode field emission electron gun (e-gun) based on a patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) film has been fabricated for use in a miniaturized reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOF MS), with future applications in other charged particle spectrometers, and performance of the CNT e-gun has been evaluated. A thermionic electron gun has also been fabricated and evaluated in parallel and its performance is used as a benchmark in the evaluation of our CNT e-gun. Implications for future improvements and integration into the RTOF MS are discussed.

  16. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Cao Juexian; Yang Wei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressures based on molecular dynamics simulations and first principles band structure calculations. It is found that carbon nanotubes experience a hard-to-soft transition as external pressure increases. The bulk modulus of soft phase is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of hard phase. The band structure calculations show that band gap of (10, 0) nanotube increases with the increase of pressure at low pressures. Above a critical pressure (5.70GPa), band gap of (10, 0) nanotube drops rapidly and becomes zero at 6.62GPa. Moreover, the calculated charge density shows that a large pressure can induce an sp 2 -to-sp 3 bonding transition, which is confirmed by recent experiments on deformed carbon nanotubes

  17. Nanofabrication and Nanopatterning of Carbon Nanomaterials for Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junjun

    Stretchable electrodes have increasingly drawn attention as a vital component for flexible electronic devices. Carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit properties such as high mechanical flexibility and strength, optical transparency, and electrical conductivity which are naturally required for stretchable electrodes. Graphene growth, nanopatterning, and transfer processes are important steps to use graphene as flexible electrodes. However, advances in the large-area nanofabrication and nanopatterning of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene are necessary to realize the full potential of this technology. In particular, laser interference lithography (LIL), a fast and low cost large-area nanoscale patterning technique, shows tremendous promise for the patterning of graphene and other nanostructures for numerous applications. First, it was demonstrated that large-area nanopatterning and the transfer of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene via LIL and plasma etching provide a reliable method to provide large area nanoengineered graphene on various target substrates. Then, to improve the electrode performance under large strain (naturally CVD grown graphene sheet will crack at tensile strains larger than 1%), a corrugated graphene structure on PDMS was designed, fabricated, and tested, with experimental results indicating that this approach successfully allows the graphene sheets to withstand cyclic tensile strains up to 15%. Lastly, to further enhance the performance of carbon-based stretchable electrodes, an approach was developed which coupled graphene and vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) on a flexible PDMS substrate. Characterization of the graphene-VACNT hybrid shows high electrical conductivity and durability through 50 cycles of loading up to 100% tensile strain. While flexible electronics promise tremendous advances in important technological areas such as healthcare, sensing, energy, and wearable electronics, continued

  18. Electronic Structure of Single- and Multiple-shell Carbon Fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yeong-Lieh; Nori, Franco

    1993-01-01

    We study the electronic states of giant single-shell and the recently discovered nested multi-shell carbon fullerenes within the tight-binding approximation. We use two different approaches, one based on iterations and the other on symmetry, to obtain the $\\pi$-state energy spectra of large fullerene cages: $C_{240}$, $C_{540}$, $C_{960}$, $C_{1500}$, $C_{2160}$ and $C_{2940}$. Our iteration technique reduces the dimensionality of the problem by more than one order of magnitude (factors of $\\...

  19. Using optically stimulated electrons from quartz for the estimation of natural doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, A.S.; Denby, Phil M.

    2009-01-01

    A flow-through Geiger-Müller pancake electron detector attachment has been fitted to a standard Risø TL/OSL reader enabling optically stimulated electrons (OSE) to be measured simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Using this detector, OSE and OSL measurements from natural......, a dose recovery test shows that OSE can successfully recover a laboratory dose of 300 Gy given before any laboratory thermal treatment, for preheating temperatures between 160 and 260 °C. Furthermore, for the first time natural OSE decay curves are detected and these signals are used to estimate a burial...... dose using the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure. Finally, a comparative study of the equivalent doses estimated using both OSE and OSL from 10 quartz samples are presented, and it is shown that OSE has a significant potential in retrospective dosimetry....

  20. Carbon Nano tube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aryasomayajula, L.; Wolter, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nano tubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nano tubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nano tube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The methods of fabrication of these composites, their properties and possible applications restricted to the field of electronic packaging have been discussed in this paper. Experimental and theoretical calculations have shown improved mechanical and physical properties like tensile stress, toughness, and improved electrical and thermal properties. They have also demonstrated the ease of production of the composites and their adaptability as one can tailor their properties as per the requirement. This paper reviews work reported on fabricating and characterizing carbon- nano tube-based metal matrix and polymer composites. The focus of this paper is mainly to review the importance of these composites in the field of electronics packaging.

  1. Study on regeneration of activated carbon by means of electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guanghua; Arai, H.; Hosono, M.

    1991-01-01

    The results of regeneration of activated carbon adsorbing sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) by 2 MeV electron radiation, and the dependence of the regeneration rate of activated carbon on the electron current intensity, the temperature of sample and the atmosphere were reported. It is shown that regeneration of activated carbon by electron radiation is full of promise

  2. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  3. Improvement of carbon fibre surface properties using electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy Segura Pino; Luci Diva Brocardo Machado; Claudia Giovedi

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced advance composites have been used for structural applications, mainly due to their mechanical properties, and additional features such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance and wear properties. The main factor for a good mechanical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composite is the interfacial interaction between the components that are fiber and polymeric matrix. The greatest challenge is to improve adhesion between components having elasticity modulus which differ by orders of magnitude and furthermore they are immiscible in each other. Another important factor is the sizing material on the carbon fiber, which protects the carbon fiber filaments and must be compatible with the matrix material in order to improve the adhesion process. The interaction of ionizing radiation from electron beam can induce in the irradiated material the formation of very active centers and free radicals. Further evolution of these active species can significantly modify structure and properties not only in the irradiated polymeric matrix but also on the fiber surface. So that, fiber and matrix play an important role in the production of chemical bonds, which promote better adhesion between both materials improving the composite mechanical performance. The aim of this work was to improve the surface properties of the carbon fiber surface using ionizing radiation from an electron beam in order to obtain improvement of the adhesion properties in the resulted composite. Commercial carbon fiber roving of high tensile strength with 12 000 filaments named 12 k, and sizing material of epoxy resin modified by ester groups was studied. EB irradiation has been carried out at the Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research (IPEN) facilities using a 1.5 MeV 37.5 kW Dynamitron electron accelerator model JOB-188. Rovings of carbon fibers with 1.78 g cm -3 density and 0.13 mm thickness were irradiated with 0.555 MeV, 6.43 mA and

  4. Modifying the electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Jesse M.

    The intrinsic electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes make them promising candidates for circuit elements and LEDs in nanoscale devices. However, applied fields and interactions with the environment can modify these intrinsic properties. This dissertation is a theoretical study of perturbations to an ideal carbon nanotube. It illustrates how transport and optical properties of carbon nanotubes can be adversely affected or intentionally modified by the local environment. The dissertation is divided into three parts. Part I analyzes the effect of a transverse electric field on the single-electron energy spectrum of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Part II analyzes the effect of the local environment on selection rules and decay pathways relevant to dark excitons. Part III is a series of 26 appendices. Two different models for a transverse electric field are introduced in Part I. The first is a uniform field perpendicular to the nanotube axis. This model suggests the field has little effect on the band gap until it exceeds a critical value that can be tuned with strain or a magnetic field. The second model is a transverse field localized to a small region along the nanotube axis. The field creates a pair of exponentially localized bound states but has no effect on the band gap for particle transport. Part II explores the physics of dark excitons in carbon nanotubes. Two model calculations illustrate the effect of the local environment on allowed optical transitions and nonradiative recombination pathways. The first model illustrates the role of inversion symmetry in the optical spectrum. Broken inversion symmetry may explain low-lying peaks in the exciton spectrum of boron nitride nanotubes and localized photoemission around impurities and interfaces in carbon nanotubes. The second model in Part II suggests that free charge carriers can mediate an efficient nonradiative decay process for dark excitons in carbon nanotubes. The appendices in Part III

  5. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  6. An electrical bio-chip to transfer and detect electromagnetic stimulation on the cells based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafizadeh-Tafti, Saeed; Haqiqatkhah, Mohammad Hossein; Saviz, Mehrdad; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Faraji Dana, Reza; Zanganeh, Somayeh; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive impedimetric bio-chip based on vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VAMWCNTs), was applied in direct interaction with lung cancer cells. Our tool provided both inducing and monitoring the bioelectrical changes in the cells initiated by electromagnetic (EM) wave stimulation. EM wave of 940MHz frequency with different intensities was used. Here, wave ablation might accumulate electrical charge on the tips of nanotubes penetrated into cell's membrane. The charge might induce ionic exchanges into the cell and cause alterations in electrical states of the membrane. Transmembrane electrostatic/dynamic states would be strongly affected due to such exchanges. Our novel modality was that, the cells' vitality changes caused by charge inductions were electrically detected with the same nanotubes in the architecture of electrodes for impedance measurement. The responses of the sensor were confirmed by electron and florescent microscopy images as well as biological assays. In summation, our method provided an effective biochip for enhancing and detecting external EM stimulation on the cells useful for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as wave-guided drug-resistance breakage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electron field emission characteristics of carbon nanotube on tungsten tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Ngoc Hong; Bui Hung Thang; Nguyen Tuan Hong; Phan Ngoc Minh; Lee, Soonil

    2009-01-01

    Electron field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes on tungsten tip was investigated in 2x10 -6 Torr vacuum. The measurement results showed that the CNTs/W tip could emit electron at 0.7 V/μm (nearly 10 times lower than that of the W tip itself) and reach up to 26 μA at the electric field of 1 V/μm. The emission characteristic follows the Fowler-Nordheim mechanism. Analysis of the emission characteristic showed that the CNTs/W tip has a very high value of field enhancement factor (β = 4.1 x 10 4 cm -1 ) that is much higher than that of the tungsten tip itself. The results confirmed the excellent field emission behavior of the CNTs materials and the CNTs/W tip is a prospective candidate for advanced electron field emitter.

  8. Emerging Carbon and Post-Carbon Nanomaterial Inks for Printed Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C

    2015-02-19

    Carbon and post-carbon nanomaterials present desirable electrical, optical, chemical, and mechanical attributes for printed electronics, offering low-cost, large-area functionality on flexible substrates. In this Perspective, recent developments in carbon nanomaterial inks are highlighted. Monodisperse semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes compatible with inkjet and aerosol jet printing are ideal channels for thin-film transistors, while inkjet, gravure, and screen-printable graphene-based inks are better-suited for electrodes and interconnects. Despite the high performance achieved in prototype devices, additional effort is required to address materials integration issues encountered in more complex systems. In this regard, post-carbon nanomaterial inks (e.g., electrically insulating boron nitride and optically active transition-metal dichalcogenides) present promising opportunities. Finally, emerging work to extend these nanomaterial inks to three-dimensional printing provides a path toward nonplanar devices. Overall, the superlative properties of these materials, coupled with versatile assembly by printing techniques, offer a powerful platform for next-generation printed electronics.

  9. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O.

    1999-01-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index. (Author)

  10. Identification of the site where the electron transfer chain of plant mitochondria is stimulated by electrostatic charge screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krab, K.; Wagner, M.J.; Wagner, A.M.; Moller, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    Modular kinetic analysis was used to determine the sites in plant mitochondria where charge-screening stimulates the rate of electron transfer from external NAD(P)H to oxygen. In mitochondria isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber callus, stimulation of the rate of oxygen uptake was

  11. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.; Lee, Olivia P.; Millstone, Jill E.; Chen, Mark S.; Su, Timothy A.; Creelman, Mark; Frechet, Jean; Mathies, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS

  12. Improving Single-Carbon-Nanotube-Electrode Contacts Using Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittayavathananon, Atiweena; Ngamchuea, Kamonwad; Li, Xiuting; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Chaisiwamongkhol, Korbua; Sawangphruk, Montree; Compton, Richard G

    2017-08-17

    We report the use of an electroactive species, acetaminophen, to modify the electrical connection between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and an electrode. By applying a potential across two electrodes, some of the CNTs in solution occasionally contact the electrified interface and bridge between two electrodes. By observing a single CNT contact between two microbands of an interdigitated Au electrode in the presence and absence of acetaminophen, the role of the molecular species at the electronic junction is revealed. As compared with the pure CNT, the current magnitude of the acetaminophen-modified CNTs significantly increases with the applied potentials, indicating that the molecule species improves the junction properties probably via redox shuttling.

  13. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Devoe, Mackenzie E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lewis, Diana J.; Lachman, Noa; Buschhorn, Samuel T.; Wardle, Brian L., E-mail: wardle@mit.edu [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Kessler, Seth S. [Metis Design Corporation, 205 Portland St., Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-02-02

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. Testing at elevated temperatures demonstrates that the aligned CNT networks have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, and application of the fluctuation induced tunneling model leads to an activation energy of ≈14 meV for electron tunneling at the CNT-CNT junctions. Since the tunneling activation energy is shown to be independent of both CNT length and orientation, the variation in electron transport is attributed to the number of CNT-CNT junctions an electron must tunnel through during its percolated path, which is proportional to the morphology of the aligned CNT network.

  14. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y.; Devoe, Mackenzie E.; Lewis, Diana J.; Lachman, Noa; Buschhorn, Samuel T.; Wardle, Brian L.; Kessler, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. Testing at elevated temperatures demonstrates that the aligned CNT networks have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, and application of the fluctuation induced tunneling model leads to an activation energy of ≈14 meV for electron tunneling at the CNT-CNT junctions. Since the tunneling activation energy is shown to be independent of both CNT length and orientation, the variation in electron transport is attributed to the number of CNT-CNT junctions an electron must tunnel through during its percolated path, which is proportional to the morphology of the aligned CNT network

  15. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amekpewu, M., E-mail: mamek219@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, University for Development Studies, Navrongo (Ghana); Mensah, S.Y. [Department of Physics, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, U.C.C. (Ghana); Musah, R. [Department of Applied Physics, University for Development Studies, Navrongo (Ghana); Mensah, N.G. [Department of Mathematics, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, U.C.C. (Ghana); Abukari, S.S.; Dompreh, K.A. [Department of Physics, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, U.C.C. (Ghana)

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac–dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons’ source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  16. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  17. Vertical electric field stimulated neural cell functionality on porous amorphous carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to support neuronal cell proliferation and differentiation in electric field mediated culture conditions. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon substrate electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm(2)) and low impedance (3.3 kΩ at 1 kHz). The optimal window of electric field stimulation for better cell viability and neurite outgrowth is established. When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (≤ 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). While the cell viability was assessed by two complementary biochemical assays (MTT and LDH), the differentiation was studied by indirect immunostaining. Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to either enhance or to restrict neurite outgrowth respectively at lower or higher field strengths, when neuroblastoma cells are cultured on porous glassy carbon electrodes having a desired combination of electrochemical properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Charge recombination processes in minerals studied using optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved exo-electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Murray, Andrew; Ankjaergaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Lapp, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A time-resolved optically stimulated exo-electron (TR-OSE) measurement system has been developed using a Photon Timer attached to a gas-flow semi-proportional pancake electron detector within a Risoe TL/OSL reader. The decay rate of the exo-electron emission after the stimulation pulse depends on the probability of (1) escape of electrons into the detector gas from the conduction band by overcoming the work function of the material and (2) thermalization of electrons in the conduction band, and subsequent re-trapping/recombination. Thus, we expect the exo-electron signal to reflect the instantaneous electron concentration in the conduction band. In this study, TR-OSE and time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) were measured for the first time using quartz, K-feldspar and NaCl by stimulating the samples using pulsed blue LEDs at different temperatures between 50 and 250 0 C after beta irradiation and preheating to 280 0 C. The majority of TR-OSE signals from all the samples decayed much faster than TR-OSL signals irrespective of the stimulation temperatures. This suggests that the lifetime of OSL in these dosimeters arises mainly from the relaxation of an excited state of the recombination centre, rather than from residence time of an electron in the conduction band.

  19. Electron energy deposition in a multilayered carbon--uranium--carbon configuration and in semi-infinite uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1977-10-01

    Absolute measurements of electron energy deposition profiles are reported here for electrons incident on the multilayer configuration of carbon-uranium-carbon. These measurements were for normally incident source electrons at an energy of 1.0 MeV. To complement these measurements, electron energy deposition profiles were also obtained for electrons incident on semi-infinite uranium as a function of energy and angle of incidence. The results are compared with the predictions of a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport model. In general, the agreement between theory and experiment is good. This work was in support of the Reactor Safety Research Equation-of-State Program

  20. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  1. Positron annihilation and thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiated polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Shinyama, Katsuyoshi; Baba, Makoto [Hachinohe Inst. of Tech., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Suzuki, Takenori

    1997-03-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were applied to electron beam irradiated poly(ether-ether-ketone). The lifetime, {tau}{sub 3}, of the ortho-positronium of unirradiated and 5 MGy irradiated specimen became rapidly longer above about 150degC. {tau}{sub 3} of 50 MGy and 100 MGy irradiated specimen was shorter than that of unirradiated one. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) decreased with increasing the dose before voltage application. In the case of voltage application, a TSC peak appeared and the peak value decreased with increased the dose. The correlation between the results of positron annihilation and TSC was investigated. (author)

  2. Electronic properties of carbon nanotubes with polygonized cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, J.; Lambin, P.; Ebbesen, T.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes having polygonized cross sections instead of purely circular ones, such as recently observed using transmission electron microscopy, are investigated with plane-wave ab initio pseudopotential local-density-functional calculations and simple tight-binding models. Strong σ * -π * hybridization effects occur in zigzag nanotubes due to the high curvature located near the edges of the polygonal cross-section prism. These effects, combined with a lowering of symmetry, dramatically affect the electronic properties of the nanotubes. It is found that modified low-lying conduction-band states are introduced either into the bandgap of insulating nanotubes, or below the degenerate states that form the top of the valence band of metallic nanotubes, leading the corresponding nanostructures to be metals, semimetals, or at least very-small-gap semiconductors. The degree of the polygon representing the cross section of the tube, and the sharpness of the edge angles, are found to be major factors in the hybridization effect, and consequently govern the electronic behavior at the Fermi level. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics for carbon-based electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J., E-mail: jiyoung.kim@utdallas.edu; Jandhyala, S.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon based nanomaterials like nanotubes and graphene have emerged as future generation electronic materials for device applications because of their interesting properties such as high-mobility and ability to carry high-current densities compared to conventional semiconductor materials like silicon. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to integrate robust gate dielectrics with high-quality interfaces for these materials in order to attain maximum performance. To date, a variety of methods including physical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition (ALD), physical assembly among others have been employed in order to integrate dielectrics for carbon nanotube and graphene based field-effect transistors. Owing to the difficulty in wetting pristine surfaces of nanotubes and graphene, most of the ALD methods require a seeding technique involving non-covalent functionalization of their surfaces in order to nucleate dielectric growth while maintaining their intrinsic properties. A comprehensive review regarding the various dielectric integration schemes for emerging devices and their limitations with respect to ALD based methods along with a future outlook is provided. - Highlights: • We introduce various dielectric integration schemes for carbon-based devices. • Physical vapor deposition methods tend to degrade device performance. • Atomic layer deposition on pristine surfaces of graphene and nanotube is difficult. • We review different seeding techniques for atomic layer deposition of dielectrics. • Compare the performance of graphene top-gate devices with different dielectrics.

  5. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models

  6. Carbon nanotube foils for electron stripping in tandem accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reden, Karl von; Zhang Mei; Meigs, Martha; Sichel, Enid; Fang Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube technology has rapidly advanced in recent years, making it possible to create meter-long, ∼4 cm wide films of multi-walled tubes of less than 3 μg/cm 2 areal density in a bench top open-air procedure. The physical properties of individual carbon nanotubes have been well established, equaling or surpassing electrical and thermal conductivity and mechanical strength of most other materials, graphite in particular. The handling and transport of such nanotube films, dry-mounted self-supporting on metal frames with several cm 2 of open area, is problem-free: the aerogel films having a volumetric density of about 1.5 mg/cm 3 survived the trip by car and air from Dallas to Oak Ridge without blemish. In this paper we will present the results of first tests of these nanotube films as electron stripper media in a tandem accelerator. The tests were performed in the Model 25 URC tandem accelerator of the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We will discuss the performance of nanotube films in comparison with chemical vapor deposition and laser-ablated carbon foils

  7. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics for carbon-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Jandhyala, S.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon based nanomaterials like nanotubes and graphene have emerged as future generation electronic materials for device applications because of their interesting properties such as high-mobility and ability to carry high-current densities compared to conventional semiconductor materials like silicon. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to integrate robust gate dielectrics with high-quality interfaces for these materials in order to attain maximum performance. To date, a variety of methods including physical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition (ALD), physical assembly among others have been employed in order to integrate dielectrics for carbon nanotube and graphene based field-effect transistors. Owing to the difficulty in wetting pristine surfaces of nanotubes and graphene, most of the ALD methods require a seeding technique involving non-covalent functionalization of their surfaces in order to nucleate dielectric growth while maintaining their intrinsic properties. A comprehensive review regarding the various dielectric integration schemes for emerging devices and their limitations with respect to ALD based methods along with a future outlook is provided. - Highlights: • We introduce various dielectric integration schemes for carbon-based devices. • Physical vapor deposition methods tend to degrade device performance. • Atomic layer deposition on pristine surfaces of graphene and nanotube is difficult. • We review different seeding techniques for atomic layer deposition of dielectrics. • Compare the performance of graphene top-gate devices with different dielectrics

  8. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-09-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models.

  9. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  10. Thermally stimulated luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, V; Veeraraghavan, R; Sastry, M D

    2003-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate yielded mechanistic information on the observed glow peaks at 365, 410 and 450 K. TSL spectral studies of the glow peaks showed that UO sub 2 sup 2 sup + acts as the luminescent center. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on gamma-irradiated samples revealed that the predominant radiation induced centers are H sup 0 , PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - , PO sub 3 sup 2 sup - and O sup - ion. Studies on the temperature dependence studies of the EPR spectra of samples annealed to different temperatures indicate the role of H sup 0 and PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - ions in the main glow peak at 410 K.

  11. Low energy electron stimulated desorption from DNA films dosed with oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Massey, Sylvain; Sanche, Leon [Groupe en sciences des radiations, Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2012-06-21

    Desorption of anions stimulated by 1-18 eV electron impact on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of single DNA strands is measured as a function of film temperature (50-250 K). The SAMs, composed of 10 nucleotides, are dosed with O{sub 2}. The OH{sup -} desorption yields increase markedly with exposure to O{sub 2} at 50 K and are further enhanced upon heating. In contrast, the desorption yields of O{sup -}, attributable to dissociative electron attachment to trapped O{sub 2} molecules decrease with heating. Irradiation of the DNA films prior to the deposition of O{sub 2} shows that this surprising increase in OH{sup -} desorption, at elevated temperatures, arises from the reaction of O{sub 2} with damaged DNA sites. These results thus appear to be a manifestation of the so-called 'oxygen fixation' effect, well known in radiobiology.

  12. Electron beam processing of carbon fibre reinforced braided composites beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halasz, L.; Zsigmond, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In this paper the possibility of producing a new type carbon fiber reinforced composite is examined by applying braiding, a well-known process of textile technology. The appearance of the new Hungarian carbon fiber with excellent mechanical properties in the market enables the development of newer type carbon fiber reinforced composites in the continuously widening range of engineering applications. Advanced hollow profiles, pipes and other composite products can be manufactured in continuous operation. A new way of composite production of this kind is the manufacturing of reinforcing structure by braiding technology producing a composite with sufficient mechanical properties from this cross directional fabric-like textile structure by impregnation. This manufacturing process can complete the variety of hollow products serving the same purpose as pultrusion or filament winding. This way a profile type framework element with a hollow cross section is manufactured having favorable mechanical properties. Owing to its small mass and high specific strength this product can be applied in dynamically loaded structures e.g. in the automotive industry. For crosslinking of the matrix the method of high-speed electron beam curing has been examined in order to reach continuous operation. The field of use and application of carbon fiber braided structures has a great chance especially in machine engineering and in the automotive industry. The main reason for this is that braiding processes are capable of producing structures having good mechanical properties at a low processing price. The mass of the composite load-bearing structure produced this way is one fifth of the steel product having similar geometry, and its specific mechanical properties are nearly as good as that of the most commonly applied semiproduct and structural component, the welded steel profile

  13. Carbon amendment stimulates benthic nitrogen cycling during the bioremediation of particulate aquaculture waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgina; MacTavish, Thomas; Savage, Candida; Caldwell, Gary S.; Jones, Clifford L. W.; Probyn, Trevor; Eyre, Bradley D.; Stead, Selina M.

    2018-03-01

    The treatment of organic wastes remains one of the key sustainability challenges facing the growing global aquaculture industry. Bioremediation systems based on coupled bioturbation-microbial processing offer a promising route for waste management. We present, for the first time, a combined biogeochemical-molecular analysis of the short-term performance of one such system that is designed to receive nitrogen-rich particulate aquaculture wastes. Using sea cucumbers (Holothuria scabra) as a model bioturbator we provide evidence that adjusting the waste C : N from 5 : 1 to 20 : 1 promoted a shift in nitrogen cycling pathways towards the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), resulting in net NH4+ efflux from the sediment. The carbon amended treatment exhibited an overall net N2 uptake, whereas the control receiving only aquaculture waste exhibited net N2 production, suggesting that carbon supplementation enhanced nitrogen fixation. The higher NH4+ efflux and N2 uptake was further supported by meta-genome predictions that indicate that organic-carbon addition stimulated DNRA over denitrification. These findings indicate that carbon addition may potentially result in greater retention of nitrogen within the system; however, longer-term trials are necessary to determine whether this nitrogen retention is translated into improved sea cucumber biomass yields. Whether this truly constitutes a remediation process is open for debate as there remains the risk that any increased nitrogen retention may be temporary, with any subsequent release potentially raising the eutrophication risk. Longer and larger-scale trials are required before this approach may be validated with the complexities of the in-system nitrogen cycle being fully understood.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...

  15. Low Secondary Electron Yield Carbon Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation in Modern Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Taborelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In order to upgrade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance to be oriented towards higher energies and higher intensities in the future, a series of improvements of the existing LHC injectors is planned to take place over the next few years. Electron cloud effects are expected to be enhanced and play a central role in limiting the performance of the machines of the CERN complex. Electron cloud phenomena in beam pipes are based on electron multiplication and can be sufficiently suppressed if the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of the surface of the beam pipes is lower than unity. The goal of this work is to find and study a thin film coating with reliably low initial Secondary Electron Yield (SEY), which does not require bake-out or conditioning in situ with photons, is robust again air exposure and can easily be applied in the beam pipes of accelerators. In this work, amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering for electron cloud mitigation and antimultipactor applicatio...

  16. Electronic structure of single- and multiple-shell carbon fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Nori, F.

    1994-01-01

    We study the electronic states of giant single-shell and the recently discovered nested multiple-shell carbon fullerenes within the tight-binding approximation. We use two different approaches, one based on iterations and the other on symmetry, to obtain the π-state energy spectra of large fullerene cages: C 240 , C 540 , C 960 , C 1500 , C 2160 , and C 2940 . Our iteration technique reduces the size of the problem by more than one order of magnitude (factors of ∼12 and 20), while the symmetry-based approach reduces it by a factor of 10. We also find formulas for the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies of C 60n 2 fullerenes as a function of n, demonstrating a tendency towards a metallic regime for increasing n. For multiple-shell fullerenes, we analytically obtain the eigenvalues of the intershell interaction

  17. High electron thermal conductivity of chiral carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Nkrumah, George; Mensah, N.G.

    2003-11-01

    Solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation with energy dispersion relation obtained in the tight binding approximation, the carrier thermal conductivity κ e of a chiral carbon nanotube (CCNT) was determined. The dependence of κ e on temperature T, chiral geometric angle φ h and overlap integrals Δ z and Δ s were obtained. The results were numerically analysed. Unusually high values of κ e were observed suggesting that ne is nontrivial in the calculation of the thermal conductivity κ of CCNT. More interestingly we noted also that at 104 K and for Δ z and Δ s values of 0.020 eV and 0.0150 eV respectively the κ e value is about 41000 W/mK as reported for a 99.9% pure 12 C crystal. We predict that the electron thermal conductivity of CCNT should exceed 200,000 W/mK at ∼ 80 K. (author)

  18. Growth, characterisation and electronic applications of amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.

    2000-11-01

    My thesis proposes solutions to a number of riddles associated with the material, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, (a-C:H). This material has lately generated interest in the electronic engineering community, owing to some remarkable properties. The characterisation of amorphous carbon films, grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The coexistence of multiple phases in the same a-C:H film manifests itself in the inconsistent electrical behaviour of different parts of the film, thus rendering it difficult to predict the nature of films. For the first time, in this thesis, a reliable prediction of Schottky contact formation on a-C:H films is reported. A novel and simple development on a Scanning Electron Microscope, configured to study the electrical properties of the grown a-C:H films, has been reported. Since device performance is crucially linked to the density of states in the film, a study of the same was undertaken in my doctoral research. I present a mathematical formalism to estimate the density of states in a-C:H. The most commonly used metal, (aluminium), for contact formation on a-C:H films, has been concluded to be the least suitable. On the basis of the study presented in this thesis, copper and chromium are judged to be the best alternatives. The resilience of a-C:H/Si heterostructures under high voltages (upto 900 V) has been reported in this thesis for the first time. The performance of a-C:H grown at room temperature on GaAs, has been studied and concluded to be satisfactory on the basis of good adherence and low leakage currents. Such a structure was motivated by the applicability in Metal Insulator Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MISFET). (author)

  19. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  20. Nature of the concentration thresholds of europium atom yield from the oxidized tungsten surface under electron stimulated desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2002-01-01

    The nature of the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of the europium atoms by the E sub e irradiating electrons energies, equal to 50 and 80 eV, as well as peculiarities of the Eu atoms yield dependence on their concentration on the oxidized tungsten surface are discussed. It is shown, that the ESD originates by the electron transition from the interval 5p- or 5s shell of the tungsten surface atom onto the oxygen external unfilled 2p-level

  1. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  2. Nanotubes on Display: How Carbon Nanotubes Can Be Integrated into Electronic Displays

    KAUST Repository

    Opatkiewicz, Justin; LeMieux, Melburne C.; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-01-01

    Random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise for use in the field of flexible electronics. Nanotube networks have been difficult to utilize because of the mixture of electronic types synthesized when grown. A variety of separation

  3. Spinning Carbon Nanotube Nanothread under a Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schulz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanothread with a diameter as small as one hundred nanometers was manufactured under a scanning electron microscope. Made directly from carbon nanotubes, and inheriting their superior electrical and mechanical properties, nanothread may be the world’s smallest man-made fiber. The smallest thread that can be spun using a bench-top spinning machine is about 5 microns in diameter. Nanothread is a new material building block that can be used at the nanoscale or plied to form yarn for applications at the micro and macro scales. Preliminary electrical and mechanical properties of nanothread were measured. The resistivity of nanothread is less than 10−5 Ω∙m. The strength of nanothread is greater than 0.5 GPa. This strength was obtained from measurements using special glue that cures in an electron microscope. The glue weakened the thread, thus further work is needed to obtain more accurate measurements. Nanothread will have broad applications in enabling electrical components, circuits, sensors, and tiny machines. Yarn can be used for various macroscale applications including lightweight antennas, composites, and cables.

  4. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Gibson, Mark A.; East, Daniel; Simon, George P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  5. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gibson, Mark A. [Process Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia); East, Daniel; Simon, George P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2011-11-07

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  6. Perpendicular State of an Electronically Excited Stilbene: Observation by Femtosecond-Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Martin; Dobryakov, Alexander L; Ioffe, Ilya N; Granovsky, Alex A; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2016-10-20

    In the photoisomerization path of stilbene, a perpendicular state P on the S 1 potential energy surface is expected just before internal conversion through a conical intersection S 1 /S 0 . For decades the observation of P was thwarted by a short lifetime τ P in combination with slow population flow over a barrier. But these limitations can be overcome by ethylenic substitution. Following optical excitation of trans-1,1'-dicyanostilbene, P is populated significantly (τ P = 27 ps in n-hexane) and monitored by an exited-state absorption band at 370 nm. Here we report stimulated Raman lines of P. The strongest, at 1558 cm -1 , is attributed to stretching vibrations of the phenyl rings. Transient electronic states, resonance conditions, and corresponding Raman signals are discussed.

  7. Electron-Stimulated Desorption of Positive Ions from Methanol Adsorbed on a Solid Ar Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanowa, H.; Hanatani, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Souda, R.

    Electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of positive ions from weakly physisorbed molecules has been investigated. From methanol adsorbed on a solid Ar substrate, the protonated cluster ions of the type H+(CH3OH)n (n = 1 - 4) are emitted, together with the fragment ions such as CHn+ (n = 0 - 3), H3O+, CHO+, CH3O+, etc. The yields of these ions are markedly enhanced at the smallest coverage and decay steeply with increasing coverage. Coulomb explosion between valence holes confined in adsorbed nanoclusters is responsible for the enhanced ion yields. Very few ions except for H+ are emitted from a thick layer as well as nanoclusters adsorbed directly on a metal substrate due to the delocalization of valence holes.

  8. Charge recombination processes in minerals studied using optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved exo-electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Murray, Andrew; Ankjærgaard, Christina

    2010-01-01

    electron concentration in the conduction band. In this study, TR-OSE and time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) were measured for the first time using quartz, K-feldspar and NaCl by stimulating the samples using pulsed blue LEDs at different temperatures between 50 and 250 °C after beta...... irradiation and preheating to 280 °C. The majority of TR-OSE signals from all the samples decayed much faster than TR-OSL signals irrespective of the stimulation temperatures. This suggests that the lifetime of OSL in these dosimeters arises mainly from the relaxation of an excited state of the recombination...

  9. Electron-stimulated desorption of cesium atoms from cesium layers adsorbed on gold-covered tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, V N; Kuznetsov, Yu A; Potekhina, N D, E-mail: kuznets@ms.ioffe.r [A F Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021, St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-03

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yields and energy distributions (ED) for neutral cesium atoms have been measured from cesium layers adsorbed on a gold-covered tungsten surface as a function of electron energy, gold film thickness, cesium coverage and substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector in the temperature range 160-300 K. A measurable ESD yield for Cs atoms is observed only after deposition of more than one monolayer of gold and cesium on a tungsten surface at a temperature T = 300 K, which is accompanied by the formation of a CsAu semiconductor film covered with a cesium atom monolayer. The Cs atom ESD yield as a function of incident electron energy has a resonant character and consists of two peaks, the appearance of which depends on both electron energy and substrate temperature. The first peak has an appearance threshold at an electron energy of 57 eV and a substrate temperature of 300 K that is due to Au 5p{sub 3/2} core level excitation in the substrate. The second peak appears at an electron energy of 24 eV and a substrate temperature of 160 K. It is associated with a Cs 5s core level excitation in the Cs adsorbed layer. The Au 5p{sub 3/2} level excitation corresponds to a single broad peak in the ED with a maximum at a kinetic energy of 0.45 eV at a substrate temperature T = 300 K, which is split into two peaks with maxima at kinetic energies of 0.36 and 0.45 eV at a substrate temperature of 160 K, associated with different Cs atom ESD channels. The Cs 5s level excitation leads to an ED for Cs atoms with a maximum at a kinetic energy of approx 0.57 eV which exists only at T < 240 K and low Cs concentrations. The mechanisms for all the Cs atom ESD channels are proposed and compared with the Na atom ESD channels in the Na-Au-W system.

  10. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techni...

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence of electronic components for forensic, retrospective, and accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inrig, E.L.; Godfrey-Smith, D.I.; Khanna, S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of electronic components found within portable electronic devices such as cell phones and pagers, portable computers, music and video players, global positioning system receivers, cameras, and digital watches. The analysis of components extracted from these ubiquitous devices was proposed for applications ranging from rapid accident dose reconstruction to the tracking and attribution of gamma-emitting radiological materials. Surface-mount resistors with alumina porcelain substrates consistently produced OSL following irradiation, with minimum detectable doses on the order of 10 mGy for a typical sample. Since the resistor ceramics were found to exhibit anomalous fading, dose reconstruction procedures were developed to correct for this using laboratory measurements of fading rates carried out over approximately 3 months. Two trials were conducted in which cellular phones were affixed to an anthropomorphic phantom and irradiated using gamma-ray sources; ultimately, analysis of the devices used in these trials succeeded in reconstructing doses in the range of 0.1-0.6Gy

  12. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...... promoted by the electric field, which resulted from an inner secondary electron potential difference from the main trunk of carbon film to the tip end of branches under electron beam. This result demonstrates importance of applying electrical effects to modify properties of carbon materials. It may have...... positive implications to explore some amorphous carbon as electron field emission device. SCANNING 35: 261-264, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  13. Evaluating Origin of Electron Traps in Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Aluminum Thin Films using Thermally Stimulated Current Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushima, Toshinori; Adachi, Chihaya

    2008-01-01

    We measured the energy distributions and concentrations of electron traps in O_2-unexposed and O_2-exposed tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq_3) films using a thermally stimulated current (TSC) technique to investigate how doping O_2 molecules in Alq_3 films affect the films' electron trap and electron transport characteristics. The results of our TSC studies revealed that Alq_3 films have an electron trap distribution with peak depths ranging from 0.075 to 0.1 eV and peak widths ranging ...

  14. Increasing carbon availability stimulates growth and secondary metabolites via modulation of phytohormones in winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Michael; Chowdhury, Somak; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Hartmann, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Phytohormones play important roles in plant acclimation to changes in environmental conditions. However, their role in whole-plant regulation of growth and secondary metabolite production under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) is uncertain but crucially important for understanding plant responses to abiotic stresses. We grew winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) under three [CO2] (170, 390, and 680 ppm) over 10 weeks, and measured gas exchange, relative growth rate (RGR), soluble sugars, secondary metabolites, and phytohormones including abscisic acid (ABA), auxin (IAA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) at the whole-plant level. Our results show that, at the whole-plant level, RGR positively correlated with IAA but not ABA, and secondary metabolites positively correlated with JA and JA-Ile but not SA. Moreover, soluble sugars positively correlated with IAA and JA but not ABA and SA. We conclude that increasing carbon availability stimulates growth and production of secondary metabolites via up-regulation of auxin and jasmonate levels, probably in response to sugar-mediated signalling. Future low [CO2] studies should address the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leaf ABA and SA biosynthesis, and at the transcriptional level should focus on biosynthetic and, in particular, on responsive genes involved in [CO2]-induced hormonal signalling pathways. PMID:28159987

  15. Elevated moisture stimulates carbon loss from mineral soils by releasing protected organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenjuan; Hall, Steven J

    2017-11-24

    Moisture response functions for soil microbial carbon (C) mineralization remain a critical uncertainty for predicting ecosystem-climate feedbacks. Theory and models posit that C mineralization declines under elevated moisture and associated anaerobic conditions, leading to soil C accumulation. Yet, iron (Fe) reduction potentially releases protected C, providing an under-appreciated mechanism for C destabilization under elevated moisture. Here we incubate Mollisols from ecosystems under C 3 /C 4 plant rotations at moisture levels at and above field capacity over 5 months. Increased moisture and anaerobiosis initially suppress soil C mineralization, consistent with theory. However, after 25 days, elevated moisture stimulates cumulative gaseous C-loss as CO 2 and CH 4 to >150% of the control. Stable C isotopes show that mineralization of older C 3 -derived C released following Fe reduction dominates C losses. Counter to theory, elevated moisture may significantly accelerate C losses from mineral soils over weeks to months-a critical mechanistic deficiency of current Earth system models.

  16. Stimulation of terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage by nitrogen addition: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kai; Peng, Yan; Peng, Changhui; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Xin; Wu, Fuzhong

    2016-01-27

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition alters the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, which is likely to feed back to further climate change. However, how the overall terrestrial ecosystem C pools and fluxes respond to N addition remains unclear. By synthesizing data from multiple terrestrial ecosystems, we quantified the response of C pools and fluxes to experimental N addition using a comprehensive meta-analysis method. Our results showed that N addition significantly stimulated soil total C storage by 5.82% ([2.47%, 9.27%], 95% CI, the same below) and increased the C contents of the above- and below-ground parts of plants by 25.65% [11.07%, 42.12%] and 15.93% [6.80%, 25.85%], respectively. Furthermore, N addition significantly increased aboveground net primary production by 52.38% [40.58%, 65.19%] and litterfall by 14.67% [9.24%, 20.38%] at a global scale. However, the C influx from the plant litter to the soil through litter decomposition and the efflux from the soil due to microbial respiration and soil respiration showed insignificant responses to N addition. Overall, our meta-analysis suggested that N addition will increase soil C storage and plant C in both above- and below-ground parts, indicating that terrestrial ecosystems might act to strengthen as a C sink under increasing N deposition.

  17. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production: Progress report, February 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Shen, Gwo-Jenn.

    1988-01-01

    These studies concern the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that control carbon and electron flow in anaerobic bacteria that conserve energy when coupling hydrogen consumption to the production of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids. Two acidogens, Propionispira arboris and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum were chosen as model systems to understand the function of oxidoreductases and electron carriers in the regulation of hydrogen metabolism and single carbon metabolism. In P. arboris, H 2 consumption was linked to the inhibition of CO 2 production and an increase in the propionate/acetate rate; whereas, H 2 consumption was linked to a stimulation of CO 2 consumption and an increase in the butyrate/acetate ratio in B. methylotrophicum. We report studies on the enzymes involved in the regulation of singe carbon metabolism, the enzyme activities and pathways responsible for conversion of multicarbon components to acetate and propionate or butyrate, and how low pH inhibits H 2 and acetic acid production in Sarcina ventriculi as a consequence of hydrogenase regulation. 9 refs

  18. Characterization of Carbon Coatings with Low Secondary Electron Yield

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, C; Costa Pinto, P; Kuzucan, A; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings can reliably be produced with a maximum secondary electron yield (SEY) close to 1 at room temperature. Measurements at low temperature (LHe) are in progress. Analysis by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a correlation between the lineshape of C1s spectrum in XPS and the maximum SEY of the investigated samples. The initial level of oxygen on the surface of the various samples does not seem to be related to the initial maximum SEY value. However, the increase of the SEY with air exposure time on each individual sample is related to the amount of oxygen containing adsorbates. Storage in different environments has been investigated (static vacuum, aluminium foil, dry nitrogen and desiccators), and shows significant differences in the “aging” behaviour. Aging is very moderate when storing samples wrapped in aluminium foil in air. Samples which have undergone aging due to inappropriate storage can be recovered nearly to the initial value of their SEY by surface treatme...

  19. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/ribbon structures in bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Hideo, E-mail: kohno.hideo@kochi-tech.ac.jp [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Masuda, Yusuke [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2015-05-11

    When the direction of flattening of a carbon nanotube changes during growth mediated by a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotetrahedron is formed in the middle of the carbon nanoribbon. We report the bending properties of the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure using a micro-manipulator system in a transmission electron microscope. In many cases, bending occurs at an edge of the carbon nanotetrahedron. No significant change is observed in the tetrahedron's shape during bending, and the bending is reversible and repeatable. Our results show that the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure has good durability against mechanical bending.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  1. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Fan, Xue; Diao, Dongfeng

    2016-10-01

    We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp2 nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp2 nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp2 nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of positron induced secondary electrons in thin carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, L H; Yang, B; Ling, C C; Beling, C D; Fung, S

    2011-01-01

    Emission of secondary electrons induced by the passage of low energy positrons through thin carbon foils was studied by the Monte Carlo method. The positron and electron elastic cross sections were calculated by partial wave analysis. The inelastic positron-valence-electron was described by the energy loss function obtained from dielectric theory. The positron-core-electron interaction was modelled by the Gryzinski's excitation function. Positron transport inside the carbon foil was simulated in detail. Secondary electrons created by positrons and high energy secondary electrons through inelastic interactions were tracked through the foil. The positron transmission coefficient and secondary electron yielded in forward and backward geometry are calculated and dependences on positron energy and carbon foil thickness are discussed.

  3. Electronic and transport properties of a carbon-atom chain in the core of semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiangwei; Yang Linfeng; Yang Huatong; Dong Jinming

    2003-01-01

    Using the tight-binding calculations, we have studied electronic and transport properties of the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SSWNTs) doped by a chain of carbon-atoms, which can be well controlled by density of the encapsulated carbon atoms. When it is lower, weak coupling between the chain atoms and the tube produces flat bands near the Fermi level, which means a great possibility of superconductivity and ferromagnetism for the combined system. The weak coupling also leads to a significant conductance at the Fermi level, which is contributed by both of the tube and the encapsulated carbon-atom chain. Increasing density of the chain carbon atoms, the flat bands near the Fermi level disappear, and the current may be carried only by the carbon-atom chain, thus making the system become an ideal one-dimensional quantum wire with its conducting chain enclosed by a SWNT insulator

  4. Field emission from individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes prepared in an electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, N.; van Druten, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Individual multiwalled carbon nanotube field emitters were prepared in a scanning electron microscope. The angular current density, energy spectra, and the emission stability of the field-emitted electrons were measured. An estimate of the electron source brightness was extracted from the

  5. Giant modulation of the electronic band gap of carbon nanotubes by dielectric screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aspitarte, Lee; McCulley, Daniel R.; Bertoni, Andrea; Island, J.O.; Ostermann, Marvin; Rontani, Massimo; Steele, G.A.; Minot, Ethan D.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising material for high-performance electronics beyond silicon. But unlike silicon, the nature of the transport band gap in CNTs is not fully understood. The transport gap in CNTs is predicted to be strongly driven by electron-electron (e-e) interactions and

  6. Electron-stimulated desorption of lithium ions from lithium halide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of positive lithium ions from thin layers of lithium halides deposited onto Si(1 1 1) are investigated by the time-of-flight technique. The determined values of isotope effect of the lithium ( 6 Li + / 7 Li + ) are 1.60 ± 0.04, 1.466 ± 0.007, 1.282 ± 0.004, 1.36 ± 0.01 and 1.33 ± 0.01 for LiH, LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI, respectively. The observed most probable kinetic energies of 7 Li + are 1.0, 1.9, 1.1, 0.9 and 0.9 eV for LiH, LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI, respectively, and seem to be independent of the halide component mass. The values of lithium ion emission yield, lithium kinetic energy and lithium isotope effect suggest that the lattice relaxation is only important in the lithium ion desorption process from the LiH system. In view of possible mechanisms and processes involved into lithium ion desorption the obtained results indicate that for LiH, LiCl, LiBr and LiI the ions desorb in a rather classical way. However, for LiF, ion desorption has a more quantum character and the modified wave packet squeezing model has to be taken into account

  7. Stimulated Raman scattering by an intense relativistic electron beam in a long rippled magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Schlesinger, S.P.

    1977-01-01

    For the first time, the parametric coupling of the negative-energy cyclotron and space-charge modes to a fast coaxial waveguide structure is observed. The coaxial waveguide smooth center conductor is internally loaded to maintain a 5% ripple of 1.4-, 1.6-, or 2.0-cm periods on the background axial magnetic field throughout the interaction region of 70 cm. The parametric coupling may be considered a stimulated scattering process with the rippled magnetic field of zero frequency in the lab frame appearing as an electromagnetic pump wave in the beam frame, with 30-MW/cm 2 power density imparting to the electrons a quiver velocity V/sub os/ approx. = 0.1c. As predicted by theory, the frequency of the microwave radiation generated by the negative-energy cyclotron mode decreases with increasing magnetic field while remaining constant for the negative-energy space-charge mode. Power levels from 1 to 5 MW have been measured at mm and cm wavelengths. Radiation at frequencies of 2γ 2 V/L, where V and L are the beam velocity and ripple period, respectively, has been observed at high magnetic fields with an exponential-growth rate consistent with parametric coupling theory. This mechanism could be employed as a tunable generator of millimeter and submillimeter wavelength radiation

  8. Stimulated Raman scattering by an intense relativistic electron beam in a long rippled magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.

    1977-01-01

    For the first time, the parametric coupling of the negative energy cyclotron and space-charge modes to a fast coaxial waveguide structure is observed. The coaxial waveguide smooth center conductor is internally loaded to maintain a 5% ripple of 1.4, 1.6, or 2.0 cm periods on the background axial magnetic field throughout the interaction region of 70 cm. The parametric coupling may be considered a stimulated scattering process with the rippled magnetic field of zero frequency in the laboratory frame appearing as an electromagnetic pump wave in the beam frame, with 30 MW/cm 2 power density imparting to the electrons a quiver velocity V/sub os/ = 0.1 c. As predicted by theory, the frequency of the microwave radiation generated by the negative energy cyclotron mode decreases with increasing magnetic field while remaining constant for the negative energy space-charge mode. Power levels from 1 to 5 MW have been measured at mm and cm wavelengths. Radiation at frequencies 2γ 2 V/L, where V and L are the beam velocity and ripple period respectively, has been observed at high magnetic fields with an exponential growth rate consistent with parametric coupling theory. This mechanism could be employed as a tunable generator of submillimeter and infrared wavelength radiation

  9. Low Secondary Electron Yield Carbon Coatings for Electron-cloud Mitigation in Modern Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Calatroni, Sergio; Chiggiato, Paolo; Costa Pinto, Pedro; Marques, Hugo; Neupert, Holger; Taborelli, Mauro; Vollenberg, Wilhelmus; Wevers, Ivo; Yaqub, Kashif

    2010-01-01

    Electron-cloud is one of the main limitations for particle accelerators with positively charged beams of high intensity and short bunch spacing, as the SPS at CERN. The Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of the inner surface of the vacuum chamber is the main parameter governing the phenomenon. The effect could be eliminated by coating the vacuum chambers with a material of low SEY, which does not require bake-out and is robust against air exposure. For such a purpose amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings were produced by magnetron sputtering of graphite targets. They exhibit maximum SEY between 0.95 and 1.05 after air transfer to the measuring instrument. After 1 month of air exposure the SEY rises by 10 - 20 % of the initial values. Storage in desiccator or by packaging in Al foil makes this increase negligible. The coatings have a similar X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) C1s spectrum for a large set of deposition parameters and exhibit an enlarged linewidth compared to HOPG graphite. The static outgassing witho...

  10. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Rao, B. Jayachander [Departamento de Química and Centro de Química, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach.

  11. Slip behaviour of experimental faults subjected to fluid pressure stimulation: carbonates vs. shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, C.; Scuderi, M. M.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for triggering tectonic fault slip and human-induced seismicity. This mechanism has been invoked to explain the dramatic increase in seismicity associated with waste water disposal in intra-plate setting, and it is appealing because fluids lubricate the fault and reduce the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. Although, this basic physical mechanism is well understood, several fundamental questions remain including the apparent delay between fluid injection and seismicity, the role of fault zone rheology, and the relationship between injection volume and earthquake size. Moreover, models of earthquake nucleation predict that a reduction in normal stress, as expected for fluid overpressure, should stabilize fault slip. Here, we address these questions using laboratory experiments, conducted in the double direct shear configuration in a true-triaxial machine on carbonates and shale fault gouges. In particular, we: 1) evaluate frictional strength and permeability, 2) characterize the rate- and state- friction parameters and 3) study fault slip evolution during fluid pressure stimulations. With increasing fluid pressure, when shear and effective normal stresses reach the failure condition, in calcite gouges, characterized by slightly velocity strengthening behaviour, we observe an acceleration of slip that spontaneously evolves into dynamic failure. For shale gouges, with a strong rate-strengthening behaviour, we document complex fault slip behavior characterized by periodic accelerations and decelerations with slip velocity that remains slow (i.e. v 200 µm/s), never approaching dynamic slip rates. Our data indicate that fault rheology and fault stability is controlled by the coupling between fluid pressure and rate- and state- friction parameters suggesting that their comprehensive characterization is fundamental for assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  12. Fabrication of carbon layer coated FE-nanoparticles using an electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Bin; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun; Oh, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A novel synthesis of carbon encapsulated Fe nanoparticles was developed in this study. Fe chloride (III) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were used as precursors. The crosslinking of PAN molecules and the nucleation of Fe nanoparticles were controlled by the electron beam irradiation dose. Stabilization and carbonization processes were carried out using a vacuum furnace at 275 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. Micro structures were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fe nanoparticles were formed with diameters of 100 nm, and the Fe nanoparticles were encapsulated by carbon layers. As the electron beam irradiation dose increased, it was observed that the particle sizes decreased.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of secondary electron emission from carbon-surface by obliquely incident particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Kaoru; Kawata, Jun; Mori, Ichiro

    1990-01-01

    Incidence angle dependences of secondary electron emission from a carbon surface by low energy electron and hydrogen atom are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations on the kinetic emission model. The calculation shows very small increase or rather decrease of the secondary electron yield with oblique incidence. It is explained in terms of not only multiple elastic collisions of incident particles with the carbon atoms but also small penetration depth of the particles comparable with the escape depth of secondary electrons. In addition, the two types of secondary electron emission are distinguished by using the secondary electron yield statistics; one is the emission due to trapped particles in the carbon, and the other is that due to backscattered particles. The high-yield component of the statistics on oblique incidence is more suppressed than those on normal incidence. (author)

  14. Determination of low-energy ion-induced electron yields from thin carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allegrini, Frederic; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Wurz, Peter; Bochsler, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ion beams crossing thin carbon foils can cause electron emission from the entrance and exit surface. Thin carbon foils are used in various types of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers to produce start pulses for TOF measurements. The yield of emitted electrons depends, among other parameters, on the energy of the incoming ion and its mass, and it has been experimentally determined for a few projectile elements. The electron emission yield is of great importance for deriving abundance ratios of elements and isotopes in space plasmas using TOF mass spectrometers. We have developed a detector for measuring ion-induced electron yields, and we have extended the electron yield measurements for oxygen to energies relevant for solar wind research. We also present first measurements of the carbon foil electron emission yield for argon and iron in the solar wind energy range

  15. Trimodal nanoelectrode array for precise deep brain stimulation: prospects of a new technology based on carbon nanofiber arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Andrews, R J

    2007-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been shown to be effective for neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, there are many limitations of the current technology: the large size of current microelectrodes (approximately 1 mm diameter); the lack of monitoring of local brain electrical activity and neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine in Parkinson's disease); the open-loop nature of the stimulation (i.e. not guided by brain electrochemical activity). Reducing the size of the monitoring and stimulating electrodes by orders of magnitude (to the size of neural elements) allows remarkable improvements in both monitoring (spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and sensitivity) and stimulation. Carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode technology offers the possibility of trimodal arrays (monitoring electrical activity, monitoring neurotransmitter levels, precise stimulation). DBS can then be guided by changes in brain electrical activity and/or neurotransmitter levels (i.e. closed-loop DBS). Here, we describe the basic manufacture and electrical characteristics of a prototype nanoelectrode array for DBS, as well as preliminary studies with electroconductive polymers necessary to optimize DBS in vivo. An approach such as the nanoelectrode array described here may offer a generic electrical-neural interface for use in various neural prostheses.

  16. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  17. Superhard sp2–sp3 hybrid carbon allotropes with tunable electronic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Four sp2–sp3 hybrid carbon allotropes are proposed on the basis of first principles calculations. These four carbon allotropes are energetically more favorable than graphite under suitable pressure conditions. They can be assembled from graphite through intralayer wrinkling and interlayer buckling, which is similar to the formation of diamond from graphite. For one of the sp2–sp3 hybrid carbon allotropes, mC24, the electron diffraction patterns match these of i-carbon, which is synthesized from shock-compressed graphite (H. Hirai and K. Kondo, Science, 1991, 253, 772. The allotropes exhibit tunable electronic characteristics from metallic to semiconductive with band gaps comparable to those of silicon allotropes. They are all superhard materials with Vickers hardness values comparable to that of cubic BN. The sp2–sp3 hybrid carbon allotroes are promising materials for photovoltaic electronic devices, and abrasive and grinding tools.

  18. Electronic properties of pristine and modified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamova, M V

    2013-01-01

    The current status of research on the electronic properties of filled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is reviewed. SWCNT atomic structure and electronic properties are described, and their correlation is discussed. Methods for modifying the electronic properties of SWCNTs are considered. SWCNT filling materials are systematized. Experimental and theoretical data on the electronic properties of filled SWCNTs are analyzed. Possible application areas for filled SWCNTs are explored. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Carbon nanotubes--electronic/electrochemical properties and application for nanoelectronics and photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgobba, Vito; Guldi, Dirk M

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental chemical, redox, electrochemical, photoelectrochemical, optical and optoelectronic features of carbon nanotubes are surveyed with particular emphasis on the most relevant applications as electron donor/electron acceptor or as electron conductor/hole conductor materials, in solutions and in the solid state. Methods that aim at p- and n-doping as a means to favor hole or electron injection/transport are covered as well (critical review, 208 references).

  20. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  1. Humidity effects on the electronic transport properties in carbon based nanoscale device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jun; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    By applying nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density functional theory, we investigate the effect of humidity on the electronic transport properties in carbon based nanoscale device. The results show that different humidity may form varied localized potential barrier, which is a very important factor to affect the stability of electronic transport in the nanoscale system. A mechanism for the humidity effect is suggested. -- Highlights: ► Electronic transport in carbon based nanoscale device. ► Humidity affects the stability of electronic transport. ► Different humidity may form varied localized potential barrier.

  2. Bending of metal-filled carbon nanotube under electron beam irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Misra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam irradiation induced, bending of Iron filled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes is reported. Bending of both the carbon nanotube and the Iron contained within the core was achieved using two approaches with the aid of a high resolution electron microscope (HRTEM. In the first approach, bending of the nanotube structure results in response to the irradiation of a pristine kink defect site, while in the second approach, disordered sites induce bending by focusing the electron beam on the graphite walls. The HRTEM based in situ observations demonstrate the potential for using electron beam irradiation to investigate and manipulate the physical properties of confined nanoscale structures.

  3. Role of lattice structure and low temperature resistivity in fast-electron-beam filamentation in carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, R J; Butler, N M H; Gray, R J; MacLellan, D A; Rusby, D R; Xu, H; Neely, D; McKenna, P; Scott, G G; Robinson, A P L; Zielbauer, B; Bagnoud, V; Desjarlais, M P

    2016-01-01

    The influence of low temperature (eV to tens-of-eV) electrical resistivity on the onset of the filamentation instability in fast-electron transport is investigated in targets comprising of layers of ordered (diamond) and disordered (vitreous) carbon. It is shown experimentally and numerically that the thickness of the disordered carbon layer influences the degree of filamentation of the fast-electron beam. Strong filamentation is produced if the thickness is of the order of 60 μm or greater, for an electron distribution driven by a sub-picosecond, mid-10 20 Wcm −2 laser pulse. It is shown that the position of the vitreous carbon layer relative to the fast-electron source (where the beam current density and background temperature are highest) does not have a strong effect because the resistive filamentation growth rate is high in disordered carbon over a wide range of temperatures up to the Spitzer regime. (paper)

  4. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of multiwall carbon nanotube/nickel oxide nanocomposite thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kittessa T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their unique electronic and optical properties, nanocomposite thin films are widely used for converting solar radiation therapy into other conventional energy forms, such as heat and electricity. Carbon nanotube-based composites which can...

  5. Stability and electronic structure of carbon capsules with superior gas storage properties: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, Arun K.; Pati, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability and electronic structure of various carbon capsules are studied. • Effects of capsule’s sizes on electronic and optical properties are explored. • Changes in cohesive and formation energy and electronic gap are discussed. • Capsule’s gas storage propensity is addressed using DFT and ab initio MD. • Capsule’s optical absorptions are discussed with and without stored gas molecules. - Abstract: Structures, electronic and optical properties of carbon nanocapsules of varying sizes (length and diameter) are studied using first-principles density functional theory. Based on calculated cohesive energy, formation energy, electronic gap and extent of orbital delocalization, we examine structural stability and changes in low-energy physics of these carbon capsules. We find that both cohesive and formation energy decrease with increase in capsule’s sizes, indicating their greater structural rigidity and favorable formation feasibility. The electronic gap also decreases with increase in capsule’s sizes due to the larger electronic delocalization. The simulated optical absorption spectra show lowering of low-energy peak positions with increase in the capsule’s dimensions, consistent with the reduction in electronic gap. Additionally, we also provide an estimate of gas storage capacity for the larger carbon capsule (C 460 ) considered. We find 7.69 wt.% and 28.08 wt.% storage propensity for hydrogen and carbon dioxide gases, respectively, which clearly suggests their potential use as light storage materials

  6. Thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiation cross-linked polyethylene, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, Mitsugu; Aida, Fumio; Shiono, Takeo

    1984-01-01

    In the past, electron-beam irradiation was for the most part applied to rather thin insulation electric cables. Considering application to thick insulation, high voltage power cables (6.6 kV or more), the authors experimented on the charge accumulation and crystallizing properties of polyethylene due to irradiation, using three differently crystallizing samples, high and low density polyethylenes (HDPE and LDPE) and straight chain low density polyethylene (LLDPE), and have obtained some findings. Those are summarized as follows. (1) The crystallizing properties (crystallinity, the size of spherulite, etc.) of polyethylene varied according to the cooling condition, and affected the thermally stimulated current (TSC). (2) In HDPE and LDPE, the behaviour of crystallization differed. In HDPE, fine crystals decreased, and spherulites significantly grew in slow cooling, but in LDPE, the generation of fine crystals and the growth of spherulites simultaneously progressed. (3) The TSC peak area for HDPE was scarcely affected by slow cooling, but that for LDPE greatly increased. (4) The TSC of irradiated polyethylene showed peaks corresponding to the melting temperatures of fine crystals and spherulites when collecting voltage Vc was lowered. (5) The above facts suggest that fine crystals and spherulites took part as charge trap sites, but the aspect of participation was different in HDPE and LDPE. (6) LLDPE has the properties of both HDPE and LDPE in view of the crystallinity, charge accumulation was small, and it was hard to be affected by cooling condition. Accordingly, it seemed to be an interesting material as the PE for irradiation. A differential scanning calorimeter and laser small angle scattering method were used for the analysis of the measured results of TSC. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Electronic Transport Parameter of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor On-Tube Heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Nanotubes research is one of the top five hot research topics in physics since 2006 because of its unique properties and functionalities, which leads to wide-range applications. One of the most interesting potential applications is in term of nanoelectronic device. It has been modeled carbon nanotubes heterojunction, which was built from two different carbon nanotubes, that one is metallic and the other one is semiconducting. There are two different carbon nanotubes metal-semiconductor heterojunction. The first one is built from CNT(10,10 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (17,0 as semiconductor carbon nanotube. The other one is built from CNT (5,5 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (8,0. All of the semiconducting carbon nanotubes are assumed to be a pyridine-like N-doped. Those two heterojunctions are different in term of their structural shape and diameter. It has been calculated their charge distribution and potential profile, which would be useful for the simulation of their electronic transport properties. The calculations are performed by using self-consistent method to solve Non-Homogeneous Poisson’s Equation with aid of Universal Density of States calculation method for Carbon Nanotubes. The calculations are done by varying the doping fraction of the semiconductor carbon nanotubes The electron tunneling transmission coefficient, for low energy region, also has been calculated by using Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB approximation. From the calculation results, it is obtained that the charge distribution as well as the potential profile of this device is doping fraction dependent. It is also inferred that the WKB method is fail to be used to calculate whole of the electron tunneling coefficient in this system. It is expected that further calculation for electron tunneling coefficient in higher energy region as well as current-voltage characteristic of this system will become an interesting issue for this carbon nanotube based

  8. Atomoxetine versus Stimulants in the Community Treatment of Children with ADHD: An Electronic Diary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Carol K.; Henker, Barbara; Ishikawa, Sharon S.; Emmerson, Natasha A.; Swindle, Ralph; Johnston, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the morning and afternoon/evening functioning of children with ADHD treated in the community with either atomoxetine or long-acting stimulants and reported to be doing well. Method: 109 8- to 12-year-olds and their mothers participated in one of three groups: stimulants (STIM, N = 26), atomoxetine (ATMX, N = 25), or…

  9. Enhanced electromagnetic properties of nickel nanoparticiles dispersed carbon fiber via electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeong Ju; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Seung Jun; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fiber has received much attention owing to its properties, including a large surface-to-volume ratio, chemical and thermal stability, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and high mechanical strengths. In particular, magnetic nanopowder dispersed carbon fiber has been attractive in technological applications such as the electrochemical capacitor and electromagnetic wave shielding. In this study, the nickel-oxide-nanoparticle dispersed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were prepared through an electrospinning method. Electron beam irradiation was carried out with a 2.5 MeV beam energy to stabilize the materials. The samples were then heat treated for stabilization and carbonization. The nanofiber surface was analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The crystal structures of the carbon matrix and nickel nanopowders were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the magnetic and electrical properties were analyzed using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and 4 point probe. As the irradiation dose increases, the density of the carbon fiber was increased. In addition, the electrical properties of the carbon fiber improved through electron beam irradiation. This is because the amorphous region of the carbon fiber decreases. This electron beam effect of PAN fibers containing nickel nanoparticles confirmed their potential as a high performance carbon material for various applications

  10. Large flexibility of high aspect ratio carbon nanostructures fabricated by electron-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Gordeev, S N, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-26

    The mechanical properties of free-standing electron beam deposited amorphous carbon structures have been studied using atomic force microscopy. The fabricated carbon blades are found to be extraordinarily flexible, capable of undergoing vertical deflection up to {approx} 75% of their total length without inelastic deformation. The elastic bending modulus of these structures was calculated to be 28 {+-} 10 GPa.

  11. Electronic transport properties of fullerene functionalized carbon nanotubes: Ab initio and tight-binding calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Hashemi, J.; Markussen, Troels

    2009-01-01

    Fullerene functionalized carbon nanotubes-NanoBuds-form a novel class of hybrid carbon materials, which possesses many advantageous properties as compared to the pristine components. Here, we report a theoretical study of the electronic transport properties of these compounds. We use both ab init...

  12. Enhanced electromagnetic properties of nickel nanoparticiles dispersed carbon fiber via electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeong Ju; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Seung Jun; Kang, Phil Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Carbon fiber has received much attention owing to its properties, including a large surface-to-volume ratio, chemical and thermal stability, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and high mechanical strengths. In particular, magnetic nanopowder dispersed carbon fiber has been attractive in technological applications such as the electrochemical capacitor and electromagnetic wave shielding. In this study, the nickel-oxide-nanoparticle dispersed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were prepared through an electrospinning method. Electron beam irradiation was carried out with a 2.5 MeV beam energy to stabilize the materials. The samples were then heat treated for stabilization and carbonization. The nanofiber surface was analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The crystal structures of the carbon matrix and nickel nanopowders were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the magnetic and electrical properties were analyzed using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and 4 point probe. As the irradiation dose increases, the density of the carbon fiber was increased. In addition, the electrical properties of the carbon fiber improved through electron beam irradiation. This is because the amorphous region of the carbon fiber decreases. This electron beam effect of PAN fibers containing nickel nanoparticles confirmed their potential as a high performance carbon material for various applications.

  13. Characterization of electron beam evaporated carbon films and compound formation on titanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthin, J.; Linsmeier, C.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of carbon-based mixed materials is unavoidable on the plasma-facing components (e.g. first wall and divertor) of fusion devices when carbon is used together with other materials. On the surfaces of these components very different conditions with respect to particle and energy impact occur. To predict the mixed material formation under these conditions the precise knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms governing these interactions is essential. In this paper we present the results of carbon interaction with titanium and silicon, as model substances for metallic and covalent carbides, during thermal treatment. To perform basic studies of the reactions of carbon with different elements, thin carbon films are produced by electron beam evaporation on the different substrates under UHV conditions. All measurements for chemical analysis are performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We discuss first the properties of the deposited carbon films. The carbon films are characterized on inert gold surfaces and are compared to bulk graphite. Annealing of the carbon films up to 970 K leads to a transition from a disordered carbon network into a graphitic structure. Preparation of carbon films at room temperature on titanium or silicon leads to a limited carbide formation at the carbon/substrate interface. Carbon deposited in excess of several monolayers is present in elementary form. Annealing of the samples leads to complete carbidization consuming the available carbon in both cases. Titanium reacts to TiC and additional substoichiometric carbide, silicon forms SiC with exact stoichiometry. (orig.)

  14. Electron source with a carbon-fibrous cathode for radiation-technology accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The paper analyses the circuit of a full operating voltage electron source which is a direct-action electron accelerator. The electron source consists of a power supply, high-voltage multiplier-rectifier, vacuum planar diode, vacuum system and control system. The vacuum electron diode contains an autoemission carbon-fibrous cathode and beryllium foil strip anode. The results of measurements of emission characteristics of alumosilicate and carbon-fibrous cathodes are presented. The investigations into test electron source show that it can be used as a basis for creating an electron accelerator which will be capable of generating 1 MW electron beams of 1-2 MeV energy and 1 A current. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Electronically stimulated deep-center reactions in electron-irradiated InP: Comparison between experiment and recombination-enhancement theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the recombination enhancement of several defect reactions involving the main deep centers in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP. A fairly good agreement is obtained with the Weeks-Tully-Kimerling theory for the activation energies of the enhanced process. On the other hand, a thorough investigation of a thermally and electronically stimulated defect transformation shows evidence that one major approximation (local vibrational equilibrium) fails, and that the recently proposed [H. Sumi, Phys. Rev. B 29, 4616 (1984)] mechanism of coherent recombination on deep centers is responsible for altered reaction rates at high injection levels

  16. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  17. Low-Energy Electron-Stimulated Luminescence of Thin H20 and D20 Layers on Pt(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2005-01-01

    The electron-stimulated luminescence (ESL) from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice films deposited on Pt(111) at 100 K is investigated as a function of the film thickness, incident electron energy (5 ? 1000 eV), isotopic composition, and film structure. The ESL emission spectrum has a characteristic double-peaked shape that has been attributed to a transition between a superexcited state ( ) and the dissociative, first excited state ( ) in water: Comparing the electron-stimulated luminescence and O2 electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yields versus incident electron energy, we find the ESL threshold blue-shifted from the O2 ESD threshold by ∼3 eV, which is close to the center of the emission spectrum near 400 nm and supports the assignment for the ESL. For thin films, radiative and non-radiative interactions with the substrate tend to quench the luminescence. The luminescence yield increases with coverage since the interactions with the substrate become less important. The ESL yield from D2O is ∼ 4 times higher than from H2O. Using layered films of H2O and D2O, this sizable isotopic effect on the ESL is exploited to spatially profile the luminescence emission within the ASW films. These experiments show that most of the luminescence is emitted from within the penetration depth of the incident electron. However, the results depend on the order of the isotopes in the film, and this asymmetry can be modeled by assuming some migration of the excited states within the film. The ESL is very sensitive to defects and structural changes in solid water, and the emission yield is significantly higher from amorphous films than from crystalline ice

  18. Fabrication of carbon quantum dots with nano-defined position and pattern in one step via sugar-electron-beam writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yuyan; Li, Zhiyun; Peng, Lun; Zhang, Weidong; Chen, Gaojian

    2017-12-14

    Quantum dots (QDs) are promising materials in nanophotonics, biological imaging, and even quantum computing. Precise positioning and patterning of QDs is a prerequisite for realizing their actual applications. Contrary to the traditional two discrete steps of fabricating and positioning QDs, herein, a novel sugar-electron-beam writing (SEW) method is reported for producing QDs via electron-beam lithography (EBL) that uses a carefully chosen synthetic resist, poly(2-(methacrylamido)glucopyranose) (PMAG). Carbon QDs (CQDs) could be fabricated in situ through electron beam exposure, and the nanoscale position and luminescence intensity of the produced CQDs could be precisely controlled without the assistance of any other fluorescent matter. We have demonstrated that upon combining an electron beam with a glycopolymer, in situ production of CQDs occurs at the electron beam spot center with nanoscale precision at any place and with any patterns, an advancement that we believe will stimulate innovations in future applications.

  19. Influence of Electrical and Electromagnetic Stimulation on Nerve Regeneration in the Transected Mouse Sciatic Nerve : An Electron Microscopic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Matsubara, Takako; Miki, Akinori

    2001-01-01

    Influence of electrical and electromagnetic stimulation on nerve regeneration was electron microscopically examined in the transected mouse sciatic nerve. Two days after the transection, several thin regenerating axons (daughter axons) were observed between the myelin sheath and basal lamina of Schwann cells in the proximal stump. Growth cones of the daughter axons contained several small round vesicles and mitochondria, and the shaft of them, neurofilaments, neurotubules and profiles of smoo...

  20. Analysis of hydrogen distribution on Mg-Ni alloy surface by scanning electron-stimulated desorption ion microscope (SESDIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, Atsushi; Hibino, Kiyohide; Suzuki, Masanori; Yamada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Kazuhide; Ueda, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution and behavior on a Mg-Ni alloy surface are studied by using a time-of-flight electron-stimulated desorption (TOF-ESD) microscopy and a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The desorbed hydrogen ions are energy-discriminated and distinguished into two characters in the adsorbed states, which belong to Mg 2 Ni grains and the other to oxygen-contaminated Mg phase at the grain boundaries. Adsorbed hydrogen is found to be stable up to 150 deg. C, but becomes thermally unstable around at 200 deg. C

  1. Multi-pulsed intense electron beam emission from velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes and dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liansheng; Yang Anmin; Chen Yi; Zhang Huang; Liu Xingguang; Li Jin; Jiang Xiaoguo; Zhang Kaizhi; Shi Jinshui; Deng Jianjun; Zhang Linwen

    2010-01-01

    The experimental results of studies of four kinds of cathode emitting intense electron beams are demonstrated under multi-pulsed mode based on an experimental setup including two multi-pulse high voltage sources. The tested cathodes include velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) and dispenser cathodes. The results indicate that all four are able to emit multi-pulsed beams. For velvet, carbon fiber and CNTs, the electron induced cathode plasma emission may be the main process and this means that there are differences in beam parameters from pulse to pulse. For dispenser cathodes tested in the experiment, although there is a little difference from pulse to pulse for some reason, thermal-electric field emission may be the main process. (authors)

  2. Electronic Structure of Low-Dimensional Carbon Π-Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Boukahil, Idris; Qiao, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    , and the electron hole interaction. For the latter, we develop a simple model that accurately represents a full Delta-self-consistent field (ΔSCF) calculation. The distortion of the LUMO because of its interaction with the C is hole is investigated. These results illustrate the electronic states of prototypical Π...

  3. Electronic properties of linear carbon chains: Resolving the controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Backri, Amaal; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J.

    2014-01-01

    Literature values for the energy gap of long one-dimensional carbon chains vary from as little as 0.2 eV to more than 4 eV. To resolve this discrepancy, we use the GW many-body approach to calculate the band gap E g of an infinite carbon chain. We also compute the energy dependence of the attenuation coefficient β governing the decay with chain length of the electrical conductance of long chains and compare this with recent experimental measurements of the single-molecule conductance of end-capped carbon chains. For long chains, we find E g = 2.16 eV and an upper bound for β of 0.21 Å −1

  4. A biosensor for hydrogen peroxide detection based on electronic properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Density functional theory has been used to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes have been considered in the presence of different number of hydrogen peroxide. The results indicate that hydrogen peroxide has no significant effect on the metallic nanotube and these nanotubes remain to be metallic. In contrast, the electronic properties of the semiconducting nanotubes are so sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. The energy band gap of these nanotubes is decreased by increasing the number of hydrogen peroxide. The electronic sensivity of the carbon nanotubes to hydrogen peroxide opens new insights into developing biosensors based on the single walled carbon nanotubes.

  5. Assessing and ameliorating the influence of the electron beam on carbon nanotube oxidation in environmental transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we examine how the imaging electron beam can induce damage in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at varying oxygen gas pressures and electron dose rates using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). Our studies show that there is a threshold cumulative electron dose which brings about damage in CNTs in oxygen – through removal of their graphitic walls – which is dependent on O_2 pressure, with a 4–5 fold decrease in total electron dose per decade increase at a lower pressure range (10"−"6 to 10"−"5 mbar) and approximately 1.3 –fold decrease per decade increase at a higher pressure range (10"−"3 to 10"0 mbar). However, at a given pressure, damage in CNTs was found to occur even at the lowest dose rate utilized, suggesting the absence of a lower limit for the latter parameter. This study provides guidelines on the cumulative dose required to damage nanotubes in the 10"−"7 mbar to 10"0 mbar pressure regimes, and discusses the role of electron dose rate and total electron dose on beam-induced CNT degradation experiments. - Highlights: • The electron beam ionizes gas molecules in ETEM and affects experimental outcomes. • Beam-induced damage in CNTs occurs at varying O_2 pressures and electron dose rates. • There is a threshold cumulative dose to damage CNTs which depends on O_2 pressure. • At a given pressure, CNT damage occurs even at the electron dose rate utilized.

  6. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation. [ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a[<=]18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T[sub e] modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Electronic structure and physical properties of 13C carbon composite

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Author was focused on the properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. Generally, the review relies on the original results and concentrates...

  8. Creation of paired electron states in the gap of semiconducting carbon nanotubes by correlated hydrogen adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchs, Gilles; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Ruffieux, Pascal; Groening, Pierangelo; Foster, Adam S; Nieminen, Risto M; Groening, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The specific, local modification of the electronic structure of carbon nanomaterials is as important for novel electronic device fabrication as the doping in the case of silicon-based electronics. Here, we report low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of semiconducting carbon nanotubes subjected to hydrogen-plasma treatment. We show that plasma treatment mostly results in the creation of paired electronic states in the nanotube band gap. Combined with extensive first-principle simulations, our results provide direct evidence that these states originate from correlated chemisorption of hydrogen adatoms on the tube surface. The energy splitting of the paired states is governed by the adatom-adatom interaction, so that controlled hydrogenation can be used for engineering the local electronic structure of nanotubes and other sp 2 -bonded nanocarbon systems

  9. Direct electron transfer from glucose oxidase immobilized on a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighi, Behzad; Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A direct electron transfer reaction of glucose oxidase was observed on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode. → A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed at the formal potential of approximately -0.439 V. → The apparent electron transfer rate constant was measured to be 5.27 s -1 . → A mechanism for the observed direct electron transfer reaction was proposed, which consists of a two-electron and a two-proton transfer. - Abstract: A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed for the direct electron transfer (DET) reaction of an immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode at the formal potential (E o ') of -0.439 V versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl. The electron transfer rate constant (k s ) was calculated to be 5.27 s -1 . The dependence of E o ' on pH indicated that the direct electron transfer of the GOx was a two-electron transfer process, coupled with two-proton transfer. The results clearly demonstrate that the nano-porous glassy carbon electrode is a cost-effective and ready-to-use scaffold for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor.

  10. Direct electron transfer from glucose oxidase immobilized on a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi, Behzad, E-mail: haghighi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A direct electron transfer reaction of glucose oxidase was observed on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode. > A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed at the formal potential of approximately -0.439 V. > The apparent electron transfer rate constant was measured to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. > A mechanism for the observed direct electron transfer reaction was proposed, which consists of a two-electron and a two-proton transfer. - Abstract: A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed for the direct electron transfer (DET) reaction of an immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode at the formal potential (E{sup o}') of -0.439 V versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl. The electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) was calculated to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. The dependence of E{sup o}' on pH indicated that the direct electron transfer of the GOx was a two-electron transfer process, coupled with two-proton transfer. The results clearly demonstrate that the nano-porous glassy carbon electrode is a cost-effective and ready-to-use scaffold for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor.

  11. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules using near field photon induced forces without resonant electronic enhancement gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth [CaSTL Center, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Huang, Fei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H., E-mail: hkwick@uci.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 142 Engineering Tower, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Nowak, Derek [Molecular Vista, Inc., 6840 Via Del Oro, San Jose, California 95119 (United States)

    2016-06-06

    We report on stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules, excited without resonant electronic enhancement gain, and recorded using near field photon induced forces. Photon-induced interaction forces between the sharp metal coated silicon tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a sample resulting from stimulated Raman excitation were detected. We controlled the tip to sample spacing using the higher order flexural eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever, enabling the tip to come very close to the sample. As a result, the detection sensitivity was increased compared with previous work on Raman force microscopy. Raman vibrational spectra of azobenzene thiol and l-phenylalanine were measured and found to agree well with published results. Near-field force detection eliminates the need for far-field optical spectrometer detection. Recorded images show spatial resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Further optimization and use of ultrafast pulsed lasers could push the detection sensitivity towards the single molecule limit.

  12. Electron spin transport in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    Electron spin transport in grafeen en in koolstof nanobuisjes Grafeen, is een kristaal laag van koolstof atomen die slechts één atoomlaag dik is. Een koolstof nanobuisje is te verkrijgen door een grafeen laag op te rollen. In dit proefschrift laten we zien, met behulp van experimenten, dat deze

  13. A novel viscoelastic surfactant suitable for use in high temperature carbonate reservoirs for diverted acidizing stimulation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Stuart; Zhou, Jian; Gadberry, Fred [AkzoNobel Surface Chemistry, Forth Worth, TX (United States); Nasr-El-Din, Hisham; Wang, Guanqun [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2012-07-01

    Due to the low permeability of many carbonate hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs, it is difficult to achieve economic hydrocarbon recovery from a well without secondary stimulation. Bullheading of strong acids, such as HCl is practiced in low temperature reservoirs, but as the bottom hole temperature (BHT) rises, the acid becomes increasingly corrosive, causing facial dissolution and sub-optimal wormhole network development. In the last decade, viscoelastic surfactants (VES) have been added to HCl acid systems to improve the stimulation of HT carbonate reservoirs. The VES form 'living polymers' or worm-like micelles as electrolyte concentration rises in the acid due to reaction with the reservoir. This leads to viscosification of the stimulation fluid. The viscosification slows further acid reaction in the region already contacted by the acid, and forces the acid to take an alternate path into the rock, leading to diversion of the acids further down the well to the harder to access toe or lower permeability zones. Until recently, the maximum BHT that such VES-based diverting systems could be used was up to about 250 deg F/120 deg C. Above that temperature, all viscous properties of the fluid are lost, destroying the mechanism of acid diversion. A recently developed novel viscoelastic surfactant provides nearly 100 deg F/55 deg C extension in the BHT range in which diverted acid treatments can be used. These fluids are able to maintain both viscosity up to about 375 deg F/190 deg C, with the elastic modulus predominating up to 350 deg F/175 deg C. It is the elasticity which is particularly important in acid diversion. These fluids can have their viscosity readily broken by in-situ hydrocarbons, dilution with water or by using a mutual solvent. The broken fluids are readily removed from the near-well bore, leaving the newly created wormhole network to produce the target hydrocarbons. The new VES is significantly more environmentally benign compared with current

  14. Nanoscale Soldering of Positioned Carbon Nanotubes using Highly Conductive Electron Beam Induced Gold Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for controlled positioning of carbon nanotubes followed by highly conductive contacting of the nanotubes, using electron beam assisted deposition of gold. The positioning and soldering process takes place inside an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E...... in a carbon matrix. Nanoscale soldering of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) onto microelectrodes was achieved by deposition of a conducting gold line across a contact point between nanotube and electrode. The solderings were found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes. We have positioned...... MWNTs to bridge the gap between two electrodes, and formed soldering bonds between the tube and each of the electrodes. All nanotube bridges showed ohmic resistances in the range 10-30 kΩ. We observed no increase in resistance after exposing the MWNT bridge to air for days....

  15. A graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lina; Zhang Haoxu; Zhou Ruifeng; Chen Zhuo; Li Qunqing; Fan Shoushan; Jiang Kaili; Ge Guanglu; Liu Renxiao

    2011-01-01

    A novel grid for use in transmission electron microscopy is developed. The supporting film of the grid is composed of thin graphene oxide films overlying a super-aligned carbon nanotube network. The composite film combines the advantages of graphene oxide and carbon nanotube networks and has the following properties: it is ultra-thin, it has a large flat and smooth effective supporting area with a homogeneous amorphous appearance, high stability, and good conductivity. The graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid has a distinct advantage when characterizing the fine structure of a mass of nanomaterials over conventional amorphous carbon grids. Clear high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of various nanomaterials are obtained easily using the new grids.

  16. UV photon and low-energy (5--150 eV) electron-stimulated processes at environmental interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Irradiation of surfaces and interfaces with low-energy (5--150 eV) electrons and ultraviolet photons occurs during the storage of ''mixed'' (chemical/radioactive) waste forms and during processing steps which involve the use of low temperature plasmas. It is well known that electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) from wide band-gap materials and interfaces can be initiated by Auger decay of deep valence and shallow core holes. This process consists of hole production, Auger decay, reversal of the Madelung potential, and ion expulsion due to the Coulomb repulsion. ESD and PSD of neutrals also occurs and involves production of electron-hole pairs and excitons. Generally, neutral yields dominate ESD and PSD cross sections, which typically vary between ∼10 -16 and 10 -22 cm 2 . The authors present results on the ESD and PSD of environmentally relevant substrates such as ZrO 2 (100), soda-glass, and NaNO 3 . The major cation thresholds and yields indicate that ESD and PSD from these complex materials involves Auger stimulated events. In particular, desorption thresholds correlate with ionization of the O(2s), Zr(4p), Si(2p) and Na(2s) levels. The near band-gap threshold energy (∼5--7 eV) for the desorption of neutrals (i.e., atomic oxygen, NO, etc) demonstrate the overall importance of self-trapped and localized excitons in both ESD and PSD of typical ceramics and oxides

  17. Bottom-up, Robust Graphene Ribbon Electronics in All-Carbon Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supur, Mustafa; Van Dyck, Colin; Bergren, Adam J; McCreery, Richard L

    2018-02-21

    Large-area molecular electronic junctions consisting of 5-carbon wide graphene ribbons (GR) with lengths of 2-12 nm between carbon electrodes were fabricated by electrochemical reduction of diazotized 1,8-diaminonaphthalene. Their conductance greatly exceeds that observed for other molecular junctions of similar thicknesses, by a factor of >1 × 10 4 compared to polyphenylenes and >1 × 10 7 compared to alkane chains. The remarkable increase of conductance of the GR nanolayer results from (i) uninterrupted planarity of fused-arene structure affording extensive π-electron delocalization and (ii) enhanced electronic coupling of molecular layer with the carbon bottom contact by two-point covalent bonding, in agreement with DFT-based simulations.

  18. Effect of Li Termination on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Linear Carbon Chains: A TAO-DFT Study

    OpenAIRE

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of linear carbon chains (C n ) and Li-terminated linear carbon chains (Li2C n ), with n carbon atoms (n?=?5?10), has been very challenging for traditional electronic structure methods, due to the presence of strong static correlation effects. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our newly developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT), a very efficient electronic structure meth...

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigations of carbon-doped β rhombohedral boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gercke, U.; Siems, C.-D.

    1979-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements at 9 and 35 GHz on polycrystalline β rhombohedral boron with various carbon contents resulted in partly resolved absorption spectra. At 300 K the spin density ratio of two lines (called D and E) showed a linear increase with the carbon content. This ratio is temperature dependent. The lines D and E are photo-EPR active with different quantum efficiencies at various temperatures. (Auth.)

  20. Beam Tests of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating for Mitigation of Electron Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey [Fermilab; Backfish, Michael [Fermilab; Kato, Shigeki [KEK, Tsukuba; Tan, Cheng-Yang [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Our results evaluate the efficacy of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating for the mitigation of electron in the Fermilab Main Injector. The interior surface of the beampipe conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the change in electron cloud flux over time in the DLC coated beampipe and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. The electron flux is measured by retarding field analyzers placed in a field-free region of the Main Injector. We find the DLC coating reduces the electron cloud signal to roughly 2\\% of that measured in the uncoated stainless steel beampipe.

  1. THE STIMULATING EFFECT OF LASER RED LIGHT, FAR RED LIGHT AND SODIUM CARBONATE AT THE INITIAL STAGES OF BARLEY ONTOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Dudin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Modern ecological state of the environment and human unhealthy diet cause many diseases. A healthy diet is the one that contains adequate amounts of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, macronutrients and micronutrients. Photosynthesis i. e. the process by which plants produce organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water, is the source of life, the source of evolution and proliferation of life forms on the Earth. Thus, the juice made from sprouted barley provides physiologically active chlorophyll, macronutrients and micronutrients, vitamins А, В2 , В3 , В5 , В6 , В8 , Е and К. It is well known that light from a red laser with a wavelength of 638.2 nm has a stimulating action on the germination energy, germination ability and productivity of seeds, and on the crop yields. Therefore, this research is of primary importance today. The research result produced a sharp decline in plant vigor and germinating capacity of barley when soaking in 1n sodium carbonate solution, as well as changes in the ratio of potassium-sodium balance in plants. Thus at lower concentrations of sodium carbonate and 0.1 n sodium increasing of pigment content in barley is observed on the seventh day. The red laser light has a similar stimulating action: the chlorophyll content of barley plants increased after the red laser treatment of barley seeds. However, the chlorophyll contents were depressed when the seeds were exposed to far red light with wavelengths of 754±10 nm. Using these factors, one can manage the content of chlorophyll and sodium-potassium balance in the initial stages of barley ontogenesis in the technology of barley juice or the powder for a healthy and proper human diet.

  2. Stimulation of methanogenesis in anaerobic digesters treating leachate from a municipal solid waste incineration plant with carbon cloth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuqing; Sun, Dezhi; Dang, Yan; Chen, Huimin; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Holmes, Dawn E

    2016-12-01

    Bio-methanogenic digestion of incineration leachate is hindered by high OLRs, which can lead to build-up of VFAs, drops in pH and ultimately in reactor souring. It was hypothesized that incorporation of carbon cloth into reactors treating leachate would promote DIET and enhance reactor performance. To examine this possibility, carbon cloth was added to laboratory-scale UASB reactors that were fed incineration leachate. As expected, the carbon-cloth amended reactor could operate stably with a 34.2% higher OLR than the control (49.4 vs 36.8kgCOD/(m 3 d)). Microbial community analysis showed that bacteria capable of extracellular electron transfer and methanogens known to participate in DIET were enriched on the carbon cloth surface, and conductivity of sludge from the carbon cloth amended reactor was almost twofold higher than sludge from the control (9.77 vs 5.47μS/cm), suggesting that microorganisms in the experimental reactor may have been expressing electrically conductive filaments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct detection of neutral metal atoms in electron-stimulated desorption: Al from CH3O/Al(111) - velocity distribution and absolute yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitten, J.E.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Jones, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of neutral aluminum from the system CH 3 O/Al(111) has been directly monitored via quasiresonant photoionization with 193 nm excimer laser light and confirmed by two-step resonant ionization, utilizing the Al 3d 2 D manifold. Velocity distribution measurements for the neutral Al peak at ∼ 800 m/s for 1 keV incident electron energy. An absolute yield of 3.2 x 10 -6 Al atoms/electron was determined by comparison with sputtering measurements in the same apparatus. This is the first observation of electron-stimulated metal desorption from adsorbate-covered metallic surfaces

  4. Dissolved organic carbon biodegradability from thawing permafrost stimulated by sunlight rather than inorganic nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Chen, L.; Zhang, B.; Wang, G.; Qin, S.; Yang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost thaw could result in a large portion of frozen carbon being laterally transferred to aquatic ecosystems as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). During this delivery process, the size of biodegradable DOC (BDOC) determines the proportion of DOC mineralized by microorganisms and associated carbon loss to the atmosphere, which may further trigger positive carbon-climate feedback. Thermokarst is an abrupt permafrost thaw process that can enhance DOC export and also impact DOC processing through increased inorganic nitrogen (N) and sunlight exposure. However, it remains unclear how thermokarst-impacted BDOC responds to inorganic N addition and ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. Here we explored the responses of DOC concentration, composition and its biodegradability to inorganic N and UV light in a typical thermokarst on the Tibetan Plateau, by combining field observation and laboratory incubation with spectra analyses (UV-visible absorption and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra) and parallel factor analyses. Our results showed that BDOC in thermokarst feature outflows was significantly higher than in reference water. Furthermore, inorganic N addition had no influence on thermokarst-impacted BDOC, whereas exposure to UV light significantly increased BDOC by as much as 2.3 times higher than the dark-control. Moreover, N addition and UV irradiation did not generate additive effects on BDOC. These results imply that sunlight rather than inorganic N can increase thermokarst-derived BDOC, potentially strengthening the positive permafrost carbon-climate feedback.

  5. Electron spectroscopy of rubber and resin-based composites containing 2D carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaciulis, S., E-mail: saulius.kaciulis@ismn.cnr.it [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN-CNR, P.O. Box 10, Monterotondo Stazione, 00015 Roma (Italy); Mezzi, A.; Balijepalli, S.K. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN-CNR, P.O. Box 10, Monterotondo Stazione, 00015 Roma (Italy); Lavorgna, M. [Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, IPCB-CNR, P.le Fermi, 80055 Napoli (Italy); Xia, H.S. [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610065 Sichuan (China)

    2015-04-30

    Composite materials with 2D carbon (graphene and/or single wall carbon nanotubes) are very promising due to their extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties. Graphene and natural rubber composites, which may be used for the gaskets or sealants, were prepared by ultrasonically assisted latex-mixing exfoliation and in-situ reduction process, with two vulcanization approaches: roll-mixing and hot-pressing. Also the resin-based composites, filled with micro-particles of Ag and graphene or carbon nanotubes, have been studied. The standards for the compositional characterization of these materials still are not established. In addition to the mostly used techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, also Auger electron spectroscopy can be employed for the identification of graphene. In this study, the shape of C KVV peak, excited by electron beam and X-ray photons, has been investigated in different composite materials containing graphene and carbon nanotubes. A spectroscopic method for 2D carbon recognition, based on the D{sub x} parameter which is determined from C KVV signal excited by X-ray photons, was proposed and verified. Even a small content of graphene in different types of composites was sufficient for this recognition due to the dominating presence of graphene on the surface of composites. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the rubber composites was determined by XPS. • Auger spectrum of carbon was used for graphene identification in composites. • Small content of graphene was sufficient for its recognition from the D parameter.

  6. Electron spectroscopy of rubber and resin-based composites containing 2D carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaciulis, S.; Mezzi, A.; Balijepalli, S.K.; Lavorgna, M.; Xia, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials with 2D carbon (graphene and/or single wall carbon nanotubes) are very promising due to their extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties. Graphene and natural rubber composites, which may be used for the gaskets or sealants, were prepared by ultrasonically assisted latex-mixing exfoliation and in-situ reduction process, with two vulcanization approaches: roll-mixing and hot-pressing. Also the resin-based composites, filled with micro-particles of Ag and graphene or carbon nanotubes, have been studied. The standards for the compositional characterization of these materials still are not established. In addition to the mostly used techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, also Auger electron spectroscopy can be employed for the identification of graphene. In this study, the shape of C KVV peak, excited by electron beam and X-ray photons, has been investigated in different composite materials containing graphene and carbon nanotubes. A spectroscopic method for 2D carbon recognition, based on the D x parameter which is determined from C KVV signal excited by X-ray photons, was proposed and verified. Even a small content of graphene in different types of composites was sufficient for this recognition due to the dominating presence of graphene on the surface of composites. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the rubber composites was determined by XPS. • Auger spectrum of carbon was used for graphene identification in composites. • Small content of graphene was sufficient for its recognition from the D parameter

  7. Dosimetry of Al2O3 optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter at high energy photons and electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Joohari, N. A.; Abdullah, R.; Shukor, N. S. Abd; Kadir, A. B. Abd; Isa, N. Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The linearity of Al2O3 OSL dosimeters (OSLD) were evaluated for dosimetry works in clinical photons and electrons. The measurements were made at a reference depth of Zref according to IAEA TRS 398:2000 codes of practice at 6 and 10 MV photons and 6 and 9 MeV electrons. The measured dose was compared to the thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) and ionization chamber commonly used for dosimetry works for higher energy photons and electrons. The results showed that the measured dose in OSL dosimeters were in good agreement with the reported by the ionization chamber in both high energy photons and electrons. A reproducibility test also reported excellent consistency of readings with the OSL at similar energy levels. The overall results confirmed the suitability of OSL dosimeters for dosimetry works involving high energy photons and electrons in radiotherapy.

  8. Negative ion emission at field electron emission from amorphous (alpha-C:H) carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Bernatskij, D P; Ivanov-Omskij, V I; Pavlov, V G; Zvonareva, T K

    2001-01-01

    The study on the electrons field emission from the plane cathode surface on the basis of the amorphous carbon film (alpha-C:H) is carried out. The methodology, making it possible to accomplish simultaneously the registration of the emission currents and visually observe the distribution of the emission centers on the plane emitter surface is developed. The analysis of the oscillograms indicated that apart from the proper electron constituent the negative ions of hydrogen (H sup - and H sub 2 sup -), carbon (C sup -) and hydrocarbon (CH sub n sup -) are observed. The ions emission is connected with the processes of formation and degradation of the local emission centers

  9. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in n......The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than...

  10. A study of point defects created by electron irradiation of dilute iron-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, J.L.

    1969-10-01

    Resistivity and magnetic after effect (m.a.e.) measurements are used to study the influence of carbon atoms on the annealing process of point defects created by electron irradiation (3 MeV) at low temperature (20 deg. K). The presence of the carbon atoms has a strong influence on the recovery sub-stage I E and stage III. For the former, the carbon impurity traps the freely migrating iron interstitial. For the latter the effect is interpreted as being due to formation during annealing, of a carbon vacancy pair. A pronounced m.a.e. band is attributed to the reorientation of this carbon vacancy complex. All these results are coherent with the interpretation of a low temperature migrating free interstitial. (author) [fr

  11. On the interplay of morphology and electronic conductivity of rotationally spun carbon fiber mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Martin; Go, Dennis; Lott, Philipp; Müller, Sandra; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Roling, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    Carbon-based materials are used as electrode materials in a wide range of electrochemical applications, e.g., in batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells. For these applications, the electronic conductivity of the materials plays an important role. Currently, porous carbon materials with complex morphologies and hierarchical pore structures are in the focus of research. The complex morphologies influence the electronic transport and may lead to an anisotropic electronic conductivity. In this paper, we unravel the influence of the morphology of rotationally spun carbon fiber mats on their electronic conductivity. By combining experiments with finite-element simulations, we compare and evaluate different electrode setups for conductivity measurements. While the "bar-type method" with two parallel electrodes on the same face of the sample yields information about the intrinsic conductivity of the carbon fibers, the "parallel-plate method" with two electrodes on opposite faces gives information about the electronic transport orthogonal to the faces. Results obtained for the van-der-Pauw method suggest that this method is not well suited for understanding morphology-transport relations in these materials.

  12. Enhancement of electron field emission of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by nitrogen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.B. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China); Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Cheng, Q.J. [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chen, X. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@csiro.au [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-09-22

    Highlights: > A new and custom-designed bias-enhanced hot-filament chemical vapor deposition system is developed to synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. > The carbon nanotubes are later treated with nitrogen plasmas. > The electron field emission characteristics of the carbon nanotubes are significantly improved after the nitrogen plasma treatment. > A new physical mechanism is proposed to interpret the improvement of the field emission characteristics. - Abstract: The electron field emission (EFE) characteristics from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) without and with treatment by the nitrogen plasma are investigated. The VACNTs with the plasma treatment showed a significant improvement in the EFE property compared to the untreated VACNTs. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the VACNTs are extensively examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the significant EFE improvement of the VACNTs after the nitrogen plasma treatment is closely related to the variation of the morphological and structural properties of the VACNTs. The high current density (299.6 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) achieved at a low applied field (3.50 V/{mu}m) suggests that the VACNTs after nitrogen plasma treatment can serve as effective electron field emission sources for numerous applications.

  13. Enhancement of electron field emission of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by nitrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.B.; Cheng, Q.J.; Chen, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new and custom-designed bias-enhanced hot-filament chemical vapor deposition system is developed to synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. → The carbon nanotubes are later treated with nitrogen plasmas. → The electron field emission characteristics of the carbon nanotubes are significantly improved after the nitrogen plasma treatment. → A new physical mechanism is proposed to interpret the improvement of the field emission characteristics. - Abstract: The electron field emission (EFE) characteristics from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) without and with treatment by the nitrogen plasma are investigated. The VACNTs with the plasma treatment showed a significant improvement in the EFE property compared to the untreated VACNTs. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the VACNTs are extensively examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the significant EFE improvement of the VACNTs after the nitrogen plasma treatment is closely related to the variation of the morphological and structural properties of the VACNTs. The high current density (299.6 μA/cm 2 ) achieved at a low applied field (3.50 V/μm) suggests that the VACNTs after nitrogen plasma treatment can serve as effective electron field emission sources for numerous applications.

  14. Electronic properties of prismatic modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Muryumin, E. E.; Rodionova, E. V.; Ryskina, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The article shows the possibility of target modifying the prismatic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by regular chemisorption of fluorine atoms in the graphene surface. It is shown that the electronic properties of prismatic SWCNT modifications are determined by the interaction of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation in the carbon-conjugated subsystems (tracks) formed in the faces. The contributions of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation depend on the structural characteristics of the tracks. It was found that the minimum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of the track width ensure the maximum contribution of the π-electron conjugation, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the hydrocarbon analog of the carbon track. It is established that the maximum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of track width ensure the maximum contribution of the ρ(in-plane) electron interface, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the unmodified carbon nanotube. The calculation of the model systems has been carried out using an ab initio Hartree-Fock method in the 3-21G basis.

  15. Assessing and ameliorating the influence of the electron beam on carbon nanotube oxidation in environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Ai Leen, E-mail: alkoh@stanford.edu [Stanford Nano Shared Facilities, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Sinclair, Robert [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    In this work, we examine how the imaging electron beam can induce damage in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at varying oxygen gas pressures and electron dose rates using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). Our studies show that there is a threshold cumulative electron dose which brings about damage in CNTs in oxygen – through removal of their graphitic walls – which is dependent on O{sub 2} pressure, with a 4–5 fold decrease in total electron dose per decade increase at a lower pressure range (10{sup −6} to 10{sup −5} mbar) and approximately 1.3 –fold decrease per decade increase at a higher pressure range (10{sup −3} to 10{sup 0} mbar). However, at a given pressure, damage in CNTs was found to occur even at the lowest dose rate utilized, suggesting the absence of a lower limit for the latter parameter. This study provides guidelines on the cumulative dose required to damage nanotubes in the 10{sup −7} mbar to 10{sup 0} mbar pressure regimes, and discusses the role of electron dose rate and total electron dose on beam-induced CNT degradation experiments. - Highlights: • The electron beam ionizes gas molecules in ETEM and affects experimental outcomes. • Beam-induced damage in CNTs occurs at varying O{sub 2} pressures and electron dose rates. • There is a threshold cumulative dose to damage CNTs which depends on O{sub 2} pressure. • At a given pressure, CNT damage occurs even at the electron dose rate utilized.

  16. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erckmann, V.; Gasparino, U.; Giannone, L.

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a≤18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T e modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  17. In situ measurements and transmission electron microscopy of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Seongwon; Olson, Eric; Zuo Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    We present the design and operation of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-compatible carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET). The device is configured with microfabricated slits, which allows direct observation of CNTs in a FET using TEM and measurement of electrical transport while inside the TEM. As demonstrations of the device architecture, two examples are presented. The first example is an in situ electrical transport measurement of a bundle of carbon nanotubes. The second example is a study of electron beam radiation effect on CNT bundles using a 200 keV electron beam. In situ electrical transport measurement during the beam irradiation shows a signature of wall- or tube-breakdown. Stepwise current drops were observed when a high intensity electron beam was used to cut individual CNT bundles in a device with multiple bundles

  18. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A.C. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Scifoni, E. [TIFPA-INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  19. Carbon K-shell excitation in small molecules by high-resolution electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, M.; King, G.C.; Read, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The excitation of 1s carbon electrons has been observed in C0, CH 4 , CF4, C0 2 , COS, C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 4 by means of the electron energy-loss technique with high resolution (70 meV in the 300 eV excitation energy range) and at an incident electron energy of 1.5 keV. The energies, widths and vibrational structures of excited states corresponding to the promotion of 1s carbon electrons to unoccupied valence and Rydberg orbitals have been obtained. The validity of the equivalent-core model, and the role of resonances caused by potential barriers, are discussed. (author)

  20. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: carrier trapping versus electron-hole recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpene, E; Mancini, E; Dallera, C; Schwen, D; Ronning, C; Silvestri, S De

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films by means of femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity. We estimated the electron-phonon relaxation time of a few hundred femtoseconds and we observed that under low optical excitation photo-generated carriers decay according to two distinct mechanisms attributed to trapping by defect states and direct electron-hole recombination. With high excitation, when photo-carrier and trap densities are comparable, a unique temporal evolution develops, as the time dependence of the trapping process becomes degenerate with the electron-hole recombination. This experimental evidence highlights the role of defects in the ultrafast electronic dynamics and is not specific to this particular form of carbon, but has general validity for amorphous and disordered semiconductors

  1. Dose response of commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector, Al2O3:C for megavoltage photons and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dong Oh; Yoon, Myonggeun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang Yeob; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the dose response of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) to megavoltage photon and electron beams. A nanoDot™ dosemeter was used to measure the dose response of the OSLD. Photons of 6-15 MV and electrons of 9-20 MeV were delivered by a Varian 21iX machine (Varian Medical System, Inc. Milpitas, CA, USA). The energy dependency was dose was linear until 200 cGy. The superficial dose measurements revealed photon irradiation to have an angular dependency. The nanoDot™ dosemeter has potential use as an in vivo dosimetric tool that is independent of the energy, has dose linearity and a rapid response compared with normal in vivo dosimetric tools, such as thermoluminescence detectors. However, the OSLD must be treated very carefully due to the high angular dependency of the photon beam.

  2. Quantum decoherence in electronic current flowing through carbon nanotubes induced by thermal atomic vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum decoherence in electronic currents flowing through metallic carbon nanotubes caused by thermal atomic vibrations using the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for an open system. We reveal that the quantum coherence of conduction electrons decays exponentially with tube length at a fixed temperature, and that the decay rate increases with temperature. We also find that the phase relaxation length due to the thermal atomic vibrations is inversely proportional to temperature.

  3. Plasma waves stimulated by electron beams in the lab and in the auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzworth, R.H.; Harbridge, W.B.; Koons, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter describes the experimental laboratory simulation of ionospheric rocket observed phenomena. The NASA sounding rocket 27.010 AE was launched in 1978 in order to study plasma dynamics in the auroral ionosphere. The rocket carried an electron accelerator and a full complement of plasma diagnostic devices including electric and magnetic receivers, particle detectors and photometers. The simulation was conducted in the large vacuum chamber at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The electron beam was operated at 4 kilovolts and the electron current modulated at 3 kiloherz from 0 to 80 milliamps during the rocket flight, resulting in the pulsing of the beam in and out of beam plasma discharge (BPD) and a variety of propagating wave modes. It is concluded that the electron-beam-produced BPD in the rocket is similar to that seen in the lab. The very low frequency (VLF) spectrum during BPD is examined

  4. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  5. Secondary electron yields of carbon-coated and polished stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzic, D.; Moore, R.; Manos, D.; Cohen, S.

    1982-01-01

    To increase the power throughput to a plasma of an existing lower hybrid waveguide, secondary electron production on the walls and subsequent electron multiplication must be reduced. Since carbon has a low secondary electron coefficient (delta), measurements were performed for several UHV compatible carbon coatings (Aquadag/sup X/, vacuum pyrolyzed Glyptal/sup X/, and lamp black deposited by electrophoresis) as a function of primary beam voltage (35 eV to 10 keV), surface roughness (60 through 600 grit mechanical polishing and electropolishing), coating thickness, and angle of incidence (theta). Also measured were uncoated stainless steel, Mo, Cu, Ti, TiC, and ATJ graphite. The yields were obtained by varying the sample bias and measuring the collected current while the samples were in the electron beam of a scanning Auger microprobe. This technique allows delta measurements of Auger characterized surfaces with < or =0.3 mm spatial resolution. Results show delta to have a typical energy dependence, with a peak occurring at 200 to 300 eV for normal incidence, and at higher energy for larger theta. In general, delta increases with theta more for smooth surfaces than for rough ones. Ninety percent of the secondary electrons have energies less than 25 eV. Some carbonized coating and surface treatment combinations give delta/sub max/ = 0.88 +- 0.01 for normal electron beam incidence: a reduction of almost 40% compared to untreated stainless steel

  6. Electronic and optical properties of finite carbon nanotubes in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R B; Lee, C H; Chang, C P; Lin, M F

    2007-01-01

    The effects, caused by the geometric structure and an electric field (E), on the electronic and optical properties of quasi-zero-dimensional finite carbon nanotubes are explored by employing the tight-binding model coupled with curvature effects. Electronic properties (state energies, symmetry of electronic states, energy spacing and state degeneracy) are significantly affected by the magnitude and the direction of the electric field and the geometric structure (radius, length and chirality). The electric field, by lowering the symmetry of finite carbon nanotubes, modifies the electronic properties. Thus, the optical excitation spectra, excited by electric polarization parallel to the nanotube axis, exhibit rich delta-function-like peaks, which reveal the characteristics of the electronic properties. Therefore it follows that geometric structure and E influence the low-energy absorption spectra, i.e. the change of frequency of the first peak, the alternation of the peak height and the production of the new peaks. There are more absorption peaks when E is oriented closer to the cross-section plane. Moreover, the very complicated optical absorption spectra are characteristic for the individual chiral carbon nanotube due to its specific geometric structure. Above all, the predicted absorption spectra and the associated electronic properties could be verified by optical measurements

  7. Enhancement of ECR performances by means of carbon nano-tubes based electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odorici, F.; Cuffiani, M.; Malferrari, L.; Rizzoli, R.; Veronese, G.P.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Miracoli, R.; Romano, F.P.; Gambino, N.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Serafino, T.

    2012-01-01

    The CANTES experiment at INFN-LNS tested the use of carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) to emit electrons by field emission effect, in order to provide additional electrons to the plasma core of an ECR ion source. This technique was used with the Caesar source, demonstrating that the total extracted ion current is increased and that a relevant reduction of the number of 'high energy' electrons (above 100 keV) may be observed. The injection of additional electrons inside the plasma increases the amount of cold and warm electrons, and then the number of ionizing collisions. Details of the construction of CNTs based electron gun and of the improvement of performances of the Caesar ECR ion source will be presented. The paper is followed by the associated poster. (authors)

  8. Differential multi-electron emission induced by swift highly charged gold ions penetrating carbon foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothard, H.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kollmus, H.; Mann, R.; Hagmann, S.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2007-05-01

    First results on swift heavy ion induced electron emission from solids obtained with a reaction microscope are presented. This advanced technique, which is successfully used since quite some time to study electron ejection in ion-atom collisions, combines the measurement of the time-of-flight of electrons with imaging techniques. A combination of electric and magnetic fields guides the ejected electrons onto a position sensitive detector, which is capable to accept multiple hits. From position and time-of-flight measurement the full differential emission characteristics of up to 10 electrons per single incoming ion can be extracted. As a first example, we show energy spectra, angular distributions and the multiplicity distribution of electrons from impact of Au24+ (11 MeV/u) on a thin carbon foil (28 μg/cm2).

  9. Differential multi-electron emission induced by swift highly charged gold ions penetrating carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothard, H.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kollmus, H.; Mann, R.; Hagmann, S.; Zouros, T.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    First results on swift heavy ion induced electron emission from solids obtained with a reaction microscope are presented. This advanced technique, which is successfully used since quite some time to study electron ejection in ion-atom collisions, combines the measurement of the time-of-flight of electrons with imaging techniques. A combination of electric and magnetic fields guides the ejected electrons onto a position sensitive detector, which is capable to accept multiple hits. From position and time-of-flight measurement the full differential emission characteristics of up to 10 electrons per single incoming ion can be extracted. As a first example, we show energy spectra, angular distributions and the multiplicity distribution of electrons from impact of Au 24+ (11 MeV/u) on a thin carbon foil (28 μg/cm 2 )

  10. Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP) for emerging applications in carbon nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, Andrei G.; Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-01

    Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP), a resist-free additive nanomanufacturing technique, is an actively researched method for ''direct-write'' processing of a wide range of structural and functional nanomaterials, with high degree of spatial and time-domain control. This article attempts to critically assess the FEBIP capabilities and unique value proposition in the context of processing of electronics materials, with a particular emphasis on emerging carbon (i.e., based on graphene and carbon nanotubes) devices and interconnect structures. One of the major hurdles in advancing the carbon-based electronic materials and device fabrication is a disjoint nature of various processing steps involved in making a functional device from the precursor graphene/CNT materials. Not only this multi-step sequence severely limits the throughput and increases the cost, but also dramatically reduces the processing reproducibility and negatively impacts the quality because of possible between-the-step contamination, especially for impurity-susceptible materials such as graphene. The FEBIP provides a unique opportunity to address many challenges of carbon nanoelectronics, especially when it is employed as part of an integrated processing environment based on multiple ''beams'' of energetic particles, including electrons, photons, and molecules. This avenue is promising from the applications' prospective, as such a multi-functional (electron/photon/molecule beam) enables one to define shapes (patterning), form structures (deposition/etching), and modify (cleaning/doping/annealing) properties with locally resolved control on nanoscale using the same tool without ever changing the processing environment. It thus will have a direct positive impact on enhancing functionality, improving quality and reducing fabrication costs for electronic devices, based on both conventional CMOS and emerging carbon (CNT/graphene) materials. (orig.)

  11. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  12. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Katagiri, K.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C{sup 4+} and C{sup 6+} ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10{sup 10} C{sup 4+} ions per pulse and about 5 × 10{sup 9} C{sup 6+} ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10{sup 11} C{sup 6+} ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the {sup 11}C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C{sup 4+} ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of {sup 11}C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  13. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of carbon doped boron nitride nanowire: Ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilian, Jaafar, E-mail: JaafarJalilian@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Br anch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box: 6718997551, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kanjouri, Faramarz, E-mail: kanjouri@khu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kharazmi University, University Square, P.O. Box: 3197937551, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated that carbon doped boron nitride nanowire (C-doped BNNW) has diverse electronic and magnetic properties depending on position of carbon atoms and their percentages. Our results show that only when one carbon atom is situated on the edge of the nanowire, C-doped BNNW is transformed into half-metal. The calculated electronic structure of the C-doped BNNW suggests that doping carbon can induce localized edge states around the Fermi level, and the interaction among localized edge states leads to semiconductor to half-metal transition. Overall, the bond reconstruction causes of appearance of different electronic behavior such as semiconducting, half-metallicity, nonmagnetic metallic, and ferromagnetic metallic characters. The formation energy of the system shows that when a C atom is doped on surface boron site, system is more stable than the other positions of carbon impurity. Our calculations show that C-doped BNNW may offer unique opportunities for developing nanoscale spintronic materials.

  14. Time-dependent aspects of electron degradation: 4, Subexcitation electrons in nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Mineo; Inokuti, Mitio; Kowari, Ken-ichi; Dillon, M.A.; Pagnamenta, A.

    1988-01-01

    We discuss here the temporal behavior of subexcitation electrons and the yields of products due to these subexcitation electrons. Our examples concern cases in which resonance scattering of electrons occurs, such as vibrational and rotational excitation in N 2 and negative-ion formation in CO 2 . One focus of the present work is a test of the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA) which we compare to the full solution of the time-dependent Spencer-Fano theory, which has been developed recently. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  15. Pre-strain stimulation of electro-mechanical sensitivity of carbon nanotube network/polyurethane composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Olejník, R.; Matyáš, J.; Machovský, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 15 (2016), s. 5898-5903 ISSN 1530-437X Grant - others:Ministerstvo školství, mládeže a tělovýchovy (MŠMT)(CZ) LO1504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * deformation sensing polymer composite * polymer composite Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.512, year: 2016

  16. Transient effects in beam-plasma interactions in a space simulation chamber stimulated by a fast pulse electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Denig, W. F.; Anderson, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Interest in the interaction of electron beams with plasma generated by ionization caused by the primary electron beam was stimulated by the need to develop special vacuum tubes to operate in the kMHz frequency region. The experiments of Getty and Smullin (1963) indicated that the interaction of an energetic electron beam with its self-produced plasma resulted in the emission of wave energy over a wide range of frequencies associated with cyclotron and longitudinal plasma instabilities. This enhanced the thermal plasma density in the vicinity of the beam, and the term Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) was employed to described this phenomenon. The present investigation is concerned with some of the transient phenomena associated with wave emission during the beam switch-on and switch-off periods. Results are presented on the changes in electron energy spectra on a time scale of tens of milliseconds following beam switch-on. The results are discussed in terms of the beam plasma discharge phenomenon.

  17. Transient effects in beam-plasma interactions in a space simulation chamber stimulated by a fast pulse electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitt, W.J.; Banks, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Interest in the interaction of electron beams with plasma generated by ionization caused by the primary electron beam was stimulated by the need to develop special vacuum tubes to operate in the kMHz frequency region. The experiments of Getty and Smullin (1963) indicated that the interaction of an energetic electron beam with its self-produced plasma resulted in the emission of wave energy over a wide range of frequencies associated with cyclotron and longitudinal plasma instabilities. This enhanced the thermal plasma density in the vicinity of the beam, and the term Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) was employed to described this phenomenon. The present investigation is concerned with some of the transient phenomena associated with wave emission during the beam switch-on and switch-off periods. Results are presented on the changes in electron energy spectra on a time scale of tens of milliseconds following beam switch-on. The results are discussed in terms of the beam plasma discharge phenomenon. 5 references

  18. Photochemical alteration of organic carbon draining permafrost soils shifts microbial metabolic pathways and stimulates respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Collin P; Nalven, Sarah G; Crump, Byron C; Kling, George W; Cory, Rose M

    2017-10-03

    In sunlit waters, photochemical alteration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) impacts the microbial respiration of DOC to CO 2 . This coupled photochemical and biological degradation of DOC is especially critical for carbon budgets in the Arctic, where thawing permafrost soils increase opportunities for DOC oxidation to CO 2 in surface waters, thereby reinforcing global warming. Here we show how and why sunlight exposure impacts microbial respiration of DOC draining permafrost soils. Sunlight significantly increases or decreases microbial respiration of DOC depending on whether photo-alteration produces or removes molecules that native microbial communities used prior to light exposure. Using high-resolution chemical and microbial approaches, we show that rates of DOC processing by microbes are likely governed by a combination of the abundance and lability of DOC exported from land to water and produced by photochemical processes, and the capacity and timescale that microbial communities have to adapt to metabolize photo-altered DOC.The role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) photo-alteration in the microbial respiration of DOC to CO 2 is unclear. Here, the authors show that the impact of this mechanism depends on whether photo-alteration of DOC produces or removes molecules used by native microbial communities prior to light exposure.

  19. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Park, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ho Sung; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji Beom; Kim, Sung Wng; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-01-01

    V. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers

  20. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics, and Actuators with Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The role of computational nanotechnology in developing next generation of multifunctional materials, molecular scale electronic and computing devices, sensors, actuators, and machines is described through a brief review of enabling computational techniques and few recent examples derived from computer simulations of carbon nanotube based molecular nanotechnology.

  1. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  2. Carbon/Hydrogen ratio determination in hydrocarbons and its mixtures by electron backscattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padron, I.; Desdin, L.F.; Navarro, A.; Fuentes, M.

    1996-01-01

    A method carbon/hydrogen ratio (C/H) determination in hydrocarbons and its mixtures was improved using the electron backscattering technique. Besides the hetero atoms (S,O and N) influence in petroleum is studied for being able to determinate the C/H ratio in cuban petroleum with high sulphur contents

  3. Radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Bonnin, X.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative losses and electron cooling rates are calculated for carbon and oxygen ions under conditions relevant to fusion plasmas. Both rates are calculated with the most recent recommended atomic data. A modified coronal model which includes the effects of metastable states is described and used to calculate the rates. Comparisons with other approaches are also discussed. (author). 36 ref, figs

  4. Hot electron-induced electrochemiluminescence at polyetherimide-carbon black-based electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, Kalle; Grönroos, Päivi; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Campbell, Joseph; Kulmala, Sakari

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Generation of hydrated electrons at carbon paste electrodes. • Hydrated electrons are able to produce intense chemiluminescence. • Relationship between carbon black content in electrode and HECL studied. • Performance of composite electrodes is similar to aluminum electrodes. • The present electrodes are good alternative for disposable assay cartridges. - Abstract: Various luminophores produce strong electrogenerated chemiluminescence during cathodic pulse polarization of the present insulating film-covered carbon paste electrodes in fully aqueous solutions. First electrodes made of a commercial conductive carbon paste were successfully utilized as working electrodes and their surface was characterized by ESCA. Then custom in-laboratory made improved composite electrodes were manufactured from the same insulating polymer and conducting carbon black particles. The relationship between the amount of carbon present on the composite electrode, in the bulk and on the surface, and the intensity of electrogenerated chemiluminescence was studied further. The overall performance of these composite electrodes makes them viable low-cost replacements for metal/insulator type electrodes such as oxide-coated silicon electrodes.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  6. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  7. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  8. Implementation of Carbon Thin Film Coatings in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) for Electron Cloud Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Basso, T; Edwards, P; Mensi, M; Sublet, A; Taborelli, M

    2014-01-01

    Low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) carbon thin films eradicate electron multipacting in accelerator beam pipes. Two magnetic cells of the SPS were coated with such material and installed. In total more than forty vacuum vessels and magnet interconnections were treated. The feasibility of the coating process was validated. The performance of the carbon thin film will be tested with LHC nominal beams after the end of the long shutdown 1. Particular attention will be drawn to the long term behaviour. This paper presents the sputtering techniques used to coat the different components; their characterization (SEY measurements on coupons, RF multipacting tests and pump down curves); and the technology to etch the carbon film in case of a faulty coating. The strategy to coat the entire SPS will also be described.

  9. Modification of anisotropic plasma diffusion via auxiliary electrons emitted by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Veronese, G P; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Castro, G; Miracoli, R; Serafino, T

    2012-02-01

    The diffusion mechanism in magnetized plasmas is a largely debated issue. A short circuit model was proposed by Simon, assuming fluxes of lost particles along the axial (electrons) and radial (ions) directions which can be compensated, to preserve the quasi-neutrality, by currents flowing throughout the conducting plasma chamber walls. We hereby propose a new method to modify Simon's currents via electrons injected by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun. We found this improves the source performances, increasing the output current for several charge states. The method is especially sensitive to the pumping frequency. Output currents for given charge states, at different auxiliary electron currents, will be reported in the paper and the influence of the frequency tuning on the compensation mechanism will be discussed.

  10. Chemistry and electronics of oxides from carbon dioxide to perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koinuma, Hideomi

    2005-01-01

    Oxides are thermodynamic stable form of materials in terrestrial conditions to exist as final products of energy consumption proceeding in nature as well as in civilization. The accumulation of heat capacitive CO 2 in atmosphere is becoming a serious environmental problem. Solid oxides as minerals in the earth shell had been used mainly for heat resistant structural materials as well as for raw materials of metals, but recent advanced chemistry and physics have been manifesting new electronic and chemical potentials hidden in oxides. Current interest and studies on oxides are directed towards two main areas: (1) prevention of CO 2 increase in atmosphere by its fixation and/or by saving the consumption of fossil fuels and (2) discovery and utilization of superfunctionality in oxides. Triggered by Bednorz and Muller's discovery of high Tc superconductor, the latter topics have been attracting rapidly growing interest from viewpoints of both fundamental research and practical application. In commemoration of WOE homecoming to the place of inauguration, a founder of WOE appreciates much to the program committee for providing him with this opportunity of briefing the workshop motivation and of reviewing his research career on oxide materials

  11. 8-Carbon oxylipins inhibit germination and growth, and stimulate aerial conidiation in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Garcia, Erika; Garzia, Aitor; Cordobés, Shandra; Espeso, Eduardo A; Ugalde, Unai

    2011-01-01

    Germination of Aspergillus nidulans conidia in liquid cultures was progressively inhibited at inoculum loads above 1×10(5)conidiamL(-1). High conidial densities also inhibited growth of neighbouring mycelia. The eight-carbon oxylipin 1-octen-3-ol was identified as the main inhibitor in a fraction also containing 3-octanone and 3-octanol. These three oxylipins also increased the conidiation rate of dark-grown surface cultures, but had no effect on liquid cultures. 3-octanone was the most conidiogenic compound. The action of 3-octanone required functional forms of developmental activators fluG, flbB-D and brlA, and was not additive to the conidiogenic effect of stress stimuli such as osmotic stress or carbon starvation. Oxylipins were produced shortly after hyphae made contact with the atmosphere and were most effective on aerial mycelia, indicating that they perform their signalling function in the gas phase. Copyright © 2011 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of doping on electronic properties of double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, R.; Ghafoori Tabrizi, K.; Jalili, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of boron nitride (BN) doping on electronic properties of armchair double-walled carbon and hetero-nanotubes is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics method. The armchair double-walled hetero-nanotubes are predicted to be semiconductor and their electronic structures depend strongly on the electronic properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube. It is found that electronic structures of BN-doped double-walled hetero-nanotubes are intermediate between those of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes and double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes. Increasing the amount of doping leads to a stronger intertube interaction and also increases the energy gap.

  13. Effect of doping on electronic properties of double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, R. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafoori Tabrizi, K., E-mail: K-TABRIZI@sbu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalili, S. [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16315-1618 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    The effect of boron nitride (BN) doping on electronic properties of armchair double-walled carbon and hetero-nanotubes is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics method. The armchair double-walled hetero-nanotubes are predicted to be semiconductor and their electronic structures depend strongly on the electronic properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube. It is found that electronic structures of BN-doped double-walled hetero-nanotubes are intermediate between those of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes and double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes. Increasing the amount of doping leads to a stronger intertube interaction and also increases the energy gap.

  14. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.

    2013-04-11

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to investigate the photoexcited dynamics of a series of triphenylamine-coumarin dye/TiO2 conjugates. The TA decay is multiexponential, spanning time scales from 100 fs to 100 ps, while the characteristic transient Raman spectrum of the radical cation decays biexponentially with a dominant ∼3 ps component. To explain these observations, we propose a model in which the decay of the TA is due to hot electrons migrating from surface trap states to the conduction band of TiO 2 while the decay of the Raman signature is due to internal conversion of the dye molecule. Furthermore, the S1 Raman spectrum of TPAC3, a dye wherein a vinyl group separates the triphenylamine and coumarin moieties, is similar to the S1 Raman spectrum of trans-stilbene; we conclude that their S1 potential energy surfaces and reactivity are also similar. This correlation suggests that dyes containing vinyl linkers undergo photoisomerization that competes with electron injection. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Velocity distribution of laser photoionized neutrals ejected from methanol-dosed aluminium(111) by electron-stimulated desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.E.; Whitten, J.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Jones, P.L.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH

    1989-01-01

    Nonresonant multiphoton ionization at 193 nm wavelength was employed for efficient detection of electron-stimulated neutral desorption from Al(111) dosed with methanol to produce monolayer methoxide coverage. Velocity spectra were measured by the flight time from the crystal surface to the focal region of the laser beam with a pulsed primary electron beam of 3 keV and the sample at 300 K. Either the C + or HCO + photofragment indicated the same non-Boltzmann velocity spectrum for the neutral parent precursor with a peak kinetic energy of ∼0.1 eV. Identical distributions were obtained when the cleaned crystal was pre-oxidized with O 2 prior to methanol dosing. As the crystal temperature was raised, photoion signal from the HCO + fragment declined steadily, while C + increased until ∼550 K. The total cross section for loss of parent signal with dose of 3 keV electrons was measured to be 2±1 x 10 -17 cm -2 . 19 refs., 4 figs

  16. Photoemission and electron-stimulated desorption studies of H on W(110): Single- versus two-binding-site models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, S.

    1982-01-01

    The chemisorption of H on W(110) at room temperature is studied with the use of angle-integrated photoemission and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD). The ESD cross sections of H + are found to be sol low that no significant H + signals with meaningful ion energy distributions are observed. The photoemission results show, however, two types of H adatoms, referred to as β 2 and β 1 states, for this chemisorptive system. Both states are found to appear simultaneously rather than sequentially as suggested by previous studies, and exhibit a simple 1-theta adsorption kinetics with different initial sticking coefficients. The β 2 state induces two binding energy levels at -2.0 and -6.0 eV, respectively, whereas the β 1 state induces a level at -3.8 eV. The work-function change (with a maximum value of -0.45 eV) is found to follow exactly with the intensity of the β 2 state. These results are found to be compatible with the two-binding-site model, inherently suggested by the reflection high-enery electron-diffraction data. However, the results can also be consistent with a single-binding-site model suggested by a recent angle-resolved photoemission and inelastic electron scattering study. A model based on the present results is proposed and critically compared with previous studies. Unresolved problems associated with both single- and two-binding-site models are also discussed

  17. [Use of lithium carbonate as a leukocyte stimulant in acute radiation sickness in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konchalovskiĭ, M V; Shishkova, T V; Chotiĭ, V G; Baranov, A E

    1989-03-01

    A total of 50 patients, who had suffered from acute radiation sickness (I-III degree of severity) as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, were followed up for hematological changes. The absorbed dose of relatively even gamma-irradiation assessed by karyometry fluctuated from 0.5 to 5.7 Gy. In 17 of the patients the influence of lithium carbonate on the course of radiation neutropenia was evaluated. No appreciable effect of the agent administration in a dose of 900 mg/patient/day was recorder from 9 to 42 day after irradiation. The authors have also considered the correlations of the values of irradiation doses calculated by varying methods of biological dosimetry.

  18. Performance Enhancement of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Electron-Injection Materials of Metal Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong-Yeol; Kim, Tae Wan; Kim, Gwi-Yeol; Lee, Su-Min; Shrestha, Bhanu; Hong, Jin-Woong

    2016-05-01

    Performance of organic light-emitting diodes was investigated depending on the electron-injection materials of metal carbonates (Li2CO3 and Cs2CO3 ); and number of layers. In order to improve the device efficiency, two types of devices were manufactured by using the hole-injection material (Teflon-amorphous fluoropolymer -AF) and electron-injection materials; one is a two-layer reference device ( ITO/Teflon-AF/Alq3/Al ) and the other is a three-layer device (ITO/Teflon-AF/Alq3/metal carbonate/Al). From the results of the efficiency for the devices with hole-injection layer and electron-injection layer, it was found that the electron-injection layer affects the electrical properties of the device more than the hole-injection layer. The external-quantum efficiency for the three-layer device with Li2CO3 and Cs2CO3 layer is improved by approximately six and eight times, respectively, compared with that of the two-layer reference device. It is thought that a use of electron-injection layer increases recombination rate of charge carriers by the active injection of electrons and the blocking of holes.

  19. Low-intensity laser irradiation at 660 nm stimulates transcription of genes involved in the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masha, Roland T; Houreld, Nicolette N; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2013-02-01

    Low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been shown to stimulate cellular functions leading to increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of LILI on genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC, complexes I-IV) and oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthase). Four human skin fibroblast cell models were used in this study: normal non-irradiated cells were used as controls while wounded, diabetic wounded, and ischemic cells were irradiated. Cells were irradiated with a 660 nm diode laser with a fluence of 5 J/cm(2) and gene expression determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). LILI upregulated cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIb polypeptide 2 (COX6B2), cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc (COX6C), and pyrophosphatase (inorganic) 1 (PPA1) in diabetic wounded cells; COX6C, ATP synthase, H+transporting, mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit B1 (ATP5F1), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 alpha subcomplex, 11 (NDUFA11), and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 7 (NDUFS7) in wounded cells; and ATPase, H+/K+ exchanging, beta polypeptide (ATP4B), and ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C2 (subunit 9) (ATP5G2) in ischemic cells. LILI at 660 nm stimulates the upregulation of genes coding for subunits of enzymes involved in complexes I and IV and ATP synthase.

  20. A high resolution electron microscopy investigation of curvature in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, D. N.; Blau, W. J.; Zandbergen, H. W.

    1995-07-01

    Evidence for heptagon inclusion in multi-walled carbon nanotubes was sought in arc-produced carbon deposits. Transmission electron microscopy revealed many curved nanotubes although their relative abundance was low. Close examination of the micrographs in the regions of expected heptagon inclusion shows that the curvature is accomplished by folding or fracture of the lattice planes. This observed phenomenon contradicts the theoretical modelling studies which predict stable structures with negative curvature accomplished by heptagon/pentagon pairs. A possible explanation for curvature in single-walled tubes is presented based on a molecular mechanics geometry optimisation study of spa inclusion in a graphite sheet.

  1. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energetics of flattened carbon nonoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    When examined under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, carbon soot produced alongside buckytubes in an arc-discharge is found to contain a small percentage of flattened carbon shells. These objects are shown to be small graphite flakes which eliminated their dangling bonds by terminating their edges with highly curved junctions. Ideal models for these structures are presented, and their energy estimated. The calculations show that the establishment of highly curved junctions is energetically favourable for a graphite flake in an inert atmosphere. Flattened shells also appear more stable than their 'inflated' counterparts (fullerene 'onions' and buckytubes) when the shell dimensions obey specific criteria.(authors)

  2. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Homer, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  3. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Kuan-Wei [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The pattern design provides a new structure of surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED). Delta-star shaped vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20o tips can simultaneously provide three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT, which produces numerous secondary electrons and enhance the SED efficiency. - Highlights: • The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. • The vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20° tips of the delta-star arrangement are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons. The cathode pattern simultaneously provides three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT. • The VACNT arrays were covered with magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). • The η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications. - Abstract: The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for

  4. Photon- and electron-stimulated desorption from laboratory models of interstellar ice grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, J. D.; Abdulgalil, A. G. M.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. J.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Rutten, F. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The nonthermal desorption of water from ice films induced by photon and low energy electron irradiation has been studied under conditions mimicking those found in dense interstellar clouds. Water desorption following photon irradiation at 250 nm relies on the presence of an absorbing species within the H 2 O ice, in this case benzene. Desorption cross sections are obtained and used to derive first order rate coefficients for the desorption processes. Kinetic modeling has been used to compare the efficiencies of these desorption mechanisms with others known to be in operation in dense clouds.

  5. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Carpets on Carbon Substrates for High Power Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    phase flow, flow visualization, electric capacitance tomography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 134... electrical ) interface resistance . Therefore, in the beginning, one approach used to create a low contact resistance is to grow the CNTs directly on...electronic devices. Electrical and thermal transport properties of device materials at micrometer and nanometer scales become very important in such

  6. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Mary [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    It is now understood that most plant C is utilized or transformed by soil microorganisms en route to stabilization. Hence the composition of microbial communities that mediate decomposition and transformation of root C is critical, as are the metabolic capabilities of these communities. The change in composition and function of the C-transforming microbial communities over time in effect defines the biological component of soil C stabilization. Our research was designed to test 2 general hypotheses; the first two hypotheses are discussed first; H1: Root-exudate interactions with soil microbial populations results in the expression of enzymatic capacities for macromolecular, complex carbon decomposition; and H2: Microbial communities surrounding roots undergo taxonomic succession linked to functional gene activities as roots grow, mature, and decompose in soil. Over the term of the project we made significant progress in 1) quantifying the temporal pattern of root interactions with the soil decomposing community and 2) characterizing the role of root exudates in mediating these interactions.

  7. Electronic structure and transport of a carbon chain between graphene nanoribbon leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G P; Fang, X W; Yao, Y X; Wang, C Z; Ho, K M; Ding, Z J

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure and transport property of a carbon chain between two graphene nanoribbon leads are studied using an ab initio tight-binding (TB) model and Landauer's formalism combined with a non-equilibrium Green's function. The TB Hamiltonian and overlap matrices are extracted from first-principles density functional calculations through the quasi-atomic minimal basis orbital scheme. The accuracy of the TB model is demonstrated by comparing the electronic structure from the TB model with that from first-principles density functional theory. The results of electronic transport on a carbon atomic chain connected to armchair and zigzag graphene ribbon leads, such as different transport characters near the Fermi level and at most one quantized conductance, reveal the effect of the electronic structure of the leads and the scattering from the atomic chain. In addition, bond length alternation and an interesting transmission resonance are observed in the atomic chain connected to zigzag graphene ribbon leads. Our approach provides a promising route to quantitative investigation of both the electronic structure and transport property of large systems.

  8. Successive ionization of positive ions of carbon and nitrogen by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donets, E.D.; Ilyushchenko, V.I.

    Experimental studies of deep ionization of heavy ions are described. The applications of such studies in atomic physics, plasma physics and space physics are discussed. Investigations using intersecting ion-electron beams, shifted beams and ion trap sources are described, and data are presented for multi-charged ions of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. A detailed description of the development of the IEL (electron beam ionizer) source, and the KRION (cryogenic version) source is given, and further data for the multiple ionization of carbon and nitrogen are given for charge states up to C 6+ and N 7+ . The advantages and disadvantages of the KRION source are discussed, and preliminary studies of a new torroidal ion trap source (HIRAC) are presented. (11 figs, 57 refs) (U.S.)

  9. Metagenomic insight into methanogenic reactors promoting direct interspecies electron transfer via granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hun; Je Seong, Hoon; Sul, Woo Jun; Jin, Kang-Hyun; Park, Hee-Deung

    2018-07-01

    To provide insight into direct interspecies electron transfer via granular activated carbon (GAC), the effect of GAC supplementation on anaerobic digestion was evaluated. Compared to control samples, the GAC supplementation increased the total amount of methane production and its production rate by 31% and 72%, respectively. 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed a shift in the archaeal community composition; the Methanosarcina proportion decreased 17%, while the Methanosaeta proportion increased 5.6%. Metagenomic analyses based on shotgun sequencing demonstrated that the abundance of pilA and omcS genes belonging to Geobacter species decreased 69.4% and 29.4%, respectively. Furthermore, the analyses suggested a carbon dioxide reduction pathway rather than an acetate decarboxylation pathway for methane formation. Taken together, these results suggest that GAC improved methane production performance by shifting the microbial community and altering functional genes associated with direct interspecies electron transfer via conductive materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks for flexible and printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be processed from solution and have excellent mechanical properties. They are highly flexible and stretchable. Depending on the type of nanotubes (semiconducting or metallic) they can be used as replacements for metal or transparent conductive oxide electrodes or as semiconducting layers for field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities. They are thus competitive alternatives to other solution-processable materials for flexible and printed electronics. This review introduces the basic properties of SWNTs, current methods for dispersion and separation of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs and techniques to deposit and pattern dense networks from dispersion. Recent examples of applications of carbon nanotubes as conductors and semiconductors in (opto-)electronic devices and integrated circuits will be discussed. (paper)

  11. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction.

  12. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction

  13. Electron density as the main parameter influencing the formation of fullerenes in a carbon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churilov, G.N.; Bulina, N.V.; Novikov, P.V.; Lopatin, V.A.; Vnukova, N.G.; Bachilo, S.M.; Tsyboulski, D.; Weisman, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamic estimates are presented for the formation of spheroidal and flat carbon clusters from reactant species of different charges. Charge is shown to strongly influence the geometry and stability of flat clusters. Changes in the charge of flat clusters can promote both their folding to spheroidal structures and their dissociation. It is concluded that the fluctuations of electron concentration in carbon plasma can result in the accumulation of fullerene clusters and the dissociation of flat clusters. Computer simulations of fullerene C 60 formation from carbon clusters having different charges are carried out using the program HyperChem 5 to calculate the optimal geometry of molecules and their molecular dynamics at different temperatures [ru

  14. Investigation of metal/carbon-related materials for fuel cell applications by electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Ki-jeong [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kong@krict.re.kr; Choi, Youngmin [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Beyong-Hwan [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-O [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyunju [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The potential of carbon-related materials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphite nanofibers (GNFs), supported metal catalysts as an electrode for fuel cell application was investigated using the first-principle electronic structure calculations. The stable binding geometries and energies of metal catalysts are determined on the CNT surface and the GNF edge. The catalyst metal is more tightly bound to the GNF edge than to the CNT surface because of the existence of active dangling bonds of edge carbon atoms. The diffusion barrier of metal atoms on the surface and edge is also obtained. From our calculation results, we have found that high dispersity is achievable for GNF due to high barrier against the diffusion of metal atoms, while CNT appears less suitable. The GNF with a large edge-to-wall ratio is more suitable for the high-performance electrode than perfect crystalline graphite or CNT.

  15. Investigation of metal/carbon-related materials for fuel cell applications by electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Ki-jeong; Choi, Youngmin; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-O; Chang, Hyunju

    2006-01-01

    The potential of carbon-related materials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphite nanofibers (GNFs), supported metal catalysts as an electrode for fuel cell application was investigated using the first-principle electronic structure calculations. The stable binding geometries and energies of metal catalysts are determined on the CNT surface and the GNF edge. The catalyst metal is more tightly bound to the GNF edge than to the CNT surface because of the existence of active dangling bonds of edge carbon atoms. The diffusion barrier of metal atoms on the surface and edge is also obtained. From our calculation results, we have found that high dispersity is achievable for GNF due to high barrier against the diffusion of metal atoms, while CNT appears less suitable. The GNF with a large edge-to-wall ratio is more suitable for the high-performance electrode than perfect crystalline graphite or CNT

  16. Collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, H, H2 and He: Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaneuf, R.A.; Janev, R.K.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report provides a handbook for fusion research of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, hydrogen atoms and molecules, and helium atoms. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical, and parametrized form. Processes considered include exciation, ionization, and charge exchange at collision energies appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research

  17. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm -3 ) and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 2 bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense 'amorphous' carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 3 bonding fractions

  18. Thermal and electron stimulated luminescence of natural bones, commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Lopez, J; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Rivera, T; Lozano, I B

    2014-01-01

    The luminescence (cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence) properties of natural bones (Siberian mammoth and adult elephant), commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen were analyzed. Chemical analyses of the natural bones were determined using by Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EMPA). Structural, molecular and thermal characteristics were determined by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Differential Thermal and Thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG). Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of natural bones and collagen showed similar intense broad bands at 440 and 490 nm related to luminescence of the tetrahedral anion [Formula: see text] or structural defects. A weaker luminescence exhibited at 310 nm could be attributed to small amount of rare earth elements (REEs). Four luminescent bands at 378, 424, 468 and 576 nm were observed in the commercial hydroxyapatite (HAP). Both natural bones and collagen samples exhibited natural thermoluminescence (NTL) with well-defined glow curves whereas that the induced thermoluminescence (ITL) only appears in the samples of commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen. Additional explanations for the TL anomalous fading of apatite, as a crucial difficulty performing dosimetry and dating, are also considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bright luminance from silicon dioxide film with carbon nanotube electron beam exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Woong; Hong, Ji Hwan; Kang, Jung Su; Callixte, Shikili; Park, Kyu Chang, E-mail: kyupark@khu.ac.kr

    2016-02-15

    We observed the bright bluish-white luminescence with naked eye from carbon nanotube electron beam exposed silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) thin film on Si substrate. The luminescence shows a peak intensity at 2.7 eV (460 nm) with wide spread up to 600 nm after the C-beam exposed on SiO{sub 2} thin film. The C-beam exposure system is composed of carbon nanotube emitters as electron beam source. The brightness strongly depend on the exposure condition. Luminescence characteristic was optimized by C-beam adjustment to observe with the naked eye. The cause of luminescence in the C-beam exposed SiO{sub 2} thin film is analyzed by CL microscopy, FT-IR, AFM and ellipsometer. Decrease of Si–O bonding was observed after C-beam exposure, and this reveals that oxygen deficient defects which are irradiation-sensitive cause 2.7 eV peak of luminescence. - Highlights: • We observed bright luminescence for SiO{sub 2} thin film with naked eye by carbon nanotube electron beam (C-beam) exposure technique. • The bright luminance from C-beam exposed SiO{sub 2} film will open novel silicon optoelectronics.

  20. Investigation of industrial-scale carbon dioxide reduction using pulsed electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, G. M.; Apruzese, J. P.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Wolford, M. F. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5346 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Carbon dioxide is the most important greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. To help mitigate increasing CO{sub 2} concentrations, we investigate a method of carbon dioxide reduction using high-power electron beams, which can be used on an industrial scale. A series of experiments are conducted in which the reduction of CO{sub 2} is measured for different gas compositions and power deposition rates. An electron beam deposition model is applied to compute reduction rates of CO{sub 2} and energy cost for breaking a CO{sub 2} molecule in flue gas and pure carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure. For flue gas consisting of 82% N{sub 2}, 6% O{sub 2}, and 12% CO{sub 2}, the calculated energy cost is 85 eV per molecule. In order to dissociate 50% of the CO{sub 2} molecules, beam energy density deposition on the order of 20 J/cm{sup 3} is required. Electron beam irradiation of 12.6 liter gas volume containing 90% CO{sub 2} and 10% CH{sub 4} at beam energy density deposition of 4.2 J/cm{sup 3}, accumulated over 43 shots in a 20 min interval, reduced the CO{sub 2} concentration to 78%. Analogous experiments with a gas mixture containing 11.5% CO{sub 2}, 11.5% CH{sub 4}, and balance of Ar, reduced the CO{sub 2} concentration to below 11% with energy deposition 0.71 J/cm{sup 3}, accumulated over 10 shots in a 5 min interval. The experimental data and the theoretical predictions of CO{sub 2} reduction using pulsed electron beams are in agreement within the experimental error. Other techniques to enhance the removal of CO{sub 2} with pulsed electron beams are also explored, yielding new possible avenues of research.

  1. Multiscale characterization of pore spaces using multifractals analysis of scanning electronic microscopy images of carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Jouini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore spaces heterogeneity in carbonates rocks has long been identified as an important factor impacting reservoir productivity. In this paper, we study the heterogeneity of carbonate rocks pore spaces based on the image analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM data acquired at various magnifications. Sixty images of twelve carbonate samples from a reservoir in the Middle East were analyzed. First, pore spaces were extracted from SEM images using a segmentation technique based on watershed algorithm. Pores geometries revealed a multifractal behavior at various magnifications from 800x to 12 000x. In addition, the singularity spectrum provided quantitative values that describe the degree of heterogeneity in the carbonates samples. Moreover, for the majority of the analyzed samples, we found low variations (around 5% in the multifractal dimensions for magnifications between 1700x and 12 000x. Finally, these results demonstrate that multifractal analysis could be an appropriate tool for characterizing quantitatively the heterogeneity of carbonate pore spaces geometries. However, our findings show that magnification has an impact on multifractal dimensions, revealing the limit of applicability of multifractal descriptions for these natural structures.

  2. Use of synthetic stimulants and hallucinogens in a cohort of electronic dance music festival attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Friscia, Melissa; Yeakel, Jillian K; Logan, Barry K

    2018-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances (NPS), often characterized as unregulated psychoactive compounds designed to circumvent existing legislation, have become mainstream on the illicit drug market. Because of their physical and mind-altering properties, NPS may be deliberately or inadvertently ingested at electronic dance music (EDM) festivals to enhance the attendees' appreciation of the music and overall experience. Their widespread use at EDM festivals have been well documented and several adverse events and fatalities associated with NPS ingestion have been reported in the United States. The diversity and rapid turnover in the prevalence of any particular NPS at any given point of time has created several challenges for public health officials, law enforcement, and forensic science communities. Epidemiological studies are often published long after drugs have cycled through the peak of their popularity with users and the scope of testing frequently failing to detect, identify or report the most recently available drugs. The aims of the study included discovering emerging NPS, ascertaining their overall prevalence and determining patterns of use and trends within this targeted population. Over the course of two years, biological samples were collected from 396 (126 blood samples; 227 urine samples; and 384 oral fluid samples) EDM festival attendees. Additionally, survey data regarding prescription and recreational drug use within the last week were collected with follow-up questions related to what substance(s) the person had ingested, amount taken, when the substance was last taken and perceived effects. All biological samples were screened and subsequently confirmed and/or quantified, when appropriate. In response to survey questions, 72% of the participants reported using a recreational drug or medicinal substance within the last week. Users most commonly reported using marijuana and alcohol, followed by "Molly" and cocaine. Of the 396 individuals tested

  3. Electronic structure and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green’s function, the influence of the wrinkle on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials have been investigated, in which the wrinkled armchair graphene nanoribbons (wAGNRs and the composite of AGNRs and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were considered with different connection of ripples. The wrinkle adjusts the electronic structures and transport properties of AGNRs. With the change of the strain, the wAGNRs for three width families reveal different electrical behavior. The band gap of AGNR(6 increases in the presence of the wrinkle, which is opposite to that of AGNR(5 and AGNR(7. The transport of AGNRs with the widths 6 or 7 has been modified by the wrinkle, especially by the number of isolated ripples, but it is insensitive to the strain. The nanojunctions constructed by AGNRs and SWCNTs can form the quantum wells, and some specific states are confined in wAGNRs. Although these nanojunctions exhibit the metallic, they have poor conductance due to the wrinkle. The filling of C20 into SWCNT has less influence on the electronic structure and transport of the junctions. The width and connection type of ripples have greatly influenced on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials.

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanofibres from waste chicken fat for field electron emission applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suriani, A.B.; Dalila, A.R.; Mohamed, A.; Isa, I.M.; Kamari, A.; Hashim, N.; Soga, T.; Tanemura, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Waste chicken fat is used as a starting material to produce CNFs via TCVD method. • High heating rate applied resulted in aggregation of catalyst particles. • Aggregated catalyst produced sea urchin-like CNFs with amorphous nature. • The as-grown CNFs presented a potential for field electron emission applications. - Abstract: Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) with sea urchin-like morphology were synthesised from waste chicken fat precursor via catalytic thermal chemical vapour deposition method at 750 °C. The CNFs showed amorphous structures under high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction examination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the core of the sea urchin-like CNFs was composed of Fe 3 C formed within the first 20 min of synthesis time. The growth of amorphous CNFs from agglomerated Fe 3 C particles was favourable due to the high heating rate applied during the synthesis. Field electron emission examination of the CNFs indicated turn-on and threshold field values of 5.4 and 6.6 V μm −1 at current density of 1 and 10 μA cm −2 , respectively. This study demonstrates that waste chicken fat, a low-cost and readily available resource, can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for the production of CNFs with a potential application in field electron emitters

  5. Electronic sputtering by swift highly charged ions of nitrogen on amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, M.; Haranger, F.; Rothard, H.; Ban d'Etat, B.; Boduch, P.; Clouvas, A.; Potiriadis, C.; Neugebauer, R.; Jalowy, T.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic sputtering with heavy ions as a function of both electronic energy loss dE/dx and projectile charge state q was studied at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL. Amorphous carbon (untreated, and sputter-cleaned and subsequently exposed to nitrogen) was irradiated with swift highly charged ions (Z=6-73, q=6-54, energy 6-13 MeV/u) in an ultrahigh vacuum scattering chamber. The fluence dependence of ion-induced electron yields allows to deduce a desorption cross-section σ which varies approximately as σ∼(dE/dx) 1.65 or σ∼q 3.3 for sputter-cleaned amorphous carbon exposed to nitrogen. This q dependence is close to the cubic charge dependence observed for the emission of H + secondary ions which are believed to be emitted from the very surface. However, the power law σ∼(dE/dx) 1.65 , related to the electronic energy loss gives the best empirical description. The dependence on dE/dx is close to a quadratic one thus rather pointing towards a thermal evaporation-like effect

  6. Effect of interwall interaction on the electronic structure of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, M; Boyer, T A; Biradar, S; Ge, L; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Barrera, E V; Elías-Zúñiga, A

    2015-01-01

    Through this study, the results of density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation of the electronic structure of zigzag–zigzag double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs), with chiral indices (n, 0)@(m, 0) for n = 7–15, and m = 15–26, has been presented and the effects of interwall interaction and orbital hybridization on the electronic structure of these systems has been discussed. It was observed that the electronic band gap of the aforementioned DWCNTs depends on the interwall distance only for metallic–semiconductor configurations and on the intrinsic properties of the constituent tubes in all other combinations. It was also observed that the calculated band gap for most of the metallic–metallic DWCNTs was smaller than semiconductor–metallic, metallic–semiconductor, and semiconductor–semiconductor configurations. Metallic–semiconductor DWCNTs were found to be desirable for band gap tuning applications because of their dependence on interwall distance, opening up the possibility of using such systems in electronic device applications, such as transistors. Other applications include the use of DWCNTs in macroscopic carbon nanotube conducting wires, for which metallic–metallic and semiconducting–metallic zigzag–zigzag DWCNTs were found to be the most desirable configurations due to their small band gaps. (paper)

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanofibres from waste chicken fat for field electron emission applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suriani, A.B., E-mail: absuriani@yahoo.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjung Malim, Perak 35900 (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjung Malim, Perak 35900 (Malaysia); Dalila, A.R. [Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjung Malim, Perak 35900 (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjung Malim, Perak 35900 (Malaysia); Mohamed, A.; Isa, I.M.; Kamari, A.; Hashim, N. [Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjung Malim, Perak 35900 (Malaysia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjung Malim, Perak 35900 (Malaysia); Soga, T.; Tanemura, M. [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Waste chicken fat is used as a starting material to produce CNFs via TCVD method. • High heating rate applied resulted in aggregation of catalyst particles. • Aggregated catalyst produced sea urchin-like CNFs with amorphous nature. • The as-grown CNFs presented a potential for field electron emission applications. - Abstract: Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) with sea urchin-like morphology were synthesised from waste chicken fat precursor via catalytic thermal chemical vapour deposition method at 750 °C. The CNFs showed amorphous structures under high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction examination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the core of the sea urchin-like CNFs was composed of Fe{sub 3}C formed within the first 20 min of synthesis time. The growth of amorphous CNFs from agglomerated Fe{sub 3}C particles was favourable due to the high heating rate applied during the synthesis. Field electron emission examination of the CNFs indicated turn-on and threshold field values of 5.4 and 6.6 V μm{sup −1} at current density of 1 and 10 μA cm{sup −2}, respectively. This study demonstrates that waste chicken fat, a low-cost and readily available resource, can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for the production of CNFs with a potential application in field electron emitters.

  8. Electronic structure and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. N.; Cheng, P.; Wu, M. J.; Zhu, H.; Xiang, Q.; Ni, J.

    2017-09-01

    Based on the density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function, the influence of the wrinkle on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials have been investigated, in which the wrinkled armchair graphene nanoribbons (wAGNRs) and the composite of AGNRs and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were considered with different connection of ripples. The wrinkle adjusts the electronic structures and transport properties of AGNRs. With the change of the strain, the wAGNRs for three width families reveal different electrical behavior. The band gap of AGNR(6) increases in the presence of the wrinkle, which is opposite to that of AGNR(5) and AGNR(7). The transport of AGNRs with the widths 6 or 7 has been modified by the wrinkle, especially by the number of isolated ripples, but it is insensitive to the strain. The nanojunctions constructed by AGNRs and SWCNTs can form the quantum wells, and some specific states are confined in wAGNRs. Although these nanojunctions exhibit the metallic, they have poor conductance due to the wrinkle. The filling of C20 into SWCNT has less influence on the electronic structure and transport of the junctions. The width and connection type of ripples have greatly influenced on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials.

  9. A new method for detection of the electron temperature in laser-plasma short wave cut off of stimulated Raman scattering spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiatai

    1994-01-01

    From the theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) three wave interaction, a new method of detecting the electron temperature in laser-plasma is obtained. SRS spectrum obtained from Shenguang No. 12 Nd-laser experiments are analysed. Using the wave length of short wave cut off of SRS, the electron temperature in corona plasma region is calculated consistently. These results agree reasonable with X-ray spectrum experiments

  10. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model

  11. Effects of surface functionalization on the electronic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Pascoini, A. L.; Knupp, W. G.; Camps, I.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important electronic, mechanical and optical properties. These features may be different when comparing a pristine nanotube with other presenting its surface functionalized. These changes can be explored in areas of research and application, such as construction of nanodevices that act as sensors and filters. Following this idea, in the current work, we present the results from a systematic study of CNT's surface functionalized with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Using the entropy as selection criterion, we filtered a library of 10k stochastically generated complexes for each functional concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%). The structurally related parameters (root-mean-square deviation, entropy, and volume/area) have a monotonic relationship with functionalization concentration. Differently, the electronic parameters (frontier molecular orbital energies, electronic gap, molecular hardness, and electrophilicity index) present and oscillatory behavior. For a set of concentrations, the nanotubes present spin polarized properties that can be used in spintronics.

  12. Nanotubes on Display: How Carbon Nanotubes Can Be Integrated into Electronic Displays

    KAUST Repository

    Opatkiewicz, Justin

    2010-06-22

    Random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise for use in the field of flexible electronics. Nanotube networks have been difficult to utilize because of the mixture of electronic types synthesized when grown. A variety of separation techniques have been developed, but few can readily be scaled up. Despite this issue, when metallic percolation pathways can be separated out or etched away, these networks serve as high-quality thinfilm transistors with impressive device characteristics. A new article in this issue illustrates this point and the promise of these materials. With more work, these devices can be implemented in transparent displays in the next generation of hand-held electronics. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Multiwalled carbon nanotube destruction in the radiation damages to electron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Pinchuk-Rugal’

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of the X-ray diffraction and vibrational Raman spectra of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT under high-energy electron irradiation (Ee = 1.8 MeV with large doses of absorption to 10 MGy were studied. With increasing dose uptake to 10.0 MGy, the interlayer correlation in the distribution of the individual graphene nanotubes nets not only is maintained, but is even improved. Defective bands D, D' and G band with increasing dose absorption have significant transformation, which show radiation damages of MWCNT. The destruction of nanotubes under electron irradiation is accompanied by increased regulation in the arrangement of individual nanotubes by interlayer cross-links involving interstitial atoms. The severity of degradation and cross-linking of MWCNT depends on the electron absorption dose.

  14. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiquan; Shi, Jun; Huang, Weimin, E-mail: huangwm@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. - Highlights: • The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected. • Dynamic investigations of ion-channel behavior of supported bilayer lipid membranes by scanning electrochemical microscopy • A novel way to explore the interaction between molecules and supported bilayer lipid membranes.

  15. Root carbon inputs to the rhizosphere stimulate extracellular enzyme activity and increase nitrogen availability in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.; Dragoni, D.; Drake, J. E.; Finzi, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter in temperate forest soils is controlled by the microbial production and activity of extracellular enzymes. The exudation of carbon (C) by tree roots into the rhizosphere may subsidize the microbial production of extracellular enzymes in the rhizosphere and increase the access of roots to N. The objective of this research was to investigate whether rates of root exudation and the resulting stimulation of extracellular enzyme activity in the rhizosphere (i.e., rhizosphere effect) differs between tree species that form associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This research was conducted at two temperate forest sites, the Harvard Forest (HF) in Central MA and the Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in Southern IN. At the HF, we measured rates of root exudation and the rhizosphere effects on enzyme activity, N cycling, and C mineralization in AM and ECM soils. At the MMSF, we recently girdled AM and ECM dominated plots to examine the impact of severing belowground C allocation on rhizosphere processes. At both sites, the rhizosphere effect on proteolytic, chitinolytic and ligninolytic enzyme activities was greater in ECM soils than in AM soils. In particular, higher rates of proteolytic enzyme activity increased the availability of amino acid-N in ECM rhizospheres relative to the bulk soils. Further, this stimulation of enzyme activity was directly correlated with higher rates of C mineralization in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Although not significantly different between species, root exudation of C comprised 3-10% of annual gross primary production at the HF. At the MMSF, experimental girdling led to a larger decline in soil respiration and enzyme activity in ECM plots than in AM plots. In both ECM and AM soils, however, girdling resulted in equivalent rates of enzyme activity in rhizosphere and corresponding bulk soils. The results of this study contribute to the

  16. Carbon doped PDMS: conductance stability over time and implications for additive manufacturing of stretchable electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, Mahmoud; Rocha, Rui; Osorio, Luis; Almeida, Miguel; De Almeida, Anibal; Ramachandran, Vivek; Tabatabai, Arya; Lu, Tong; Majidi, Carmel

    2017-01-01

    Carbon doped PDMS (cPDMS), has been used as a conductive polymer for stretchable electronics. Compared to liquid metals, cPDMS is low cost and is easier to process or to print with an additive manufacturing process. However, changes on the conductance of the carbon based conductive PDMS (cPDMS) were observed over time, in particular after integration of cPDMS and the insulating polymer. In this article we investigate the process parameters that lead to improved stability over conductance of the cPDMS over time. Slight modifications to the fabrication process parameters were conducted and changes on the conductance of the samples for each method were monitored. Results suggested that change of the conductance happens mostly after integration of a pre-polymer over a cured cPDMS, and not after integration of the cPDMS over a cured insulating polymer. We show that such changes can be eliminated by adjusting the integration priority between the conductive and insulating polymers, by selecting the right curing temperature, changing the concentration of the carbon particles and the thickness of the conductive traces, and when possible by changing the insulating polymer material. In this way, we obtained important conclusions regarding the effect of these parameters on the change of the conductance over time, that should be considered for additive manufacturing of soft electronics. Also, we show that these changes can be possibly due to the diffusion from PDMS into cPDMS. (paper)

  17. Ab initio study on the electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.N. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yu Quan Rd, Beijing 100049 (China); Zheng, X.H.; Zeng, Z. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, L.L. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yu Quan Rd, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2011-12-15

    The effects of electron doping and molecule adsorption on the electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions CNT(3,3)/n-CNT(6,0)/CNT(3,3) (n = 1-5) are simulated by first-principles calculations combined with a non-equilibrium Green's function technique. The doping effects are investigated by N substitution for the carbon atom while the molecule adsorption effects are studied by adsorbing a H{sub 2}O molecule or an OH group on the top of one carbon atom, respectively. The transmission function around the Fermi level is highly dependent on the doping or adsorption site. The effects are negligible when the site is at the interface, while it always forms a scattering barrier which causes a valley of the transmission spectra around the Fermi level when the doping/adsorption site is inside the sandwiched CNT(6,0). The conductance of CNT intramolecular junctions is very sensitive to the environment, which may provide potential of application in future nanoelectronic devices and gas sensors. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Structural, electronic properties, and quantum capacitance of B, N and P-doped armchair carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi-Khoshdel, S. Morteza, E-mail: mmousavi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanbakhsh-bonab, Parisa [Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Targholi, Ehsan [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Abhar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Abhar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-07

    Using DFT calculations, we study the structural parameters, electronic properties and quantum capacitance of N, B, and P-doped armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Fermi level shifts towards conduction band and valence band in N- and B-doped CNTs, respectively. While in the case of P atom, despite having an extra valence electron than carbon, there is no shift in Fermi level. The results revealed from a symmetric capacitance enhancement in P-doped CNT and an asymmetric capacitance enhancement in B and N-doped CNTs. The greatest amount of quantum capacitance of N-doped (6, 6) CNT could be achieved at the concentration range of 0.1–0.15. - Highlights: • Exploration of variation in quantum capacitance of CNTs through doping N, B and P atoms. • Quantum capacitance of CNTs is sensitive to impurities entered in carbon nanotubes. • Maximum quantum capacitance of N-doped CNTs is achieved at the concentration range of 0.1–0.15.

  19. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Hunneman, P; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W; Doddema, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 mu M) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  20. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  1. Effect of carbon limitation on photosynthetic electron transport in Nannochloropsis oculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavřel, Tomáš; Szabó, Milán; Tamburic, Bojan; Evenhuis, Christian; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Literáková, Petra; Larkum, Anthony W D; Raven, John A; Červený, Jan; Ralph, Peter J

    2018-04-01

    This study describes the impacts of inorganic carbon limitation on the photosynthetic efficiency and operation of photosynthetic electron transport pathways in the biofuel-candidate microalga Nannochloropsis oculata. Using a combination of highly-controlled cultivation setup (photobioreactor), variable chlorophyll a fluorescence and transient spectroscopy methods (electrochromic shift (ECS) and P 700 redox kinetics), we showed that net photosynthesis and effective quantum yield of Photosystem II (PSII) decreased in N. oculata under carbon limitation. This was accompanied by a transient increase in total proton motive force and energy-dependent non-photochemical quenching as well as slightly elevated respiration. On the other hand, under carbon limitation the rapid increase in proton motive force (PMF, estimated from the total ECS signal) was also accompanied by reduced conductivity of ATP synthase to protons (estimated from the rate of ECS decay in dark after actinic illumination). This indicates that the slow operation of ATP synthase results in the transient build-up of PMF, which leads to the activation of fast energy dissipation mechanisms such as energy-dependent non-photochemical quenching. N. oculata also increased content of lipids under carbon limitation, which compensated for reduced NAPDH consumption during decreased CO 2 fixation. The integrated knowledge of the underlying energetic regulation of photosynthetic processes attained with a combination of biophysical methods may be used to identify photo-physiological signatures of the onset of carbon limitation in microalgal cultivation systems, as well as to potentially identify microalgal strains that can better acclimate to carbon limitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Pannonibacter phragmitetus LSSE-09 stimulated with external electron donors under alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lin; Luo Mingfang; Li Wangliang; Wei Xuetuan; Xie Keng; Liu Lijun; Jiang Chengying; Liu Huizhou

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Growing cells have high Cr (VI) resistant and reducing ability aerobically. → Resting cells show strong anaerobic-reduction potential. → Acetate can highly stimulate both aerobic and anaerobic reduction process. - Abstract: A novel Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strain LSSE-09, identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus, was isolated from industrial sludge. It has strong aerobic and anaerobic Cr (VI)-reduction potential under alkaline conditions. At 37 o C and pH 9.0, growing cells of strain LSSE-09 could completely reduce 100 and 1000 mg L -1 Cr (VI)-Cr (III) within 9 and 24 h, respectively under aerobic condition. Resting cells showed higher anaerobic reduction potential with the rate of 1.46 mg g -1 (dryweight) min -1 , comparing with their aerobic reduction rate, 0.21 mg g -1 min -1 . External electron donors, such as lactate, acetate, formate, pyruvate, citrate and glucose could highly increase the reduction rate, especially for aerobic reduction. The presence of 3000 mg L -1 acetate enhanced anaerobic and aerobic Cr (VI)-reduction rates up to 9.47 mg g -1 min -1 and 4.42 mg g -1 min -1 , respectively, which were 5 and 20 times faster than those without it. Strain LSSE-09 retained high activities over six batch cycles and NO 3 - and SO 4 2- had slightly negative effects on Cr (VI)-reduction rates. The results suggest that strain LSSE-09 has potential application for Cr (VI) detoxification in alkaline wastewater.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy characterisation of carbon deposited layers in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchambre, E.; Brosset, C.; Reichle, R.; Devynck, P.; Guirlet, R.; Tsitrone, E.; Saikali, W.; Dominici, C.; Charai, A.

    2003-01-01

    For long discharges in Tore-Supra, an infra-red safety system has been installed to survey surface temperature of the target plates located below the toroidal pump limiter. A shift in temperature is attributed to the growth of a carbon layer at the surface of the neutralizer and has been estimated to a temperature increase of 400 Celsius degrees between virgin and layered surfaces. For temperature safety analysis, target plates have been cleaned and carbon layers were sampled for scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) study. SEM micrographs have allowed to measure the deposited layer thickness and to study the specific fractal and stratified structure. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis has permitted to distinguish carbon layers corresponding to boronization and then to deduce an average growth rate of about 20 nm/s. The growth rate is not constant and is likely to depend on plasma operation parameters. These analyses completed by time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have shown a beneficial effect of the boronization on metallic contamination of the plasma, confirming the in situ optical spectroscopic measurements. These analyses have also shown an increase of hydrogen storage in carbon layer due to boronization. Although the measurements performed on deposited layer are very local, the results reflect the history of the 2002 campaign. (A.C.)

  4. Stability and Electronic Properties of Hydrogenated Zigzag Carbon Nanotube Focused on Stone-Wales Defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Li-Jun; Zhang Jie; Chen Wei-Guang; Tang Ya-Nan

    2015-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the chemisorption of hydrogen on a Stone-Wales (SW) defective carbon nanotube (10,0). The investigated configurations include four configurations covering single defects and double defects. One hydrogen dimer adsorption is energetically favored on bonds shared by carbon heptagon-heptagon for configurations with the defect parallel to the tube axis compared with the carbon pentagon-hexagon sites for ones with a slanted defect. This different behavior is also demonstrated for hydrogen dimer chain adsorption, the favored site for the former ones is through the defect, which is the nearest neighbor site to defect for the latter ones. It is found that the energy band gaps of hydrogenated configurations may be enlarged or decreased by altering the adsorption site or defect position. The semiconductor-to-metal transition may occur for configurations with the defect or defects parallel to the tube axis due to low electronic localization. Our results highlight the interest of the interaction of multi-factor system by providing a detailed bond and position picture of a hydrogenated defective carbon nanotube (10,0). (paper)

  5. Evidence of hot spot formation on carbon limiters due to thermal electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Samm, U.; Tokar, M.Z.; Unterberg, B.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon test limiters have been exposed in TEXTOR to high heat loads up to about 30 MW/m 2 . The evolutions of the surface temperature distribution and of the carbon release have been observed by means of local diagnostics. A sudden acceleration of the rise of the surface temperature has been found at a critical temperature of approx. 2400 deg. C. The increase of the rate of the temperature rise is consistent with an enhancement of the power loading by a factor of 2.5-3. Following the temperature jump (hot spot), a quasi-equilibrium temperature establishes at approx. 2700 deg. C. The development of the hot spot is explained by an increase of the local power loading to the breakdown of the sheath potential by thermal emission of electrons from the carbon surface. Simultaneously with the appearance of the hot spot, the carbon release from the surface increases sharply. This increase can be explained by normal thermal sublimation. Sublimation cooling contributes to the establishment of the quasi-equilibrium temperature at about 2700 deg. C. (author). 16 refs, 10 figs

  6. Performance of Carbon Coatings for Mitigation of Electron Cloud in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, C; Costa Pinto, P; Neupert, H; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Taborelli, M; Kato, S

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings have been tested in electron cloud monitors (ECM) in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and have shown for LHC type beams a reduction of the electron cloud current by a factor 104 compared to stainless steel (StSt). This performance has been maintained for more than 3 years under SPS operation conditions. Secondary electron yield (SEY) laboratory data confirm that after more than 1 year of SPS operation, the coating maintains a SEY below 1.0. The compatibility of coexisting StSt and a-C surfaces has been studied in an ECM having coated and uncoated areas. The results show no degradation of the properties of the a-C areas. The performance of diamond like carbon (DLC) coating has also been studied. DLC shows a less effective reduction of the EC current than a-C, but conditioning is faster than for StSt. Three a-C coated dipoles were inserted in the SPS. However, even with no EC detected, the dynamic pressure rise is similar to the one observed in the StSt reference dipoles. Measu...

  7. Structural, electronic and photovoltaic characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown directly on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Camilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have taken advantage of the native surface roughness and the iron content of AISI-316 stainless steel to grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by chemical vapour deposition without the addition of an external catalyst. The structural and electronic properties of the synthesized carbon nanostructures have been investigated by a range of electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The results show the good quality and the high graphitization degree of the synthesized MWCNTs. Through energy-loss spectroscopy we found that the electronic properties of these nanostructures are markedly different from those of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG. Notably, a broadening of the π-plasmon peak in the case of MWCNTs is evident. In addition, a photocurrent was measured when MWCNTs were airbrushed onto a silicon substrate. External quantum efficiency (EQE and photocurrent values were reported both in planar and in top-down geometry of the device. Marked differences in the line shapes and intensities were found for the two configurations, suggesting that two different mechanisms of photocurrent generation and charge collection are in operation. From this comparison, we are able to conclude that the silicon substrate plays an important role in the production of electron–hole pairs.

  8. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Maschmann, Matthew R., E-mail: MaschmannM@missouri.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Kim, Sanha; Hart, A. John [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Slinker, Keith [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RX, Air Force Research Lab, Ohio 45433 (United States); Universal Technology Corporation, Beavercreek, Ohio 45424 (United States); Ehlert, Gregory J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RX, Air Force Research Lab, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0–100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm{sup 3}/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  9. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Kim, Sanha; Slinker, Keith; Ehlert, Gregory J.; Hart, A. John; Maschmann, Matthew R.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0-100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm3/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  10. Ohmic contact junction of carbon nanotubes fabricated by in situ electron beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y G; Wang, T H; Lin, X W; Dravid, V P

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of in situ fabrication of multi-walled carbon nanotube junctions via electron beam induced deposition. The tip-to-tip interconnection of the nanotubes involves the alignment of two nanotubes via a piezodriven nanomanipulator and nano-welding by electron beam deposition. Hydrocarbon contamination from the pump oil vapour of the vacuum system of the TEM chamber was used as the solder; this is superior to the already available metallic solders because its composition is identical to the carbon nanotube. The hydrocarbon deposition, with perfect wettability, on the nanotubes establishes strong mechanical binding between the two nanotubes to form an integrated structure. Consequently, the nanotubes cross-linked by the hydrocarbon solder produce good electrical and mechanical connections. The joint dimension was determined by the size of the electron beam, which results in a sound junction with well-defined geometry and the smallest junction size obtained so far. In situ electric measurement showed a linear current-voltage property for the multi-walled nanotube junction

  11. Carbon Mineralization Can Be Sustained or Even Stimulated under Fluctuating Redox Conditions in Tropical and Temperate Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Hall, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) mineralization is widely thought to be affected by O2 availability, and anaerobiosis represents a significant global mechanism of C stabilization. However, mineral-associated organic C (e.g. Fe-bound organic C) may be vulnerable to redox fluctuations due to release following Fe reduction, which could counteract protective effects of anaerobiosis. Many soils, including temperate Mollisols and tropical Oxisols, experience fluctuating redox conditions following moisture variations that could impact C cycling and stabilization. Here we incubated two soils with C4 leaf litter at different duration and frequencies of anaerobic periods for 128 days to investigate how redox fluctuations affect soil C mineralization. The treatments included static aerobic (control), and 2-, 4-, 8- and 12- day anaerobic followed by 4-day aerobic. We measured CO2, CH4, and their C isotope ratios. Longer durations of anaerobic conditions promoted greater Fe reduction and more DOC released. Notably, in both soils despite their large differences in composition, the production of CO2 and CH4 was stimulated under aerobic conditions following anaerobic conditions (relative to the control), which compensated for the decrease under anaerobic conditions. After 128 days, cumulative C mineralization in the control was similar between the Mollisol (9.7 mg C g-1) and the Oxisol (10.1 mg C g-1). The value in the Mollisol was significantly higher in the 12-day anaerobic treatment (11.2 mg C g-1) than the aerobic control and the 2-day anaerobic treatment (9.7 mg C g-1). In the Oxisol, cumulative C mineralization was not significantly affected by any of the fluctuating redox treatments relative to the control. Our findings challenge theory by showing that redox fluctuations can counteract the suppressive effects of O2 limitation on decomposition.

  12. Treatment of industrial effluents using electron beam accelerator and adsorption with activated carbon. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Las Casas, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    Several methods are used In the pollutant removal from Industrial and domestic wastewater. However when the degradation of toxic organic pollutants, mainly the recalcitrant is objectified, the conventional treatments usually do not meet the desirable performance in the elimination or decrease the impact when the effluent are released to the environment what takes to the research of alternative methods that seek the improvement of the efficiency of the wastewater treatment systems jointly employees or separately. This work presents a study of degradation/removal of pollutants organic compounds comparing two methods using radiation from industrial electron beam and granular activated carbon (GAC). The removal efficiency of the pollutants was evaluated and it was verified that the efficiency of adsorption with activated carbon is similar to the radiation method. The obtained results allowed to evaluated the relative costs of these methods. (author)

  13. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Nitze, F; Schmid, M; Aznar, R; Mehring, M; Wå gberg, T

    2011-01-01

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  14. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  15. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  16. Measurements of Wake-Riding Electrons in Antiproton-Carbon-Foil Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When a charged particle passes through dielectric media, e.g. a thin carbon foil, a ``wake'' is induced. The characteristic wake-potential shows an oscillatory behaviour, with a wavelength of about $ 2 \\pi v _{p} / \\omega _{p} _{l} $ where $ v _{p} $ is the projectile velocity and $ \\omega _{p} _{l} $ the plasmon energy of the target. This induced wake potential is superimposed on the Coulomb potential of the projectile, the latter leading to a pronounced ``cusp'' of electrons leaving the solid at $ v _{e} app v _{p} $ for positively charged projectiles in the MeV region. Correspondingly, an ``anti-cusp'' is expected for antiprotons. \\\\ \\\\ In the solid, the wake-potential leads to an attractive force on electrons, and a dynamic electronic state is predicted both for proton and antiproton projectiles. In the solid, the wake-riding electrons are travelling with the projectile speed $ v _{p} $ Upon exit of the foil, the electron released from the wake-riding state of an antiproton will suddenly find itself in th...

  17. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    efficient delivery of this power to the screen. We describe a method based on optical rectification to create an electron acceleration process which can act simultaneously on a femtosecond photo-electron pulse as well as cancel space-charge effects. This method can be used to produce attosecond electron and photon pulses. Narrow linewidth high intensity tunable light pulses are very useful for applications such as spectroscopic studies and remote sensing. Tunable lasers and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) process are commonly used for this purpose. SRS process has high threshold because of small spontaneous Raman scattering cross-sections. We combined amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from dye molecules with SRS process in solvent molecules in which dye molecules are dissolved. ASE seeds SRS process and SRS peak is further amplified by stimulated emission gain. We got amplifications ~100 over SRS from pure solvent. This peak can be tuned over gain bandwidth of dye molecules.

  18. The characteristics of carbon nanotubes grown at low temperature for electronic device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Seob [Department of Photoelectronics Information, Chosun College of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong, E-mail: jaehyeong@skku.edu [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    For the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in flexible electronic devices, the CNTs were grown on Corning 1737 glass substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. To deposit the catalyst layer, TiN buffer layer of 200 nm thickness and Ni catalyst layer of 60 nm were first deposited on the glass by r.f. magnetron sputtering method. The CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} gases are used as the synthesis gas of CNTs and the working pressure was about 2.13 kPa, and the substrate bias was about − 200 V. The growth time was from 2 min to 5 min and the microwave power was about 800 W. The substrate temperature as the main parameter was changed from 400 °C to 550 °C. The structural properties of CNTs synthesized with the substrate temperature were investigated using Raman, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy methods. The surface and electrical properties of CNTs grown by MPECVD method were studied by scanning probe microscopy and four-point probe methods. We obtained the multi-walled CNTs (MW-CNTs). Multi-walled CNTs were vertically grown on Ni/TiN/glass substrates below 500 °C without any glass deformations. As the substrate temperature was increased, the crystallinity of CNTs was improved. Ni catalyst was found at the tip of CNT by the TEM observation and the grown CNTs were found to have a multi-walled with bamboo like structure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Effects of substrate temperature on carbon nanotubes properties. • Improvement of the crystallinity with increasing substrate temperature. • Reduction of sheet resistance with increasing substrate temperature.

  19. Investigation of Basic Mechanisms of Radiation Effects in Carbon-Based Electronic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    electron volt (eV) 1.602 177 × 10 –19 joule (J) erg 1 × 10 –7 joule (J) kiloton (kt) (TNT equivalent) 4.184 × 10 12 joule (J) British thermal ...graduate, 2 Ph.D. graduates (one that continued for a follow on year as a post doc), and partially supported 1 additional Ph.D. student , 1 additional post...June (2011) 35. E. Comfort et al., “Creation of individual defects at extremely high proton fluences in carbon nanotube p-n diodes”, IEEE Trans. Nucl

  20. Application of electron energy loss spectroscopy for single wall carbon nanotubes (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs. (authors)

  1. Carbon nanotube based 3-D matrix for enabling three-dimensional nano-magneto-electronics [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Hong

    Full Text Available This letter describes the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT-based arrays with estimated 2-nm thick cobalt (Co nanoparticles deposited inside individual tubes to unravel the possibility of using the unique templates for ultra-high-density low-energy 3-D nano-magneto-electronic devices. The presence of oriented 2-nm thick Co layers within individual nanotubes in the CNT-based 3-D matrix is confirmed through VSM measurements as well as an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS.

  2. Cobalt nanorods fully encapsulated in carbon nanotube and magnetization measurements by off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Fully encapsulated face-centered-cubic (fcc) Co nanorods in multiwalled carbon nanotubes were produced by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Quantitative magnetization measurements of the Co nanorods were carried out by off-axis electron holography using a theoretical cylindrical model. The component of magnetic induction was then measured to be 1.2±0.1 T, which is lower than the expected saturation magnetization of fcc Co of 1.7 T. The reason for the reduced magnetic component was discussed

  3. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  4. Electronic structures and magnetism for carbon doped CdSe: Modified Becke–Johnson density functional calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, S.W., E-mail: fansw1129@126.com; Song, T.; Huang, X.N.; Yang, L.; Ding, L.J.; Pan, L.Q.

    2016-09-15

    Utilizing the full potential linearized augment plane wave method, the electronic structures and magnetism for carbon doped CdSe are investigated. Calculations show carbon substituting selenium could induce CdSe to be a diluted magnetic semiconductor. Single carbon dopant could induce 2.00 μ{sub B} magnetic moment. Electronic structures show the long-range ferromagnetic coupling mainly originates from the p–d exchange-like p–p coupling interaction. Positive chemical pair interactions indicate carbon dopants would form homogeneous distribution in CdSe host. The formation energy implies the non-equilibrium fabricated technology is necessary during the samples fabricated. - Highlights: • The C{sub Se} defects could induce the CdSe to be typical diluted magnetic semiconductor. • Electronic structures show ferromagnetism come from p-d exchange-like p-p coupling. • Chemical pair interactions indicate C{sub Se} prefer homogenous distribution in CdSe host.

  5. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  6. First-principles study of electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuchika Iwami, Hidekazu Goto, Kikuji Hirose and Tomoya Ono

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of density functional theory, we study the electronic structures of five types of carbon nanotubes: the non-deformed (6,6 tube, the uniformly stretched tube along the tube axis, the uniformly compressed tube, the partially stretched tube and the partially compressed tube. The electron charge density increases at the compressed C–C bond of the partially stretched tube, while the density decreases at the stretched C–C bond of the partially stretched tube. In addition, the a1 and e1 states of the (6,6 tube contribute to the bonding along the tube axis and the a2 and e2 states are the bonds connecting the atoms in the same layers. Thus, the energy bands of the a1 and e1 states are sensitively affected by the deformation of the tubes along the tube axis.

  7. Electronic and magneto-transport in chirality sorted carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Dawid; Czechowski, Nikodem; Adamus, Zbigniew; GiŻewski, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    This research details electronic and magneto-transport in unsorted and chirality-enriched carbon nanotube (CNT) films. By measuring the electrical conductivity from 4 K to 297 K, we were able to assign the governing mechanism of electronic transport. Fluctuation-induced tunnelling was in accordance with the obtained data and very well matched the underlying physics. We demonstrated how a change in the type of CNT to make the film affects its electrical performance. As the temperature was decreased down to cryogenic conditions, up to a 56-fold increase in resistance was noted. Moreover, the measurement of magnetoresistance (MR) revealed a non-monotonic dependence on the applied magnetic field. The initial negative component of MR was eventually overpowered by the positive MR component as the field strength was increased beyond a certain threshold.

  8. Carbonate radical anion-induced electron transfer in bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ravi [Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: rjudrin@yahoo.com; Mukherjee, T. [Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Reaction of native and thermally denatured bovine serum albumin (BSA) with carbonate radical anion (CO{sub 3}{sup -} radical) has been studied using pulse radiolysis technique. Scavenging of CO{sub 3}{sup -} radical by native BSA and consequent electron transfer from tyrosine to tryptophan radical has been observed to occur with almost same rate constant (k{approx}1.7x10{sup 8} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}) at pH 8.8. Effect of structural changes, due to thermal denaturation, on scavenging of CO{sub 3}{sup -} radical and the electron transfer process have been studied and discussed in this paper.

  9. Synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies and carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activity of carbon-modified TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiaogang; Xing, Xing; Li, Qiuye; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-modified TiO 2 (CT) nanoparticles were prepared via a two-step method of heat treatment without the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) polymer. As-prepared CT nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis/DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N 2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, thermal analysis (TA), electron spin resonance (ESR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The visible light photocatalytic activities were evaluated on the basis of the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies (SETOVs) and the carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activities of the CT nanoparticles were discussed. It was found that the crystalline phase, the morphology, and particle size of the CT nanoparticles depended on the second heat-treatment temperature instead of the first heat-treatment temperature. The visible light photocatalytic activities were attributed to the synergistic effect of SETOVs and the carbon species, and also depended on the specific surface area of the photocatalysts. - Highlights: • Carbon-modified TiO 2 particles have been prepared without RF polymer. • The visible light photocatalytic activities of the particles have been evaluated. • The band gap energy structure of the carbon-modified TiO 2 has been proposed. • Synergistic effect of SETOVs and carbon species has been discussed. • The activities also depend on the specific surface area of the catalysts

  10. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  11. Stimulation of growth of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori by atmospheric level of oxygen under high carbon dioxide tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Na

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a human pathogen that is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer, has been considered a microaerophile, but there is no general consensus about its specific O2 requirements. A clear understanding of Hp physiology is needed to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism(s of Hp infection. Results We cultured Hp under a range of O2 levels with or without 10% CO2 and evaluated growth profiles, morphology, intracellular pH, and energy metabolism. We found that, in the presence of 10% CO2, the normal atmospheric level of O2 inhibited Hp growth at low density but stimulated growth at a higher density. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of Hp cells cultured under 20% O2 tension revealed live spiral-shaped bacteria with outer membrane vesicles on a rugged cell surface, which became smooth during the stationary phase. Fermentation products including acetate, lactate, and succinate were detected in cell culture media grown under microaerobic conditions, but not under the aerobic condition. CO2 deprivation for less than 24 h did not markedly change cytoplasmic or periplasmic pH, suggesting that cellular pH homeostasis alone cannot account for the capnophilic nature of Hp. Further, CO2 deprivation significantly increased intracellular levels of ppGpp and ATP but significantly decreased cellular mRNA levels, suggesting induction of the stringent response. Conclusions We conclude, unlike previous reports, that H. pylori may be a capnophilic aerobe whose growth is promoted by atmospheric oxygen levels in the presence of 10% CO2. Our data also suggest that buffering of intracellular pH alone cannot account for the CO2 requirement of H. pylori and that CO2 deprivation initiates the stringent response in H. pylori. Our findings may provide new insight into the physiology of this fastidious human pathogen.

  12. Non-uniform shrinkage of multiple-walled carbon nanotubes under in situ electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lunxiong [South China Normal University, Brain Science Institute, Guangzhou (China); Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China); Su, Jiangbin [Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China); Chang Zhou University, School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou (China); Zhu, Xianfang [Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China)

    2016-10-15

    Instability of multiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy at room temperature. Specially, the non-uniform shrinkage of tubes was found: The pristine MWCNT shrank preferentially in its axial direction from the most curved free cap end of the tube, but the shrinkage of the tube diameter was offset by the axial shrinkage: For the complex MWCNT, the two inner MWCNTs also preferentially axially shrank from their most curved cap ends and separated from each other. However, for the effect of the radial pressure from the out walls which enveloped the two inner tubes and the tube amorphization, the two inner tubes were extruded to come close to each other and finally touched again. The new ''evaporation'' and ''diffusion'' mechanisms of carbon atoms as driven by the nano-curvature of CNT and the electron beam-induced athermal activation were suggested to explain the above phenomena. (orig.)

  13. Electronic transport in large systems through a QUAMBO-NEGF approach: Application to atomic carbon chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, X.W.; Zhang, G.P.; Yao, Y.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ding, Z.J.; Ho, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    The conductance of single-atom carbon chain (SACC) between two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (GNR) is studied by an efficient scheme utilizing tight-binding (TB) parameters generated via quasi-atomic minimal basis set orbitals (QUAMBOs) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF). Large systems (SACC contains more than 50 atoms) are investigated and the electronic transport properties are found to correlate with SACC's parity. The SACCs provide a stable off or on state in broad energy region (0.1-1 eV) around Fermi energy. The off state is not sensitive to the length of SACC while the corresponding energy region decreases with the increase of the width of GNR. -- Highlights: → Graphene has many superior electronic properties. → First-principles calculation are accurate but limited to system size. → QUAMBOs construct tight-binding parameters with spatial localization, and then use divide-and-conquer method. → SACC (single carbon atom chain): structure and transport show even-odd parity, and long chains are studied.

  14. Asymmetric carbon nanotube-MnO2 two-ply yarn supercapacitors for wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fenghua; Miao, Menghe

    2014-04-01

    Strong and flexible two-ply carbon nanotube yarn supercapacitors are electrical double layer capacitors that possess relatively low energy storage capacity. Pseudocapacitance metal oxides such as MnO2 are well known for their high electrochemical performance and can be coated on carbon nanotube yarns to significantly improve the performance of two-ply carbon nanotube yarn supercapacitors. We produced a high performance asymmetric two-ply yarn supercapacitor from as-spun CNT yarn and CNT@MnO2 composite yarn in aqueous electrolyte. The as-spun CNT yarn serves as negative electrode and the CNT@MnO2 composite yarn as positive electrode. This asymmetric architecture allows the operating potential window to be extended from 1.0 to 2.0 V and results in much higher energy and power densities than the reference symmetric two-ply yarn supercapacitors, reaching 42.0 Wh kg-1 at a lower power density of 483.7 W kg-1, and 28.02 Wh kg-1 at a higher power density of 19 250 W kg-1. The asymmetric supercapacitor can sustain cyclic charge-discharge and repeated folding/unfolding actions without suffering significant deterioration of specific capacitance. The combination of high strength, flexibility and electrochemical performance makes the asymmetric two-ply yarn supercapacitor a suitable power source for flexible electronic devices for applications that require high durability and wearer comfort.

  15. One electron oxidation of Ni(II)-iminodiacetate by carbonate radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.C.; Bardhan, D.K.; Bhattacharyya, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Reactions of carbonate radical (CO 3 - ), generated by photolysis or by radiolysis of a carbonate solution with nickel(II)-iminodiacetate (Ni(II)IDA) were studied at pH 10.5 and ionic strength (I)=0.2 mol x dm -3 . The stable product arising from the ligand degradation in the complex is mainly glyoxalic acid. Time-resolved spectroscopy and transient kinetics were studied using flash photolysis. From the kinetic data it was suggested that the carbonate radical initially reacts with Ni(III)IDA with a rate constant (2.4.±0.4) x 10 6 dm 3 x mol -1 x s -1 to form a Ni(II)IDA species which, however, undergoes a first-order transformation (k=2.7 x 10 2 x s -1 ) to give a radical intermediate of the type Ni(II)RNHCHCO - 2 ) which rapidly forms an adduct containing a Ni-C bond. This adduct decays very slowly to give rise to glyoxalic acid. From a consideration of equilibrium between Ni(II)IDA and Ni(III)IDA, the one electron reduction potential for the Ni(III)IDA/Ni(II)IDA couple was determined to be 1.467 V. (author) 30 refs.; 5 figs

  16. Electronic structures and three-dimensional effects of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koretsune, Takashi; Saito, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    We study boron-doped carbon nanotubes by first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. To discuss the possibility of superconductivity, we calculate the electronic band structure and the density of states (DOS) of boron-doped (10,0) nanotubes by changing the boron density. It is found that the Fermi level density of states D(ε F ) increases upon lowering the boron density. This can be understood in terms of the rigid band picture where the one-dimensional van Hove singularity lies at the edge of the valence band in the DOS of the pristine nanotube. The effect of three-dimensionality is also considered by performing the calculations for bundled (10,0) nanotubes and boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes (10,0)/(19,0). From the calculation of the bundled nanotubes, it is found that interwall dispersion is sufficiently large to broaden the peaks of the van Hove singularity in the DOS. Thus, to achieve the high D(ε F ) using the bundle of nanotubes with single chirality, we should take into account the distance from each nanotube. In the case of double-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that the holes introduced to the inner tube by boron doping spread also on the outer tube, while the band structure of each tube remains almost unchanged.

  17. Number distribution of emitted electrons by MeV H+ impact on carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, H.; Koyanagi, Y.; Hongo, N.; Ishii, K.; Kaneko, T.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical distributions of the number of the forward- and backward-emitted secondary electrons (SE's) from a thin carbon foil have been measured in coincidence with foil-transmitted H+ ions of 0.5-3.0 MeV in every 0.5 MeV step. The measured SE energy spectra were fitted by assuming a Pólya distribution for the simultaneous n-SE emission probabilities. For our previous data with a couple of the carbon foils with different thicknesses, a similar analysis has been carried out. As a result, it was found that the measured spectra could be reproduced as well as by an analysis without placing any restriction on the emission probabilities both for the forward and backward SE emission. The obtained b-parameter of the Pólya distribution, which is a measure of the deviation from a Poisson distribution due to the cascade multiplication by high energy internal SE's, increases monotonically with the incident energy of proton beams. On the other hand, a clear foil-thickness dependence is not observed for the b-parameter. A theoretical model which could reproduced the magnitude of the b-parameter for the SE energy spectra obtained with thick Au, Cu and Al targets is found to overestimates our values for thin carbon foils significantly. Another model calculation is found to reproduce our b-values very well.

  18. Enhancement of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics tuning single-walled carbon nanotube forest height and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberti, Francesco; Ferraro, Davide; Giomo, Monica; Elvassore, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors are growing in number and importance. Surface modifications could enhance charge transfer properties occurring at the interfaces and carbon nanoassemblies is one of the most used strategy to improve sensitivity to measurements. However, well defined protocols of surface modification are needed in order to fabricate electrochemically effective nanostructured sensors. Therefore, we aim at investigating the electrochemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) forests as a function of height and nanotube surface density. Height of the forests is accurately controlled tuning the oxidation temperatures in the range of 293–313 K of SWCNTs. The surface density of carbon nanotubes was adjusted developing cysteamine/2-mercaptoethanol (CYS/ME) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces at different ratios (1:0, 1:3, 1:10, 1:100, 0:1). Apparent electron transfer rate was analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and experimental data show that transfer rate constant, k app , increases from 1 × 10 −4 cm/s to 6 × 10 −4 cm/s rising oxidation temperatures (i.e. lowering forest height); therefore forests with reduced height show higher electron transfer rate without significant difference in electrodic reversibility. On the other hand, tuning SWCNT surface density, forests obtained with no ME show optimal Δ peak value of 0.087 ± 0.015 V and highest k app value of 9.15 × 10 −3 cm/s. Surprisingly, electrochemical surface area analysis shows that samples with lower amount of cysteamine have an active surface area three times bigger than samples with 1:3 CYS/ME ratio. Low electrochemical efficiency associated with high active surface may be related to unwanted SWCNT bundles adsorbed on the surface for 1:10 and 1:100 CYS/ME ratio samples as confirmed by AFM morphological characterization. Further investigation shows that a transition from a semi-infinite planar diffusion mechanism to a radial diffusion one takes

  19. Carbon Electrode-Molecule Junctions: A Reliable Platform for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Xin, Na; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-15

    The development of reliable approaches to integrate individual or a small collection of molecules into electrical nanocircuits, often termed "molecular electronics", is currently a research focus because it can not only overcome the increasing difficulties and fundamental limitations of miniaturization of current silicon-based electronic devices, but can also enable us to probe and understand the intrinsic properties of materials at the atomic- and/or molecular-length scale. This development might also lead to direct observation of novel effects and fundamental discovery of physical phenomena that are not accessible by traditional materials or approaches. Therefore, researchers from a variety of backgrounds have been devoting great effort to this objective, which has started to move beyond simple descriptions of charge transport and branch out in different directions, reflecting the interdisciplinarity. This Account exemplifies our ongoing interest and great effort in developing efficient lithographic methodologies capable of creating molecular electronic devices through the combination of top-down micro/nanofabrication with bottom-up molecular assembly. These devices use nanogapped carbon nanomaterials (such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene), with a particular focus on graphene, as point contacts formed by electron beam lithography and precise oxygen plasma etching. Through robust amide linkages, functional molecular bridges terminated with diamine moieties are covalently wired into the carboxylic acid-functionalized nanogaps to form stable carbon electrode-molecule junctions with desired functionalities. At the macroscopic level, to improve the contact interface between electrodes and organic semiconductors and lower Schottky barriers, we used SWCNTs and graphene as efficient electrodes to explore the intrinsic properties of organic thin films, and then build functional high-performance organic nanotransistors with ultrahigh responsivities

  20. Multi-walled carbon nanotube structural instability with/without metal nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Huang, Shengli; Wu, Chenxu

    2017-12-01

    The structural transformation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) under electron beam (e-beam) irradiation at room temperature is studied, with respect to a novel passivation effect due to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). MWCNT structural evolution induced by energetic e-beam irradiation leads to faster shrinkage, as revealed via in situ transmission electron microscopy, while MWCNT surface modification with Au NPs (Au-MWCNT) slows down the shrinkage by impeding the structural evolution process for a prolonged time under the same irradiation conditions. The new relationship between MWCNT and Au-MWCNT shrinking radii and irradiation time illustrates that the MWCNT shrinkage rate is faster than either theoretical predictions or the same process in Au-MWCNTs. As compared with the outer surface energy (positive curvature), the inner surface energy (negative curvature) of the MWCNT contributes more to the athermal evaporation of tube wall atoms, leading to structural instability and shrinkage under e-beam irradiation. Conversely, Au NPs possess only outer surface energy (positive curvature) compared with the MWCNT. Their presence on MWCNT surfaces retards the dynamics of MWCNT structural evolution by slowing down the evaporation process of carbon atoms, thus restricting Au-MWCNT shrinkage. Au NP interaction and growth evolves athermally on MWCNT surfaces, exhibits increase in their size, and indicates the association of this mechanism with the coalescence induced by e-beam activated electronic excitations. Despite their growth, Au NPs show extreme structural stability, and remain crystalline under prolonged irradiation. It is proposed that the surface energy of MWCNTs and Au NPs, together with e-beam activated soft modes or lattice instability effects, predominantly govern all the above varieties of structural evolution.

  1. Carbon nanotube conditioning: ab initio simulations of the effect of defects and doping on the electronic properties of carbon nanotube systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Matias; Barrera, Enrique

    Using carbon nanotubes for electrical conduction applications at the macroscale has proven to be a difficult task, mainly, due to defects and impurities present, and lack of uniform electronic properties in synthesized carbon nanotube bundles. Some researchers have suggested that growing only metallic armchair nanotubes and arranging them with an ideal contact length could lead to the ultimate electrical conductivity; however, such recipe presents too high of a cost to pay. A different route and the topic of this work is to learn to manage the defects, impurities, and the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes present, so that the electrical conduction of a bundle or even wire may be enhanced. We used density functional theory calculations to study the effect of defects and doping on the electronic structure of metallic, semi-metal and semiconducting carbon nanotubes in order to gain a clear picture of their properties. Additionally, using dopants to increase the conductance across a junction between two carbon nanotubes was studied for different configurations. Finally, interaction potentials obtained via first-principles calculations were generalized by developing mathematical models for the purpose of running simulations at a larger length scale using molecular dynamics. Partial funding was received from CONACyT Scholarship 314419.

  2. Electronically type-sorted carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensors with glucose oxidase and dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Hitoshi; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Nowaki, Kohei

    2015-01-14

    An electrochemical enzyme biosensor with electronically type-sorted (metallic and semiconducting) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use in aqueous media is presented. This research investigates how the electronic types of SWNTs influence the amperometric response of enzyme biosensors. To conduct a clear evaluation, a simple layer-by-layer process based on a plasma-polymerized nano thin film (PPF) was adopted because a PPF is an inactive matrix that can form a well-defined nanostructure composed of SWNTs and enzyme. For a biosensor with the glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme in the presence of oxygen, the response of a metallic SWNT-GOx electrode was 2 times larger than that of a semiconducting SWNT-GOx electrode. In contrast, in the absence of oxygen, the response of the semiconducting SWNT-GOx electrode was retained, whereas that of the metallic SWNT-GOx electrode was significantly reduced. This indicates that direct electron transfer occurred with the semiconducting SWNT-GOx electrode, whereas the metallic SWNT-GOx electrode was dominated by a hydrogen peroxide pathway caused by an enzymatic reaction. For a biosensor with the glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; oxygen-independent catalysis) enzyme, the response of the semiconducting SWNT-GDH electrode was 4 times larger than that of the metallic SWNT-GDH electrode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to show that the semiconducting SWNT network has less resistance for electron transfer than the metallic SWNT network. Therefore, it was concluded that semiconducting SWNTs are more suitable than metallic SWNTs for electrochemical enzyme biosensors in terms of direct electron transfer as a detection mechanism. This study makes a valuable contribution toward the development of electrochemical biosensors that employ sorted SWNTs and various enzymes.

  3. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  4. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  5. The structural and electronic properties of monovalent sidewall functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Jamali, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► (6,0)-(13,0) DWCNT, built from (6,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs, is a metallic nanotubes. ► NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) and COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) is semimetal and semiconductor, respectively. ► In NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) electrons transferred mainly from inner tube to NH 2 group. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(13,0) double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) and monovalent sidewall functionalized DWCNTs with –NH 2 and –COOH groups were studied using density functional theory. The results show that pure (6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs are metallic. However, by functionalizing a DWCNT, local distortions are induced in the outer tube sidewall along the radial direction. The resulting structures, NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) and COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, exhibit significant structural changes, and are semimetal with no energy gap and semiconducting with a small energy gap, respectively. In NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, new electronic states are created and distributed on the outer wall and NH 2 group by electron transfer from the inner tube to the NH 2 group. In COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, new states are created and distributed on the inner wall, but there is insignificant charge transfer between the inner tube and the COOH group. These results confirm that local atomic structural distortion on DWCNTs caused by sidewall functionalization can modify the electronic structures of DWCNTs.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Conditioning: Ab Initio Simulations of the Effect of Interwall Interaction, Defects And Doping on the Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Matias Soto

    Using carbon nanotubes for electrical conduction applications at the macroscale has been shown to be a difficult task for some time now, mainly, due to defects and impurities present, and lack of uniform electronic properties in synthesized carbon nanotube bundles. Some researchers have suggested that growing only metallic armchair nanotubes and arranging them with an ideal contact length could lead to the ultimate electrical conductivity; however, such recipe presents too high of a cost to pay. A different route is to learn to manage the defects, impurities, and the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes present in bundles grown by current state-of-the-art reactors, so that the electrical conduction of a bundle or even wire may be enhanced. In our work, we have used first-principles density functional theory calculations to study the effect of interwall interaction, defects and doping on the electronic structure of metallic, semi-metal and semiconducting single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes in order to gain a clear picture of their properties. The electronic band gap for a range of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes with chiral indices (5,0) - (30,0) was obtained. Their properties were used as a stepping stone in the study of the interwall interaction in double-walled carbon nanotubes, from which it was found that the electronic band gap depends on the type of inner and outer tubes, average diameter, and interwall distance. The effect of vacancy defects was also studied for a range of single-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that the electronic band gap is reduced for the entire range of zigzag carbon nanotubes, even at vacancy defects concentrations of less than 1%. Finally, interaction potentials obtained via first-principles calculations were generalized by developing mathematical models for the purpose of running simulations at a larger length scale using molecular dynamics of the adsorption doping of diatomic iodine. An ideal adsorption site

  7. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  8. Tunable electronic properties of partially edge-hydrogenated armchair boron-nitrogen-carbon nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaal, Naresh; Medhekar, Nikhil; Shukla, Alok

    2018-04-18

    We employ a first-principles calculations based density-functional-theory (DFT) approach to study the electronic properties of partially and fully edge-hydrogenated armchair boron-nitrogen-carbon (BNC) nanoribbons (ABNCNRs), with widths between 0.85 nm to 2.3 nm. Due to the partial passivation of edges, the electrons, which do not participate in the bonding, form new energy states located near the Fermi-level. Because of these additional bands, some ABNCNRs exhibit metallic behavior, which is quite uncommon in armchair nanoribbons. Our calculations reveal that metallic behavior is observed for the following passivation patterns: (i) when the B atom from one edge and the N atom from another edge are unpassivated. (ii) when the N atoms from both the edges are unpassivated. (iii) when the C atom from one edge and the N atom from another edge are unpassivated. Furthermore, spin-polarization is also observed for certain passivation schemes, which is also quite uncommon for armchair nanoribbons. Thus, our results suggest that the ABNCNRs exhibit a wide range of electronic and magnetic properties in that the fully edge-hydrogenated ABNCNRs are direct band gap semiconductors, while the partially edge-hydrogenated ones are either semiconducting, or metallic, while simultaneously exhibiting spin polarization, based on the nature of passivation. We also find that the ribbons with larger widths are more stable as compared to the narrower ones.

  9. Electronic excitation induced modifications in elongated iron nanoparticle encapsulated multiwalled carbon nanotubes under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikiran, V.; Bazylewski, P.; Sameera, I.; Bhatia, Ravi; Pathak, A. P.; Prasad, V.; Chang, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) filled with Fe nanorods were shown to have contracted and deformed under heavy ion irradiation. In this study, 120 MeV Ag and 80 MeV Ni ion irradiation was performed to study the deformation and defects induced in iron filled MWCNT under heavy ion irradiation. The structural modifications induced due to electronic excitation by ion irradiation were investigated employing high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman scattering experiments, and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. We understand that the ion irradiation causes modifications in the Fe nanorods which result in compressions and expansions of the nanotubes, and in turn leads to the buckling of MWCNT. The G band of the Raman spectra shifts slightly towards higher wavenumber and the shoulder G‧ band enhances with the increase of ion irradiation fluence, where the buckling wavelength depends on the radius 'r' of the nanotubes as exp[(r)0.5]. The intensity ratio of the D to G Raman modes initially decreases at the lowest fluence, and then it increases with the increase in ion fluence. The electron diffraction pattern and the high resolution images clearly show the presence of ion induced defects on the walls of the tube and encapsulated iron nanorods.

  10. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/diamond double-layered structure for improved field electron emission stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@mail.usask.ca; Yang, Q.; Zhang, C.; Li, Y.S.

    2013-12-31

    A double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized on silicon substrate by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition. The synthesis was achieved by first depositing a layer of diamond on silicon and then depositing a top layer of vertically aligned CNTs by applying a negative bias on the substrate holder. The growth of CNTs was catalyzed by a thin layer of spin-coated iron nitride. The surface morphology and structure of the CNTs/diamond double-layered structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrum, and Raman Spectroscopy. Their field electron emission (FEE) properties were measured by KEITHLEY 237 high voltage measurement unit, showing much higher FEE current stability than single layered CNTs. - Highlights: • A new double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned CNTs and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. • This double-layered structure exhibits superior field electron emission stability. • The improvement of emission stability is due to the combination of the unique properties of diamond and CNTs.

  11. Tuning the electronic properties of armchair carbon nanoribbons by a selective boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Santos, P; Ricardo-Chavez, J L; Lopez-Sandoval, R; Reyes-Reyes, M; Rivera, J L

    2010-01-01

    Armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) substitutionally doped with boron atoms are investigated in the framework of first-principles density functional theory. Different boron-boron arrangements and concentrations are considered in order to simulate possible aggregation patterns, their structural stability and electronic behavior are determined as a function of ribbon size. In agreement with previous studies, our results show that the dopant atoms have in general a preference for edge sites, but specific effects appear as a function of concentration that importantly modify the properties of the ribbons compared to the pristine case. Interesting tendencies are discovered as a function of dopant concentration that significantly affect the electronic properties of the ribbons. We have found that BC 3 island formation and edge doping are the most important factors for the structural stabilization of the ribbons with high boron concentration (>7%) whereas for the cases of low boron concentrations ( 3 island patterns give rise to highly localized B states on top of the Fermi level, resulting in semiconducting behavior. On the other hand, when the average distance between the B atoms increases beyond island stoichiometry, the localization of their states is reduced and the ribbons may become metallic due to a band crossing caused by the lowering of the Fermi level resulting from the positive charge doping. Thus, tuning the dopant interaction would be an appropriate way to tailor the electronic properties of the ribbons in a convenient manner in view of potential technological applications.

  12. Healable, Transparent, Room-Temperature Electronic Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Network-Coated Polyelectrolyte Multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shouli; Sun, Chaozheng; Yan, Hong; Sun, Xiaoming; Zhang, Han; Luo, Liang; Lei, Xiaodong; Wan, Pengbo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-11-18

    Transparent and conductive film based electronics have attracted substantial research interest in various wearable and integrated display devices in recent years. The breakdown of transparent electronics prompts the development of transparent electronics integrated with healability. A healable transparent chemical gas sensor device is assembled from layer-by-layer-assembled transparent healable polyelectrolyte multilayer films by developing effective methods to cast transparent carbon nanotube (CNT) networks on healable substrates. The healable CNT network-containing film with transparency and superior network structures on self-healing substrate is obtained by the lateral movement of the underlying self-healing layer to bring the separated areas of the CNT layer back into contact. The as-prepared healable transparent film is assembled into healable transparent chemical gas sensor device for flexible, healable gas sensing at room temperature, due to the 1D confined network structure, relatively high carrier mobility, and large surface-to-volume ratio. The healable transparent chemical gas sensor demonstrates excellent sensing performance, robust healability, reliable flexibility, and good transparency, providing promising opportunities for developing flexible, healable transparent optoelectronic devices with the reduced raw material consumption, decreased maintenance costs, improved lifetime, and robust functional reliability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electronic states of carbon alloy catalysts and nitrogen substituent effects on catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Tomoyuki; Ushiyama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, Carbon Alloy Catalysts (CACs) are attracting attention as a candidate for non-platinum-based cathode catalysts in fuel cells. Oxygen reduction reactions at the cathode are divided into two elementary processes, electron transfer and oxygen adsorption. The electron transfer reaction is the rate-determining, and by comparison of energy levels, catalytic activity can be evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, to begin with, adsorption mechanism is obscure. The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of nitrogen substitution and oxygen adsorption mechanism, by first-principle electronic structure calculations for nitrogen substituted models. To reproduce the elementary processes of oxygen adsorption, we assumed that the initial structures are formed based on the Pauling model, a CACs model and nitrogen substituted CACs models in which various points are replaced with nitrogen. When we try to focus only on the DOS peaks of oxygen, in some substituted model that has high adsorption activity, a characteristic partial occupancy state was found. We conclude that this state will affect the adsorption activity, and discuss on why partially occupied states appear with simplification by using an orbital correlation diagram.

  14. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of electronic properties of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Azadi, Sam

    2008-09-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory we investigated the structural and electronic properties of semiconducting (7, 0), (8, 0) and (10, 0) carbon nanotube bundles. The energetic and electronic evolutions of nanotubes in the bundling process are also studied. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of semiconducting carbon nanotube bundles are demonstrated. Our results show that the inter-tube coupling decreases the energy gap in semiconducting nanotubes. We found that bundles of (7, 0) and (8, 0) carbon nanotubes have metallic feature, while (10, 0) bundle is a semiconductor with an energy gap of 0.22 eV. To clarify our results the band structures of isolated and bundled nanotubes are compared.

  15. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  16. Electron transfer mediators accelerated the microbiologically influence corrosion against carbon steel by nitrate reducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Yang, Dongqing; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-12-01

    Electron transfer is a rate-limiting step in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by microbes that utilize extracellular electrons. Cross-cell wall electron transfer is necessary to transport the electrons released from extracellular iron oxidation into the cytoplasm of cells. Electron transfer mediators were found to accelerate the MIC caused by sulfate reducing bacteria. However, there is no publication in the literature showing the effect of electron transfer mediators on MIC caused by nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This work demonstrated that the corrosion of anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) grown as a nitrate reducing bacterium biofilm on C1018 carbon steel was enhanced by two electron transfer mediators, riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) separately during a 7-day incubation period. The addition of either 10ppm (w/w) (26.6μM) riboflavin or 10ppm (12.7μM) FAD did not increase planktonic cell counts, but they increased the maximum pit depth on carbon steel coupons considerably from 17.5μm to 24.4μm and 25.0μm, respectively. Riboflavin and FAD also increased the specific weight loss of carbon steel from 2.06mg/cm 2 to 2.34mg/cm 2 and 2.61mg/cm 2 , respectively. Linear polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves all corroborated the pitting and weight loss data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electron transport determines the electrochemical properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomäki, Tommi; Wester, Niklas; Caro, Miguel A.; Sainio, Sami; Protopopova, Vera; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous carbon based electrodes are very promising for electrochemical sensing applications. In order to better understand their structure-function relationship, the effect of film thickness on the electrochemical properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) electrodes was investigated. ta-C thin films of 7, 15, 30, 50 and 100 nm were characterized in detail with Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to assess (i) the surface properties of the films, (ii) the effect of film thickness on their structure and electrical properties and (iii) the subsequent correlation with their electrochemistry. The electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using two different outer-sphere redox probes, Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+/2+ and FcMeOH, and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Computational simulations using density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to rationalize the experimental findings. The characterization results showed that the sp 2 /sp 3 ratio increased with decreasing ta-C film thickness. This correlated with a decrease in mobility gap value and an increase in the average current through the films, which was also consistent with the computational results. XAS indicated that the surface of the ta-C films was always identical and composed of a sp 2 -rich layer. The CV measurements indicated reversible reaction kinetics for both outer-sphere redox probes at 7 and 15 nm ta-C films with a change to quasi-reversible behavior at a thickness of around 30 nm. The charge transfer resistance, obtained from EIS measurements, decreased with decreasing film thickness in accordance with the CV results. Based on the characterization and electrochemical results, we conclude that the reaction kinetics in the case of outer-sphere redox systems is determined mainly by the electron transport through the

  18. The reactions of loaded carbon nanotubes, studied by novel electron microscope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawcliffe, A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel electron microscope technique, controlled environment transmission electron microscopy (CETEM), has been used to investigate the reaction of materials loaded within the internal cavities of carbon nanotubes. CETEM allows the introduction of up to 20 mbar of gas around an electron microscope sample, while maintaining a high resolution imaging capability. The microscope is stable, flexible and reliable under these conditions and high resolution images of encapsulated transmission metal oxide reduction have been recorded at 460 deg. C. Recently discovered carbon nanotubes have in theory many applications, many of which will require controlled reliable loading of the internal cavity. However, at present, there is little experimental evidence to confirm theoretical descriptions of the fundamental mechanisms which govern both the extent of loading and the state in which it is found. Similarly, reaction within the cavity and the effect of encapsulation on the nano-scale particle distribution must also be understood, and CETEM proves to be an ideal technique for the study of these processes. Nanotubes have been loaded from aqueous solution with (NH 4 ) 2 IrCI 6 and with molten MoO 3 or K 2 WO 4 /WO 3 . Bulk samples of the first salt are known to decompose spontaneously in air at 200 deg. C, and the bulk oxides are partially reduced at temperature under hydrogen to give potentially useful conducting phases. Comparing the reaction of these materials it is thus possible to: investigate the effect of loading on their reaction; compare the reaction of these materials in- and out-side the tube cavity; and assess the result of violent loading processes on the tubes themselves. Fortuitously, a spontaneous decomposition, a solid-gas reduction and a phase rearrangement were all recorded, allowing mechanistic implications of encapsulation to be considered for each of these reactions. Perhaps surprisingly, the results can be largely interpreted using the reported bulk

  19. Structure and electronic properties of molybdenum monatomic wires encapsulated in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GarcIa-Fuente, A; Vega, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica. Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); GarcIa-Suarez, V M; Ferrer, J [Departamento de Fisica and CINN, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-07-06

    Monatomic chains of molybdenum encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different chiralities are investigated using density functional theory. We determine the optimal size of the CNT for encapsulating a single atomic wire, as well as the most stable atomic arrangement adopted by the wire. We also study the transport properties in the ballistic regime by computing the transmission coefficients and tracing them back to the electronic conduction channels of the wire and the host. We predict that CNTs of appropriate radii encapsulating a Mo wire have metallic behavior, even if both the nanotube and the wire are insulators. Therefore, encapsulation of Mo wires in CNTs is a way to create conductive quasi-one-dimensional hybrid nanostructures.

  20. Electrografting of diazonium-functionalized polyoxometalates: synthesis, immobilisation and electron-transfer characterisation from glassy carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinfray, Corentin; Izzet, Guillaume; Pinson, Jean; Gam Derouich, Sarra; Ganem, Jean-Jacques; Combellas, Catherine; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Proust, Anna

    2013-10-04

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are attractive candidates for the rational design of multi-level charge-storage materials because they display reversible multi-step reduction processes in a narrow range of potentials. The functionalization of POMs allows for their integration in hybrid complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)/molecular devices, provided that fine control of their immobilisation on various substrates can be achieved. Owing to the wide applicability of the diazonium route to surface modification, a functionalized Keggin-type POM [PW11 O39 {Ge(p-C6 H4 -CC-C6 H4 -${{\\rm N}{{+\\hfill \\atop 2\\hfill}}}$)}](3-) bearing a pending diazonium group was prepared and subsequently covalently anchored onto a glassy carbon electrode. Electron transfer with the immobilised POM was thoroughly investigated and compared to that of the free POM in solution. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Single electron detachment of carbon group and oxygen group elements incident on helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongyi; Li Guangwu; Gao Yinghui; Yang Enbo; Gao Mei; Lu Fuquan; Zhang Xuemei

    2006-01-01

    The absolute single electron detachment (SED) cross sections of carbon group elements C - , Si - , Ge - in the energy range of 0.05-0.29 a.u. (5 keV-30 keV) and oxygen group elements O - and S - 0.08-0.27 a.u. (5 keV-30 keV), incident on helium are measured with growth rate method. In our energy region, the SED cross sections of C - , Si - , S - and Ge - increase with the projectiles velocity, at the same time, O - cross sections reach a conspicuous maximum at 0.18 a.u. Some abnormal behavior occurs in measurement of SED cross sections for the oxygen group collision with helium. Our results have been compared with a previous work

  2. Thin films of amorphous nitrogenated carbon a-CN{sub x}: Electron transfer and surface reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamiasso-Martinhon, P.; Cachet, H.; Debiemme-Chouvy, C.; Deslouis, C. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, CNRS, UPR15-LISE, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France)

    2008-08-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of thin films of nitrogenated amorphous carbon a-CN{sub x} is similar to that of boron-doped diamond, with a wide potential window in aqueous media. They are elaborated by cathodic sputtering of a graphite target in an Ar-N{sub 2} active plasma for varying nitrogen contents, determined by XPS (0.06 {<=} x {<=} 0.39). Their electrochemical reactivity is sensitive to the surface state. The present study reports on the influence of electrochemical pre treatment on the electronic transfer rate of a fast redox system ferri-ferrocyanide, by focusing on the direction of the potential excursion. On the other hand, the role of both the pH and the potential on the interfacial capacitance in the presence of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} without redox species is documented. The results show up the sensitivity of the film surface to the electrochemical conditions. (author)

  3. The drift velocity of electrons in carbon dioxide at temperatures between 193 and 573 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elford, M.T.; Haddad, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The drift velocity of electrons in carbon dioxide has been measured at gas temperatures ranging from 193 to 573 K and at E/N values up to 20 Td at 193 K, 50 Td at 293 K and 40 Td at 573 K. The measured drift velocities were found to decrease linearly with increasing gas number density at a given value of E/N for gas temperatures less than 293 K. This dependence has been attributed to multiple scattering and the data have been extrapolated to zero number density to correct for this effect. Comparisons are made with previous measurements where available. The present data for the variation of μN(thermal) with temperature agree to within the experimental error with the data of Pact et al. (1962)

  4. High resolution electron microscopy study of as-prepared and annealed tungsten-carbon multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Gronsky, R.; Kortright, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    A series of sputtered tungsten-carbon multilayer structures with periods ranging from 2 to 12 nm in the as-prepared state and after annealing at 500/degree/C for 4 hours has been studied with high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The evolution with annealing of the microstructure of these multilayers depends on their period. As-prepared structures appear predominantly amorphous from TEM imaging and diffraction. Annealing results in crystallization of the W-rich layers into WC in the larger period samples, and less complete or no crystallization in the smaller period samples. X-ray scattering reveals that annealing expands the period in a systematic way. The layers remain remarkably well-defined after annealing under these conditions. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Electron-shading effect on the horizontal aligned growth of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Yang; Xiao Zhiyong; Chan, Philip C. H.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the well-accepted electron-shading theory during plasma processing, we designed microstructures to control the local built-in electric-field on the substrate surface. The distortion magnitude of the electric-field is largest near the sidewalls of the microstructures, creating a horizontal electric-field in this region. We showed that the horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by making use of this built-in electric-field during the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process, with a tactical choice of geometries and materials of the microstructures on the substrate. This technique opens up a way to selectively and controllably grow horizontally aligned CNTs on the substrate surface

  6. Absorption and stimulated emission between the electronic states of C and C_2 radicals in an expanding thermal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otorbaev, D.K.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Buuron, A.J.M.; Schram, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Using the method of reabsorption the absolute densities of argon, atomic and molecular carbon are determined during the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated (diamond-like) carbon coatings by an expanding thermal are plasma. Depending on the gas mixture argon/methane or argon/acetylene and the manner

  7. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  8. Newton Output Blocking Force under Low-Voltage Stimulation for Carbon Nanotube-Electroactive Polymer Composite Artificial Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Wen Peter; Yang, Ming-Chia; Yang, Chia-Hui; Zhong, Dai-Xuan; Hsu, Ming-Chun; Chen, YiWen

    2017-02-15

    This is a study on the development of carbon nanotube-based composite actuators using a new ionic liquid-doped electroactive ionic polymer. For scalable production purposes, a simple hot-pressing method was used. Carbon nanotube/ionic liquid-Nafion/carbon nanotube composite films were fabricated that exhibited a large output blocking force and a stable cycling life with low alternating voltage stimuli in air. Of particular interest and importance, a blocking force of 1.5 N was achieved at an applied voltage of 6 V. Operational durability was confirmed by testing in air for over 30 000 cycles (or 43 h). The superior actuation performance of the carbon nanotube/ionic liquid-Nafion/carbon nanotube composite, coupled with easy manufacturability, low driving voltage, and reliable operation, promises great potential for artificial muscle and biomimetic applications.

  9. The effect of promoters on the electronic structure of ruthenium catalysts supported on carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guraya, Monica; Sprenger, Susanne; Rarog-Pilecka, Wioletta; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Kowalczyk, Zbigniew; Muhler, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Alkali- and earth-alkali-promoted ruthenium catalysts supported on graphitized carbon were investigated by means of X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) in order to study the effect of promoters on the electronic structure of this metal-support system. Samples were measured as prepared and after thorough reduction in hydrogen. The C 1s spectra of reduced alkali-promoted catalysts showed a shift towards higher binding energies and an asymmetric broadening. Neither non-promoted nor Ba-promoted Ru/C samples exhibited such a behaviour after similar treatments. The most important feature in the UP spectra of the reduced alkali-promoted catalysts was the appearance of a well defined Fermi edge absent in the semimetal-like electronic structure of graphite. No significant effects appeared in the case of non-promoted or Ba-promoted catalysts. The increase in the density of occupied states at the Fermi energy indicates a shift of this level into the conduction band, due to a charge transfer from the promoter to the support. This interpretation also provides an explanation for the observed higher C 1s binding energy and asymmetric broadening, due to the off-set introduced in the binding energy scale and the increasing probability of inelastic excitations near the Fermi level. In addition to photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy ion scattering (ISS) was used to obtain information about the localisation of the promoters. Based on the mild sputtering effect during prolonged series of spectra, it was possible to conclude that potassium covers both the carbon support and the Ru metal particles

  10. Asymmetric carbon nanotube–MnO2 two-ply yarn supercapacitors for wearable electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Fenghua; Miao, Menghe

    2014-01-01

    Strong and flexible two-ply carbon nanotube yarn supercapacitors are electrical double layer capacitors that possess relatively low energy storage capacity. Pseudocapacitance metal oxides such as MnO 2 are well known for their high electrochemical performance and can be coated on carbon nanotube yarns to significantly improve the performance of two-ply carbon nanotube yarn supercapacitors. We produced a high performance asymmetric two-ply yarn supercapacitor from as-spun CNT yarn and CNT@MnO 2 composite yarn in aqueous electrolyte. The as-spun CNT yarn serves as negative electrode and the CNT@MnO 2 composite yarn as positive electrode. This asymmetric architecture allows the operating potential window to be extended from 1.0 to 2.0 V and results in much higher energy and power densities than the reference symmetric two-ply yarn supercapacitors, reaching 42.0 Wh kg −1 at a lower power density of 483.7 W kg −1 , and 28.02 Wh kg −1 at a higher power density of 19 250 W kg −1 . The asymmetric supercapacitor can sustain cyclic charge–discharge and repeated folding/unfolding actions without suffering significant deterioration of specific capacitance. The combination of high strength, flexibility and electrochemical performance makes the asymmetric two-ply yarn supercapacitor a suitable power source for flexible electronic devices for applications that require high durability and wearer comfort. (paper)

  11. Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Carbonic Anhydrase: Transition Metal Ions and Spin-Labeled Sulfonamides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, June S.; Mushak, Paul; Coleman, Joseph E.

    1970-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (esr) spectra of Cu(II) and Co(II) carbonic anhydrase, and a spin-labeled sulfonamide complex of the Zn(II) enzyme, are reported. The coordination geometry of Cu(II) bound in the enzyme appears to have approximately axial symmetry. Esr spectra of enzyme complexes with metal-binding anions also show axial symmetry and greater covalency, in the order ethoxzolamide cyanide complex suggests the presence of two, and probably three, equivalent nitrogen ligands from the protein. Esr spectra of the Co(II) enzyme and its complexes show two types of Co(II) environment, one typical of the native enzyme and the 1:1 CN- complex, and one typical of a 2:1 CN- complex. Co(II) in the 2:1 complex appears to be low-spin and probably has a coordination number of 5. Binding of a spin-labeled sulfonamide to the active center immobilizes the free radical. The similarity of the esr spectra of spin-labeled Zn(II) and Co(II) carbonic anhydrases suggests that the conformation at the active center is similar in the two metal derivatives. PMID:4320976

  12. Eco-friendly all-carbon paper electronics fabricated by a solvent-free drawing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaparthi, Srinivasulu; Badhulika, Sushmee

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication of high-performance all-carbon temperature and infrared (IR) sensors with a solvent-free multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) trace as the sensing element and commercial graphite pencil trace as the electrical contact on recyclable and biodegradable cellulose filter paper without using any toxic materials or complex procedures. The temperature sensor shows a large negative temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) in the range of −3100 ppm K −1 to −4900 ppm K −1 , which is comparable to available commercial temperature sensors, and an activation energy of 34.85 meV. The IR sensor shows a high responsivity of 58.5 V W −1 , which is greater than reported IR sensors with similar dimensions. A detailed study of the conduction mechanism in MWCNTs with temperature and the photo response with IR illumination was done and it was found that the conduction is due to thermally assisted hopping in band tails and the photo response is bolometric in nature. The successful fabrication of these sensors on cellulose filter paper with a comparable performance to existing components indicates that it is possible to fabricate high-performance electronics using low-cost, eco-friendly materials without the need for expensive clean-room processing techniques or harmful chemicals. (paper)

  13. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  14. The influence of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putro, Triswantoro, E-mail: tris@physics.its.ac.id; Endarko, E-mail: endarko@physics.its.ac.id [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS), Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    The influences of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation in water have been successfully investigated. The study used three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T whilst the electron discharge was generated from television flyback transformer type BW00607 and stainless steel SUS 304 as an electrode. The water sample with an initial condition of 230 mg/L placed in the reactor with flow rate 375 mL/minutes, result showed that the electron discharge can be reduced contain of calcium carbonate the water sample around 17.39% within 2 hours. Meanwhile for the same long period of treatment and flow rate, around 56.69% from initial condition of 520 mg/L of calcium carbonate in the water sample can be achieved by three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T. When the combination of three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T and the electron discharge used for treatment, the result showed that the combination of electron discharge and magnetic field methods can be used to precipitate calcium carbonate in the water sample 300 mg/L around 76.66% for 2 hours of treatment. The study then investigated the influence of the polar position of the magnetic field on calcium carbonate precipitation. Two positions of magnetic field were tested namely the system with alternated polar magnetics and the system without inversion of the polar magnetics. The influence of the polar position showed that the percentage reduction in levels of calcium carbonate in the water sample (360 mg/L) is significant different. Result showed that the system without inversion of the polar magnetics is generally lower than the system with alternated polar magnetics, with reduction level at 30.55 and 57.69%, respectively.

  15. Recent Experimental Results on Amorphous Carbon Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, C; Chiggiato, P; Costa Pinto, P; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Vollenberg, W

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films, produced in different coating configurations by using DC magnetron sputtering, have been investigated in laboratory for low secondary electron yield (SEY) applications. After the coatings had shown a reliable low initial SEY, the a-C thin films have been applied in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and tested with Large Hadron Collider (LHC) type beams.Currently, we have used a-C thin film coated in so-called liner configuration for the electron cloud monitors. In addition the vacuum chambers of three dipole magnets have been coated and inserted into the machine. After describing the different configurations used for the coatings, results of the tests in the machine and a summary of the analyses after extraction will be presented. Based on comparison between different coating configurations, a new series of coatings has been applied on three further dipole magnet vacuum chambers. They have been installed and will be tested in coming machine development runs.

  16. Annealing effects of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy resin composites irradiated by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Akira; Sasuga, Tuneo; Ito, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1987-01-01

    Carbon cloth-reinforced epoxy resin composites were irradiated with 2 MeV electrons at room temperature and then annealed in air for 2 h at temperatures up to 180 deg C. A considerable decrease in the three-point bending strength occurred when the irradiated composites were annealed in the temperature range of 115 - 135 deg C which is below the glass transition temperature T g of the matrix resin, while the bending strength remained unchanged up to 180 deg C for the unirradiated composites. In the dynamic viscoelastic spectra of the irradiated matrix, a new relaxation appeared at the temperature extending from 50 deg C to just below the matrix T g and disappeared on annealing for 2 h at 135 deg C. Annealing also decreased the concentration of free radicals existing stably in the irradiated matrix at room temperature. After annealing, a large amount of clacks and voids were observed in the fractography of the composites by scanning electron microscopy. These results indicate: (1) Annealing brings about rearrangement of the radiation-induced molecular chain scission in the matrix; (2) The bending strength of the irradiated composites decreased owing to the increased brittleness of the matrix by annealing. (author)

  17. Carbon Nanofiber versus Graphene-Based Stretchable Capacitive Touch Sensors for Artificial Electronic Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, Pietro; Dussoni, Simeone; Ceseracciu, Luca; Maggiali, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Metta, Giorgio; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Bayer, Ilker S

    2018-02-01

    Stretchable capacitive devices are instrumental for new-generation multifunctional haptic technologies particularly suited for soft robotics and electronic skin applications. A majority of elongating soft electronics still rely on silicone for building devices or sensors by multiple-step replication. In this study, fabrication of a reliable elongating parallel-plate capacitive touch sensor, using nitrile rubber gloves as templates, is demonstrated. Spray coating both sides of a rubber piece cut out of a glove with a conductive polymer suspension carrying dispersed carbon nanofibers (CnFs) or graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) is sufficient for making electrodes with low sheet resistance values (≈10 Ω sq -1 ). The electrodes based on CnFs maintain their conductivity up to 100% elongation whereas the GnPs-based ones form cracks before 60% elongation. However, both electrodes are reliable under elongation levels associated with human joints motility (≈20%). Strikingly, structural damages due to repeated elongation/recovery cycles could be healed through annealing. Haptic sensing characteristics of a stretchable capacitive device by wrapping it around the fingertip of a robotic hand (ICub) are demonstrated. Tactile forces as low as 0.03 N and as high as 5 N can be easily sensed by the device under elongation or over curvilinear surfaces.

  18. Comparison of Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties of Few Layer Graphene and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhar Chandra Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study has been made for the non-catalyst based few layer graphene (FLG and Fe-catalyst based multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Magnetic and electronic properties of FLG and MWCNTs were studied using magnetic M-H hysteresis loops and synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements. Structural defects and electronic and bonding properties of FLG/MWCNTs have been studied using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS. The work functions of FLG and MWCNTs are 4.01 eV and 3.79 eV, respectively, obtained from UPS (He-I spectra. UPS (He-II results suggest that the density of states (DOS of MWCNTs is higher than FLG and is consistent with Raman spectroscopy result that shows the defect of MWCNTs is higher than FLG. The magnetic coercivity (Hc of the MWCNTs (~750 Oe is higher than FLG (~85 Oe which could be used for various technological magnetic applications.

  19. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Wako, K; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-25

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C(60) and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  20. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Wako, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Xiong Qihua

    2010-01-01

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C 60 and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  1. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-02

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  2. Mediatorless electron transfer in glucose dehydrogenase/laccase system adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratautas, D.; Marcinkevičienė, L.; Meškys, R.; Kulys, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Glucose dehydrogenase from Ewingella americana (GDH) demonstrated an effective mediatorless oxidation of glucose on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). • Laccase from Trichaptum abietinum (LAC) exhibited mediatorless oxygen reduction when the enzyme was adsorbed on SWCNT. • Simultaneous adsorption of GDH and LAC on SWCNT formed an electron transfer chain in which glucose and lactose were oxidized by oxygen in mediatorless manner. - Abstract: A mediatorless electron transfer in the chain of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and laccase (LAC) catalysing the oxidation of glucose by molecular oxygen was studied. To demonstrate mediatorless processes, the GDH from Ewingella americana was adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The effective mediatorless oxidation of glucose proceeded at 0.2–0.4 V vs. SCE. The electrode was most active at pH 6.1, and generated 0.8 mA cm −2 biocatalytic current in the presence of 50 mM glucose. The electrode showed a bell-shaped pH dependence with pK a values of 4.1 and 7.5. LAC from Trichaptum abietinum adsorbed on SWCNT exhibited mediatorless oxygen reduction at electrode potential less than 0.65 V. The electrode was most active at pH 3.0–4.0 and generated 1.1 mA cm −2 biocatalytic current in the presence of 0.254 mM oxygen, with an apparent pK a of 1.0 and 5.4. The electrodes prepared by simultaneous adsorption of GDH and LAC on SWCNT exhibited glucose oxidation at a potential higher than 0.25 V. The oxygen consumption in the chain was demonstrated using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. The dependence of oxygen consumption on glucose and lactose concentrations as well as activity of the system on pH were measured. A model of the pH dependence as well as mediatorless consecutive glucose oxidation with oxygen catalysed by LAC/GDH system is presented. This work provides a novel approach towards the synthesis of artificial multi enzyme systems by wiring oxidoreductases with SWCNT, and offers a better

  3. Tuning the electronic properties of armchair carbon nanoribbons by a selective boron doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Santos, P; Ricardo-Chavez, J L; Lopez-Sandoval, R [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, San Luis Potosi 78216 (Mexico); Reyes-Reyes, M [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi 78000 (Mexico); Rivera, J L, E-mail: sandov@ipicyt.edu.m [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Santiago Tapia 403, Morelia, Michoacan, 58000 (Mexico)

    2010-12-22

    Armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) substitutionally doped with boron atoms are investigated in the framework of first-principles density functional theory. Different boron-boron arrangements and concentrations are considered in order to simulate possible aggregation patterns, their structural stability and electronic behavior are determined as a function of ribbon size. In agreement with previous studies, our results show that the dopant atoms have in general a preference for edge sites, but specific effects appear as a function of concentration that importantly modify the properties of the ribbons compared to the pristine case. Interesting tendencies are discovered as a function of dopant concentration that significantly affect the electronic properties of the ribbons. We have found that BC{sub 3} island formation and edge doping are the most important factors for the structural stabilization of the ribbons with high boron concentration (>7%) whereas for the cases of low boron concentrations (<5%) the structural stabilities are similar. For all the doped cases, we have found that the BC{sub 3} island patterns give rise to highly localized B states on top of the Fermi level, resulting in semiconducting behavior. On the other hand, when the average distance between the B atoms increases beyond island stoichiometry, the localization of their states is reduced and the ribbons may become metallic due to a band crossing caused by the lowering of the Fermi level resulting from the positive charge doping. Thus, tuning the dopant interaction would be an appropriate way to tailor the electronic properties of the ribbons in a convenient manner in view of potential technological applications.

  4. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping 58183 (Sweden); Bergsten, J.; Rorsman, N. [Microwave Electronics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg 41296 (Sweden)

    2015-12-28

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  5. Superhard sp{sup 2}–sp{sup 3} hybrid carbon allotropes with tunable electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Meng; Ma, Mengdong; Zhao, Zhisheng; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong, E-mail: hjl@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Four sp{sup 2}–sp{sup 3} hybrid carbon allotropes are proposed on the basis of first principles calculations. These four carbon allotropes are energetically more favorable than graphite under suitable pressure conditions. They can be assembled from graphite through intralayer wrinkling and interlayer buckling, which is similar to the formation of diamond from graphite. For one of the sp{sup 2}–sp{sup 3} hybrid carbon allotropes, mC24, the electron diffraction patterns match these of i-carbon, which is synthesized from shock-compressed graphite (H. Hirai and K. Kondo, Science, 1991, 253, 772). The allotropes exhibit tunable electronic characteristics from metallic to semiconductive with band gaps comparable to those of silicon allotropes. They are all superhard materials with Vickers hardness values comparable to that of cubic BN. The sp{sup 2}–sp{sup 3} hybrid carbon allotroes are promising materials for photovoltaic electronic devices, and abrasive and grinding tools.

  6. Growth Termination and Multiple Nucleation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Evidenced by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2017-01-01

    and successive growth of additional SWCNTs on Co catalyst particles supported on MgO by means of environmental transmission electron microscopy. Such in situ observations reveal the plethora of solid carbon formations at the local scale while it is happening and thereby elucidate the multitude of configurations...

  7. Light-harvesting dendrimer zinc-phthalocyanines chromophores labeled single-wall carbon nanotube nanoensembles: Synthesis and photoinduced electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hongqin [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education and Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Pan, Sujuan; Ma, Dongdong; He, Dandan; Wang, Yuhua [College of Chemistry & Engineering, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Xie, Shusen [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education and Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Peng, Yiru, E-mail: yirupeng@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry & Engineering, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-11-15

    A novel series of light-harvesting dendrimer zinc-phthalocyanines chromophores labeled-single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) nanoparticles, in which 0–2 generations dendrimer zinc phthalocyanines covalently linked with SWNTs using either ethylenediamine or hexamethylenediamine as the space linkers were prepared. The structures and morphologies of these nanoconjugates were comprehensively characterized by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis methods. Their photophysical properties were investigated by fluorescence and time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer occurred from phthalocyanines (donors) to SWNTs (acceptors). Besides, the electron transfer exchange rates and exchange efficacies between the dendritic phthalocyanines and single-wall carbon nanotubes increased as the length of spacer linker decreased, or as the dendritic generation increased. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) method further confirmed thermodynamics possibility of the electron transfer from phthalocyanines to single-wall carbon nanotubes. These new nanoconjugates are fundamentally important due to the synergy effects of both carbon nanotubes and dendrimer phthalocyanines, which may find potential applications in the fields of drug delivery, biological labeling, or others.

  8. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  9. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  10. Hierarchical meso/macro-porous carbon fabricated from dual MgO templates for direct electron transfer enzymatic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Hiroto; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tsujimura, Seiya

    2017-03-01

    We designed a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical pore structure to improve the current production efficiency and stability of direct electron transfer-type biocathodes. The 3D hierarchical electrode structure was fabricated using a MgO-templated porous carbon framework produced from two MgO templates with sizes of 40 and 150 nm. The results revealed that the optimal pore composition for a bilirubin oxidase-catalysed oxygen reduction cathode was a mixture of 33% macropores and 67% mesopores (MgOC33). The macropores improve mass transfer inside the carbon material, and the mesopores improve the electron transfer efficiency of the enzyme by surrounding the enzyme with carbon.

  11. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  12. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO 2 . Finally, author's comments for CO 2 electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  13. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  14. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Carbon sources, nitrate as electron acceptor, and characterization of the sludge community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensson, M

    1997-10-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was studied in laboratory scale experiments as well as in a full scale EBPR process. The studies were focused on carbon source transformations, the use of nitrate as an electron acceptor and characterisation of the microflora. A continuous anaerobic/aerobic laboratory system was operated on synthetic wastewater with acetate as sole carbon source. An efficient EBPR was obtained and mass balances over the anaerobic reactor showed a production of 1.45 g poly-{beta}-hydroxyalcanoic acids (PHA), measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), per g of acetic acid (as COD) taken up. Furthermore, phosphate was released in the anaerobic reactor in a ratio of 0.33 g phosphorus (P) per g PHA (COD) formed and 0.64 g of glycogen (COD) was consumed per g of acetic acid (COD) taken up. Microscopic investigations revealed a high amount of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) in the sludge. Isolation and characterisation of bacteria indicated Acinetobacter spp. to be abundant in the sludge, while sequencing of clones obtained in a 16S rDNA clone library showed a large part of the bacteria to be related to the high mole % G+C Gram-positive bacteria and only a minor fraction to be related to the gamma-subclass of proteobacteria to which Acinetobacter belongs. Operation of a similar anaerobic/aerobic laboratory system with ethanol as sole carbon source showed that a high EBPR can be achieved with this compound as carbon source. However, a prolonged detention time in the anaerobic reactor was required. PHA were produced in the anaerobic reactor in an amount of 1.24 g COD per g of soluble DOC taken up, phosphate was released in an amount of 0.4-0.6 g P per g PHA (COD) produced and 0.46 g glycogen (COD) was consumed per g of soluble COD taken up. Studies of the EBPR in the UCT process at the sewage treatment plant in Helsingborg, Sweden, showed the amount of volatile fatty acids (VFA) available to the PAO in the anaerobic stage to be

  15. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB2 superconductor nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin; Häßler, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB 2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp 3 -hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature T c was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Koc University, RumelifeneriYolu, Sariyer, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdem, Emre, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin [Pavezyum Kimya Sanayi Dış Ticaret LTD. ŞTI., Tuzla, Istanbul (Turkey); Häßler, Wolfgang [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden (IFW), P.O. Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature T{sub c} was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra.

  18. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy characterization and microwave absorption of iron-filled carbon-nitrogen nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Renchao; Liang Chongyun; Shi Honglong; Zhou Xingui; Yang Xinan

    2007-01-01

    Iron-filled carbon-nitrogen (Fe/CN x ) nanotubes and iron-filled carbon (Fe/C) nanotubes were synthesized at 900 deg. C through a pyrolysis reaction of ferrocene/acetonitrile and ferrocene/xylene, respectively. The differences of structure and composition between the Fe/CN x nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was found that the morphology of Fe/CN x nanotubes is more corrugated than that of the Fe/C nanotubes due to the incorporation of nitrogen. By comparing the Fe L 2,3 electron energy-loss spectra of Fe/CN x nanotubes to those of the Fe/C nanotubes, the electron states at the interface between Fe and the tubular wall of both Fe/CN x nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated. At the boundary between Fe and the wall of a CN x nanotube, the additional electrons contributed from the doped 'pyridinic-like' nitrogen might transfer to the empty 3d orbital of the encapsulated iron, therefore leading to an intensity suppression of the iron L 2,3 edge and an intensity enhancement of the carbon K edge. However, such an effect could not be found in Fe/C nanotubes. Microwave absorption properties of both Fe/CN x and Fe/C nanocomposites at 2-18 GHz band were studied

  19. Trans-membrane electron transfer in red blood cells immobilized in a chitosan film on a glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chunmei; Wang, Li; Zhu, Zhenkun; Bao, Ning; Gu, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the trans-membrane electron transfer in human red blood cells (RBCs) immobilized in a chitosan film on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Electron transfer results from the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) in the RBCs. The electron transfer rate (k s ) of Hb in RBCs is 0.42 s −1 , and <1.13 s −1 for Hb directly immobilized in the chitosan film. Only Hb molecules in RBCs that are closest to the plasma membrane and the surface of the electrode can undergo electron transfer to the electrode. The immobilized RBCs displayed sensitive electrocatalytic response to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. It is believed that this cellular biosensor is of potential significance in studies on the physiological status of RBCs based on observing their electron transfer on the modified electrode. (author)

  20. Backward and forward electron emission induced by helium projectiles incident on thin carbon foils: Influence of charge changing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: nipauly@ulb.ac.be; Dubus, A. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Roesler, M. [Karl-Pokern-Str. 12, D-12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The backward and forward electron emission yields {gamma} {sub B} and {gamma} {sub F} have been calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for helium (He{sup ++}, He{sup +} or He{sup 0}) ions incident on thin amorphous carbon foils with energies around the electronic stopping power maximum (0.2-2 MeV). Besides the direct excitation of target electrons by the incident projectile, we have taken into account the different charge changing processes (He{sup ++} {r_reversible} He{sup +} {r_reversible} He{sup 0}) undergone by the helium ion in the target. We discuss in particular the connection between the electron emission yield {gamma} and the electronic stopping power (dE/dx){sub e}. We compare our results with previously published experimental results.

  1. Detection of electron and hole traps in CdZnTe radiation detectors by thermoelectric emission spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.Y.; Brunett, B.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Hermon, H.; James, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The electrical properties of CdZnTe radiation detectors are largely determined by electron and hole traps in this material. The traps, in addition to degrading the detector performance, can function as dopants and determine the resistivity of the material. Thermoelectric emission spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity are used to detect these traps in a commercially available spectrometer-grade CdZnTe detector, and the electrical resistivity is measured as a function of temperature. A deep electron trap having an energy of 695 meV and cross section of 8 x 10 -16 cm 2 is detected and three hole traps having energies of 70 ± 20 meV, 105 ± 30 meV and 694 ± 162 meV are detected. A simple model based on these traps explains quantitatively all the data, including the electrical properties at room temperature and also their temperature dependence

  2. WO3 nanorods-modified carbon electrode for sustained electron uptake from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with suppressed biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Feng; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • WO 3 nanorods-modified carbon paper was used as the anode of MFC. • WO 3 nanorods suppressed biofilm growth on the electrode surface. • Sustained electron transfer from cells to electrode via riboflavin was achieved. • C–WO 3 nanorods enable stable and efficient EET process in long-time operation. - Abstract: Carbon materials are widely used as electrodes for bioelectrochemical systems (BES). However, a thick biofilm tends to grow on the electrode surface during continuous operation, resulting in constrained transport of electrons and nutrients at the cell-electrode interface. In this work, we tackled this problem by adopting a WO 3 -nanorods modified carbon electrode (C–WO 3 nanorods), which completely suppressed the biofilm growth of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1. Moreover, the C–WO 3 nanorods exhibited high electric conductivity and strong response to riboflavin. These two factors together make it possible for the C–WO 3 nanorods to maintain a sustained, efficient process of electron transfer from the MR-1 planktonic cells. As a consequence, the microbial fuel cells with C–WO 3 nanorods anode showed more stable performance than the pure carbon paper and WO 3 -nanoparticles systems in prolonged operation. This work suggests that WO 3 nanorods have the potential to be used as a robust and biofouling-resistant electrode material for practical bioelectrochemical applications

  3. Textural and electronic characteristics of mechanochemically activated composites with nanosilica and activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gun’ko, V.M.; Zaulychnyy, Ya.V.; Ilkiv, B.I.; Zarko, V.I.; Nychiporuk, Yu.M.; Pakhlov, E.M.; Ptushinskii, Yu.G.; Leboda, R.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.

    2011-01-01

    Nanosilicas (A-50, A-300, A-500)/activated carbon (AC, S BET = 1520 m 2 /g) composites were prepared using short-term (5 min) mechanochemical activation (MCA) of powder mixtures in a microbreaker. Smaller silica nanoparticles of A-500 (average diameter d av = 5.5 nm) can more easily penetrate into broad mesopores and macropores of AC microparticles than larger nanoparticles of A-50 (d av = 52.4 nm) or A-300 (d av = 8.1 nm). After MCA of silica/AC, nanopores of non-broken AC nanoparticles remained accessible for adsorbed N 2 molecules. According to ultra-soft X-ray emission spectra (USXES), MCA of silica/AC caused formation of chemical bonds Si-O-C; however, Si-C and Si-Si bonds were practically not formed. A decrease in intensity of OK α band in respect to CK α band of silica/AC composites with diminishing sizes of silica nanoparticles is due to both changes in the surface structure of particles and penetration of a greater number of silica nanoparticles into broad pores of AC microparticles and restriction of penetration depth of exciting electron beam into the AC particles.

  4. Role of contact bonding on electronic transport in metal-carbon nanotube-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deretzis, I; La Magna, A

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the interfacial bond arrangement on the electronic transport features of metal-nanotube-metal systems. The transport properties of finite, defect-free armchair and zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes attached to Au(111) metallic contacts have been calculated by means of the non-equilibrium Green functional formalism with the tight-binding and the extended Hueckel Hamiltonians. Our calculations show that the electrode material is not the only factor which rules contact transparency. Indeed, for the same electrode, but changing nanotube helicities, we have observed an overall complex behaviour of the transmission spectra due to band mixing and interference. A comparison of the two models shows that the tight-binding approach fails to give a satisfactory representation of the transmission function when a more accurate description of the C-C and Au-C chemical bonds has to be considered. We have furthermore examined the effect of interface geometry variance on conduction and found that the contact-nanotube distance has a significant impact, while the contact-nanotube symmetry plays a marginal, yet evident role

  5. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses

  6. Analytical evaluation of different carbon sources and growth stimulators on the biomass and lipid production of Chlorella vulgaris – Implications for biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephine, A.; Niveditha, C.; Radhika, A.; Shali, A. Brindha; Kumar, T.S.; Dharani, G.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2015-01-01

    The key challenges in lipid production from marine microalgae include the selection of appropriate strain, optimization of the culture conditions and enhancement of biolipid yield. This study is aimed at evaluating the optimal harvest time and effect of chlorella growth factor (CGF) extract, carbon sources and phytohormones on the biomass and lipid production in Chlorella vulgaris. CGF, extracted using hot water from Chlorella has been reported to possess various medicinal properties. However, in the present study, for the first time in C. vulgaris, CGF was found as a best growth stimulator by enhancing the biomass level (1.208 kg m −3 ) significantly on day 5. Gibberellin and citrate augmented the biomass by 0.935 kg m −3 and 1.025 kg m −3 . Combination of CGF and phytohormones were more effective than CGF and carbon sources. Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters indicated that the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids is higher in cytokinin, abscisic acid and CGF, and are also rich in short chain carbon atoms, ideal criteria for biodiesel. Nitrogen starvation favoured synthesis of more unsaturated fatty acids than saturated. This study shows that CGF enhances the biomass and lipid significantly and thus can be used for large scale biomass production. - Highlights: • Optimization studies revealed 7th day to be the ideal period for harvesting Chlorella vulgaris. • Chlorella growth factor extract acted as a chief growth promoting factor of C. vulgaris. • Chlorella growth factor with carbon sources or phytohormones was not effective than chlorella growth factor extract alone. • Cytokinin treatment increased saturated fatty acids level, although the biomass production was not significant

  7. Understanding the electron-stimulated surface reactions of organometallic complexes to enable design of precursors for electron beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Julie A.; Rosenberg, Samantha G.; Barclay, Michael; Fairbrother, D. Howard [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wu, Yung-Chien; McElwee-White, Lisa [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Standard practice in electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) is to use precursors designed for thermal processes, such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD). However, organometallic precursors that yield pure metal deposits in CVD often create EBID deposits with high levels of organic contamination. This contamination negatively impacts the deposit's properties (e.g., by increasing resistivity or decreasing catalytic activity) and severely limits the range of potential applications for metal-containing EBID nanostructures. To provide the information needed for the rational design of precursors specifically for EBID, we have employed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) surface science approach to identify the elementary reactions of organometallic precursors during EBID. These UHV studies have demonstrated that the initial electron-induced deposition of the surface-bound organometallic precursors proceeds through desorption of one or more of the ligands present in the parent compound. In specific cases, this deposition step has been shown to proceed via dissociative electron attachment, involving low-energy secondary electrons generated by the interaction of the primary beam with the substrate. Electron beam processing of the surface-bound species produced in the initial deposition event usually causes decomposition of the residual ligands, creating nonvolatile fragments. This process is believed to be responsible for a significant fraction of the organic contaminants typically observed in EBID nanostructures. A few ligands (e.g., halogens) can, however, desorb during electron beam processing while other ligands (e.g., PF{sub 3}, CO) can thermally desorb if elevated substrate temperatures are used during deposition. Using these general guidelines for reactivity, we propose some design strategies for EBID precursors. The ultimate goal is to minimize organic contamination and thus overcome the key bottleneck for fabrication of relatively pure EBID nanostructures. (orig.)

  8. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8 and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4, respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  9. The monolithic carbon aerogels and aerogel composites for electronics and thermal protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Guo, Hui; Zhou, Yugui; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Zhaoguo; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yingmin

    2017-09-01

    Monolithic carbon aerogels have been prepared by condensation polymerization and high temperature pyrolysis. The morphology of carbon aerogels are characterized by SEM. The pore structure is characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption technique. Monolithic carbon aerogels are mesoporous nanomaterials. Carbon fiber reinforced carbon aerogel composites are prepared by in-situ sol-gel process. Fiber reinforced carbon aerogel composites are of high mechanical strength. The thermal response of the fiber reinforced aerogel composite samples are tested in an arc plasma wind tunnel. Carbon aerogel composites show good thermal insulation capability and high temperature resistance in inert atmosphere even at ultrahigh temperature up to 1800 °C. The results show that they are suitable for applications in electrodes for supercapacitors/ Lithium-ion batteries and aerospace thermal protection area.

  10. Electronic Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube Networks: The Effect of Nitrate Doping on Intratube and Intertube Conductances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketolainen, T.; Havu, V.; Jónsson, E. Ö.; Puska, M. J.

    2018-03-01

    The conductivity of carbon-nanotube (CNT) networks can be improved markedly by doping with nitric acid. In the present work, CNTs and junctions of CNTs functionalized with NO3 molecules are investigated to understand the microscopic mechanism of nitric acid doping. According to our density-functional-theory band-structure calculations, there is charge transfer from the CNT to adsorbed molecules indicating p -type doping. The average doping efficiency of the NO3 molecules is higher if the NO3 molecules form complexes with water molecules. In addition to electron transport along individual CNTs, we also study electron transport between different types (metallic, semiconducting) of CNTs. Reflecting the differences in the electronic structures of semiconducting and metallic CNTs, we find that in addition to turning semiconducting CNTs metallic, doping further increases electron transport most efficiently along semiconducting CNTs as well as through the junctions between them.

  11. The Properties of SBR/ENR50 Blend Containing Nanoclay/Carbon Black Dual Filler System Cured by Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ahmadi-Shooli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites based on an SBR/ENR50 rubber blend with the blend ratio of 50/50 using Cloisite 15A nanoclay (5 and 10 phr and carbon black (20 phr were prepared by melt mixing process. The rubber compounds were crosslinked by electron beam irradiation process at 50 and 100 kGy doses. A reference sample containing carbon black at 35 phr was prepared using a conventional sulphur curing system. The gel content of the samples was specified using gel fraction measurement. The results showed the maximum gel content for the sample having 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black. The dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage modulus, loss modulus, and loss factor, of the nanocomposites were evaluated using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA tests. The results indicated that, in spite of a well dispersed nanoclay in samples containing 10 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black, a minimum loss factor was observed in the sample containing 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black at 100 kGy. On the other hand, the storage modulus of the reference sample was found to be higher than that of the sample with 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, stress at 100%, 200%, and 300% elongation and the percentage of elongation were measured by a tensile machine. The results showed an increase in tensile strength and the stress at different elongations for a sample with 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black compared to the reference sample. In the corresponding SEM images of the samples having nanoclay and carbon black irradiated at 100 kGy a significantly higher surface roughness was observed.

  12. Influence of temperature, chloride ions and chromium element on the electronic property of passive film formed on carbon steel in bicarbonate/carbonate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tubular Goods Research Center of CNPC, Xi' an 710065 (China)], E-mail: dangguoli78@yahoo.com.cn; Feng, Y.R.; Bai, Z.Q. [Tubular Goods Research Center of CNPC, Xi' an 710065 (China); Zhu, J.W.; Zheng, M.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2007-11-01

    The influences of temperature, chloride ions and chromium element on the electronic property of passive film formed on carbon steel in NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} buffer solution are investigated by capacitance measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the passive film appears n-type semiconductive character; with increasing the solution temperature, the addition of chromium into carbon steel and increasing the concentration of chloride ions, the slopes of Mott-Schottky plots decrease, which indicates the increment of the defect density in the passive film. EIS results show that the transfer impedance R{sub 1} and the diffusion impedance W decrease with increasing the solution temperature, with the addition of chromium into carbon steel and with increasing the chloride ions concentration. It can be concluded that the corrosion protection effect of passive film on the substrate decreases with increasing the solution temperature, adding chromium into carbon steel and increasing chloride ions concentration.

  13. Communication: electronic band gaps of semiconducting zig-zag carbon nanotubes from many-body perturbation theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Petrenko, O; Taioli, S; De Souza, M M

    2012-05-14

    Electronic band gaps for optically allowed transitions are calculated for a series of semiconducting single-walled zig-zag carbon nanotubes of increasing diameter within the many-body perturbation theory GW method. The dependence of the evaluated gaps with respect to tube diameters is then compared with those found from previous experimental data for optical gaps combined with theoretical estimations of exciton binding energies. We find that our GW gaps confirm the behavior inferred from experiment. The relationship between the electronic gap and the diameter extrapolated from the GW values is also in excellent agreement with a direct measurement recently performed through scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  14. Environmental transmission electron microscopy investigations of Pt-Fe2O3 nanoparticles for nucleating carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Jin, Hua; Zhang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    electron microscopy, restructuring of the acorn-like Pt-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at reaction conditions is investigated. Upon heating to reaction temperature, ε-Fe2O3 is converted to β-Fe2O3, which can be subsequently reduced to metallic Fe once introducing CO. As Pt promotes the carburization of Fe, part...... of the metallic Fe reacts with active carbon atoms to form Fe2.5C instead of Fe3C, catalyzing the nucleation of carbon nanotubes. Nanobeam electron diffraction characterizations on SWCNTs grown under ambient pressure at 800 °C demonstrate that their chiral angle and diameter distributions are similar to those...

  15. Direct electron transfer and electrocatalysis of glucose oxidase immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified with Nafion and mesoporous carbon FDU-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kunqi; Yang Hua; Zhu Lin; Ma Zhongsu; Xing Shenyang; Lv Qiang; Liao Jianhui; Liu Changpeng; Xing Wei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, it was found that glucose oxidase (GOD) has been stably immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified with mesoporous carbon FDU-15 (MC-FDU-15) and Nafion by simple technique. The sorption behavior of GOD immobilized on MC-FDU-15 matrix was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), FTIR, respectively, which demonstrated that MC-FDU-15 could facilitate the electron exchange between the active center of GOD and electrode. The direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis behavior of GOD on the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammogram (CV) which indicated that GOD immobilized on Nafion and MC-FDU-15 matrices display direct, reversible and surface-controlled redox reaction with an enhanced electron transfer rate constant of 4.095 s -1 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) (pH 7.12). Furthermore, it was also discovered that, in the presence of O 2 , GOD immobilized on Nafion and MC-FDU-15 matrices could produce a linear response to glucose. Thus, Nafion/GOD-MC-FDU-15/GC electrode is hopeful to be used in glucose biosensor. In addition, GOD immobilized on MC-FDU-15 and Nafion matrices possesses an excellent bioelectrocatalytic activity for the reduction of O 2 . So, the Nafion/GOD-MC-FDU-15/GC electrode can be utilized as the cathode in biofuel cell.

  16. The effect of tube filling on the electronic properties of Fe filled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linganiso, Ella C.; Chimowa, George; Franklyn, Paul J.; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Coville, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: HRTEM image of a twisted CNT filled with a bent single crystal of Fe. Insets from top to bottom show the power spectra of the corresponding regions, indicating the twisting of the Fe lattice. Inset in the top right shows the relative angling of the lattice fringes to accommodate the twisting of the Fe. Highlights: ► Synthesis of Fe filled CNTs with Fe content varying from 3 to 35%. ► TEM analysis indicates that Fe in the tubes is in contact with the CNTs. ► TEM analysis reveals that α-Fe crystallizes after CNT formation. ► Temperature dependent electronic transport measurements performed. ► Conductivity varies with the % Fe filling in the CNTs. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes filled with Fe nanostructures (Fe-CNTs) were synthesized using an injection method in a 1-stage horizontal CVD furnace and a bubbling method in a 2-stage horizontal CVD reactor. Fe-CNTs were obtained through the pyrolysis of a mixture of dichlorobenzene and ferrocene in 5%H 2 /Ar. Metal impurities from the Fe-CNTs were removed using 1 M HCl solution. CNTs filled with crystalline Fe nanoparticles, nanorods and nanowires were obtained using these procedures. An intimate interaction between the Fe and the CNT was established by HRTEM studies. The α-Fe phase was observed to be the most dominant fraction found in the synthesized Fe-CNTs. The Fe 2 O 3 residue obtained from the TGA analysis revealed the amount of Fe filled inside the CNTs and this ranged between 3 and 31% by mass after purification. The temperature dependence of the conductivity in the temperature range between 2.5 and 100 K for an entangled network of Fe-CNTs was measured. An increase in conductivity due to the increased Fe filling inside the CNTs with increased temperature was observed. The observed temperature dependence was explained in terms of variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanisms. A transition from Efros–Shklovskii behavior at low % Fe filling of the CNTs to Mott 3D VRH behavior at

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of electron depth distribution and backscattering for carbon films deposited on aluminium as a function of incidence angle and primary energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films are deposited on various substrates (polymers, polyester fabrics, polyester yarns, metal alloys) both for experimental and technological motivations (medical devices, biocompatible coatings, food package and so on). Computational studies of the penetration of electron beams in supported thin film of carbon are very useful in order to compare the simulated results with analytical techniques data (obtained by scanning electron microscopy and/or Auger electron spectroscopy) and investigate the film characteristics. In the present paper, the few keV electron depth distribution and backscattering coefficient for the special case of film of carbon deposited on aluminium are investigated, by a Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the incidence angle and primary electron energy. The simulated results can be used as a way to evaluate the carbon film thickness by a set of measurements of the backscattering coefficient.

  18. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma; Evaporacion de carbono usando los electrones de un plasma de alta densidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index). (Author)

  19. The erosion and erosion products of tungsten and carbon based materials bombarded by high energy pulse electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Fu; Xu Zengyu; Liu Yong; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the erosion behaviors and erosion products of tungsten and some carbon based materials, such as graphite, C/C composite and B 4 C/Cu functionally graded material, were investigated by using a pulse electron beam to simulate the vertical displacement events (VDE) process. The authors will focus on the forms and differences of erosion products among these testing materials, and make clear to their erosion mechanisms

  20. The influence of carbon non-stoichiometry on the electronic properties of thorium monocarbide ThC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shein, I.R.; Ivanovskii, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The first-principle band structure calculations are employed to examine the influence of carbon non-stoichiometry on the structural and electronic properties of the cubic thorium monocarbide ThC. As a result, the equilibrium geometries, electronic bands, densities of states (DOS), Sommerfeld constants and Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility for ThC 1-x (where x = 0, 0.25 and 0.50) are obtained and analyzed in comparison with available experimental data. Additionally, the formation energies of carbon vacancies are theoretically estimated for ThC 1-x . The results obtained indicate that the introduction of carbon vacancies in ThC is accompanied by pronounced DOS changes due to the appearance of novel 'vacancy states' in the near-Fermi region formed by comparable contributions of Th 6d and 5f states. The carbon deficiency strongly affects the structure and stability of thorium carbide. For example, for the hypothetical 'over-deficient' composition ThC 0.50 the initial cubic structure undergoes significant tetragonal distortions. On the contrary, for ThC 0.75 the value of Evf is positive and the cubic structure of this phase is preserved. (authors)

  1. The influence of carbon non-stoichiometry on the electronic properties of thorium monocarbide ThC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shein, I.R.; Ivanovskii, A.L. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-15

    The first-principle band structure calculations are employed to examine the influence of carbon non-stoichiometry on the structural and electronic properties of the cubic thorium monocarbide ThC. As a result, the equilibrium geometries, electronic bands, densities of states (DOS), Sommerfeld constants and Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility for ThC{sub 1-x} (where x = 0, 0.25 and 0.50) are obtained and analyzed in comparison with available experimental data. Additionally, the formation energies of carbon vacancies are theoretically estimated for ThC{sub 1-x}. The results obtained indicate that the introduction of carbon vacancies in ThC is accompanied by pronounced DOS changes due to the appearance of novel 'vacancy states' in the near-Fermi region formed by comparable contributions of Th 6d and 5f states. The carbon deficiency strongly affects the structure and stability of thorium carbide. For example, for the hypothetical 'over-deficient' composition ThC{sub 0.50} the initial cubic structure undergoes significant tetragonal distortions. On the contrary, for ThC{sub 0.75} the value of Evf is positive and the cubic structure of this phase is preserved. (authors)

  2. Direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase promoted by carbon nanotubes is without value in certain mediator-free applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the direct electron transfer (DET) promoted by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on an electrode containing immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) with the aim to develop a third-generation glucose biosensor and a mediator-free glucose biofuel cell anode. GOx was immobilized via chitosan (CS) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Cyclic voltammetric revealed that the GOx on the surface of such an electrode is unable to simultaneously demonstrate DET with the electrode and to retain its catalytic activity towards glucose, although the MWCNTs alone can promote electron transfer between GOx and electrode. This is interpreted in terms of two types of GOx on the surface, the distribution and properties of which are quite different. The first type exhibits DET capability that results from the collaboration of MWCNTs and metal impurities, but is unable to catalyze the oxidation of glucose. The second type maintains its glucose-specific catalytic capability in the presence of a mediator, which can be enhanced by MWCNTs, but cannot undergo DET with the electrode. As a result, the MWCNTs are capable of promoting the electron transfer, but this is without value in some mediator-free applications such as in third-generation glucose biosensors and in mediator-free anodes for glucose biofuel cells. (author)

  3. Electron stimulated desorption of positive and negative oxygen ions from YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Solid State Inst.; Moss, S D; Paterson, P J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); McCubbery, D [La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, VIC (Australia); Petravic, M [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of positive and negative oxygen ion from superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} surfaces was studied. Based on ion desorption yield measurements as function of electron kinetic energy, primary excitations leading to positive and negative oxygen ion desorption are suggested. To the best of the authors` knowledge this is the first study on electron energy dependent ESD from YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} surfaces. The YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} samples were prepared from BaCO{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CuO using standard high temperature sintering and annealing procedures. Slices 2 mm thick were cut and further annealed at 400 C in flowing oxygen for 24 hours prior to insertion into the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for ESD. The near surface composition and chemical state of the annealed sample after exposure to air was examined by Auger and XPS analysis. These measurements suggest that the ESD experiments were performed on samples of similar near surface and bulk composition with some OH- chemisorbed groups and Cl surface contaminations and that negative and positive oxygen ion desorption may be initiated via a primary core level ionization. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Electron stimulated desorption of positive and negative oxygen ions from YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Solid State Inst.; Moss, S.D.; Paterson, P.J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); McCubbery, D. [La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, VIC (Australia); Petravic, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of positive and negative oxygen ion from superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} surfaces was studied. Based on ion desorption yield measurements as function of electron kinetic energy, primary excitations leading to positive and negative oxygen ion desorption are suggested. To the best of the authors` knowledge this is the first study on electron energy dependent ESD from YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} surfaces. The YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} samples were prepared from BaCO{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CuO using standard high temperature sintering and annealing procedures. Slices 2 mm thick were cut and further annealed at 400 C in flowing oxygen for 24 hours prior to insertion into the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for ESD. The near surface composition and chemical state of the annealed sample after exposure to air was examined by Auger and XPS analysis. These measurements suggest that the ESD experiments were performed on samples of similar near surface and bulk composition with some OH- chemisorbed groups and Cl surface contaminations and that negative and positive oxygen ion desorption may be initiated via a primary core level ionization. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Electron spin relaxation governed by Raman processes both for Cu2+ ions and carbonate radicals in KHCO3 crystals: EPR and electron spin echo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Stanislaw K.; Goslar, Janina; Lijewski, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    EPR studies of Cu2+ and two free radicals formed by γ-radiation were performed for KHCO3 single crystal at room temperature. From the rotational EPR results we concluded that Cu2+ is chelated by two carbonate molecules in a square planar configuration with spin-Hamiltonian parameters g|| = 2.2349 and A|| = 18.2 mT. Free radicals were identified as neutral HOCOrad with unpaired electron localized on the carbon atom and a radical anion CO3·- with unpaired electron localized on two oxygen atoms. The hyperfine splitting of the EPR lines by an interaction with a single hydrogen atom of HOCOrad was observed with isotropic coupling constants ao = 0.31 mT. Two differently oriented radical sites were identified in the crystal unit cell. Electron spin-lattice relaxation measured by electron spin echo methods shows that both Cu2+ and free radicals relax via two-phonon Raman processes with almost the same relaxation rate. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate 1/T1 is well described with the effective Debye temperature ΘD = 175 K obtained from a fit to the Debye-type phonon spectrum. We calculated a more realistic Debye temperature value from available elastic constant values of the crystal as ΘD = 246 K. This ΘD-value and the Debye phonon spectrum approximation give a much worse fit to the experimental results. Possible contributions from a local mode or an optical mode are considered and it is suggested that the real phonon spectrum should be used for the relaxation data interpretation. It is unusual that free radicals in KHCO3 relax similarly to the well localized Cu2+ ions, which suggests a small destruction of the host crystal lattice by the ionizing irradiation allowing well coupling between radical and lattice dynamics.

  6. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-01-09

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses: MWCNTs increase their electrical resistance (positive response) and rGOs decrease their electrical resistance (negative response). The authors propose a new phenomenology that describes a

  7. Carbon nanotubes as electromechanical resonators : Single-electron tunneling, nonlinearity, and high-bandwidth readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a remarkable material and can be thought of as a single-atom thick cylinder of carbon atoms capped of with a semisphere. This is called a single-walled CNT and, depending on how the cylinder is rolled up, CNTs are either semiconducting or metallic. A CNT is made into a

  8. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of carbon fiber after electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Diva Brocardo Machado, Luci; Augusto, Marcos; Segura Pino, Eddy; Radino, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Carbon fibers are used as reinforcement material in epoxy matrix in advanced composites. An important aspect of the mechanical properties of composites is associated to the adhesion between the surface of the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. This paper aimed to the evaluation of the effects of EB irradiation on the tensile properties of two different carbon fibers prepared as resin-impregnated specimens. The fibers were EB irradiated before the preparation of the resin-impregnated specimens for mechanical tests. Observations of the specimens after breakage have shown that EB irradiation promoted significant changes in the failure mode. Furthermore, the tensile strength data obtained for resin-impregnated specimens prepared with carbons fibers previously irradiated presented a slight tendency to be higher than those obtained from non-irradiated carbon fibers

  9. Cu incorporated amorphous diamond like carbon (DLC) composites: An efficient electron field emitter over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sk Faruque; Alam, Md Shahbaz; Mukherjee, Nillohit

    2018-03-01

    The effect of temperature on the electron field emission properties of copper incorporated amorphous diamond like carbon (a-Cu:DLC) thin films have been reported. The a-Cu:DLC thin films have been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and silicon substrate by the radio frequency sputtering process. The chemical composition of the films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the micro structure was established using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The sp2 and sp3 bonding ratio in the a-Cu:DLC have been analyzed by the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy studies. The material showed excellent electron field emission properties; which was optimized by varying the copper atomic percentage and temperature of the films. It was found that the threshold field and effective emission barrier were reduced significantly by copper incorporation as well as temperature and a detailed explanation towards emission mechanism has been provided.

  10. Comparative studies of utilization of industrial electron accelerators and adsorption with activated carbon for industrial effluent treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampa, Maria Helena de O.; Rela, Paulo R.; Duarte, Celina Lopes; Las Casas, Alexandre; Mori, Manoel Nunes; Omi, Nelson M.

    2005-01-01

    A technical and economical feasibility study was performed comparing the use electron beam and activated charcoal for treatment of industrial wastewater. In this study was used synthetic solutions, prepared in laboratory with organic compounds standards, where the composition was focused on the critical organic contaminants usually presented in wastewater from petrochemical industry. For the sample irradiation was used an industrial electron beam from Radiation Dynamics Inc. 1.5 MeV - 37.5 kW setup in IPEN. The doses ranged from 5 kGy to 100 kGy. A common granulated activated charcoal in a fixed-bed absorber glass column was used to study the pollutants absorption performance. The results show that if the adequate irradiation dose was delivered to the organic pollutant, it is possible to conclude for the studied compounds that the Electron Beam Process is, in aspect of organic removal efficiency, similar to the activated carbon process. (author)

  11. Doubly differential cross sections of low-energy electrons emitted in the ionization of molecular hydrogen by bare carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribedi, L.C.; Richard, P.; Ling, D.; Wang, Y.D.; Lin, C.D.; Moshammer, R.; Kerby, G.W. III; Gealy, M.W.; Rudd, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the double differential cross sections (DDCS) (d 2 σ/d var-epsilon ed Ω e ) of low-energy electron emission in the ionization of H 2 bombarded by bare carbon ions of energy 30 MeV. The energy and angular distributions of the electron DDCS have been obtained for 12 different emission angles and for electron energies varying between 0.1 and 300 eV. We have also deduced the single differential and total ionization cross section from the measured DDCS. The data have been compared with the predictions of first Born approximations and the CDW-EIS (continuum distorted wave endash eikonal initial state) model. The CDW-EIS model provides an excellent agreement with the data. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. Electron injection mechanisms of green organic light-emitting devices fabricated utilizing a double electron injection layer consisting of cesium carbonate and fullerene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.S.; Choo, D.C.; Kim, T.W.; Jin, Y.Y.; Seo, J.H.; Kim, Y.K.

    2010-01-01

    Electron injection mechanisms of the luminance efficiency of green organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) fabricated utilizing a cesium carbonate (Cs 2 CO 3 )/fullerene (C 60 ) heterostructure acting as an electron injection layer (EIL) were investigated. Current density-voltage and luminance-voltage measurements showed that the current densities and the luminances of the OLEDs with a Cs 2 CO 3 or Cs 2 CO 3 /C 60 EIL were higher than that of the OLEDs with a Liq EIL. The luminance efficiency of the OLEDs with a Cs 2 CO 3 EIL was almost three times higher than that of the OLEDs with a Liq EIL. Because the electron injection efficiency of the Cs 2 CO 3 layer in OLEDs was different from that of the C 60 layer, the luminance efficiency of the OLEDs with a double EIL consisting of a Cs 2 CO 3 layer and a C 60 layer was smaller than that of the OLEDs with a Cs 2 CO 3 EIL. The electron injection mechanisms of OLEDs with a Cs 2 CO 3 and C 60 double EIL are described on the basis of the experimental results.

  13. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Sompetch, Kanganit [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarakonsri, Thapanee, E-mail: tsarakonsri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Analytical electron microscopy has revealed the structure of particles that were synthesized by chemical reaction of GeO{sub 2} with NaBH{sub 4} in the basic solution including graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) powders. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was arranged by recrystallization of melamine at 600 °C under N{sub 2} gas atmosphere. The samples were dried at 60 °C or 180 °C for 4 h. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was observed as lamellae of several ten nm or less in size and had an amorphous-like structure with a distorted lattice in an area as small as a few hundred pm in size. The reaction product was Ge(O) particles as fine as several nm in size and composed of Ge and O atoms. Most of the particles must be of GeO{sub 2−x} with the amorphous-like structure that has also a distorted lattice in an area of a few hundred pm in size. In the sample dried at 60 °C, the particles were found to be dispersed in a wide area on the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} lamella. It is hard to recognize those particles in TEM images. The particles in the sample dried at 180 °C became larger and were easily observed as isolated lumps. Hence, these powders can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites, and expected to be applicable to anode materials for high energy Li-ion batteries due to Ge catalysis effect, accordingly. - Graphical abstract: STEM analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder. - Highlights: • Graphitic (g)-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder was prepared at 600 °C by recrystallization of melamine. • Ge(O) was prepared by chemical reaction in a solution including the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powders. • The products can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. • GeO{sub 2} was amorphous several-nm particles and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was amorphous lamella of several 10 nm in size. • We expect them to be applicable for high energy Li-ion battery anode

  14. Influence of high-energy electron irradiation on field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Sandip S. [Center for Advanced Studies in Material Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Koinkar, Pankaj M. [Center for International Cooperation in Engineering Education (CICEE), University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-Josanjima-Cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Dhole, Sanjay D. [Center for Advanced Studies in Material Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); More, Mahendra A., E-mail: mam@physics.unipune.ac.i [Center for Advanced Studies in Material Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Murakami, Ri-ichi, E-mail: murakami@me.tokushima-u.ac.j [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-Josanjima-Cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of very high energy electron beam irradiation on the field emission characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been investigated. The MWCNTs films deposited on silicon (Si) substrates were irradiated with 6 MeV electron beam at different fluence of 1x10{sup 15}, 2x10{sup 15} and 3x10{sup 15} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The irradiated films were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro-Raman spectrometer. The SEM analysis clearly revealed a change in surface morphology of the films upon irradiation. The Raman spectra of the irradiated films show structural damage caused by the interaction of high-energy electrons. The field emission studies were carried out in a planar diode configuration at the base pressure of {approx}1x10{sup -8} mbar. The values of the threshold field, required to draw an emission current density of {approx}1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}, are found to be {approx}0.52, 1.9, 1.3 and 0.8 V/{mu}m for untreated, irradiated with fluence of 1x10{sup 15}, 2x10{sup 15} and 3x10{sup 15} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The irradiated films exhibit better emission current stability as compared to the untreated film. The improved field emission properties of the irradiated films have been attributed to the structural damage as revealed from the Raman studies.

  15. Long-Lived Charge Separation at Heterojunctions between Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Perylene Diimide Electron Acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Suk [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arias, Dylan H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Blackburn, Jeffrey L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sisto, Thomas J. [Columbia University; Peurifoy, Samuel [Columbia University; Zhang, Boyuan [Columbia University; Nuckolls, Colin [Columbia University

    2018-04-13

    Nonfullerene electron acceptors have facilitated a recent surge in the efficiencies of organic solar cells, although fundamental studies of the nature of exciton dissociation at interfaces with nonfullerene electron acceptors are still relatively sparse. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs), unique one-dimensional electron donors with molecule-like absorption and highly mobile charges, provide a model system for studying interfacial exciton dissociation. Here, we investigate excited-state photodynamics at the heterojunction between (6,5) s-SWCNTs and two perylene diimide (PDI)-based electron acceptors. Each of the PDI-based acceptors, hPDI2-pyr-hPDI2 and Trip-hPDI2, is deposited onto (6,5) s-SWCNT films to form a heterojunction bilayer. Transient absorption measurements demonstrate that photoinduced hole/electron transfer occurs at the photoexcited bilayer interfaces, producing long-lived separated charges with lifetimes exceeding 1.0 us. Both exciton dissociation and charge recombination occur more slowly for the hPDI2-pyr-hPDI2 bilayer than for the Trip-hPDI2 bilayer. To explain such differences, we discuss the potential roles of the thermodynamic charge transfer driving force available at each interface and the different molecular structure and intermolecular interactions of PDI-based acceptors. Detailed photophysical analysis of these model systems can develop the fundamental understanding of exciton dissociation between organic electron donors and nonfullerene acceptors, which has not been systematically studied.

  16. Highly n-Type Titanium Oxide as an Electronically Active Support for Platinum in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Baker, L. Robert

    2011-08-18

    The role of the oxide-metal interface in determining the activity and selectivity of chemical reactions catalyzed by metal particles on an oxide support is an important topic in science and industry. A proposed mechanism for this strong metal-support interaction is electronic activation of surface adsorbates by charge carriers. Motivated by the goal of using electronic activation to drive nonthermal chemistry, we investigated the ability of the oxide support to mediate charge transfer. We report an approximately 2-fold increase in the turnover rate of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanoparticles supported on stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO2) when the TiO2 is made highly n-type by fluorine (F) doping. However, for nonstoichiometric titanium oxide (TiOX<2) the effect of F on the turnover rate is negligible. Studies of the titanium oxide electronic structure show that the energy of free electrons in the oxide determines the rate of reaction. These results suggest that highly n-type TiO2 electronically activates adsorbed oxygen (O) by electron spillover to form an active O- intermediate. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Study of the secondary electron energy spectrum of clean aluminium modification during oxygen adsorption, hydrogen adsorption or carbon segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin, Francois

    1981-01-01

    The first part of this work is a review of both theoretical and experimental aspects of the fine structure appearing in the Secondary Electron Spectrum (SES) and in the electron energy loss spectrum. In the second part, we report the results of a study of the SES and ELS spectra of clean and gas covered aluminium. The use of very low primary electron energies (E p ≤ 30 eV) enables the detection of previously unobserved peaks in the ELS spectra of clean and oxygen covered aluminium. They are attributed to single electron excitations. Furthermore, a very large peak appears in the SES spectrum during oxygen or carbon adsorption on aluminium. It is interpreted in terms of interaction of the background electrons with the valence electrons of the surface. Molecular hydrogen adsorption is observed on Ta, Pt, Al 2 O 3 , Si. It is responsible for an ELS peak located 13 eV below the elastic peak. Furthermore, on silicon, the chemisorbed hydrogen form can be distinguished from the molecular form with the help of ELS. Finally, some examples are given of the application of these results to surface imaging. (author) [fr

  18. The effects of different substrates on the electron stimulated desorption dynamics of O - from physisorbed O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedhili, M. N.; Parenteau, L.; Huels, M. A.; Azria, R.; Tronc, M.; Sanche, L.

    1997-11-01

    We report condensed phase measurements of kinetic energy (Ek) distributions of O-, produced by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) at 6 eV incident electron energy; they are obtained under identical experimental conditions from submonolayer quantities of 16O2 deposited on disordered multilayer substrates of 18O2, Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, and C2H6, all condensed at 20 K on polycrystalline platinum (Pt). The results suggest that the desorption dynamics of O- DEA fragments is, in part, determined by large angle elastic scattering of O- prior to desorption, as well as the net image charge potential (Ep) induced in the condensed dielectric solid and the Pt metal. The measurements also indicate that, particularly at small Kr substrate thicknesses, the Ep may not necessarily be uniform across the surface, but may fluctuate due to surface roughness. Thus, in addition to energy losses in the substrate prior to, and during, DEA, these effects may influence the dissociation dynamics of the O2- resonance itself, as well as the desorption of the DEA O- fragment.

  19. Studies on the heterogeneous electron transport and oxygen reduction reaction at metal (Co, Fe) octabutylsulphonylphthalocyanines supported on multi-walled carbon nanotube modified graphite electrode

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mamuru, SA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities using octabutylsulphonylphthalocyanine complexes of iron (FeOBSPc) and cobalt (CoOBSPc) supported on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) platforms have been...

  20. Electron emission from nano-structured carbon composite materials and fabrication of high-quality electron emitters by using plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, H.; Hiraki, A.; Jiang, N.; Wang, H. X.

    2006-01-01

    Many trials have been done to fabricate high-quality electron-emitters from nano-composite carbon materials (such as nano-diamond, carbon nano tubes and others) by means of a variety of plasma chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) techniques. Based upon the mechanism of electron emission, we have proposed several strategic guide lines for the fabrication of good emitters. Then, following these lines, several types of emitters were tried. One of the emitters has shown a worldclass, top ranking for fabricating very bright lamps: namely, a low turn-on voltage (0.5 ∼ 1 V/μm to induce 10 μA/cm 2 emission current) to emit a 1 mA/cm 2 current at 3 V/μm and 100 mA/cm 2 current at a slightly higher applied voltage. The bright lamps are Mercury-free fluorescence lamps to exhibit brightness of ∼10 5 cd/m 2 with high efficiency of ∼100 lm/w.

  1. Strategic Functionalization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Manipulate Their Electronic and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Brendan Joel

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are unique materials that exhibit chirality-specific properties due to their one-dimensional confinement. As a result, they are explored for a wide range of applications including single-photon sources in communications devices. Despite progress in this area, SWCNTs still suffer from a relatively narrow range of energies of emission features that fall short of the 1500 nm desired for long-distance lossless data transfer. One approach that is frequently used to resolve this involves chemical functionalization with aryl groups. However, this approach is met with a number of fundamental issues. First, chirality-specific SWCNTs must be acquired for subsequent functionalization. Synthesis of such samples has thus far eluded experimental efforts. As such, post-synthetic non-covalent functionalization is required to break bundles and create disperse SWCNTs that can undergo further separation, processing, and functionalization. Second, a number of low-energy emission features are introduced upon functionalization across a 200 nm range. The origin of such diverse emission features remains unknown. The research presented here focuses on computationally addressing these issues. A series of polyfluorene polymers possessing sidechains of varying length are explored using molecular mechanics to determine the impact of alkyl sidechains on SWCNT-conjugated polymer interaction strength and morphology. Additionally, density functional theory (DFT) and linear-response time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to explore the effect of functionalization on emission features. A prerequisite to these calculations involves constructing finite-length SWCNT systems with similar electronic structure to their infinite counterparts: a methodological approach for the formation of such systems is presented. The optical features for aryl-functionalized SWCNTs are then explored. It is shown that the predominant effect on the energies of emission features involves

  2. Half-metallicity and electronic structures for carbon-doped group III-nitrides: Calculated with a modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuai-wei; Wang, Ri-gao; Xu, Pemg

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structures and magnetism for carbon-doped group III-nitrides are investigated by utilizing the first principle method with the modified Becke-Johnson potential. Calculations show that carbon substituting cations (anions) would induce the group III-nitrides to be paramagnetic metals (half-metallic ferromagnets). Single carbon substituting nitrogen could produce 1.00μB magnetic moment. Electronic structures indicate that the carriers-mediated double-exchange interaction plays a crucial role in forming the ferromagnetism. Based on the mean-field theory, the Curie temperature for carbon-doped group III-nitrides would be above the room temperature. Negative chemical pair interactions imply that carbon dopants tend to form clustering distribution in group III-nitrides. The nitrogen vacancy would make the carbon-doped group III-nitrides lose the half-metallic ferromagnetism.

  3. Long-term stability of organic carbon-stimulated chromatereduction in contaminated soils, and its relation to manganese redoxstatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton,Steve R.; Newville, Matthew; Rao, William

    2007-03-13

    In-situ reduction of toxic Cr(V1) to less hazardous Cr(II1)is becoming a popular strategy for remediating contaminated soils.However, the long term stability of reduced Cr remains to be understood,especially given the common presence of MnfIIIJV) oxides that reoxidizeCr(II1). This 4.6 year laboratory study tracked Cr and Mn redoxtransformations in soils contaminated with Cr(V1) which were then treatedwith different amounts of organic carbon (OC). Changes in Cr and Mnoxidation states within soils were directly and nondestructively measuredusing micro X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Chromatereduction was roughly lst-order, and the extent of reduction was enhancedwith higher OC additions. However, significant Cr(||1) reoxidationoccurred in soils exposed to the highest Cr(V1) concentrations (2,560 mgkg"'). Transient Cr(II1) reoxidation up to 420 mg kg1 was measured at 1.1years after OC treatment, followed by further reduction. Chromateconcentrations increased by 220 mg kgm1a t the end of the study (4.6years) in one soil. The causal role that Mn oxidation state had inreoxidizing Cr was supported by trends in Mn K-edge energies. Theseresults provide strong evidence for longterm dependence of soil Croxidation states on balances between OC availability and Mn redoxstatus.

  4. The mechanism of pleural inflammation by long carbon nanotubes: interaction of long fibres with macrophages stimulates them to amplify pro-inflammatory responses in mesothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Fiona A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes (CNT are high aspect ratio nanoparticles with diameters in the nanometre range but lengths extending up to hundreds of microns. The structural similarities between CNT and asbestos have raised concern that they may pose a similar inhalation hazard. Recently CNT have been shown to elicit a length-dependent, asbestos-like inflammatory response in the pleural cavity of mice, where long fibres caused inflammation but short fibres did not. However the cellular mechanisms governing this response have yet to be elucidated. This study examined the in vitro effects of a range of CNT for their ability to stimulate the release of the acute phase cytokines; IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6 and the chemokine, IL-8 from both Met5a mesothelial cells and THP-1 macrophages. Results showed that direct exposure to CNT resulted in significant cytokine release from the macrophages but not mesothelial cells. This pro-inflammatory response was length dependent but modest and was shown to be a result of frustrated phagocytosis. Furthermore the indirect actions of the CNT were examined by treating the mesothelial cells with conditioned media from CNT-treated macrophages. This resulted in a dramatic amplification of the cytokine release from the mesothelial cells, a response which could be attenuated by inhibition of phagocytosis during the initial macrophage CNT treatments. We therefore hypothesise that long fibres elicit an inflammatory response in the pleural cavity via frustrated phagocytosis in pleural macrophages. The activated macrophages then stimulate an amplified pro-inflammatory cytokine response from the adjacent pleural mesothelial cells. This mechanism for producing a pro-inflammatory environment in the pleural space exposed to long CNT has implications for the general understanding of fibre-related pleural disease and design of safe nanofibres.

  5. Molecular effects in carbon K-shell Auger-electron production by 0.6-2.0 MeV protons and extraction of an atomic cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, F.D.; Lapicki, G.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon K-shell Auger-electron production cross sections are reported for 0.6-2.0 MeV protons incident on CH 4 (methane), C 2 H 2 (acetylene), C 2 H 4 (ethylene), C 2 H 6 (ethane), n-C 4 H 10 (normal butane), i-C 4 H 10 (isobutane), C 6 H 6 (benzene), CO (carbon monoxide), and CO 2 (carbon dioxide). A constant-energy mode 45 0 parallel-plate electrostatic analyzer was used for detection of Auger electrons. The carbon KLL Auger-electron cross sections for all molecules were found to be lower than that found for CH 4 by 9-23%. All carbon KLL Auger-electron data could be brought into agreement when corrected for the chemical shift of the carbon K-shell binding energy in molecules and for intramolecular scattering. KLL Auger-electron production cross sections are compared to first Born and ECPSSR theories and show good agreement with both after the chemical shift of the carbon K-shell binding energy in molecules and the effects of intramolecular scattering are considered. (orig.)

  6. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10 –17 cm 2 molecule –1 was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  7. A comparative thermoluminescence and electron spin resonance study of synthetic carbonated A-type hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.C.; Rossi, A.M.; Baffa, O.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity of the 150 °C thermoluminescence peak of beta-irradiated carbonated synthetic A-type hydroxyapatite is approximately 12 times higher than that of the noncarbonated material. Deconvolution of the glow curve showed that this peak is a result of a trap distribution. An attempt was made to relate this thermoluminescence peak enhanced by carbonation with the ESR signal of the CO 2 − radical in natural or synthetic hydroxyapatite. - Highlights: ► Synthetic hydroxyapatite was carbonated with CO 2 . ► TL enhanced by 12 times in carbonated synthetic A-type hydroxyapatite. ► EPR and TL were performed to find out a relation between CO 2 − center and the TL. ► No direct relation was found between the CO 2 − center and TL enhancement.

  8. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  9. Study of nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon films for explosive electron emission cathode in high-voltage planar diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir; Belous, Nikolai; Gurinovich, Alexandra; Gurnevich, Evgeny [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, Polina, E-mail: polina.kuzhir@gmail.com [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Maksimenko, Sergey [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Molchanov, Pavel; Shuba, Mikhail [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Roddatis, Vladimir [CIC energiGUNE, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Alava (Spain); Institut für Materialphysik of Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri [Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, Joensuu FI-80101 (Finland)

    2015-04-30

    We report on an experimental study of explosive electron emission properties of cathode made by nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films (2–150 nm) deposited on Cu substrate via methane-based chemical vapor deposition. High current density at level of 300 A/cm{sup 2} in 5 · 10{sup −5} Pa vacuum has been observed together with very stable explosive emission from the planar cathode. The Raman spectroscopy investigation proves that the PyC films remain the same after seven shots. According to the optical image analysis of the cathode before and after one and seven shots, we conclude that the most unusual and interesting feature of using the PyC films/Cu cathode for explosive emission is that the PyC layer on the top of the copper target prevents its evaporation and oxidation, which leads to higher emission stability compared to conventional graphitic/Cu cathodes, and therefore results in longer working life. - Highlights: • Explosive electron emission from pyrolytic carbon (PyC) cathode is reported. • We observe high current density, 300 A/cm{sup 2}, and stable emission parameters. • PyC integrity ensures a high application potential for high current electronics.

  10. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  11. Simple and cost-effective method of highly conductive and elastic carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite for wearable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Hwang, Ji-Young; Hwang, Ha Ryeon; Kim, Han Seop; Lee, Joong Hoon; Seo, Jae-Won; Shin, Ueon Sang; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2018-01-22

    The development of various flexible and stretchable materials has attracted interest for promising applications in biomedical engineering and electronics industries. This interest in wearable electronics, stretchable circuits, and flexible displays has created a demand for stable, easily manufactured, and cheap materials. However, the construction of flexible and elastic electronics, on which commercial electronic components can be mounted through simple and cost-effective processing, remains challenging. We have developed a nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer. To achieve uniform distributions of CNTs within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and methyl-terminated PDMS in combination with ultrasonication. After vaporizing the IPA, various shapes and sizes can be easily created with the nanocomposite, depending on the mold. The material provides high flexibility, elasticity, and electrical conductivity without requiring a sandwich structure. It is also biocompatible and mechanically stable, as demonstrated by cytotoxicity assays and cyclic strain tests (over 10,000 times). We demonstrate the potential for the healthcare field through strain sensor, flexible electric circuits, and biopotential measurements such as EEG, ECG, and EMG. This simple and cost-effective fabrication method for CNT/PDMS composites provides a promising process and material for various applications of wearable electronics.

  12. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, Naiara L. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sertão Pernambucano, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); La Porta, Felipe A. [Chemistry Department, Federal Technological University of Paraná, 86036-370 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Longo, Elson [São Paulo State University, Chemistry Institute, UNESP, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Sambrano, Julio R. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  13. Effects of electron irradiation in space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qi; Chen, Ping; Gao, Yu; Ma, Keming; Lu, Chun; Xiong, Xuhai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Electron irradiation decreased the storage modulus finally. •T g decreased first and then increased and finally decreased. •The thermal stability was reduced and then improved and finally decreased. •The changing trend of flexural strength and ILSS are consistent. -- Abstract: The effects of electron irradiation in simulated space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of high performance carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites were investigated. The dynamic mechanical properties of the composites exposed to different fluences of electron irradiation were evaluated by Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermogravimetric analysis was applied to investigate the changes in thermal stability of the resin matrix after exposure to electron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). The results indicated that electron irradiation in high vacuum had an impact on thermal and mechanical properties of CF/BMI composites, which depends on irradiation fluence. At lower irradiation fluences less than 5 × 10 15 cm −2 , the dynamic storage modulus, cross-linking degree, thermal stability and mechanical properties that were determined by a competing effect between chain scission and cross-linking process, decreased firstly and then increased. While at higher fluences beyond 5 × 10 15 cm −2 , the chain scission process was dominant and thus led to the degradation in thermal and mechanical properties of the composites

  14. Electron transfer across anodic films formed on tin in carbonate-bicarbonate buffer solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervasi, C.A.; Folquer, M.E.; Vallejo, A.E.; Alvarez, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    Impedance and steady-state data were recorded in order to study the kinetics of electron transfer between passive tin electrodes and an electrolytic solution containing the K 3 Fe(CN) 6 -K 4 Fe(CN) 6 redox couple. Film thickness plays a key role in determining the type of electronic conduction of these oxide covered electrodes. Electron exchange with the oxide takes place with participation of the conduction band in the semiconducting film. A mechanism involving direct electron tunneling through the space charge barrier is the most suitable to interpret the experimental evidence

  15. Electron transfer across anodic films formed on tin in carbonate-bicarbonate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasi, C.A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas; Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria; Folquer, M.E. [Universidad Nacional de Tucaman (Argentina). Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Vallejo, A.E. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria; Alvarez, P.E. [Universidad Nacional de Tucaman (Argentina). Inst. de Fisica

    2005-01-15

    Impedance and steady-state data were recorded in order to study the kinetics of electron transfer between passive tin electrodes and an electrolytic solution containing the K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6}-K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6} redox couple. Film thickness plays a key role in determining the type of electronic conduction of these oxide covered electrodes. Electron exchange with the oxide takes place with participation of the conduction band in the semiconducting film. A mechanism involving direct electron tunneling through the space charge barrier is the most suitable to interpret the experimental evidence. (Author)

  16. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy synthesis observation of nanostructured carbon coated LiFePO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, M. L.; Laul, D.; Veillette, R.; Serventi, A. M.; Mauger, A.; Julien, C. M.; Zaghib, K.

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies of the structural transformations that occur during the synthesis of carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C-LiFePO 4) and heat treatment to elevated temperatures were conducted in two different electron microscopes. Both microscopes have sample holders that are capable of heating up to 1500 °C, with one working under high vacuum and the other capable of operating with the sample surrounded by a low gaseous environment. The C-LiFePO 4 samples were prepared using three different compositions of precursor materials with Fe(0), Fe(II) or Fe(III), a Li-containing salt and a polyethylene- block-poly(ethylene glycol)-50% ethylene oxide or lactose. The in situ TEM studies suggest that low-cost Fe(0) and a low-cost carbon-containing compound such as lactose are very attractive precursors for mass production of C-LiFePO 4, and that 700 °C is the optimum synthesis temperature. At temperatures higher than 800 °C, LiFePO 4 has a tendency to decompose. The same in situ measurements have been made on particles without carbon coat. The results show that the homogeneous deposit of the carbon deposit at 700 °C is the result of the annealing that cures the disorder of the surface layer of bare LiFePO 4. Electrochemical tests supported the conclusion that the C-LiFePO 4 derived from Fe(0) is the most attractive for mass production.

  17. Influence of Fe nanoparticles diameters on the structure and electron emission studies of carbon nanotubes and multilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Himani; Shukla, A.K.; Vankar, V.D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report the effect of Fe film thickness on the growth, structure and electron emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multilayer graphene deposited on Si substrate. It is observed that the number of graphitic shells in carbon nanostructures (CNs) varies with the thickness of the catalyst depending on the average size of nanoparticles. Further, the Fe nanoparticles do not catalyze beyond a particular size of nanoclusters leading to the formation of multilayer graphene structure, instead of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It is observed that the crystallinity of CNs enhances upon increasing the catalyst thickness. Multilayer graphene structures show improved crystallinity in comparison to CNTs as graphitic to defect mode intensity ratio (I D /I G ) decreases from 1.2 to 0.8. However, I 2D /I G value for multilayer graphene is found to be 1.1 confirming the presence of at least 10 layers of graphene in these samples. CNTs with smaller diameter show better electron emission properties with enhancement factor (γ C = 2.8 × 10 3 ) in comparison to multilayer graphene structure (γ C = 1.5 × 10 3 ). The better emission characteristics in CNTs are explained due to combination of electrons from edges as well as centers in comparison to the multilayer graphene. Highlights: ► Graphitic shells in CNTs and graphene depend on the size of Fe nanoparticles. ► The diameter of nanoparticles decides the morphology of CNTs and graphene. ► Multilayer graphene structures show improved crystallinity in comparison to CNTs. ► Multilayer graphene (MLG) has the γ C factor of 1.5 × 10 3 and CNTs has 2.8 × 10 3 . ► The nonlinearity in MLG may occur through change in work function.

  18. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mickelson, W, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-20

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  19. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A; Mickelson, W

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  20. Carbon Nanofibers Synthesized on Selective Substrates for Nonvolatile Memory and 3D Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Khan, Abdur R.

    2011-01-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) growth technique has been developed where the choice of starting substrate was found to influence the electrical characteristics of the resulting carbon nanofiber (CNF) tubes. It has been determined that, if the tubes are grown on refractory metallic nitride substrates, then the resulting tubes formed with dc PECVD are also electrically conducting. Individual CNFs were formed by first patterning Ni catalyst islands using ebeam evaporation and liftoff. The CNFs were then synthesized using dc PECVD with C2H2:NH3 = [1:4] at 5 Torr and 700 C, and approximately equal to 200-W plasma power. Tubes were grown directly on degenerately doped silicon substrates with resistivity rho approximately equal to 1-5 meterohm-centimeter, as well as NbTiN. The approximately equal to 200-nanometer thick refractory NbTiN deposited using magnetron sputtering had rho approximately equal to 113 microohm-centimeter and was also chemically compatible with CNF synthesis. The sample was then mounted on a 45 beveled Al holder, and placed inside a SEM (scanning electron microscope). A nanomanipulator probe stage was placed inside the SEM equipped with an electrical feed-through, where tungsten probes were used to make two-terminal electrical measurements with an HP 4156C parameter analyzer. The positive terminal nanoprobe was mechanically manipulated to physically contact an individual CNF grown directly on NbTiN as shown by the SEM image in the inset of figure (a), while the negative terminal was grounded to the substrate. This revealed the tube was electrically conductive, although measureable currents could not be detected until approximately equal to 6 V, after which point current increased sharply until compliance (approximately equal to 50 nA) was reached at approximately equal to 9.5 V. A native oxide on the tungsten probe tips may contribute to a tunnel barrier, which could be the reason for the suppressed transport at low biases

  1. Comparison of electron and phonon transport in disordered semiconductor carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Lehmann, T.; Ryndyk, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    as a function of length of the disordered device shows that both electrons and phonons with different energies display different transport regimes, i.e. quasi-ballistic, diffusive and localization regimes coexist. In the light of the results we discuss heating of the semiconductor device in electronic...

  2. Observation and spectroscopy of a two-electron Wigner molecule in an ultraclean carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecker, S.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Secchi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two electrons on a string form a simple model system where Coulomb interactions are expected to play an interesting role. In the presence of strong interactions, these electrons are predicted to form a Wigner molecule, separating to the ends of the string. This spatial structure is believed to be...

  3. Direct measurement of the charge distribution along a biased carbon nanotube bundle using electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes can be examined in the transmission electron microscope under an applied bias. Here we introduce a model-independent method, which allows the charge distribution along a nanowire or nanotube to be measured directly from the Laplacian of an electron holographic phase image....

  4. Mechanism of electron attachment to van der Waals clusters: Application to carbon dioxide clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, M.; Shima, N.; Tsuneyuki, S.; Kageshima, H.; Kondow, T.

    1987-01-01

    A theory on the attachment of very slow electrons to van der Waals clusters was developed on the basis of the electronic structure theory, and was applied to clarify the mechanism of the collisional electron transfer from a high-Rydberg atom to a CO 2 cluster. The strong coupled electron--phonon model is found to afford a reasonable mechanism of the attachment. The equilibrium geometry of (CO 2 )/sub N/ (2≤N≤13) clusters are determined and their vertical affinity levels are obtained by the DV-X α-transition state method. Using this information, as well as some plausible assumptions on the values of the coupling constants, the attachment cross section σ is evaluated as a function of the energy of the incident electron. The theory predicts the existence of the threshold cluster size for the attachment and a sharp decrease of σ with the energy, which are consistent with the experimental results

  5. Electron spin resonance as a high sensitivity technique for environmental magnetism: determination of contamination in carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Nigel P.; Hoon, Stephen R.; Taylor, Kevin G.; Perry, Chris T.

    2002-05-01

    This study investigates the application of high sensitivity electron spin resonance (ESR) to environmental magnetism in conjunction with the more conventional techniques of magnetic susceptibility, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and chemical compositional analysis. Using these techniques we have studied carbonate sediment samples from Discovery Bay, Jamaica, which has been impacted to varying degrees by a bauxite loading facility. The carbonate sediment samples contain magnetic minerals ranging from moderate to low concentrations. The ESR spectra for all sites essentially contain three components. First, a six-line spectra centred around g = 2 resulting from Mn2+ ions within a carbonate matrix; second a g = 4.3 signal from isolated Fe3+ ions incorporated as impurities within minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite or quartz; third a ferrimagnetic resonance with a maxima at 230 mT resulting from the ferrimagnetic minerals present within the bauxite contamination. Depending upon the location of the sites within the embayment these signals vary in their relative amplitude in a systematic manner related to the degree of bauxite input. Analysis of the ESR spectral components reveals linear relationships between the amplitude of the Mn2+ and ferrimagnetic signals and total Mn and Fe concentrations. To assist in determining the origin of the ESR signals coral and bauxite reference samples were employed. Coral representative of the matrix of the sediment was taken remote from the bauxite loading facility whilst pure bauxite was collected from nearby mining facilities. We find ESR to be a very sensitive technique particularly appropriate to magnetic analysis of ferri- and para-magnetic components within environmental samples otherwise dominated by diamagnetic (carbonate) minerals. When employing typical sample masses of 200 mg the practical detection limit of ESR to ferri- and para-magnetic minerals within a diamagnetic carbonate matrix is of the order of 1 ppm and 1 ppb

  6. Holey carbon micro-arrays for transmission electron microscopy: A microcontact printing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, David W.; Klemic, James F.; Stern, Eric; Sigworth, Fred J.; Klemic, Kathryn G.

    2007-01-01

    We have used a microcontact printing approach to produce high quality and inexpensive holey carbon micro-arrays. Fabrication involves: (1) micromolding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer stamp from a microfabricated master that contains the desired array pattern; (2) using the PDMS stamp for microcontact printing a thin sacrificial plastic film that contains an array of holes; (3) floating the plastic film onto TEM grids; (4) evaporating carbon onto the plastic film and (5) removing the sacrificial plastic film. The final holey carbon micro-arrays are ready for use as support films in TEM applications with the fidelity of the original microfabricated pattern. This approach is cost effective as both the master and the stamps have long-term reusability. Arbitrary array patterns can be made with microfabricated masters made through a single-step photolithographic process

  7. Influence of the electronic distribution of polymers in the spatial conformation of polymer grafted carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garate, H. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Fisica IFIBA-CONICET LPyMC, Pabellon I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Quimica Organica, (CIHIDECAR-CONICET) Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); De Falco, A. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Fisica IFIBA-CONICET LPyMC, Pabellon I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Fascio, M.L. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Quimica Organica, (CIHIDECAR-CONICET) Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Fisica IFIBA-CONICET LPyMC, Pabellon I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); D' Accorso, N.B., E-mail: norma@qo.fcen.uba.ar [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Quimica Organica, (CIHIDECAR-CONICET) Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    In this work we report the covalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polyvinylpyridine (PVP) by the graft from method. Differences in the electronic distribution of both polymers resulted in different interaction between polymers and the nanotubes. It was found that PVP chains wrapped the nanotubes while nanotubes functionalized with PAN presented PAN chains forming amorphous entanglements on the nanoscale linked to the MWCNTs. Differences in the conformation between both polymers and the MWCNTs can be attributed to interactions between the aromatic groups in PVP and the MWCNTs through {pi}-{pi} stacking. The absence of aromatic groups in the case of the PAN chains favours the interaction between them. The functionalization efficiency was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-vis spectroscopy, while morphological changes were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, H.P.; Aumayr, F.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials

  9. Interaction of a two-dimensional electromagnetic breather with an electron inhomogeneity in an array of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Fedorov, E. G.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2014-01-01

    Propagation of ultrashort laser pulses through various nano-objects has recently became an attractive topic for both theoretical and experimental studies due to its promising perspectives in a variety of problems of modern nanoelectronics. Here, we study the propagation of extremely short two-dimensional bipolar electromagnetic pulses in a heterogeneous array of semiconductor carbon nanotubes. Heterogeneity is defined as a region of enhanced electron density. The electromagnetic field in an array of nanotubes is described by Maxwell's equations, reduced to a multidimensional wave equation. Our numerical analysis shows the possibility of stable propagation of an electromagnetic pulse in a heterogeneous array of nanotubes. Furthermore, we establish that, depending on its speed of propagation, the pulse can pass through the area of increased electron concentration or be reflected therefrom.

  10. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Aumayr, F; Diez-Muino, R; Juaristi, J I

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  11. Electronic Interactions between "Pea" and "Pod" : The Case of Oligothiophenes Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Jia; Blondeau, Pascal; Salice, Patrizio; Menna, Enzo; Bartova, Barbora; Hebert, Cecile; Leschner, Jens; Kaiser, Ute; Milko, Matus; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging strategies to achieve tunable nanophotonic devices is to build robust nanohybrids with variable emission in the visible spectral range, while keeping the merits of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). This goal is realized by filling SWNTs ("pods") with a

  12. Temperature modification of oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes studied by electron spectroscopy methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesiak, B.; Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Stobinski, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 246, 11-12 (2009), s. 2645-2649 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * XPS * XAES * sp2/sp3 hybridization * chemical bonding Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.150, year: 2009

  13. XANES study on the electronic states of carbon nanotube and related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, M [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Shimada, H [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Matsubayashi, H [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Yumura, M [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Uchida, K [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Oshima, S [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Kuriki, Y [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Sato, T [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Nishijima, A [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The C K-edge XANES spectra of carbon nanotubes and two fullerenes are presented . The XANES of the nanotubes is quite different from those of fullerenes, but analogous to that of HOPG. The difference in the 1s{yields}{pi}{sup *} transition is discussed in conjunction with the structural features. ((orig.)).

  14. Electrochemical Tuning of Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerene Peapods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.; Kataura, H.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2004), s. 1011-1019 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040306; GA MŠk ME 487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : electrochemical analysis * carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.331, year: 2004

  15. Selective laser melting of carbon/AlSi10Mg composites: Microstructure, mechanical and electronical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiao; Song, Bo, E-mail: bosong@hust.edu.cn; Fan, Wenrui; Zhang, Yuanjie; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-04-25

    Carbon nanotubes/AlSi10Mg composites has drawn lots of attention in structural engineering and functional device applications due to its extraordinary high elastic modulus and mechanical strength as well as excellent electrical and thermal conductivities. In this study, the CNTs/AlSi10Mg composites was firstly prepared and then processed by selective laser melting. The powder preparation, SLM process, and microstructure evolution, properties were clarified. The results showed that CNTs were decomposed due to the direct interaction with the laser beam. The SLMed composites displayed a similar microstructure to that of SLMed AlSi10Mg. The common brittleness phase Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} didn't form, and the carbon dispersion strengthening was observed. The electrical resistivity of the composites was reduced significantly and the hardness was improved. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes/AlSi10Mg powder were prepared by slurry ball milling process. • Carbon nanotubes/AlSi10Mg composites were firstly prepared by SLM. • The electrical resistivity of the composites was significantly reduced and hardness was improved.

  16. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Francisco; Xia, Zhenhai; Lebrion-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The physics of HRTEM image formation and electron diffraction of SWCNT in a polymer matrix were investigated theoretically on the basis of the multislice method, and the optics of a FEG Super TWIN Philips CM 200 TEM operated at 80 kV. The effect of nanocomposite thickness on both image contrast and typical electron diffraction reflections of nanofillers were explored. The implications of the results on the experimental applicability to study dispersion, chirality and diameter of nanofillers are discussed.

  17. Surface and electron emission properties of hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon films investigated by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongping; Zhang, Sam; Ong, S.-E.; Benstetter, Guenther; Du Hejun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we have deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films by using DC magnetron sputtering of graphite target at various r.f. bias voltages. Surface and nanoscale emission properties of these DLC films have been investigated using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanowear tests and conducting-AFM, by simultaneously measuring the topography and the conductivity of the samples. Nanowear tests show that these DLC films are covered with the thin (1.5-2.0 nm) graphite-like layers at surfaces. Compared to the film bulk structure, the graphite-like surface layers are more conductive. The graphite-like surface layers significantly influence the electron emission properties of these films. Low-energy carbon species can be responsible for the formation of graphite-like surface layers. Nanoscale electron emission measurements have revealed the inhomogeneous emission nature of these films. The low-field emission from these films can be attributed to the existence of sp 2 -configured nanoclusters inside the films

  18. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M; Patole, Shashikant P.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Deepak, Francis L; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode–interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode–nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  19. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-10-09

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode–interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode–nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  20. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Nitin M; Patole, Shashikant P; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H; Deepak, Francis L; Costa, Pedro M F J

    2015-11-06

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode-interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode-nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.