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Sample records for electron microscopy scanning

  1. Scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1970-05-15

    The JSM-11 scanning electron microscope at CRNL has been used extensively for topographical studies of oxidized metals, fracture surfaces, entomological and biological specimens. A non-dispersive X-ray attachment permits the microanalysis of the surface features. Techniques for the production of electron channeling patterns have been developed. (author)

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  3. Monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechberger, W.; Kothleitner, G.; Hofer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has developed into an established technique for chemical and structural analysis of thin specimens in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM. The energy resolution in EELS is largely limited by the stability of the high voltage supply, by the resolution of the spectrometer and by the energy spread of the source. To overcome this limitation a Wien filter monochromator was recently introduced with commercially available STEMs, offering the advantage to better resolve EELS fine structures, which contain valuable bonding information. The method of atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging within an STEM, utilizing a high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector can perfectly complement the excellent energy resolution, since EELS spectra can be collected simultaneously. In combination with a monochromator microscope not only high spatial resolution images can be recorded but also high energy resolution EELS spectra are attainable. In this work we investigated the STEM performance of a 200 kV monochromated Tecnai F20 with a high resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (HR-GIF). (author)

  4. Spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohashi, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Spin-Polarized Scanning Electron Microscopy (Spin SEM) is one way for observing magnetic domain structures taking advantage of the spin polarization of the secondary electrons emitted from a ferromagnetic sample. This principle brings us several excellent capabilities such as high-spatial resolution better than 10 nm, and analysis of magnetization direction in three dimensions. In this paper, the principle and the structure of the spin SEM is briefly introduced, and some examples of the spin SEM measurements are shown. (author)

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of primary bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, R.R.; Kerner, B.

    1975-01-01

    Critical-point-drying of tumor tissue fixed in a glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution and viewed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides a 3-dimensional view of tumor cells and their matrices. This report describes the SEM appearance of three primary bone tumors: a canine osteosarcoma of the distal radius, a feline chondrosarcoma of the proximal tibia and a canine fibrosarcoma of the proximal humerus. The ultrastructural morphology is compared with the histologic appearance of each tumor

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresse, J.F.; Dupuy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy in semiconductors opens up a large field of use. The operating modes lending themselves to the study of semiconductors are the induced current, cathodoluminescence and the use of the potential contrast which can also be applied very effectively to the study of the devices (planar in particular). However, a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of the penetration of electrons, generation and recombination of generated carriers in a semiconductor is necessary in order to attain a better understanding of the operating modes peculiar to semiconductors [fr

  8. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, F.; Repoux, L.; Ruste, J.; Grillon, F.; Robaut, F.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the related micro-analyses are involved in extremely various domains, from the academic environments to the industrial ones. The overall theoretical bases, the main technical characteristics, and some complements of information about practical usage and maintenance are developed in this book. high-vacuum and controlled-vacuum electron microscopes are thoroughly presented, as well as the last generation of EDS (energy dispersive spectrometer) and WDS (wavelength dispersive spectrometer) micro-analysers. Beside these main topics, other analysis or observation techniques are approached, such as EBSD (electron backscattering diffraction), 3-D imaging, FIB (focussed ion beams), Monte-Carlo simulations, in-situ tests etc.. This book, in French language, is the only one which treats of this subject in such an exhaustive way. It represents the actualized and totally updated version of a previous edition of 1979. It gathers the lectures given in 2006 at the summer school of Saint Martin d'Heres (France). Content: 1 - electron-matter interactions; 2 - characteristic X-radiation, Bremsstrahlung; 3 - electron guns in SEM; 4 - elements of electronic optics; 5 - vacuum techniques; 6 - detectors used in SEM; 7 - image formation and optimization in SEM; 7a - SEM practical instructions for use; 8 - controlled pressure microscopy; 8a - applications; 9 - energy selection X-spectrometers (energy dispersive spectrometers - EDS); 9a - EDS analysis; 9b - X-EDS mapping; 10 - technological aspects of WDS; 11 - processing of EDS and WDS spectra; 12 - X-microanalysis quantifying methods; 12a - quantitative WDS microanalysis of very light elements; 13 - statistics: precision and detection limits in microanalysis; 14 - analysis of stratified samples; 15 - crystallography applied to EBSD; 16 - EBSD: history, principle and applications; 16a - EBSD analysis; 17 - Monte Carlo simulation; 18 - insulating samples in SEM and X-ray microanalysis; 18a - insulating

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of coal macerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.R.; White, A.; Deegan, M.D.

    1986-02-01

    Individual macerals separated from some United Kingdom coals of Carboniferous age and bituminous rank were examined by scanning electron microscopy. In each case a specific morphology characteristic of the macerals studied could be recognized. Collinite (a member of the vitrinite maceral group) was recognizable in all samples by its angular shape and characteristic fracture patterns, the particles (30-200 ..mu..m) frequently showing striated or laminated surface. Sporinite particles had no well defined shape and were associated with more detrital material than were the other macerals studied. This detritus was shown by conventional light microscopy to be the maceral micrinite. Fusinite was remarkable in having a chunky needle form, with lengths of up to 200 ..mu..m. 8 references.

  10. Elemental mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Lugg, N R; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss atomic resolution chemical mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and also on energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) imaging. Chemical mapping using EELS can yield counterintuitive results which, however, can be understood using first principles calculations. Experimental chemical maps based on EDX bear out the thesis that such maps are always likely to be directly interpretable. This can be explained in terms of the local nature of the effective optical potential for ionization under those imaging conditions. This is followed by an excursion into the complementary technique of elemental mapping using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in a conventional transmission electron microscope. We will then consider the widely used technique of Z-contrast or high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, which is based on phonon excitation, where it has recently been shown that intensity variations can be placed on an absolute scale by normalizing the measured intensities to the incident beam. Results, showing excellent agreement between theory and experiment to within a few percent, are shown for Z-contrast imaging from a sample of PbWO 4 .

  11. Emission sources in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkusch, W.

    1990-01-01

    Since the beginning of the commercial scanning electron microscopy, there are two kinds of emission sources generally used for generation of the electron beam. The first group covers the cathodes heated directly and indirectly (tungsten hair-needle cathodes and lanthanum hexaboride single crystals, LaB 6 cathode). The other group is the field emission cathodes. The advantages of the thermal sources are their low vacuum requirement and their high beam current which is necessary for the application of microanalysis units. Disadvantages are the short life and the low resolution. Advantages of the field emission cathode unambiguously are the possibilities of the very high resolution, especially in the case of low acceleration voltages. Disadvantages are the necessary ultra-high vacuum and the low beam current. An alternative source is the thermally induced ZrO/W field emission cathode which works stably as compared to the cold field emission and does not need periodic flashing for emitter tip cleaning. (orig.) [de

  12. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope for correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ian E G; Dennison, Clare L; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara; Yarwood, Andrew; O'Toole, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The JEOL ClairScope is the first truly correlative scanning electron and optical microscope. An inverted scanning electron microscope (SEM) column allows electron images of wet samples to be obtained in ambient conditions in a biological culture dish, via a silicon nitride film window in the base. A standard inverted optical microscope positioned above the dish holder can be used to take reflected light and epifluorescence images of the same sample, under atmospheric conditions that permit biochemical modifications. For SEM, the open dish allows successive staining operations to be performed without moving the holder. The standard optical color camera used for fluorescence imaging can be exchanged for a high-sensitivity monochrome camera to detect low-intensity fluorescence signals, and also cathodoluminescence emission from nanophosphor particles. If these particles are applied to the sample at a suitable density, they can greatly assist the task of perfecting the correlation between the optical and electron images. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation of Smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... scanning electron microscopy evaluation of smear layer removal with chitosan and .... this compound has considerably increased its concentration in rivers and .... of the images was done by three investigators who calibrated ...

  14. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  15. Time-Resolved Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    .... The pulsed electron beam is obtained by rapidly switching the electron emission of a field emission tip using the AC electric field arising from exposure to the intense electromagnetic radiation...

  16. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  17. Study of Hydrated Lime in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Rovnaníková, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, S2 (2013), s. 1644-1645 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Hydrated Lime * Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.757, year: 2013

  18. Characterization of Polycaprolactone Films Biodeterioration by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Voberková, S.; Hermanová, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1950-1951 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polycaprolactone films * biodeterioration * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  19. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  20. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2012), s. 2731-2756 ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/2270; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * slow electrons * low energy SEM * low energy STEM * cathode lens Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2012

  2. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  3. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  4. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in himematsutake was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The atomic percentage of the metals was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Results show that the accumulation of ...

  5. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716 ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  6. Simultaneous correlative scanning electron and high-NA fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Liv

    Full Text Available Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown.

  7. Head-facial hemangiomas studied with scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Chiara; Giovannetti, Filippo; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2009-11-01

    Hemangiomas of the head or face are a frequent vascular pathology, consisting in an embryonic dysplasia that involves the cranial-facial vascular network. Hemangiomas show clinical, morphological, developmental, and structural changes during their course. Morphological, structural, ultrastructural, and clinical characteristics of head-facial hemangiomas were studied in 28 patients admitted in our hospital. Nineteen of these patients underwent surgery for the removal of the hemangiomas, whereas 9 patients were not operated on. All the removed tissues were transferred in our laboratories for the morphological staining. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for the observation of all microanatomical details. All patients were studied for a clinical diagnosis, and many were subjected to surgical therapy. The morphological results revealed numerous microanatomical characteristics of the hemangiomatous vessels. The observation by light microscopy shows the afferent and the efferent vessels for every microhemangioma. All the layers of the arterial wall are uneven. The lumen of the arteriole is entirely used by a blood clot. The observation by transmission electron microscopy shows that it was impossible to see the limits of the different layers (endothelium, medial layer, and adventitia) in the whole wall of the vessels. Moreover, both the muscular and elastic components are disarranged and replaced with connective tissue. The observation by scanning electron microscopy shows that the corrosion cast of the hemangioma offers 3 periods of filling: initially with partial filling of the arteriolar and of the whole cast, intermediate with the entire filling of the whole cast (including arteriole and venule), and a last period with a partial emptying of the arteriolar and whole cast while the venule remains totally injected with resin. Our morphological results can be useful to clinicians for a precise

  8. Stereoscopic and photometric surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.

    2000-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one of the most important devices to examine microscopic structures as it offers images of a high contrast range with a large depth of focus. Nevertheless, three-dimensional measurements, as desired in fracture mechanics, have previously not been accomplished. This work presents a system for automatic, robust and dense surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy combining new approaches in shape from stereo and shape from photometric stereo. The basic theoretical assumption for a known adaptive window algorithm is shown not to hold in scanning electron microscopy. A constraint derived from this observation yields a new, simplified, hence faster calculation of the adaptive window. The correlation measure itself is obtained by a new ordinal measure coefficient. Shape from photometric stereo in the SEM is formulated by relating the image formation process with conventional photography. An iterative photometric ratio reconstruction is invented based on photometric ratios of backscatter electron images. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using ground truth data obtained by three alternative shape recovery devices. Most experiments showed relative height accuracy within the tolerances of the alternative devices. (author)

  9. Secondary electron spectroscopy and Auger microscopy at high spatial resolution. Application to scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gressus, Claude; Massignon, Daniel; Sopizet, Rene

    1979-01-01

    Secondary electron spectroscopy (SES), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) are combined with ultra high vacuum scanning microscopy (SEM) for surface analysis at high spatial resolution. Reliability tests for the optical column for the vacuum and for the spectrometer are discussed. Furthermore the sensitivity threshold in AES which is compatible with a non destructive surface analysis at high spatial resolution is evaluated. This combination of all spectroscopies is used in the study of the beam damage correlated with the well known secondary electron image (SEI) darkening still observed in ultra high vacuum. The darkening is explained as a bulk decontamination of the sample rather than as a surface contamination from the residual vacuum gas [fr

  10. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  11. Examination of living fungal spores by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, N.D.; Lord, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    Ascospores of Sordaria macrospora germinated and produced hyphae exhibiting normal growth and differentiation after examination by scanning electron microscopy and following numerous, different preparative protocols. Seventy-nine to ninety-nine percent of the ascospores retained normal viability after being observed in the fully frozen-hydrated, partially freeze-dried, and vacuum-dried states at accelerating voltages of 5 and 40 keV. Hyphae did not survive these treatments. From these observations it is concluded that ascospores of S. macrospora can remain in a state of suspended animation while being observed in the scanning electron microscope. The ascospores also survived, but with reduced viability: 6 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, 6 h in OsO4, or 2 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde followed by 2 h in OsO 4 . However, the ascospores did not germinate after dehydration in ethanol. (author)

  12. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  13. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of archaeological materials through Scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, A.; Tenorio C, D.; Elizalde, S.; Mandujano, C.; Cassiano, G.

    2005-01-01

    With the purpose to know the uses and the chemical composition of some cultural objects in the pre hispanic epoch this work presents several types of analysis for identifying them by means of the Scanning electron microscopy and its techniques as the Functional analysis of artifacts based on the 'tracks of use' analysis, also the X-ray spectroscopy and the X-ray dispersive energy (EDS) are mentioned, all of them allowing a major approach to the pre hispanic culture in Mexico. (Author)

  15. Fracture characteristics of uranium alloys by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koger, J.W.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.

    1976-10-01

    The fracture characteristics of uranium alloys were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The fracture mode of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of uranium-7.5 weight percent niobium-2.5 weight percent zirconium (Mulberry) alloy, uranium--niobium alloys, and uranium--molybdenum alloys in aqueous chloride solutions is intergranular. The SCC fracture surface of the Mulberry alloy is characterized by very clean and smooth grain facets. The tensile-overload fracture surfaces of these alloys are characteristically ductile dimple. Hydrogen-embrittlement failures of the uranium alloys are brittle and the fracture mode is transgranular. Fracture surfaces of the uranium-0.75 weight percent titanium alloys are quasi cleavage

  16. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic structure classifications using scanning tunneling microscopy conductance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, K.M.; Swartzentruber, B.S.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bouchard, A.; Bartholomew, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The electronic structure of atomic surfaces is imaged by applying multivariate image classification techniques to multibias conductance data measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. Image pixels are grouped into classes according to shared conductance characteristics. The image pixels, when color coded by class, produce an image that chemically distinguishes surface electronic features over the entire area of a multibias conductance image. Such open-quotes classedclose quotes images reveal surface features not always evident in a topograph. This article describes the experimental technique used to record multibias conductance images, how image pixels are grouped in a mathematical, classification space, how a computed grouping algorithm can be employed to group pixels with similar conductance characteristics in any number of dimensions, and finally how the quality of the resulting classed images can be evaluated using a computed, combinatorial analysis of the full dimensional space in which the classification is performed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  19. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  20. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  1. Visualization of bacterial polysaccharides by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanski, B S; McAleer, W J; Hilleman, M R

    1983-04-01

    Highly purified capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis groups A, B, and C have been visualized by high resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). Spheroidal macromolecules approximately 200 A in diameter are characteristic of the Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides whereas filaments that are 400-600 A in length are found in Meningococcus B polysaccharide preparations. Filaments are occasionally found associated with the spheroidal Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides and it is proposed that these structures are composed of a long (1-4 microns) filament or filaments that are arranged in spheroidal molecules or micelles of high molecular weight. The Meningococcus B polysaccharide, by contrast, is a short flexuous filament or strand of relatively low molecular weight. A relationship between morphology and antigenicity is proposed.

  2. Optimization of permanganic etching of polyethylenes for scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naylor, K.L.; Phillips, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The permanganic etching technique has been studied as a function of time, temperature, and concentration for a series of polyethylenes. Kinetic studies show that a film of reaction products builds up on the surface, impeding further etching, an effect which is greatest for the lowest-crystallinity polymers. SEM studies combined with EDS show that the film contains sulfur, potassium and some manganese. An artifact is produced by the etching process which is impossible to remove by washing procedures if certain limits of time, temperature, and concentration are exceeded. For lower-crystallinity polyethylenes multiple etching and washing steps were required for optimal resolution. Plastic deformation during specimen preparation, whether from scratches or freeze fracturing, enhances artifact formation. When appropriate procedures are used, virtually artifact-free surfaces can be produced allowing a combination of permanganic etching and scanning electron microscopy to give a rapid method for detailed morphological characterization of bulk specimens

  3. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamer Vestlund, A.; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Drew, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors

  4. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer Vestlund, A. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); FIRA International Ltd., Maxwell Road, Stevenage, Herts SG1 2EW (United Kingdom); Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Drew, G.H., E-mail: g.h.drew@cranfield.ac.uk [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Electron beam effects in auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, J.M.; Duraud, J.P.; Le Gressus, C.

    1979-01-01

    Electron beam effects on Si(100) and 5% Fe/Cr alloy samples have been studied by measurements of the secondary electron yield delta, determination of the surface composition by Auger electron spectroscopy and imaging with scanning electron microscopy. Variations of delta as a function of the accelerating voltage Esub(p) (0.5 -9 Torr has no effect on technological samples covered with their reaction layers; the sensitivities to the beam depend rather on the earlier mechanical, thermal and chemical treatment of the surfaces. (author)

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  8. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  9. Helium ion microscopy and energy selective scanning electron microscopy - two advanced microscopy techniques with complementary applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, C.; Jepson, M. A. E.; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2014-06-01

    Both scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and helium ion microscopes (HeIM) are based on the same principle of a charged particle beam scanning across the surface and generating secondary electrons (SEs) to form images. However, there is a pronounced difference in the energy spectra of the emitted secondary electrons emitted as result of electron or helium ion impact. We have previously presented evidence that this also translates to differences in the information depth through the analysis of dopant contrast in doped silicon structures in both SEM and HeIM. Here, it is now shown how secondary electron emission spectra (SES) and their relation to depth of origin of SE can be experimentally exploited through the use of energy filtering (EF) in low voltage SEM (LV-SEM) to access bulk information from surfaces covered by damage or contamination layers. From the current understanding of the SES in HeIM it is not expected that EF will be as effective in HeIM but an alternative that can be used for some materials to access bulk information is presented.

  10. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM

  11. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  12. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy

  13. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmaack, K.; Wehnes, H.; Heinzmann, U.; Agerer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 μm. The collected particles, sampled for short periods (∼15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C 60 or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces

  14. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  15. Specific surface area evaluation method by using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrescu, Camelia; Petrescu, Cristian; Axinte, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics are among the most interesting materials for a large category of applications, including both industry and health. Among the characteristic of the ceramic materials, the specific surface area is often difficult to evaluate.The paper presents a method of evaluation for the specific surface area of two ceramic powders by means of scanning electron microscopy measurements and an original method of computing the specific surface area.Cumulative curves are used to calculate the specific surface area under assumption that the values of particles diameters follow a normal logarithmic distribution. For two powder types, X7R and NPO the results are the following: - for the density ρ (g/cm 2 ), 5.5 and 6.0, respectively; - for the average diameter D bar (μm), 0.51 and 0.53, respectively; - for σ, 1.465 and 1.385, respectively; - for specific surface area (m 2 /g), 1.248 and 1.330, respectively. The obtained results are in good agreement with the values measured by conventional methods. (authors)

  16. Reference nano-dimensional metrology by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Fluegge, Jens; Bosse, Harald; Heidelmann, Markus; Kübel, Christian; Prang, Robby

    2013-01-01

    Traceable and accurate reference dimensional metrology of nano-structures by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is introduced in the paper. Two methods, one based on the crystal lattice constant and the other based on the pitch of a feature pair, were applied to calibrate the TEM magnification. The threshold value, which was defined as the half-intensity of boundary materials, is suggested to extract the boundary position of features from the TEM image. Experimental investigations have demonstrated the high potential of the proposed methods. For instance, the standard deviation from ten repeated measurements of a line structure with a nominal 100 nm critical dimension (CD) reaches 1σ = 0.023 nm, about 0.02%. By intentionally introduced defocus and larger sample alignment errors, the investigation shows that these influences may reach 0.20 and 1.3 nm, respectively, indicating the importance of high-quality TEM measurements. Finally, a strategy for disseminating the destructive TEM results is introduced. Using this strategy, the CD of a reference material has been accurately determined. Its agreement over five independent TEM measurements is below 1.2 nm. (paper)

  17. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  18. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  19. Observation of Magnetic Induction Distribution by Scanning Interference Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Yajima, Yusuke; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kuroda, Katsuhiro

    1994-09-01

    A scanning interference electron microscope (SIEM) capable of observing magnetic induction distribution with high sensitivity and spatial resolution has been developed. The SIEM uses a pair of fine coherent scanning probes and detects their relative phase change by magnetic induction, giving raster images of microscopic magnetic distributions. Its performance has been demonstrated by observing magnetic induction distributed near the edge of a recorded magnetic storage medium. Obtained images are compared with corresponding images taken in the scanning Lorentz electron microscope mode using the same microscope, and the differences between them are discussed.

  20. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  1. Ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti (Anoplura, Echinophthiriidae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores del Carmen Castro

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti Werneck, 1955, mainly the external chorionic features of the egg, is described through electronic microscopy techniques. This species was first cited in Argentina, infesting Arctocephalus australis (Zimmermann, 1873. The morphological adaptations of adults and nymphs are described in both species of Proechinophthirus parasitic on Otariidae: P. fluctus (Ferris, 1916 and P. zumpti.

  2. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-12-21

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed.

  3. A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation of Smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of chitosan and MTAD for the smear layer removal from the root canal through a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to the final irrigants: 0.2% chitosan, MTAD, saline (control group).

  4. A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation of Smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of chitosan and MTAD for the smear layer removal from the root canal through a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to the final irrigants: 0.2% chitosan, MTAD, saline (control group). After the ...

  5. Electron microscopy of intermediate filaments: teaming up with atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Richter, Karsten; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) were originally discovered and defined by electron microscopy in myoblasts. In the following it was demonstrated and confirmed that they constitute, in addition to microtubules and microfilaments, a third independent, general filament system in the cytoplasm of most metazoan cells. In contrast to the other two systems, IFs are present in cells in two principally distinct cytoskeletal forms: (i) extended and free-running filament arrays in the cytoplasm that are integrated into the cytoskeleton by associated proteins of the plakin type; and (ii) a membrane- and chromatin-bound thin 'lamina' of a more or less regular network of interconnected filaments made from nuclear IF proteins, the lamins, which differ in several important structural aspects from cytoplasmic IF proteins. In man, more than 65 genes code for distinct IF proteins that are expressed during embryogenesis in various routes of differentiation in a tightly controlled manner. IF proteins exhibit rather limited sequence identity implying that the different types of IFs have distinct biochemical properties. Hence, to characterize the structural properties of the various IFs, in vitro assembly regimes have been developed in combination with different visualization methods such as transmission electron microscopy of fixed and negatively stained samples as well as methods that do not use staining such as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryoelectron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy. Moreover, with the generation of both IF-type specific antibodies and chimeras of fluorescent proteins and IF proteins, it has become possible to investigate the subcellular organization of IFs by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopic methods. The combination of these powerful methods should help to further develop our understanding of nuclear architecture, in particular how nuclear subcompartments are organized and in which way lamins are involved.

  6. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  7. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  8. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  9. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  10. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, O L; Dellby, N; Murfitt, M F

    2011-01-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been able to image individual heavy atoms in a light matrix for some time. It is now able to do much more: it can resolve individual atoms as light as boron in monolayer materials; image atomic columns as light as hydrogen, identify the chemical type of individual isolated atoms from the intensity of their annular dark field (ADF) image and by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); and map elemental composition at atomic resolution by EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). It can even map electronic states, also by EELS, at atomic resolution. The instrumentation developments that have made this level of performance possible are reviewed, and examples of applications to semiconductors and oxides are shown.

  11. Characterization of catalysts by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targos, W.M.; Bradley, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an integral tool for characterizing catalysts because of its unique ability to image and analyze nanosized volumes. This information is valuable in optimizing catalyst formulations and determining causes for reduced catalyst performance. For many commercial catalysts direct correlations between structural features of metal crystallites and catalytic performance are not attainable. When these instances occur, determination of elemental distribution may be the only information available. In this paper the authors discuss some of the techniques employed and limitations associated with characterizing commercial catalysts

  12. [Scanning electron microscopy of heat-damaged bone tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsanyl, L

    1977-02-01

    Parts of diaphyses of bones were exposed to high temperature of 200-1300 degrees C. Damage to the bone tissue caused by the heat was investigated. The scanning electron microscopic picture seems to be characteristic of the temperature applied. When the bones heated to the high temperature of 700 degrees C characteristic changes appear on the periostal surface, higher temperatura on the other hand causes damage to the compact bone tissue and can be observed on the fracture-surface. Author stresses the importance of this technique in the legal medicine and anthropology.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  14. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  15. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  16. Conditioning of mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma-Jimenez, Melissa; Blanco-Meneses, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The cleaning and correct observation of the mealybug specimens was determined by the conditioning methodology. The research was done in the Laboratorio del Centro de Investigacion en Estructuras Microscopicas (CIEMIC) of the Universidad de Costa Rica during the year 2012. A gradual improvement for the observation of the ultrastructures through the Scanning Electron Microscope was evidenced by the implementation of four types of methodologies. Each process was described in detail. The incorporation of 10% xylene (in some cases have been viable using ethanol at 95-100% ) was allowed to remove the wax from the body of the insect, to avoid this the collapse and to observe specific ultrastructures of the individual, they were the best results. The methodology used has reduced the time and costs in future taxonomic research of mealybug. (author) [es

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of cells from periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, P A

    1975-09-01

    Examination of lymphocytes from peripheral blood with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown differences between B cells and T cells on the basis of their surface architecture. This study was initiated to determine whether the cellular components of periapical lesions could be identified with the use of similar criteria. Cells were dispersed from lesions by aspiration of fragments of tissue through syringe needles of decreasing diameters. The liberated cells were filtered on silver-coated Flotronic membranes and examined under the SEM. Lymphocytes, macrophages, epithelial cells, and mast cells were observed in granulomas and cysts. Most of the lymphocytes had smooth surfaces similar to that of T cells; others had villous projections similar to that of B cells. Epithelial nests were seen in the cyst linings while the cyst fluid was rich in lymphocytes. These findings suggest that SEM examination of periapical lesions can be a useful adjunct in studying cellular composition and possible immunological reactions in these tissues.

  18. Automated rapid particle investigation using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Jerod Laurence

    The chemical composition of fly ash particles has been known to vary significantly depending on a number of factors. Current bulk methods of investigation including X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction are thought to be inadequate in determining the performance of fly ash in concrete. It is the goal of this research to develop a method of Automated Rapid Particle Investigation that will not look at fly ash as a bulk material but as individual particles. By examining each particle individually scientists and engineers will have the ability to study the variation in chemical composition by comparing the chemistry present in each particle. The method of investigation developed by this research provides a practical technique that will allow the automated chemical analysis of hundreds, or even thousands, of fly ash particles in a matter of minutes upon completion of sample preparation and automated scanning electron microscope (ASEM) scanning. This research does not examine the significance of the chemical compounds discovered; rather, only the investigation methodology is discussed. Further research will be done to examine the importance of the chemistry discovered with this automated rapid particle investigation technique.

  19. Recent applications of scanning electron microscopy; Neueste Anwendungen der Rasterelektronenmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Sten; Moverare, Johan; Peng, Ru [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Management and Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A few examples were shown of how to use SEM to study phenomena that are not normally visible and possible to identify by introducing a known phenomenon called Electron Channeling. The channeling is best utilized in a FEG SEM not because of the in lens detection system but due to the fact that the highly coherent high electron density probe is creating a high contrast image with a resolution that is high enough to image crystal defects on a dislocation level. The fact that diffraction phenomena are involved in channeling is also of great importance for the contrast formation. The technique allows the user to choose to either just take a picture or decide if the image should be based on careful determination of the Bragg condition. The biggest advantage with channeling in addition the good contrast produced is the possibility to literally combine it with other techniques like EBSD. In fact, it is also possible to use thin foils to combine ECCI, EBSD, EDS and STEM in a modern FEG SEM. The development of a eucentric specimen stage of the same class as a TEM stage would allow even more advanced microscopy in SEM. (orig.)

  20. Dopant profiling based on scanning electron and helium ion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chee, Augustus K.W., E-mail: kwac2@cam.ac.uk [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Boden, Stuart A. [University of Southampton, Electronics and Computer Science, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, we evaluate and compare doping contrast generated inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning helium ion microscope (SHIM). Specialised energy-filtering techniques are often required to produce strong doping contrast to map donor distributions using the secondary electron (SE) signal in the SEM. However, strong doping contrast can be obtained from n-type regions in the SHIM, even without energy-filtering. This SHIM technique is more sensitive than the SEM to donor density changes above its sensitivity threshold, i.e. of the order of 10{sup 16} or 10{sup 17} donors cm{sup −3} respectively on specimens with or without a p–n junction; its sensitivity limit is well above 2×10{sup 17} acceptors cm{sup −3} on specimens with or without a p–n junction. Good correlation is found between the widths and slopes of experimentally measured doping contrast profiles of thin p-layers and the calculated widths and slopes of the potential energy distributions across these layers, at a depth of 1 to 3 nm and 5 to 10 nm below the surface in the SHIM and the SEM respectively. This is consistent with the mean escape depth of SEs in silicon being about 1.8 nm and 7 nm in the SHIM and SEM respectively, and we conclude that short escape depth, low energy SE signals are most suitable for donor profiling. - Highlights: • Strong doping contrast from n-type regions in the SHIM without energy-filtering. • Sensitivity limits are established of the SHIM and SEM techniques. • We discuss the impact of SHIM imaging conditions on quantitative dopant profiling. • Doping contrast stems from different surface layer thicknesses in the SHIM and SEM.

  1. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5 Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. -- Highlights: ► TV-rate STEM imaging of heavy atoms is demonstrated. ► DNA sequencing by STEM dark field imaging should be possible at a rate of 10 6 bases/s. ► Individual silicon atom impurities in graphene are imaged atom-by-atom. ► Single atoms of nitrogen and boron incorporated in graphene are imaged spectroscopically. ► Bonding of individual atoms can be probed by analyzing the fine structures of their EEL spectra.

  3. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  4. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; van Es, P.; Petersen, W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  5. Formation of hot spots in a superconductor observed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichele, R.; Seifert, H.; Huebener, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy can be used for the direct observation of hot spots in a superconductor. Experiments performed at 2.10 K with tim films demonstrating the method are reported

  6. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  7. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  8. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  9. Enzymatic hydrolysis of Amaranth flour - differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba de la Rosa, A.P.; Paredes-Lopez, O.; Carabez-Trejo, A.; Ordorica-Falomir, C. (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Irapuato (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados)

    1989-11-01

    High-protein amaranth flour (HPAF) and carbohydrate rich fraction (CRF) were produced from raw flour in a single-step process using a heat-stable alpha-amylase preparation. Protein content of flour increased from 15 to about 30 or 39% at liquefaction temperatures of 70 or 90{sup 0}C, respectively and 30 min hydrolysis time. CRF exhibited 14-22 DE. Enzymatic action at 70{sup 0}C increased endotherm temperature and gelatinization enthalpy of HPAF, in relation to gelatinized flour, as assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Hydrolysis at 90{sup 0}C did not affect significantly (P > 0.05) DSC peak temperature. It is suggested that these changes in DSC performance might result from differences in amount and type of low-molecular weight carbohydrates and residual starch. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that hydrolysis temperature changed substantially the structural appearance of flour particles. HPAF and CRF might find applications as dry milk extender and sweetener, respectively. (orig.).

  10. Mechanisms of biliary stent clogging: confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, A M; van Marle, J; Groen, A K; Bruno, M J

    2005-08-01

    Endoscopic insertion of plastic biliary endoprostheses is a well-established treatment for obstructive jaundice. The major limitation of this technique is late stent occlusion. In order to compare events involved in biliary stent clogging and identify the distribution of bacteria in unblocked stents, confocal laser scanning (CLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out on two different stent materials - polyethylene (PE) and hydrophilic polymer-coated polyurethane (HCPC). Ten consecutive patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures were included in the study. Two 10-Fr stents 9 cm in length, one made of PE and the other of HCPC, were inserted. The stents were electively exchanged after 3 months and examined using CLS and SEM. No differences were seen between the two types of stent. The inner stent surface was covered with a uniform amorphous layer. On top of this layer, a biofilm of living and dead bacteria was found, which in most cases was unstructured. The lumen was filled with free-floating colonies of bacteria and crystals, surrounded by mobile laminar structures of mucus. An open network of large dietary fibers was seen in all of the stents. The same clogging events occurred in both PE and HCPC stents. The most remarkable observation was the identification of networks of large dietary fibers, resulting from duodenal reflux, acting as a filter. The build-up of this intraluminal framework of dietary fibers appears to be a major factor contributing to the multifactorial process of stent clogging.

  11. Contribution of scanning Auger microscopy to electron beam damage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    Electron bombardment can produce surface modifications of the analysed sample. The electron beam effects on solid surfaces which have been discussed in the published literature can be classified into the following four categories: (1) heating and its consequent effects, (2) charge accumulation in insulators and its consequent effects, (3) electron stimulated adsorption (ESA), and (4) electron stimulated desorption and/or decomposition (ESD). In order to understand the physico-chemical processes which take place under electron irradiation in an Al-O system, we have carried out experiments in which, effects, such as heating, charging and gas contamination, were absent. Our results point out the role of an enhanced surface diffusion of oxygen during electron bombardment of an Al (111) sample. The importance of this phenomenon and the contribution of near-elastic scattering of the primary electrons (5 keV) to the increase of the oxidation degree observed on Al (111) are discussed, compared to the generally studied effects

  12. Transmission/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy | Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    crystallographic structure of a material. Amplitude-contrast images yield information about the chemistry and microstructure of a material and its defects. Phase-contrast imaging or high-resolution (HR) TEM imaging gives information about the microstructure of a material and its defects at an atomic resolution. With scanning

  13. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  14. New Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Observation of Live Nature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Shiojiri, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, 1-2 (2013), s. 1-5 ISSN 2228-9038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * detection systems * methodology * live samples Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM)-in-SEM for Bio- and Organo-Mineral Interface Characterization in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Guillaume; Hellal, Jennifer; Ollivier, Patrick; Richard, Annie; Burel, Agnes; Jolly, Louis; Crampon, Marc; Michel, Caroline

    2017-12-01

    Understanding biofilm interactions with surrounding substratum and pollutants/particles can benefit from the application of existing microscopy tools. Using the example of biofilm interactions with zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), this study aims to apply various approaches in biofilm preparation and labeling for fluorescent or electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) microanalysis for accurate observations. According to the targeted microscopy method, biofilms were sampled as flocs or attached biofilm, submitted to labeling using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol, lectins PNA and ConA coupled to fluorescent dye or gold nanoparticles, and prepared for observation (fixation, cross-section, freezing, ultramicrotomy). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that nZVI were embedded in the biofilm structure as aggregates but the resolution was insufficient to observe individual nZVI. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed nZVI aggregates close to bacteria, but it was not possible to confirm direct interactions between nZVI and cell membranes. Scanning transmission electron microscopy in the SEM (STEM-in-SEM) showed that nZVI aggregates could enter the biofilm to a depth of 7-11 µm. Bacteria were surrounded by a ring of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) preventing direct nZVI/membrane interactions. STEM/EDS mapping revealed a co-localization of nZVI aggregates with lectins suggesting a potential role of EPS in nZVI embedding. Thus, the combination of divergent microscopy approaches is a good approach to better understand and characterize biofilm/metal interactions.

  16. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning......: 2h); G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h); G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min). All bleaching treatments adopted...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  17. Use of scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis to determine chloride content of concrete and raw materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Standard sample sets of cement and mortar formulations with known levels of Cl as well as concrete samples subject to Cl diffusion were all prepared for and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe (EPMA). Using x-ray ...

  18. Nano-tomography of porous geological materials using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang; King, Helen E.; van Huis, Marijn A.; Drury, Martyn R.; Plümper, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Tomographic analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) provides three-dimensional information about solid materials with a resolution of a few nanometres and thus bridges the gap between X-ray and transmission electron microscopic tomography techniques. This contribution

  19. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  1. In situ transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of sintering of Ag and Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoro, M.A.; Ferreira, P.J.; Kovar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies were conducted in situ on 2–5 nm Pt and 10–40 nm Ag nanoparticles to study mechanisms for sintering and to measure relevant sintering kinetics in nanoscale particles. Sintering between two separated particles was observed to initiate by either (1) diffusion of the particles on the sample support or (2) diffusion of atoms or small clusters of atoms to the neck region between the two particles. After particle contact, the rate of sintering was controlled by atomic surface diffusivity. The surface diffusivity was determined as a function of particle size and temperature from experimental measurements of the rate of neck growth of the particles. The surface diffusivities did not show a strong size effect for the range of particle sizes that were studied. The surface diffusivity for Pt nanoparticles exhibited the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence and did not appear to be sensitive to the presence of surface contaminants. In contrast, the surface diffusivity for Ag nanoparticles was affected by the presence of impurities such as carbon. The diffusivities for Ag nanoparticles were consistent with previous measurements of bulk surface diffusivities for Ag in the presence of C, but were significantly slower than those obtained from pristine Ag

  2. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-09-01

    Limbal ring (also known as 'circle') contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or 'enclosed' within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of 'circle' contact lenses. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis was performed using a variable pressure Hitachi S3400N instrument to discern the placement of lens pigments. Atomic force microscopy (Dimension Icon AFM from Bruker Nano) was used to determine the surface roughness of the pigmented regions of the contact lenses. Atomic force microscopic analysis was performed in fluid phase under contact mode using a Sharp Nitride Lever probe (SNL-10) with a spring constant of 0.06 N/m. Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were analysed using a generalised linear mixed model with a log-normal distribution. Least square means and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each brand, location and pigment combination. SEM cross-sectional images at 500× and 2,000× magnification showed pigment on the surface of six of the seven lens types tested. The mean depth of pigment for 1-DAY ACUVUE DEFINE (1DAD) lenses was 8.1 μm below the surface of the lens, while the remaining lens types tested had pigment particles on the front or back surface. Results of the atomic force microscopic analysis indicated that 1DAD lenses had significantly lower root mean square roughness values in the pigmented area of the lens than the other lens types tested. SEM and AFM analysis revealed pigment on the surface of the lens for all types tested with the exception of 1DAD. Further research is required to determine if the difference in pigment location influences on-eye performance. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental

  3. Hyaline articular cartilage dissected by papain: light and scanning electron microscopy and micromechanical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P; Brereton, J D; Gardner, D L

    1984-01-01

    Papain was used to digest the hyaline femoral condylar cartilages of 30 adult Wistar rats. Matrix proteoglycan degradation was assessed by the light microscopy of paraffin sections stained with toluidine blue. The extent of surface structural change was estimated by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural integrity of the hyaline cartilage tested by the controlled impact of a sharp pin. The results demonstrated an early loss of cartilage metachromasia, increasing with time of papain ...

  4. Determination of line edge roughness in low-dose top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduin, T.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the off-line metrology for line edge roughness (LER) determination by using the discrete power spectral density (PSD). The study specifically addresses low-dose scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images in order to reduce the acquisition time and the risk of resist shrinkage. The

  5. A simple methodology for obtaining X-ray color images in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, M.M. da; Pietroluongo, L.R.V.

    1985-01-01

    A simple methodology for obtaining at least 3 elements X-ray images in only one photography is described. The fluorescent X-ray image is obtained from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion analysis system. The change of detector analytic channels, color cellophane foils and color films are used sequentially. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Fine structure of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning and transmission electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the surface morphology of the endolymphatic duct epithelium, 8 rats were vascularly perfused with glutaraldehyde in a buffered and oxygenated blood substitute. Optimal preservation of the epithelium for scanning electron microscopy was attained by coating of the specimens with OsO4...

  7. Calibration-free quantitative surface topography reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, E.T.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    This work presents a new approach to obtain reliable surface topography reconstructions from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. In this method a set of images taken at different tilt angles are compared by means of digital image correlation (DlC). It is argued that the strength of the

  8. Local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline AlN ceramics measured by scanning thermal microscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue-Fei; Wang Li; Wei Bin; Ji Yuan; Han Xiao-Dong; Zhang Ze; Heiderhoff, R.; Geinzer, A. K.; Balk, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics is measured and imaged by using a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) and complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) based techniques at room temperature. The quantitative thermal conductivity for the AlN sample is gained by using a SThM with a spatial resolution of sub-micrometer scale through using the 3ω method. A thermal conductivity of 308 W/m·K within grains corresponding to that of high-purity single crystal AlN is obtained. The slight differences in thermal conduction between the adjacent grains are found to result from crystallographic misorientations, as demonstrated in the electron backscattered diffraction. A much lower thermal conductivity at the grain boundary is due to impurities and defects enriched in these sites, as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Nonconductive Specimens at Critical Energies in a Cathode Lens System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Zadražil, Martin; Müllerová, Ilona

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2001), s. 36-50 ISSN 0161-0457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/96/0961; GA ČR GA202/99/0008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * specimen charging * nonconductive specimens Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.389, year: 2001

  10. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  11. Surface morphology of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    microscopy was attained by coating of the specimens with osmium tetroxide and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. This technique permitted, for the first time, an investigation of the surface morphology of the epithelial cells in the endolymphatic duct. Three types of cells......Following intracardiac vascular perfusion fixation of 8 rats with glutaraldehyde in a buffered and oxygenated blood substitute, the vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic duct were opened by microsurgery of the resulting 16 temporal bones. Optimum preservation of the epithelium for scanning electron...... were identified with the scanning electron microscope. A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, and in the juxtasaccular half of the duct, two additional types of epithelial cells were observed. The scanning electron microscopic observations...

  12. Electron microscopy for Engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I P

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of (mainly) Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) in an engineering context. The first two sections are TEM and chemical in nature; the final three sections are more general and include aspects of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  13. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy...... explanted due to dislocation demonstrated calcifications in 8 lenses (50%), salt precipitates in 6 cases (37.5%), and erythrocytes and fibrosis/fibroblasts in 2 cases (12.5%). In the refractive error cases, the SEM showed proteins in 5 cases (45.5%) and salt precipitates in 4 lenses (36.4%). In IOL...... opacification, the findings were calcifications in 2 of the 3 lenses (66.6%) and proteins in 2 lenses (66.6%). Conclusions A marked variation in surface changes was observed by SEM. Findings did not correlate with cause for explantation. Scanning electron microscopy is a useful tool that provides exclusive...

  14. Use of scanning electron microscopy to confirm the identity of lice infesting communally grazed goat herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Sebei

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Lice have been described on goats in commercial farming systems in South Africa but not from flocks on communal grazing. During a longitudinal survey on the causes of goat kid mortality, conducted in Jericho district, North West Province, lice were collected from communally grazed indigenous goats. These lice were prepared for and viewed by scanning electron microscopy, and micromorphological taxonomic details are described. Three species of lice were found in the study area and identified as Bovicola caprae, Bovicola limbatus and Linognathus africanus. Sucking and biting lice were found in ten of the 12 herds of goats examined. Lice were found on both mature goats and kids. Bovicola caprae and L. africanus were the most common biting and sucking lice respectively in all herds examined. Scanning electron microscopy revealed additional features which aided in the identification of the louse species. Photomicrographs were more accurate aids to identification than the line drawings in the literature and facilitated identification using dissecting microscope.

  15. Use of scanning electron microscopy to confirm the identity of lice infesting communally grazed goat herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebei, P J; McCrindle, C M E; Green, E D; Turner, M L

    2004-06-01

    Lice have been described on goats in commercial farming systems in South Africa but not from flocks on communal grazing. During a longitudinal survey on the causes of goat kid mortality, conducted in Jericho district, North West Province, lice were collected from communally grazed indigenous goats. These lice were prepared for and viewed by scanning electron microscopy, and micro-morphological taxonomic details are described. Three species of lice were found in the study area and identified as Bovicola caprae, Bovicola limbatus and Linognathus africanus. Sucking and biting lice were found in ten of the 12 herds of goats examined. Lice were found on both mature goats and kids. Bovicola caprae and L. africanus were the most common biting and sucking lice respectively in all herds examined. Scanning electron microscopy revealed additional features which aided in the identification of the louse species. Photomicrographs were more accurate aids to identification than the line drawings in the literature and facilitated identification using dissecting microscope.

  16. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, NOV (2012), s. 48-59 ISSN 0304-3991 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : stereoscopy * scanning transmission electron microscopy * single crystal Ni-base superalloys * Dislocation substructures * Foil thickness measurement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.470, year: 2012

  17. Imaging of block copolymer vesicles in solvated state by wet scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Lapčíková, Monika; Štěpánek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2011), s. 1273-1278 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0353; GA AV ČR KAN200520704; GA AV ČR IAA400500703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : environmental scanning electron microscopy * self-assembly * amphiphilic block copolymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.739, year: 2011

  18. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autocla...

  19. Use of scanning electron microscopy to confirm the identity of lice infesting communally grazed goat herds

    OpenAIRE

    P.J. Sebei; C.M.E. McCrindle; E.D. Green; M.L. Turner

    2004-01-01

    Lice have been described on goats in commercial farming systems in South Africa but not from flocks on communal grazing. During a longitudinal survey on the causes of goat kid mortality, conducted in Jericho district, North West Province, lice were collected from communally grazed indigenous goats. These lice were prepared for and viewed by scanning electron microscopy, and micromorphological taxonomic details are described. Three species of lice were found in the study area and identif...

  20. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color image s * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  1. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF THE DORSAL SURFACE OF THE TONGUE IN Chaetophractus vellerosus (MAMMALIA, DASYPODIDAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Estecondo, Silvia; Codón, Stella Maris; Casanave, Emma Beatriz

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of the dorsal surface of Chaetophractus vellerosus tongue were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Simple or branched filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae are described. Simple conical filiform papillae appear in the apex, lateral edges and posterior third, caudally to the circumvallated ones. The branched papillae are densely distributed all over the dorsal surface of the lingual body. Fungiform ones are scattered among the branched filiform papillae. In the post...

  2. Examination of the Combustion Morphology of Ziconium Carbide Using Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Newbold, Brian R.

    1997-01-01

    Calculation of viscous particle damping of acoustic combustion instability in solid propellant motors requires an understanding of the combustion behavior of added particles and oxides. A simple hydrogen/oxygen flame was used to ignite carefully sieved zirconium carbide particles which were impacted on slides at different levels below the burner. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that zirconium carbide has a complex heterogeneous combustion morphology. Initially, particles are partly v...

  3. Challenges of microtome‐based serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANNER, A. A.; KIRSCHMANN, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is becoming increasingly popular for a wide range of applications in many disciplines from biology to material sciences. This review focuses on applications for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience, which is one of the major driving forces advancing SBEM. Neuronal circuit reconstruction poses exceptional challenges to volume EM in terms of resolution, field of view, acquisition time and sample preparation. Mapping the connections between neurons in the brain is crucial for understanding information flow and information processing in the brain. However, information on the connectivity between hundreds or even thousands of neurons densely packed in neuronal microcircuits is still largely missing. Volume EM techniques such as serial section TEM, automated tape‐collecting ultramicrotome, focused ion‐beam scanning electron microscopy and SBEM (microtome serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy) are the techniques that provide sufficient resolution to resolve ultrastructural details such as synapses and provides sufficient field of view for dense reconstruction of neuronal circuits. While volume EM techniques are advancing, they are generating large data sets on the terabyte scale that require new image processing workflows and analysis tools. In this review, we present the recent advances in SBEM for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience and an overview of existing image processing and analysis pipelines. PMID:25907464

  4. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  5. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liv, Nalan, E-mail: n.liv@tudelft.nl; Lazić, Ivan; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy. - Highlights: • We investigate the achievable resolution in liquid scanning electron microscopy (SEM). • We demonstrate liquid SEM imaging of individual fluorescent nanoparticle bio-markers • We show imaging of cellular QDot uptake with simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and SEM. • The positions of individual QDots can be resolved with details on cellular structure.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liv, Nalan; Lazić, Ivan; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy. - Highlights: • We investigate the achievable resolution in liquid scanning electron microscopy (SEM). • We demonstrate liquid SEM imaging of individual fluorescent nanoparticle bio-markers • We show imaging of cellular QDot uptake with simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and SEM. • The positions of individual QDots can be resolved with details on cellular structure

  8. Special raster scanning for reduction of charging effects in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Oho, Eisaku

    2014-01-01

    A special raster scanning (SRS) method for reduction of charging effects is developed for the field of SEM. Both a conventional fast scan (horizontal direction) and an unusual scan (vertical direction) are adopted for acquiring raw data consisting of many sub-images. These data are converted to a proper SEM image using digital image processing techniques. About sharpness of the image and reduction of charging effects, the SRS is compared with the conventional fast scan (with frame-averaging) and the conventional slow scan. Experimental results show the effectiveness of SRS images. By a successful combination of the proposed scanning method and low accelerating voltage (LV)-SEMs, it is expected that higher-quality SEM images can be more easily acquired by the considerable reduction of charging effects, while maintaining the resolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. METHOD FOR OBSERVATION OF DEEMBEDDED SECTIONS OF FISH GONAD BY SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This article reports a method for examining the intracellular structure of fish gonads using a scanning electron microscope(SEM). The specimen preparation procedure is similar to that for transmission electron microscopy wherein samples cut into semi-thin sections are fixed and embedded in plastic. The embedment matrix was removed by solvents. Risen-free specimens could be observed by SEM. The morphology of matured sperms in the gonad was very clear, and the oocyte internal structures appeared in three-dimensional images. Spheroidal nucleoli and yolk vesicles and several bundles of filaments adhered on the nucleoli could be viewed by SEM for the first time.

  10. The Fresnel mode of Lorentz microscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.N.; Waddell, E.M.; Batson, P.E.; Ferrier, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    The most widely used method of investigating ferromagnetic films in the transmission electron microscope is the Fresnel or defocus mode of Lorentz microscopy. This may be implemented either in a fixed beam or a scanning instrument. Despite a rather inefficient utilization of electrons, several advantages accrue if the latter is used, and provided it is equipped with a field emission gun, low noise images may be obtained in acceptable recording times. To extract quantitative estimates of domain wall widths from such images it is necessary to measure accurately both instrumental and specimen parameters. Methods for this are discussed and an example of an analysis using a polycrystalline permalloy film is given. (Auth.)

  11. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelliccione, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sciambi, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  12. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  13. Processing influence on the morphology of PVDF/PMMA blends examined by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Estevao; Forte, Maria M.C.; Monteiro, Elisabeth E.C.

    2011-01-01

    PVDF/PMMA blends were melt blended in proportions of 20, 40 e 60% PVDF by weight in two different mixers, a low shear and a high shear mixer. The compositions obtained were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results were correlated with the two types of processing and showed that the type of mixer affects the morphology of the blend. The morphologies obtained corroborated the NMR analysis demonstrating the phase separation phenomena and the effect of the type of mixer used in this study. (author)

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of the collodion membrane from a self-healing collodion baby*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Isaacsson, Henrique; Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Self-healing collodion baby is a well-established subtype of this condition. We examined a male newborn, who was covered by a collodion membrane. The shed membrane was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The outer surface showed a very compact keratin without the normal elimination of corneocytes. The lateral view of the specimen revealed a very thick, horny layer. The inner surface showed the structure of lower corneocytes with polygonal contour. With higher magnifications villous projections were seen in the cell membrane. PMID:26375232

  15. Reaction of LiD with water vapor: thermogravimetric and scanning electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balooch, M; Dinh, L N; LeMay, J D

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of hydroxide film growth on LiD have been studied by the thermogravimetric method in nitrogen saturated with water vapor and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of samples that have been exposed to air with 50% relative humidity. The reaction probability is estimated to be 4 x 10 -7 for LiD exposed to ambient air with 50% relative humidity, suggesting that the diffusion through the hydroxide film is not the limiting step on the overall process at high moisture levels. The rate of growth is drastically reduced when the temperature is increased to 60 C

  16. Larval morphology of Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Sukontason, Kom; Piangjai, Somsak; Boonchu, Noppawan; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Kuntalue, Budsabong; Thijuk, Natchanart; Olson, Jimmy K

    2003-06-01

    The larval morphology of Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) is presented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Extreme similarity of this species to Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), a species usually found concurrently inhabiting decomposing human corpses in Thailand, is seen only in the first-instar larvae. The relative thickness of the branches of the posterior spiracular hairs in these species could be used to differentiate them in this developmental stage. In contrast, the "hairy" appearance of C. rufifacies allows second- and third-instar larvae to be easily distinguished. Results of this study should help in future endeavors to differentiate C. megacephala from other larvae found in decomposing human corpses in Thailand.

  17. Dynamics of annular bright field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of image formation in the so-called annular bright field mode in scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereby an annular detector is used with detector collection range lying within the cone of illumination, i.e. the bright field region. We show that this imaging mode allows us to reliably image both light and heavy columns over a range of thickness and defocus values, and we explain the contrast mechanisms involved. The role of probe and detector aperture sizes is considered, as is the sensitivity of the method to intercolumn spacing and local disorder.

  18. Ti-6Al-4V electron beam weld qualification using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanjara, P.; Brochu, M.; Jahazi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Processing conditions for manufacturing Ti-6Al-4V components by welding using an electron beam source are known to influence the transformation microstructure in the narrow fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld region. This work examined the effect of multiple-sequence welding on the characteristics of the transformed beta microstructure, using laser scanning confocal microscopy to resolve the Widmanstaetten alpha-beta structure in the fusion zone. The evolution in the alpha interlamellar spacing and plate thickness with processing was then related to microhardness measurements in the weld region

  19. Reevaluation of Physaloptera bispiculata (Nematoda: Spiruroidaea) by light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafra, A C; Lanfredi, R M

    1998-06-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify several aspects of morphological and taxonomic characters of Physaloptera bispiculata Vaz and Pereira, 1935, a parasite of the water rat, Nectomys squamipes. The cephalic structures (including lips, papillae, teeth, amphids, and porous areas) and details of the posterior end of male and female adult worms were examined by scanning electron microscopy, leading to the addition of new taxonomic characters for this species. We consider P. bispiculata a valid species, based on a comparative analysis of the specific characters for P. bispiculata and P. getula Seurat, 1917, including the morphology and morphometry of body structures as well as number and disposition of caudal papillae of the males.

  20. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  1. The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunia (Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima as revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muszyński

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunias was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The pollen grain wall is developed into characteristic pattern of convulations.

  2. New Technique for Fabrication of Scanning Single-Electron Transistor Microscopy Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Eric; Tessmer, Stuart

    Fabrication of glass tips for Scanning Single-Electron Transistor Microscopy (SSETM) can be expensive, time consuming, and inconsistent. Various techniques have been tried, with varying levels of success in regards to cost and reproducibility. The main requirement for SSETM tips is to have a sharp tip ending in a micron-scale flat face to allow for deposition of a quantum dot. Drawing inspiration from methods used to create tips from optical fibers for Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopes, our group has come up with a quick and cost effective process for creating SSETM tips. By utilizing hydrofluoric acid to etch the tips and oleic acid to guide the etch profile, optical fiber tips with appropriate shaping can be rapidly prepared. Once etched, electric leads are thermally evaporated onto each side of the tip, while an aluminum quantum dot is evaporated onto the face. Preliminary results using various metals, oxide layers, and lead thicknesses have proven promising.

  3. Immunogold scanning electron microscopy can reveal the polysaccharide architecture of xylem cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuliang; Juzenas, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the two main techniques commonly used to detect polysaccharides in plant cell walls. Both are important in localizing cell wall polysaccharides, but both have major limitations, such as low resolution in IFM and restricted sample size for immunogold TEM. In this study, we have developed a robust technique that combines immunocytochemistry with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study cell wall polysaccharide architecture in xylem cells at high resolution over large areas of sample. Using multiple cell wall monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this immunogold SEM technique reliably localized groups of hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of five different xylem structures (vessel elements, fibers, axial and ray parenchyma cells, and tyloses). This demonstrates its important advantages over the other two methods for studying cell wall polysaccharide composition and distribution in these structures. In addition, it can show the three-dimensional distribution of a polysaccharide group in the vessel lateral wall and the polysaccharide components in the cell wall of developing tyloses. This technique, therefore, should be valuable for understanding the cell wall polysaccharide composition, architecture and functions of diverse cell types. PMID:28398585

  4. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  5. Application of scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet fluorescence to a study of Chattanooga Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, L.A.; Kopp, O.C.; Crouse, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Microanalytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and electron-beam microprobe analysis have been shown to be ideal for determining the host phases of the minor and trace elements in the Chattanooga shale. Positive correlations were found between pyrite and organic constituents. However, these observations provided no evidence that microorganisms acted as hosts for pyrite framboids. Interestingly, appreciable organic sulfur is still present, suggesting that the sulfur used for the formation of pyrite must have been derived mostly from other sources. It may be that the sulfate-reducing bacteria had an affinity for organic matter and that the organic fragments acted as substrates for pyrite growth

  6. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forslind, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed.

  7. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forslind, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed

  8. The surface topography of the choroid plexus. Environmental, low and high vacuum scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Pedro; Pütz, Norbert; Garcia Gómez de Las Heras, Soledad; García Poblete, Eduardo; Morguet, Andrea; Laue, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) allows the examination of hydrated and dried specimens without a conductive metal coating which could be advantageous in the imaging of biological and medical objects. The aim of this study was to assess the performance and benefits of wet-mode and low vacuum ESEM in comparison to high vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the choroid plexus of chicken embryos as a model, an organ of the brain involved in the formation of cerebrospinal fluid in vertebrates. Specimens were fixed with or without heavy metals and examined directly or after critical point drying with or without metal coating. For wet mode ESEM freshly excised specimens without any pre-treatment were also examined. Conventional high vacuum SEM revealed the characteristic morphology of the choroid plexus cells at a high resolution and served as reference. With low vacuum ESEM of dried but uncoated samples the structure appeared well preserved but charging was a problem. It could be reduced by a short beam dwell time and averaging of images or by using the backscattered electron detector instead of the gaseous secondary electron detector. However, resolution was lower than with conventional SEM. Wet mode imaging was only possible with tissue that had been stabilized by fixation. Not all surface details (e.g. microvilli) could be visualized and other structures, like the cilia, were deformed. In summary, ESEM is an additional option for the imaging of bio-medical samples but it is problematic with regard to resolution and sample stability during imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. An extended model of electrons: experimental evidence from high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Werner A

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper we introduced a model of extended electrons, which is fully compatible with quantum mechanics in the formulation of Schrödinger. However, it contradicts the current interpretation of electrons as point-particles. Here, we show by a statistical analysis of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, that the interpretation of electrons as point particles and, consequently, the interpretation of the density of electron charge as a statistical quantity will lead to a conflict with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Given the precision in these experiments we find that the uncertainty principle would be violated by close to two orders of magnitude, if this interpretation were correct. We are thus forced to conclude that the density of electron charge is a physically real, i.e. in principle precisely measurable quantity, as derived in a recent paper. Experimental evidence to the contrary, in particular high-energy scattering experiments, is briefly discussed. The finding is expected to have wide implications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, and biology, scientific disciplines which are based on the properties and interactions of electrons.

  10. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Burlaud-Gaillard

    Full Text Available The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy. CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  12. Charge dynamics in aluminum oxide thin film studied by ultrafast scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Maurizio; Sala, Vittorio; Irde, Gabriele; Pietralunga, Silvia Maria; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    The excitation dynamics of defects in insulators plays a central role in a variety of fields from Electronics and Photonics to Quantum computing. We report here a time-resolved measurement of electron dynamics in 100 nm film of aluminum oxide on silicon by Ultrafast Scanning Electron Microscopy (USEM). In our pump-probe setup, an UV femtosecond laser excitation pulse and a delayed picosecond electron probe pulse are spatially overlapped on the sample, triggering Secondary Electrons (SE) emission to the detector. The zero of the pump-probe delay and the time resolution were determined by measuring the dynamics of laser-induced SE contrast on silicon. We observed fast dynamics with components ranging from tens of picoseconds to few nanoseconds, that fits within the timescales typical of the UV color center evolution. The surface sensitivity of SE detection gives to the USEM the potential of applying pump-probe investigations to charge dynamics at surfaces and interfaces of current nano-devices. The present work demonstrates this approach on large gap insulator surfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. External cervical resorption: an analysis using cone beam and microfocus computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, V; Mavridou, A; Huybrechts, B; Van Gorp, G; Bergmans, L; Lambrechts, P

    2013-09-01

    To provide a three-dimensional representation of external cervical resorption (ECR) with microscopy, stereo microscopy, cone beam computed tomography (CT), microfocus CT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). External cervical resorption is an aggressive form of root resorption, leading to a loss of dental hard tissues. This is due to clastic action, activated by a damage of the covering cementum and stimulated probably by infection. Clinically, it is a challenging situation as it is characterized by a late symptomatology. This is due to the pericanalar protection from a resorption-resistant sheet, composed of pre-dentine and surrounding dentine. The clastic activity is often associated with an attempt to repair, seen by the formation of osteoid tissue. Cone beam CT is extremely useful in the diagnoses and treatment planning of ECR. SEM analyses provide a better insight into the activity of osteoclasts. The root canal is surrounded by a layer of dentine that is resistant to resorption. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, L D; Rivas, J; José-Yacamán, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS 2 will be discussed. MoS 2 -based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important

  15. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Manaka, Sachie [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Nakane, Daisuke [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  16. Evaluation of the infection process by Lecanicillium fungicola in Agaricus bisporus by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Nunes, Janaira; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cunha Zied, Diego; Aparecida das Graças Leite, Eloisa; Souza Dias, Eustáquio; Alves, Eduardo

    Lecanicillium fungicola causes dry bubble disease in Agaricus bisporus mushrooms leading to significant economic losses in commercial production. To monitor the infection process of L. fungicola in Brazilian strains of A. bisporus. The interaction between the mycelium of L. fungicola (LF.1) and three strains of A. bisporus (ABI 7, ABI 11/14 and ABI 11/21) was studied. Electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of vegetative growth and basidiocarp infection were evaluated. Micrographs show that the vegetative mycelium of the Brazilian strains of A. bisporus is not infected by the parasite. The images show that the pathogen can interlace the hyphae of A. bisporus without causing damage, which contributes to the presence of L. fungicola during the substrate colonization, allowing their presence during primordial formation of A. bisporus. In the basidiocarp, germ tubes form within 16h of infection with L. fungicola and the beginning of penetration takes place within 18h, both without the formation of specialized structures. Scanning electron microscopy enabled the process of colonization and reproduction to be observed within the formation of phialides, conidiophores and verticils of L. fungicola. The formation of calcium oxalate crystals by the pathogen was also visible using the X-ray microanalysis, both at the hyphae in the Petri plate and at basidiocarp infection site. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Patricia K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Mahaffee, Walt F.

    2011-08-01

    The dual beam scanning electron microscope, equipped with both a focused ion- and scanning electron- beam (FIB SEM) is a novel tool for the exploration of the subsurface structure of biological tissues. The FIB can remove a predetermined amount of material from a selected site to allow for subsurface exploration and when coupled with SEM or scanning ion- beam microscopy (SIM) could be suitable to examine the subsurface structure of bacterial biofilms on the leaf surface. The suitability of chemical and cryofixation was examined for use with the FIB SEM to examine bacterial biofilms on leaf surfaces. The biological control agent, Burkholderia pyroccinia FP62, that rapidly colonizes the leaf surface and forms biofilms, was inoculated onto geranium leaves and incubated in a greenhouse for 7 or 14 days. Cryofixation was not suitable for examination of leaf biofilms because it created a frozen layer over the leaf surface that cracked when exposed to the electron beam and the protective cap required for FIB milling could not be accurately deposited. With chemically fixed samples, it was possible to precisely FIB mill a single cross section (5 µm) or sequential cross sections from a single site without any damage to the surrounding surface. Biofilms, 7 days post-inoculation (DPI), were composed of 2 to 5 bacterial cell layers while biofilms 14 DPI ranged from 5 to greater than 30 cell layers. Empty spaces between bacteria cells in the subsurface structure were observed in biofilms 7- and 14-DPI. Sequential cross sections inferred that the empty spaces were often continuous between FP62 cells and could possibly make up a network of channels throughout the biofilm. FIB SEM was a useful tool to observe the subsurface composition of a foliar biofilm.

  18. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  19. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  20. In-situ environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy of catalysts at the atomic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2014-01-01

    Observing reacting single atoms on the solid catalyst surfaces under controlled reaction conditions is a key goal in understanding and controlling heterogeneous catalytic reactions. In-situ real time aberration corrected environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (E(S)TEM permit the direct imaging of dynamic surface and sub-surface structures of reacting catalysts. In this paper in-situ AC ETEM and AC ESTEM studies under controlled reaction environments of oxide catalysts and supported metal nanocatalysts important in chemical industry are presented. They provide the direct evidence of dynamic processes at the oxide catalyst surface at the atomic scale and single atom dynamics in catalytic reactions. The ESTEM studies of single atom dynamics in controlled reaction environments show that nanoparticles act as reservoirs of ad-atoms. The results have important implications in catalysis and nanoparticle studies

  1. Imaging of surface spin textures on bulk crystals by scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Hiroshi; Okumura, So; Farjami, Sahar; Murakami, Yasukazu; Nishida, Minoru

    2016-11-01

    Direct observation of magnetic microstructures is vital for advancing spintronics and other technologies. Here we report a method for imaging surface domain structures on bulk samples by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Complex magnetic domains, referred to as the maze state in CoPt/FePt alloys, were observed at a spatial resolution of less than 100 nm by using an in-lens annular detector. The method allows for imaging almost all the domain walls in the mazy structure, whereas the visualisation of the domain walls with the classical SEM method was limited. Our method provides a simple way to analyse surface domain structures in the bulk state that can be used in combination with SEM functions such as orientation or composition analysis. Thus, the method extends applications of SEM-based magnetic imaging, and is promising for resolving various problems at the forefront of fields including physics, magnetics, materials science, engineering, and chemistry.

  2. Devolatilization Studies of Oil Palm Biomass for Torrefaction Process through Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, D.; Abd. Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, palm oil biomass consisting of empty fruit bunch (EFB), mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell (PKS) were chosen as raw material for torrefaction process. Torrefaction process was conducted at various temperatures of 240 °C, 270 °C and 300 °C with a residence time of 60 minutes. The morphology of the raw and torrefied biomass was then observed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. Also, through this experiment the correlation between the torrefaction temperatures with the volatile gases released were studied. From the observation, the morphology structure of the biomass exhibited inter-particle gaps due to the release of volatile gases and it is obviously seen more at higher temperatures. Moreover, the change of the biomass structure is influenced by the alteration of the lignocellulose biomass.

  3. Large area strain analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy across multiple images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; LeBeau, J. M.; Raju, S. V.; Saxena, S.; Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.; Rajan, K.; Kumar, A.; Sinnott, S.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we apply revolving scanning transmission electron microscopy to measure lattice strain across a sample using a single reference area. To do so, we remove image distortion introduced by sample drift, which usually restricts strain analysis to a single image. Overcoming this challenge, we show that it is possible to use strain reference areas elsewhere in the sample, thereby enabling reliable strain mapping across large areas. As a prototypical example, we determine the strain present within the microstructure of a Ni-based superalloy directly from atom column positions as well as geometric phase analysis. While maintaining atomic resolution, we quantify strain within nanoscale regions and demonstrate that large, unit-cell level strain fluctuations are present within the intermetallic phase

  4. Colorimeter and scanning electron microscopy analysis of teeth submitted to internal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Biedma, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Lopes, Manuela; Lopes, Luis; Vilar, Rui; Bahillo, José; Varela-Patiño, Purificación

    2010-02-01

    This in vitro study compared the tooth color and the ultrastructure of internal dental tissues before and after internal bleaching. Sodium perborate was placed in the pulp chamber of endodontically treated molars and sealed with intermediate restorative material. The test samples were stored in a physiologic solution, and the bleaching agent was replaced every 7 days. A control group was used. After 1 month, the colors of the test and control samples were measured with a colorimeter, and the internal surfaces were observed under field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Statistically significant differences were found between the test and control sample colors. The FESEM ultrastructure analysis of the internal enamel and dentin surfaces did not show any changes after the internal bleaching. The results of the present study show that sodium perborate is effective in bleaching nonvital teeth and does not produce ultrastructural changes in the dental tissues. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase-selective staining of metal salt for scanning electron microscopy imaging of block copolymer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing Ze, E-mail: Lijinge@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Microelectronic and Solid-state Electronic, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering (Sichuan University), Chengdu 610054 (China); Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Urumuqi 830011 (China); Wang, Ying; Hong Wang, Zhi; Mei, Di; Zou, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Microelectronic and Solid-state Electronic, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Min Chang, Ai [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering (Sichuan University), Chengdu 610054 (China); Wang, Qi [Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Urumuqi 830011 (China); Komura, Motonori; Ito, Kaori [Division of Integrated Molecular Engineering, Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Iyoda, Tomokazu, E-mail: Iyoda.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Division of Integrated Molecular Engineering, Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Three metal salts, i.e., AgNO{sub 3}, HAuCl{sub 4}, and KCl, were proposed as novel staining reagents instead of traditional RuO{sub 4} and OsO{sub 4} labeled with expensive price and extreme toxicity for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of microphase separated block copolymer film. A simple and costless aqueous solution immersion procedure could ensure selective staining of the metal slat in specific phase of the nanostructured copolymer film, leading to a clear phase contrasted SEM image. The heavy metal salt has better staining effect, demonstrating stable and high signal-to-noise SEM image even at an acceleration voltage as high as 30 kV and magnification up to 250,000 times.

  6. The Role of Scanning Electron Microscopy in the Direct Diagnosis of Onychomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Yue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the direct diagnosis of suspected onychomycosis with negative mycological test results. Methods. Outpatients diagnosed with suspected onychomycosis with negative mycological test results, including direct microscopic examination with 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH and fungal culture, on 3 separate occasions were recruited. A small piece of infected nail was obtained for SEM examination. Results. Among the 48 suspected onychomycosis samples, SEM revealed that 18 (37.5% were positive for fungal structures, including 10 (20.8% cases of hyphae and 8 (16.7% cases of yeast blastospores or budding. Conclusion. SEM represents an effective method to diagnose suspected onychomycosis when the traditional mycological methods were negative. Therefore, this technique could be used in clinical practice.

  7. Atomic-scale Ge diffusion in strained Si revealed by quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Favre, L.; Couillard, M.; Amiard, G.; Berbezier, I.; Botton, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to investigate the local chemistry in the vicinity of a Si0.8Ge0.2/Si interface grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark field contrast reveals the presence of a nonuniform diffusion of Ge from the substrate into the strained Si thin film. On the basis of multislice calculations, a model is proposed to quantify the experimental contrast, showing that the Ge concentration in the thin film reaches about 4% at the interface and decreases monotonically on a typical length scale of 10 nm. Diffusion occurring during the growth process itself therefore appears as a major factor limiting the abruptness of interfaces in the Si-Ge system.

  8. Morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Bettina; Huss, Hans Henrik; Bresciani, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi in vitro at pH 3.5 and 7.0 is described using light and scanning electron microscopy. Only vegetative growth was observed. At pH 3.5, hyphal growth was seen. The hyphae of I. hoferi are characterized by evacuated hyphal walls with the cytoplasm migrating......-walled multinucleate spores in the fish stomach as a response to the low pH. The hyphae then penetrate the digestive tract and rupture when they reach a blood vessel (neutral pH), whereby uni- and binucleate bodies and/or amoeboid bodies are released. The small cells are transported in the blood vessels and spread...

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopy Study of the Antennal Sensilla of Monema flavescens Walker (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Liu, H; Zhang, J T; Liu, J; Zheng, H; Ren, Y

    2017-04-01

    Monema flavescens Walker (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae) is a serious polyphagous defoliator. Using scanning electron microscopy, the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of this pest was examined for a better understanding of the mechanisms of insect-insect and insect-plant chemical communications. The antennae of M. flavescens were filiform in shape, and 11 morphological types of sensilla were found in both sexes. Six types of likely chemosensory sensilla were identified: uniporous sensilla chaetica, multiporous sensilla trichodea, and four types of multiporous sensilla basiconica. The sensilla identified as likely mechanoreceptors included two subtypes of aporous sensilla chaetica, aporous sensilla coeloconica, aporous sensilla styloconica, and Böhm's bristles, whereas the position of the antennae was monitored by Böhm's bristles.

  10. Calibration-free quantitative surface topography reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, E T; Martinez-Martinez, D; Mansilla, C; Ocelík, V; Hosson, J Th M De

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach to obtain reliable surface topography reconstructions from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. In this method a set of images taken at different tilt angles are compared by means of digital image correlation (DIC). It is argued that the strength of the method lies in the fact that precise knowledge about the nature of the rotation (vector and/or magnitude) is not needed. Therefore, the great advantage is that complex calibrations of the measuring equipment are avoided. The paper presents the necessary equations involved in the methods, including derivations and solutions. The method is illustrated with examples of 3D reconstructions followed by a discussion on the relevant experimental parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigations of a Cretaceous limestone with spectral induced polarization and scanning electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sara; Sparrembom, Charlotte; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    limestone was carried out in the Kristianstad basin, Sweden. The time domain IP data was processed with a recently developed method in order to suppress noise from the challenging urban setting in the survey area. The processing also enabled extraction of early decay times resulting in broader spectra...... in early time ranges for bedrock characterization. The inverted sections showed variations within the limestone that could be caused by variations in texture and composition. Samples from a deep drilling in the Kristianstad basin were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X......Characterization of varying bedrock properties is a common need in various contexts, ranging from large infrastructure pre-investigations to environmental protection. A direct current resistivity and time domain induced polarization (IP) survey aiming to characterize properties of a Cretaceous...

  12. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A low-cost technique to manufacture a container to process meiofauna for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolafia, J

    2015-09-01

    An easy and low-cost method to elaborate a container to dehydrate nematodes and other meiofauna in order to process them for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is presented. Illustrations of its elaboration, step by step, are included. In addition, a brief methodology to process meiofauna, especially nematodes and kinorhynchs, and illustrations are provided. With this methodology it is possible to easily introduce the specimens, to lock them in a closed chamber allowing the infiltration of fluids and gases (ethanol, acetone, carbon dioxide) but avoiding losing the specimens. After using this meiofauna basket for SEM the results are efficient. Examples of nematode and kinorhynch SEM pictures obtained using this methodology are also included. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Erni, R.; Bals, S.; Luysberg, M.; Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  15. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  17. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  18. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells

  19. The mechanism of PTFE and PE friction deposition: a combined scanning electron and scanning force microscopy study on highly oriented polymeric sliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, Holger; Schaeben, H.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of friction deposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethylene (PE) was studied by scanning electron (SEM) and scanning force microscopy (SFM) on the worn surfaces of PTFE and PE sliders that were used in friction deposition on glass substrates. These surfaces exhibited a

  20. Analysis of enamel microbiopsies in shed primary teeth by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Polarizing Microscopy (PM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa de Almeida, Glauce Regina; Molina, Gabriela Ferian; Meschiari, Cesar Arruda; Barbosa de Sousa, Frederico; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to verify how close to the theoretically presumed areas are the areas of enamel microbiopsies carried out in vivo or in exfoliated teeth; 2) to test whether the etching solution penetrates beyond the tape borders; 3) to test whether the etching solution demineralizes the enamel in depth. 24 shed upper primary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups: the Rehydrated Teeth Group and the Dry Teeth Group. An enamel microbiopsy was performed, and the enamel microbiopsies were then analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Polarizing Microscopy (PM). Quantitative birefringence measurements were performed. The 'true' etched area was determined by measuring the etched enamel using the NIH Image analysis program. Enamel birefringence was compared using the paired t test. There was a statistically significant difference when the etched areas in the Rehydrated teeth were compared with those of the Dry teeth (p = 0.04). The etched areas varied from - 11.6% to 73.5% of the presumed area in the Rehydrated teeth, and from 6.6% to 61.3% in the Dry teeth. The mean percentage of variation in each group could be used as a correction factor for the etched area. Analysis of PM pictures shows no evidence of in-depth enamel demineralization by the etching solution. No statistically significant differences in enamel birefringence were observed between values underneath and outside the microbiopsy area in the same tooth, showing that no mineral loss occurred below the enamel superficial layer. Our data showed no evidence of in-depth enamel demineralization by the etching solution used in the enamel microbiopsy proposed for primary enamel. This study also showed a variation in the measured diameter of the enamel microbiopsy in nineteen teeth out of twenty four, indicating that in most cases the etching solution penetrated beyond the tape borders.

  1. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  2. Comparison of macroscopic and microscopic (stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy) features of bone lesions due to hatchet hacking trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Luísa; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Bertrand, Marie-France; Rallon, Christophe; Ceinos, Romain; du Jardin, Philippe; Adalian, Pascal; Alunni, Véronique

    2017-03-01

    This experimental study examined the lesions produced by a hatchet on human bones (tibiae). A total of 30 lesions were produced and examined macroscopically (naked eye) and by stereomicroscopy. 13 of them were also analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The general shape of the lesion, both edges, both walls, the kerf floor and the extremities were described. The length and maximum width of the lesions were also recorded. The microscopic analysis of the lesions led to the description of a sharp-blunt mechanism. Specific criteria were identified (lateral pushing back, fragmentation of the upraising, fossa dug laterally to the edge and vertical striae) enabling the forensic expert to conclude that a hacking instrument was used. These criteria are easily identifiable using scanning electron microscopy, but can also be observed with stereomicroscopy. Overall, lateral pushing back and vertical striae visible using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy signal the use of a hacking tool.

  3. High Resolution Scanning Ion Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the thesis is the following. The first chapter is an introduction to scanning microscopy, where the path that led to the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is described and the main differences between electrons and ion beams are highlighted. Chapter 2 is what is normally referred to (which I

  4. The importance of scanning electron microscopy (sem in taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kownacki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on the value of scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae. This method has been relatively rarely used in Chironomidae studies. Our studies suggest that the SEM method provides a lot of new information. For example, the plastron plate of the thoracic horn of Macropelopia nebulosa (Meigen under light microscopy is visible as points, while under SEM we have found that it consists of a reticular structure with holes. By using SEM a more precise picture of the body structure of Chironomidae can be revealed. It allows researchers to explain inconsistencies in the existing descriptions of species. Another advantage of the SEM method is obtaining spatial images of the body and organs of Chironomidae. However, the SEM method also has some limitations. The main problem is dirt or debris (e.g. algae, mud, secretions, mucus, bacteria, etc., which often settles on the external surface of structures, especially those which are uneven or covered with hair. The dirt should be removed after collection of chironomid material because if left in place it can become chemically fixed to various surfaces. It unnecessarily remains at the surface and final microscopic images may contain artifacts that obscure chironomid structures being investigated. In this way many details of the surface are thus unreadable. The results reported here indicate that SEM examination helps us to identify new morphological features and details that will facilitate the identification of species of Chironomidae and may help to clarify the function of various parts of the body. Fast development of electron microscope technique allows us to learn more about structure of different organisms.

  5. Determination of aberration center of Ronchigram for automated aberration correctors in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannomiya, Takumi, E-mail: sannomiya@mtl.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka; Nakamichi, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Fumio [JEOL Limited, Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Yoshio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    A generic method to determine the aberration center is established, which can be utilized for aberration calculation and axis alignment for aberration corrected electron microscopes. In this method, decentering induced secondary aberrations from inherent primary aberrations are minimized to find the appropriate axis center. The fitness function to find the optimal decentering vector for the axis was defined as a sum of decentering induced secondary aberrations with properly distributed weight values according to the aberration order. Since the appropriate decentering vector is determined from the aberration values calculated at an arbitrary center axis, only one aberration measurement is in principle required to find the center, resulting in /very fast center search. This approach was tested for the Ronchigram based aberration calculation method for aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both in simulation and in experiments, the center search was confirmed to work well although the convergence to find the best axis becomes slower with larger primary aberrations. Such aberration center determination is expected to fully automatize the aberration correction procedures, which used to require pre-alignment of experienced users. This approach is also applicable to automated aperture positioning. - Highlights: • A generic method to determine the aberration center is established for (S)TEM. • Decentering induced secondary aberrations are utilized to find the center. • The method is tested on Ronchigrams both in simulation and experiment. • Proper weighting of the aberration gives a good convergence. • Larger primary aberration results in a slower convergence.

  6. Optimizing the 3D-reconstruction technique for serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernitznig, Stefan; Sele, Mariella; Urschler, Martin; Zankel, Armin; Pölt, Peter; Rind, F Claire; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Elucidating the anatomy of neuronal circuits and localizing the synaptic connections between neurons, can give us important insights in how the neuronal circuits work. We are using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) to investigate the anatomy of a collision detection circuit including the Lobula Giant Movement Detector (LGMD) neuron in the locust, Locusta migratoria. For this, thousands of serial electron micrographs are produced that allow us to trace the neuronal branching pattern. The reconstruction of neurons was previously done manually by drawing cell outlines of each cell in each image separately. This approach was very time consuming and troublesome. To make the process more efficient a new interactive software was developed. It uses the contrast between the neuron under investigation and its surrounding for semi-automatic segmentation. For segmentation the user sets starting regions manually and the algorithm automatically selects a volume within the neuron until the edges corresponding to the neuronal outline are reached. Internally the algorithm optimizes a 3D active contour segmentation model formulated as a cost function taking the SEM image edges into account. This reduced the reconstruction time, while staying close to the manual reference segmentation result. Our algorithm is easy to use for a fast segmentation process, unlike previous methods it does not require image training nor an extended computing capacity. Our semi-automatic segmentation algorithm led to a dramatic reduction in processing time for the 3D-reconstruction of identified neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrobo, Juan C., E-mail: idrobojc@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Walkosz, Weronika [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Klie, Robert F.; Oeguet, Serdar [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface and in bulk Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Revealing the atomic structure of the {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and lattice location of oxygen impurities in bulk {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering of nitrogen and oxygen at the {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  8. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  9. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  10. Nano-Tomography of Porous Geological Materials Using Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM provides three-dimensional information about solid materials with a resolution of a few nanometres and thus bridges the gap between X-ray and transmission electron microscopic tomography techniques. This contribution serves as an introduction and overview of FIB-SEM tomography applied to porous materials. Using two different porous Earth materials, a diatomite specimen, and an experimentally produced amorphous silica layer on olivine, we discuss the experimental setup of FIB-SEM tomography. We then focus on image processing procedures, including image alignment, correction, and segmentation to finally result in a three-dimensional, quantified pore network representation of the two example materials. To each image processing step we consider potential issues, such as imaging the back of pore walls, and the generation of image artefacts through the application of processing algorithms. We conclude that there is no single image processing recipe; processing steps need to be decided on a case-by-case study.

  11. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Teruo, E-mail: t.hashimoto@manchester.ac.uk; Thompson, George E.; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-04-15

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. - Highlights: • The roughness of the ultramicrotomed block face of AA2024 in Al area was 1.2 nm. • Surface texture associated with chattering was evident in grains with 45° diamond knife. • A 76° rake angle minimises the stress on the block face. • Using the oscillating knife with a cutting speed of 0.04 mms{sup −1} minimised the surface texture. • A variety of material applications were presented.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Complete X-Ray Spectra for Use in Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roet, David; Van Espen, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Full Text: The interactions of keV electrons and photons with matter can be simulated accurately with the aid of the Monte Carlo (MC) technique. In scanning electron microscopy x-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) such simulations can be used to perform quantitative analysis using a Reverse Monte Carlo method even if the samples have irregular geometry. Alternatively the MC technique can generate spectra of standards for use in quantization with partial least squares regression. The feasibility of these alternatives to the more classical ZAF or phi-rho-Z quantification methods has been proven already. In order to be applicable for these purposes the MC-code needs to generate accurately only the characteristic K and L x-ray lines, but also the Bremsstrahlung continuum, i.e. the complete x-ray spectrum need to be simulated. Currently two types of MC simulation codes are available. Programs like Electron Flight Simulator and CASINO simulate characteristic x-rays due to electron interaction in a fast and efficient way but lack provision for the simulation of the continuum. On the other hand, programs like EGS4, MCNP4 and PENELOPE, originally developed for high energy (MeV- GeV) applications, are more complete but difficult to use and still slow, even on todays fastest computers. We therefore started the development of a dedicated MC simulation code for use in quantitative SEM-EDX work. The selection of the most appropriate cross section for the different interactions will be discussed and the results obtained will be compared with those obtained with existing MC programs. Examples of the application of MC simulations for quantitative analysis of samples with various composition will be given

  13. Microscale reconstruction of biogeochemical substrates using multimode X-ray tomography and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.; Miller, E.; Liu, J.; Lund, R. M.; McKinley, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMP), and computational image analysis are mature technologies used in many disciplines. Cross-discipline combination of these imaging and image-analysis technologies is the focus of this research, which uses laboratory and light-source resources in an iterative approach. The objective is to produce images across length scales, taking advantage of instrumentation that is optimized for each scale, and to unify them into a single compositional reconstruction. Initially, CT images will be collected using both x-ray absorption and differential phase contrast modes. The imaged sample will then be physically sectioned and the exposed surfaces imaged and characterized via SEM/EMP. The voxel slice corresponding to the physical sample surface will be isolated computationally, and the volumetric data will be combined with two-dimensional SEM images along CT image planes. This registration step will take advantage of the similarity between the X-ray absorption (CT) and backscattered electron (SEM) coefficients (both proportional to average atomic number in the interrogated volume) as well as the images' mutual information. Elemental and solid-phase distributions on the exposed surfaces, co-registered with SEM images, will be mapped using EMP. The solid-phase distribution will be propagated into three-dimensional space using computational methods relying on the estimation of compositional distributions derived from the CT data. If necessary, solid-phase and pore-space boundaries will be resolved using X-ray differential phase contrast tomography, x-ray fluorescence tomography, and absorption-edge microtomography at a light-source facility. Computational methods will be developed to register and model images collected over varying scales and data types. Image resolution, physically and dynamically, is qualitatively different for the electron microscopy and CT methodologies. Routine

  14. Evaluation of intracameral injection of ranibizumab and bevacizumab on the corneal endothelium by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Seyhmus; Nergiz, Yusuf; Aksit, Ihsan; Sahin, Alparslan; Cingu, Kursat; Caca, Ihsan

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of intracameral injection of ranibizumab and bevacizumab on the corneal endothelium by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty-eight female rabbits were randomly divided into four equal groups. Rabbits in groups 1 and 2 underwent intracameral injection of 1 mg/0.1 mL and 0.5 mg/0.05 mL ranibizumab, respectively; group 3 was injected with 1.25 mg/0.05 mL bevacizumab. All three groups were injected with a balanced salt solution (BSS) into the anterior chamber of the left (fellow) eye. None of the rabbits in group 4 underwent an injection. Corneal thickness and intraocular pressure were measured before the injections, on the first day, and in the first month after injection. The rabbits were sacrificed and corneal tissues were excised in the first month after injection. Specular microscopy was used for the corneal endothelial cell count. Endothelial cell density was assessed and comparisons drawn between the groups and the control. Micrographs were recorded for SEM examination. The structure of the corneal endothelial cells, the junctional area of the cell membrane, the distribution of microvillus, and the cell morphology of the eyes that underwent intracameral injection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), BSS, and the control group were compared. Corneal thickness and intraocular pressure were not significantly different between the groups that underwent anti-VEGF or BSS injection and the control group on the first day and in the first month of injection. The corneal endothelial cell count was significantly diminished in all three groups; predominantly in group 1 and 2 (P<0.05). The SEM examination revealed normal corneal endothelial histology in group 3 and the control group. Eyes in group 1 exhibited indistinctness of corneal endothelial cell borders, microvillus loss in the luminal surface, excessive blebbing, and disintegration of intercellular junctions. In group 2, the cell structure of the corneal endothelium

  15. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  16. Is scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) quantitative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2013-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a widely applied elemental microanalysis method capable of identifying and quantifying all elements in the periodic table except H, He, and Li. By following the "k-ratio" (unknown/standard) measurement protocol development for electron-excited wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS), SEM/EDS can achieve accuracy and precision equivalent to WDS and at substantially lower electron dose, even when severe X-ray peak overlaps occur, provided sufficient counts are recorded. Achieving this level of performance is now much more practical with the advent of the high-throughput silicon drift detector energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SDD-EDS). However, three measurement issues continue to diminish the impact of SEM/EDS: (1) In the qualitative analysis (i.e., element identification) that must precede quantitative analysis, at least some current and many legacy software systems are vulnerable to occasional misidentification of major constituent peaks, with the frequency of misidentifications rising significantly for minor and trace constituents. (2) The use of standardless analysis, which is subject to much broader systematic errors, leads to quantitative results that, while useful, do not have sufficient accuracy to solve critical problems, e.g. determining the formula of a compound. (3) EDS spectrometers have such a large volume of acceptance that apparently credible spectra can be obtained from specimens with complex topography that introduce uncontrolled geometric factors that modify X-ray generation and propagation, resulting in very large systematic errors, often a factor of ten or more. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muratore, Massimo, E-mail: M.Muratore@ed.ac.uk [Institute of Integrated Micro and Nano System, School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Steve [Institute of Molecular Plant Science, School of Biological Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Waterfall, Martin [Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy

  19. Ultrastructural instability of paired helical filaments from corticobasal degeneration as examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiezak-Reding, H.; Tracz, E.; Yang, L. S.; Dickson, D. W.; Simon, M.; Wall, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the brains of subjects affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and certain other neurodegenerative disorders, including corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Electron microscope studies have shown that PHFs from CBD differ from those of AD by being wider and having a longer periodicity of the helical twist. Moreover, PHFs from CBD have been shown to be primarily composed of two rather than three highly phosphorylated polypeptides of tau (PHF-tau), with these polypeptides expressing no exons 3 and 10. To further explore the relationship between the heterogeneity of PHF-tau and the appearance of abnormal filaments, the ultrastructure and physical parameters such as mass per unit length and dimensions were compared in filaments from CBD and AD using high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Filament-enriched fractions were isolated as Sarcosyl-insoluble pellets and for STEM studies, samples were freeze-dried without prior fixation or staining. Ultrastructurally, PHFs from CBD were shown to be a heterogeneous population as double- and single-stranded filaments could be identified based on their width and physical mass per unit length expressed in kilodaltons (kd) per nanometer (nm). Less abundant, double-stranded filaments had a maximal width of 29 nm and a mass per unit length of 133 kd/nm, whereas three times more abundant single-stranded filaments were 15 nm wide and bad a mass per unit length of 62 kd/nm. Double-stranded filaments also displayed a distinct axial region of less dense mass, which appeared to divide the PHFs into two protofilament-like strands. Furthermore, these filaments were frequently observed to physically separate along the long axis into two single strands or to break longitudinally. In contrast, PHFs from AD were ultrastructurally stable and uniform both in their width (22 nm) and physical mass per unit length (104 kd/nm). The ultrastructural features indicate that filaments of

  20. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...

  1. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Massimo; Mitchell, Steve; Waterfall, Martin

    2013-09-06

    Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy characterisation of carbon deposited layers in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchambre, E.; Brosset, C.; Reichle, R.; Devynck, P.; Guirlet, R.; Tsitrone, E.; Saikali, W.; Dominici, C.; Charai, A.

    2003-01-01

    For long discharges in Tore-Supra, an infra-red safety system has been installed to survey surface temperature of the target plates located below the toroidal pump limiter. A shift in temperature is attributed to the growth of a carbon layer at the surface of the neutralizer and has been estimated to a temperature increase of 400 Celsius degrees between virgin and layered surfaces. For temperature safety analysis, target plates have been cleaned and carbon layers were sampled for scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) study. SEM micrographs have allowed to measure the deposited layer thickness and to study the specific fractal and stratified structure. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis has permitted to distinguish carbon layers corresponding to boronization and then to deduce an average growth rate of about 20 nm/s. The growth rate is not constant and is likely to depend on plasma operation parameters. These analyses completed by time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have shown a beneficial effect of the boronization on metallic contamination of the plasma, confirming the in situ optical spectroscopic measurements. These analyses have also shown an increase of hydrogen storage in carbon layer due to boronization. Although the measurements performed on deposited layer are very local, the results reflect the history of the 2002 campaign. (A.C.)

  3. Multiscale characterization of pore spaces using multifractals analysis of scanning electronic microscopy images of carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Jouini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore spaces heterogeneity in carbonates rocks has long been identified as an important factor impacting reservoir productivity. In this paper, we study the heterogeneity of carbonate rocks pore spaces based on the image analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM data acquired at various magnifications. Sixty images of twelve carbonate samples from a reservoir in the Middle East were analyzed. First, pore spaces were extracted from SEM images using a segmentation technique based on watershed algorithm. Pores geometries revealed a multifractal behavior at various magnifications from 800x to 12 000x. In addition, the singularity spectrum provided quantitative values that describe the degree of heterogeneity in the carbonates samples. Moreover, for the majority of the analyzed samples, we found low variations (around 5% in the multifractal dimensions for magnifications between 1700x and 12 000x. Finally, these results demonstrate that multifractal analysis could be an appropriate tool for characterizing quantitatively the heterogeneity of carbonate pore spaces geometries. However, our findings show that magnification has an impact on multifractal dimensions, revealing the limit of applicability of multifractal descriptions for these natural structures.

  4. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarrubia, J S; Tondare, V N; Vladár, A E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples-mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  5. Saphenous vein graft thrombus findings by scanning electron microscopy in a patient with acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Marcela Dias; Aguillera, André Haraguti [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brilhante, José Joaquim; Caixeta, Adriano [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An eighty-year-old male patient with a history of prior (19 years) coronary artery bypass graft surgery was admitted to the hospital with non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). During the hospital stay he was taking acetylsalicylic acid 100mg per day, a loading dose of 600mg clopidogrel, and low molecular weight heparin 1mg/kg twice a day. Twenty-four hours later the patient underwent coronary angiography, which showed a 90% obstruction in the mid portion of the saphenous vein graft to obtuse marginal with signs of degeneration and local thrombus (Figure 1). Thrombus aspiration was performed with a 6-Fr Export{sup ™} catheter (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA, USA), which removed small reddish colored fragments. They were fixed in 2,5% glutaraldehyde in a 0.1M sodium cacodilate buffer. The material was processed following the GOTO protocol in which the fragments were washed with osmium tetroxide and titanic acid, after which they were dried in a critical-point device and a golden bath. Scanning electron microscopy and high definition photos (3,000 to 27,221x magnification) were obtained by the FEI Quanta{sup ™} FEG SEM device (FEI Company, Hillsboro, OR, USA). The images showed that the thrombus was rich in activated platelets, with few erythrocytes or inflammatory cells. Many cholesterol crystals were observed (Figures 2 to). The fibrin networks were sparse and thin, which is compatible with a short ischemic time and recent thrombus formation.

  6. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autoclave, 1 autoclave cycle, 5 autoclave cycles and 10 autoclave cycles) by SEM under 200× and 1000× magnifications. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software and the paired sample t-test, independent sample t-test and multifactorial repeated measures ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. New files had debris and pitting on their surfaces. When the autoclave cycles were increased, the mean of surface roughness also increased at both magnifications (Pautoclave increased the surface roughness of the files and this had was directly related to the number of autoclave cycles.

  7. Functional anatomy of the footpad vasculature of dogs: scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Hiroyoshi; Akiyama, Emi; Simazaki, Kanae; Oguri, Atsuko; Jitsumoto, Momoko; Fukuyama, Takaaki

    2011-12-01

    Dogs are well adapted to cold climates and they can stand, walk and run on snow and ice for long periods of time. In contrast to the body trunk, which has, dense fur, the paws are more exposed to the cold due to the lack of fur insulation. The extremities have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, so they lose heat very easily. We offer anatomical evidence for a heat-conserving structure associated with dog footpad vasculature. Methylmethacrylate vascular corrosion casts for scanning electron microscopy, Indian ink-injected whole-mount and histological specimens were each prepared, in a series of 16 limbs from four adult dogs. Vascular casts and Indian ink studies showed that abundant venules were arranged around the arteries supplying the pad surface and formed a vein-artery-vein triad, with the peri-arterial venous network intimately related to the arteries. In addition, numerous arteriovenous anastomoses and well-developed venous plexuses were found throughout the dermal vasculature. The triad forms a counter-current heat exchanger. When the footpad is exposed to a cold environment, the counter-current heat exchanger serves to prevent heat loss by recirculating heat back to the body core. Furthermore, the arteriovenous anastomoses shift blood flow, draining blood to the skin surface, and the venous plexuses retain warm blood in the pad surface. Hence, the appropriate temperature for the footpad can be maintained in cold environments. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy and histopathological observations of Beauveria bassiana infection of Colorado potato beetle larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yulin; Wu, Hui; Ma, Zhiyan; Yang, Liu; Ma, Deying

    2017-10-01

    Beauveria bassiana is a potential candidate for use as an environmentally friendly bio-pesticide. We studied the infection process and histopathology of B. bassiana strain NDBJJ-BFG infection of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) using scanning electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining of tissue sections. The results show that the fungus penetrated the insect epidermis through germ tubes and appressoria after spraying the larvae with conidial suspensions. The conidia began to germinate after 24 h and invade the epidermis. After 48 h, the conidia invaded the larvae with germ tubes and began to enter the haemocoel. By 72 h, hyphae had covered the host surface and had colonized the body cavity. The dermal layer was dissolved, muscle tissues were ruptured and adipose tissue was removed. The mycelium had damaged the intestinal wall muscles, and invaded into intestinal wall and midfield cells resulting in cell separation and tracheal deformation. After 96 h of inoculation, the internal structure of the larvae was destroyed. The research shows that B. bassiana NDBJJ-BFG surface inoculation resulted in a series of histopathological changes to the potato beetle larvae that proved lethal within 72 h. This indicated that this fungus has a high pathogenicity to Colorado potato beetle larvae. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  10. Forensic applications of scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyser in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y S

    1982-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy - Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM/EDX) has been applied in casework for more than a year in the Forensic Division, Government Laboratory of Hong Kong. The types of samples being analysed are summarised and three cases of scientific interest are described. The first case applies SEM/EDX to characterize microscopic gold particles recovered from clothing of suspects involved in goldsmith robberies. Both elemental and morphological results obtained were used as supporting evidence. The second case describes the three types of beaded ends on fibres found in a single cloth sample. These beaded ends are different in shape and surface features and can be used as an additional parameter in fibre identification. The final case shows the application of vacuum evaporation of graphite on a document sample to reveal the area of paper which has been skillfully mechanically erased. Both the image intensity and the composition of the ink are used to differentiate between original and altered characters on the document.

  11. Differentiation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) eggs using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faull, Katherine J; Williams, Craig R

    2016-05-01

    Aedes notoscriptus and Aedes aegypti are both peri-domestic, invasive container-breeding mosquitoes. While the two potential arboviral vectors are bionomically similar, their sympatric distribution in Australia is limited. In this study, analyses of Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus eggs were enabled using scanning electron microscopy. Significant variations in egg length to width ratio and outer chorionic cell field morphology between Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus enabled distinction of the two species. Intraspecific variations in cell field morphology also enabled differentiation of the separate populations of both species, highlighting regional and global variation. Our study provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of inter- and intraspecific egg morphological and morphometric variation between two invasive container-breeding mosquitoes. The results indicate a high degree of intraspecific variation in Ae. notoscriptus egg morphology when compared to the eggs of Ae. aegypti. Comparative morphological analyses of Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus egg attributes using SEM allows differentiation of the species and may be helpful in understanding egg biology in relation to biotope of origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the interaction between Trichoderma harzianum and perithecia of Gibberella zeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inch, S; Gilbert, J

    2011-01-01

    Chronological events associated with the interaction between a strain of Trichoderma harzianum, T472, with known biological control activity against perithecial production of G. zeae, were studied with scanning electron microscopy to investigate the mechanisms of control. Large clusters of perithecia consisting of 5-15 perithecia formed on the autoclaved, mulched wheat straw inoculated with G. zeae alone (control) with an average of 157 perithecia per plate. Small clusters consisting of 3-6 and an average of 15 perithecia per plate perithecia formed on straw that was treated with T. harzianum. The mature perithecia from straw treated with T. harzianum produced less pigment and were lighter in color than those from the control plates. Furthermore the cells of the outer wall of these perithecia were abnormal in appearance and unevenly distributed across the surface. Immature perithecia were colonized by T. harzianum approximately 15 d after inoculation (dai) with the biocontrol agent and pathogen. Few perithecia were colonized at later stages. The affected perithecia collapsed 21 dai, compared to the perithecia in the control samples that began to collapse 28 dai. Abundant mycelium of T. harzianum was seen on the perithecia of treated samples. Perithecial structures may be resistant to penetration by the mycelium because direct penetration was not observed. Trichoderma harzianum colonized the substrate quickly and out-competed the pathogen, G. zeae.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of heat treated TiO2 nanotubes arrays obtained by anodic oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, D. I.; García-Vergara, S. J.; Blanco, S.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the anatase-rutile transformation of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes obtained on titanium foil by anodizing and subsequent heat treatment. The anodizing was carried out at 20V in an 1% v/v HF acid and ethylene glycol:water (50:50) electrolyte at room temperature. The anodized samples were initially pre-heat treated at 450°C for 4 hours to modify the amorphous structure of TiO2 nanotubes into anatase structure. Then, the samples were heated between 600 to 800°C for different times, in order to promote the transformation to rutile structure. The formation of TiO2 nanotubes is evident by SEM images. Notably, when the samples are treated at high temperature, the formation of rutile crystals starts to become evident at the nanotubes located on the originally grain boundaries of the titanium. Thus, the anatase - rutile transformation has a close relationship with the microstructure of the titanium, more exactly with grain boundaries.

  14. Environmental scanning electron microscopy analysis of Proteus mirabilis biofilms grown on chitin and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Duque, Zoilabet; Rojas, Héctor; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, María A; Alciaturi, Carlos

    Proteus mirabilis is a human pathogen able to form biofilms on the surface of urinary catheters. Little is known about P. mirabilis biofilms on natural or industrial surfaces and the potential consequences for these settings. The main aim of this work was to assess and compare the adhesion and biofilm formation of P. mirabilis strains from different origins on chitin and stainless steel surfaces within 4 to 96 h. Using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the biofilms of a clinical strain grown on chitin at 4 h showed greater adhesion, aggregation, thickness, and extracellular matrix production than those grown on stainless steel, whereas biofilms of an environmental strain had less aggregation on both surfaces. Biofilms of both P. mirabilis strains developed different structures on chitin, such as pillars, mushrooms, channels, and crystalline-like precipitates between 24 and 96 h, in contrast with flat-layer biofilms produced on stainless steel. Significant differences ( p  biofilm formation. This represents the first study of P. mirabilis showing adhesion, biofilm formation, and development of different structures on surfaces found outside the human host.

  15. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D., E-mail: marta.rossell@empa.ch

    2017-05-15

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. - Highlights: • The heterogeneous integration of high-quality compound semiconductors remains a challenge. • Lattice defects cause severe degradation of the semiconductor device performances. • Aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM allows atomic-scale characterization of defects. • An overview of lattice defects found in cubic semiconductors is presented. • Theoretical modelling and calculations are needed to determine the defect properties.

  16. Saphenous vein graft thrombus findings by scanning electron microscopy in a patient with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Marcela Dias; Aguillera, André Haraguti; Brilhante, José Joaquim; Caixeta, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    An eighty-year-old male patient with a history of prior (19 years) coronary artery bypass graft surgery was admitted to the hospital with non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). During the hospital stay he was taking acetylsalicylic acid 100mg per day, a loading dose of 600mg clopidogrel, and low molecular weight heparin 1mg/kg twice a day. Twenty-four hours later the patient underwent coronary angiography, which showed a 90% obstruction in the mid portion of the saphenous vein graft to obtuse marginal with signs of degeneration and local thrombus (Figure 1). Thrombus aspiration was performed with a 6-Fr Export"™ catheter (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA, USA), which removed small reddish colored fragments. They were fixed in 2,5% glutaraldehyde in a 0.1M sodium cacodilate buffer. The material was processed following the GOTO protocol in which the fragments were washed with osmium tetroxide and titanic acid, after which they were dried in a critical-point device and a golden bath. Scanning electron microscopy and high definition photos (3,000 to 27,221x magnification) were obtained by the FEI Quanta"™ FEG SEM device (FEI Company, Hillsboro, OR, USA). The images showed that the thrombus was rich in activated platelets, with few erythrocytes or inflammatory cells. Many cholesterol crystals were observed (Figures 2 to). The fibrin networks were sparse and thin, which is compatible with a short ischemic time and recent thrombus formation

  17. Scanning electron microscopy and magnetic characterization of iron oxides in solid waste landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huliselan, Estevanus Kristian; Bijaksana, Satria; Srigutomo, Wahyu; Kardena, Edwan

    2010-01-01

    Leachate sludge samples were taken from two municipal solid waste sites of Jelekong and Sarimukti in Bandung, Indonesia. Their magnetic mineralogy and granulometry were analyzed to discriminate the sources of magnetic minerals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and rock magnetism. SEM-EDX analyses infer that the main magnetic minerals in the leachate sludge are iron oxides. In terms of their morphology, the grains from Jelekong are mostly octahedral and angular, which are similar to the general shapes of magnetic grains from the local soils. The grains from Sarimukti, on the other hand, are dominated by imperfect spherule shapes suggesting the product of combustion processes. Hysteresis parameters verify that the predominant magnetic mineral in leachate sludge is low coercivity ferrimagnetic mineral such as magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ). Furthermore, comparisons of rock magnetic parameters show that the magnetic minerals of soil samples from Jelekong have higher degree of magnetic pedogenesis indicating higher proportion of superparamagnetic/ultrafine particles than those of soil samples from Sarimukti. The plot of susceptibilities ratio versus coercive force has a great potential to be used as a discriminating tool for determining the source of magnetic minerals.

  18. Method to characterize inorganic particulates in lung tissue biopsies using field emission scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Heather; Breit, George N.; Strand, Matthew; Pillers, Renee M.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Todorov, Todor I.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Robinson, Maura; Parr, Jane; Miller, Robert J.; Groshong, Steve; Green, Francis; Rose, Cecile

    2018-01-01

    Humans accumulate large numbers of inorganic particles in their lungs over a lifetime. Whether this causes or contributes to debilitating disease over a normal lifespan depends on the type and concentration of the particles. We developed and tested a protocol for in situ characterization of the types and distribution of inorganic particles in biopsied lung tissue from three human groups using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Many distinct particle types were recognized among the 13 000 particles analyzed. Silica, feldspars, clays, titanium dioxides, iron oxides and phosphates were the most common constituents in all samples. Particles were classified into three general groups: endogenous, which form naturally in the body; exogenic particles, natural earth materials; and anthropogenic particles, attributed to industrial sources. These in situ results were compared with those using conventional sodium hypochlorite tissue digestion and particle filtration. With the exception of clays and phosphates, the relative abundances of most common particle types were similar in both approaches. Nonetheless, the digestion/filtration method was determined to alter the texture and relative abundances of some particle types. SEM/EDS analysis of digestion filters could be automated in contrast to the more time intensive in situ analyses.

  19. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P < 0.05) than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  20. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Serrao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM. Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n=5, and Victus, n=5. In addition, five manual CCC (n=5 were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA. Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq, were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P<0.05 than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  1. Early and late scanning electron microscopy findings in diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sara; Perico, Norberto; Novelli, Rubina; Carrara, Camillo; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2018-03-20

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), the single strongest predictor of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes, is characterized by initial glomerular hyperfiltration with subsequent progressive renal function loss with or without albuminuria, greatly accelerated with the onset of overt proteinuria. Experimental and clinical studies have convincingly shown that early interventions retard disease progression, while treatment if started late in the disease course seldom modifies the slope of GFR decline. Here we assessed whether the negligible renoprotection afforded by drugs in patients with proteinuric DN could be due to loss of glomerular structural integrity, explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In diabetic patients with early renal disease, glomerular structural integrity was largely preserved. At variance SEM documented that in the late stage of proteinuric DN, glomerular structure was subverted with nearly complete loss of podocytes and lobular transformation of the glomerular basement membrane. In these circumstances one can reasonably imply that any form of treatment, albeit personalized, is unlikely to reach a given cellular or molecular target. These findings should persuade physicians to start the putative renoprotective therapy soon after the diagnosis of diabetes or in an early phase of the disease before structural integrity of the glomerular filter is irreversibly compromised.

  2. Calibration-free quantitative surface topography reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, E.T.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Mansilla, C.; Ocelík, V.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach to obtain reliable surface topography reconstructions from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. In this method a set of images taken at different tilt angles are compared by means of digital image correlation (DIC). It is argued that the strength of the method lies in the fact that precise knowledge about the nature of the rotation (vector and/or magnitude) is not needed. Therefore, the great advantage is that complex calibrations of the measuring equipment are avoided. The paper presents the necessary equations involved in the methods, including derivations and solutions. The method is illustrated with examples of 3D reconstructions followed by a discussion on the relevant experimental parameters. - Highlights: • A novel method for quantitative 3D surface reconstruction in SEM is described. • This method uses at least 3 SEM images acquired at different sample tilts. • This method does not need calibration from the movement of the sample holder. • Mathematical background and examples of application are presented

  3. Production of muscovite-feldspathic glass composite: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, F.P.F.; Ogasawara, T.; Santos, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to find the sintering conditions for the feldspathic glass + muscovite mixture to produce a dense composite block for manufacturing dental prosthesis by using CAD-CAM. Each 20g of the glass-frit had : 15.55g of Armil-feldspar; 0.53g of Al 2 O 3 ; 1.56g of Na 2 CO 3 ; 0.5g of borax; 1.74g of K 2 CO 3 ; 0.13g of CeO 2 . Frit's powder finer than 350 Tyler mesh was mixed with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 100 wt% of muscovite pressed cylinders (5600 pounds force) 16mm in diameter and sintered under vacuum Vacumat (VITA) furnace at 850 deg C, 900 deg C, 950 deg C, 1000 deg C, 1050 deg C, 1100 deg C and 1150 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The necessary temperature for high densification depended on the composition of the mixture: 850 deg C (for pure frit); 1050 deg C (for 10 wt% mica) and 1150 deg C (for 20 wt% mica); pure mica degraded during sintering. (author)

  4. Characterization of the calcification of cardiac valve bioprostheses by environmental scanning electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogne, Christophe; Lawford, Patricia V; Habesch, Steven M; Carolan, Vikki A

    2007-10-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valve tissue and associated calcification were studied in their natural state, using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Energy dispersive X-ray micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the various calcific deposits observed with ESEM. The major elements present in calcified valves were also analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. To better understand the precursor formation of the calcific deposits, results from the elemental analyses were statistically correlated. ESEM revealed the presence of four broad types of calcium phosphate crystal morphology. In addition, two main patterns of organization of calcific deposits were observed associated with the collagen fibres. Energy dispersive X-ray micro-analysis identified the crystals observed by ESEM as salts containing mainly calcium and phosphate with ratios from 1.340 (possibly octacalcium phosphate, which has a Ca/P ratio of 1.336) to 2.045 (possibly hydroxyapatite with incorporation of carbonate and metal ion contaminants, such as silicon and magnesium, in the crystal lattice). Raman and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy also identified the presence of carbonate and the analyses showed spectral features very similar to a crystalline hydroxyapatite spectrum, also refuting the presence of precursor phases such as beta-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate. The results of this study raised the possibility of the presence of precursor phases associated with the early stages of calcification.

  5. Anisotropic Shape Changes of Silica Nanoparticles Induced in Liquid with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, J.; Hermannsdorfer, Justus; Schuh, Tobias; de Jong, Krijn P.; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for in-situ imaging of nanoscale processes taking place in liquid, such as the evolution of nanoparticles during synthesis or structural changes of nanomaterials in liquid environment. Here, it is shown that the focused electron beam of

  6. Parallel and pipelined front-end for multi-element silicon detectors in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulin, C.; Epstein, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a silicon quadrant detector (128 elements) implemented as an electron detector in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope. As the electron beam scans over the sample, electrons are counted during each pixel. The authors developed an ASIC for the multichannel counting system. The digital front-end carries out the readout of all elements, in four groups, and uses these data to compute linear combinations to generate up to eight simultaneous images. For the preprocessing the authors implemented a parallel and pipelined system. Dedicated software tools were developed to generate the programs for all the processors. These tools are transparently accessed by the user via a user friendly interface

  7. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudo Jacome, L., E-mail: leonardo.agudo@bam.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Eggeler, G., E-mail: gunther.eggeler@ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dlouhy, A., E-mail: dlouhy@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  8. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, A.

    2012-01-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: ► The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. ► The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. ► The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. ► We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  9. Characterization and Properties of Oligothiophenes Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy for Possible Use in Organic Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishara, E.M.El.

    2009-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy study has been made on a group of alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes. The self-assembled monolayers of this type of semi-conducting oligomers on graphite were observed and characterized. To control the self-assembly, it is important to first understand the forces that drive the spontaneous ordering of molecules at interfaces. For the identification of the forces, several substituted oligothiophenes were examined: carboxylic acid groups, methyl ester carboxylic acid, and iodine atoms at one end and benzyl esters at the other end of the oligomers this is in addition to the non-functionalized oligothiophehens, Self-assembled monolayers of these molecules were then examined by STM. A detailed analysis of the driving forces and parameters controlling the formation of the self-assembled 2- D crystal monolayers was carried out by performing modeling of the experimental observations. The theoretical calculations gave us a conclusive insight into the intermolecular interactions, which lead to the observed conformation of molecules on the surface. An attempt to react two iodinated oligomers on the surface after the formation of the monolayer has been done; a topochemical reaction studies using UV/Vis light irradiation has been preceded. The targeted reaction was achieved. This can be considered as a great step towards the formation of nano-wires and other organic electronic devices. The applicability of the above method of force-driven self organisation in different patterns was examined as template for building donor-nano structures for electronic devices. It was necessary to examine the stability of the formed templates in air. The monolayers were left to dry and STM images were taken; C60 was then added to the monolayer, and the complexation of the C60 (as acceptor) with the formed monolayer template was examined.

  10. Qualitative analysis of barium particles coated in small intestinal mucosa of rabbit by using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Suk; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yang Seob; Kim, Jae Kyun; Yoon, Seong Eon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Chung, Dong Jin; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    To qualitatively analysed barium coating status in the intestinal mucosa, we used scanning electron microscopy to observe barium particles coated in the small intestinal mucosa of rabbit, and we attempted to assess the relationship between electron microscopic findings and radiographic densities. Six different combination of barium and methylcellulose suspensions were infused into the resected small intestines of 15 rabbits. Barium powders were mixed with water to make 40% and 70% w/v barium solutions, and also mixed with 0.5% methylcellulose solutions were used as a double contrast agent. After the infusion of barium suspensions, a mammography unit was used to obtain radiographs of the small intestine, and their optical densities were measured by a densitometer. Thereafter, photographs of barium-coated small intestinal mucosa were obtained using a scanning electron microscope (x 8,000), and the number of barium particles in the unit area were measured. To compare the relationship between the electron microscopic findings and optical densities, statistical analysis using Spearman correlation was performed. This study shows that by using scanning electron microscopy, barium particles coated on the small intestinal mucosa can be qualitatively analysed. It also shows that the number of small barium particles measured by scanning electron microscopy is related to optical densities. (author). 14 refs., 2 figs

  11. Determination of lead in clay enameled by X-ray fluorescence technique in Total reflection and by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarazua O, G.; Carapia M, L.

    2000-01-01

    This work has the objective of determining lead free in the glazed commercial stewing pans using the X-ray fluorescence technique in Total reflection (FRX) and the observation and semiquantitative determination of lead by Analytical Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM). (Author)

  12. Detection of fatigue fracture in pearlitic flake graphite cast iron with the help of scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunger, B.; Hunger, J.

    1976-01-01

    To prove the existence of the characteristic features of fatigue fracture in a pearlitic flake graphite cast iron, its fracture surface topography revealed by scanning electron microscopy has been compared with that of a pearlitic steel, the fractures having been caused by static tensile and by cyclic bending tests. The characteristic features of fatigue fracture were visible in the pearlitic matrix of the steel and of the flake graphite cast iron as well. These features differ characteristically from the lamellar structure of the pearlite, particularly after etching the surface area of the fractures. The graphite structures as viewed on the electron scanning and the electron transmission microscope are described. (orig.) [de

  13. Role of scanning electron microscopy in identifying drugs used in medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazil Marickar, Y M; Sylaja, N; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Several plant preparations are administered for treatment of stone disease without scientific basis. This paper presents the results of in vitro and animal experimental studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the identification of the therapeutic properties of trial drugs in medicine. In the first set of the study, urinary crystals namely calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dehydrate were grown in six sets of Hane's tubes in silica gel medium. Trial drugs namely scoparia dulcis Lynn, musa sapiens and dolicos biflorus were incorporated in the gel medium to identify the dopant effect of the trial drugs on the size and extent of crystal column growth. The changes in morphology of crystals were studied using SEM. In the second set, six male Wistar rats each were calculogenised by administering sodium oxalate and ethylene glycol and diabetised using streptozotocin. The SEM changes of calculogenisation were studied. The rats were administered trial drugs before calculogenisation or after. The kidneys of the rats studied under the scanning electron microscope showed changes in tissue morphology and crystal deposition produced by calculogenisation and alterations produced by addition of trial drugs. The trial drugs produced changes in the pattern of crystal growth and in the crystal morphology of both calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate grown in vitro. Elemental distribution analysis showed that the crystal purity was not altered by the trial drugs. Scoparia dulcis Lynn was found to be the most effective anticalculogenic agent. Musa sapiens and dolicos biflorus were found to have no significant effect in inhibiting crystal growth. The kidneys of rats on calculogenisation showed different grades of crystals in the glomerulus and interstitial tissues, extrusion of the crystals into the tubular lumen, collodisation and tissue inflammatory cell infiltration. Scoparia dulcis Lynn exhibited maximum protector effect against the

  14. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of canal cleaning after canal preparation with nickel titanium files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Root canal preparation is the most important phase of endodontic procedure and it consists of adequate canal space cleaning and shaping. In recent years, rotary instruments and techniques have gained importance because of the great efficacy, speed and safety of the preparation procedure. Objective. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of different NiTi files on the canal wall cleaning quality, residual dentine debris and smear layer. Methods. The research was conducted on extracted human teeth in vitro conditions. Teeth were divided in 7 main groups depending on the kind of instruments used for root canal preparation: ProTaper, GT, ProFile, K-3, FlexMaster, hand ProTaper and hand GT. Root canal preparation was accomplished by crown-down technique. Prepared samples were assessed on scanning electron microscopy JEOL, JSM-6460 LV. The evaluation of dentine debris was done with 500x magnification, and the evaluation of smear layer with 1,000 times magnification. Quantitive assessment of dentine debris and smear layer was done according to the criteria of Hulsmann. Results. The least amount of debris and smear layer has been found in canals shaped with ProFile instruments, and the largest amount in canals shaped with FlexMaster instruments. Canal cleaning efficacy of hand GT and ProTaper files has been similar to cleaning efficacy of rotary NiTi files. Statistic analysis has shown a significant difference in amount of dentine debris and smear layer on the canal walls between sample groups shaped with different instruments. Conclusion. Completely clean canals have not been found in any tested group of instruments. The largest amount of debris and smear layer has been found in the apical third of all canals. The design and the type of endodontic instruments influence the efficacy of the canal cleaning.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of mouse intestinal mucosa after cobalt 60 and D-T neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.R.; Toner, P.G.; Nias, A.H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The stem-cell population of the intestinal crypt is an important model system in experimental radiobiology. Standardized techniques have been developed to allow quantitation of the response of crypt cells to radiation injury following doses of 0 to 2 krad of D-T neutrons or 60 Co γ rays. These techniques rely on the identification of regenerating crypt cells three-and-a-half days after irradiation. The results were expressed as the number of regenerating crypts per circumference of small intestine, as determined by conventional histological examination; the more profound the injury, the smaller the the crypt count. The practical relevance of crypt-counting techniques to clinical radiotherapy is limited by their relative insensitivity; the dose levels commonly used in fractionated radiotherapy produced no detectable response. Scanning electron microscopy of the mucosal surface provided a more sensitive measure of radiation injury. The earliest detectable changes occurred at the level of 300 rad of γ radiation, well below the threshold of the crypt-counting technique. At around 1,000 rad, where the first drop in crypt counts occurred, there were well-marked morphological changes which became more severe with increasing dose levels. Some differences have been observed between the morphological effects of γ and neutron irradiation at points of radiobiological equivalence in terms of crypt counts (using RBE value of about 2). The changes observed may reflect more than the disruption of epithelial cell kinetics. Mucosal morphology is the total expression of many different biological parameters of which the regenerative ability of the crypt cells is only one. The surface microanatomy of the gut may be the most sensitive indicator of radiation injury which is conveniently available for study. (author)

  18. Scanning electron microscopy observations of failures of implant overdenture bars: a case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, J Neil; Payne, Alan G T; Swain, Michael V; Kieser, Jules A

    2010-03-01

    Soldered or cast bars are used as a standard of care in attachment systems supporting maxillary and mandibular implant overdentures. When failures of these bars occur, currently there is a lack of evidence in relation to their specific etiology, location, or nature. To investigate the failure process of a case series of six failed soldered bars, four intact soldered bars, and one intact cast milled bar, which had been supporting implant overdentures. A total of 11 different overdenture bars were removed from patients with different configuration of opposing arches. A failed bar (FB) group (n = 6) had failed soldered overdenture bars, which were recovered from patients following up to 2 years of wear before requiring prosthodontic maintenance and repair. An intact bar (IB) group (n = 5) had both soldered bars and a single cast milled bar, which had been worn by patients for 2 to 5 years prior to receiving other aspects of prosthodontic maintenance. All bars were examined using scanning electron microscopy to establish the possible mode of failure (FB) or to identify evidence of potential failure in the future (IB). Evidence of a progressive failure mode of corrosion fatigue and creep were observed on all the FB and IB usually around the solder areas and nonoxidizing gold cylinder. Fatigue and creep were also observed in all the IB. Where the level of corrosion was substantial, there was no evidence of wear from the matrices of the attachment system. Evidence of an instantaneous failure mode, ductile and brittle overload, was observed on the fracture surfaces of all the FB, within the solder and the nonoxidizing gold cylinders, at the solder/cylinder interface. Corrosion, followed by corrosion fatigue, appears to be a key factor in the onset of the failure process for overdenture bars in this case series of both maxillary and mandibular overdentures. Limited sample size and lack of standardization identify trends only but prevent broad interpretation of the findings.

  19. Comparative study of dental enamel loss after debonding braces by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Chávez, Jacqueline Adelina; Arenas-Alatorre, Jesús; Belio-Reyes, Irma Araceli

    2017-07-01

    Clinical procedures when shear forces are applied to brackets suggest adhesion forces between 2.8 and 10.0 MPa as appropriate. In this study dental enamel was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after removing the brackets. Thirty bicuspids (previous prophylaxis) with metallic brackets (Roth Inovation 0.022 GAC), Transbond Plus SEP 3M Unitek adhesive and Transbond XT 3M resin were used. The samples were preserved to 37°C during 24 hr and submited to tangential forces with the Instron Universal machine 1.0 mm/min speed load strength resistance debonding. Also the Adhesive Remanent Index (ARI) test was made, evaluating the bracket base and the bicuspid surface. All the bracket SEM images were processed with AutoCAD to determine the enamel detached area. The average value was 6.86 MPa (SD ± 3.2 MPa). ARI value 1= 63.3%, value 2= 20%, value 3= 13.3% and 33% presented value 0. All those samples with dental enamel loss, presented different situations as fractures, ledges, horizontal, and vertical loss in some cases, and some scratch lines. There is no association between the debonding resistance and enamel presence. Less than half of the remanent adhesive on the dental enamel was present in most of the samples when the ARI test was applied. When the resin area increases, the debonding resistance also increases, and when the enamel loss increases, the resin free metallic area of the bracket base decreases in the debonding. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of the trabecular meshwork: Understanding the pathogenesis of primary angle closure glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjit Sihota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study ultrastructural changes of the trabecular meshwork in acute and chronic primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG eyes by scanning electron microscopy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one trabecular meshwork surgical specimens from consecutive glaucomatous eyes after a trabeculectomy and five postmortem corneoscleral specimens were fixed immediately in Karnovsky solution. The tissues were washed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer saline, post-fixed in 1% osmium tetraoxide, dehydrated in acetone series (30-100%, dried and mounted. Results: Normal trabecular tissue showed well-defined, thin, cylindrical uveal trabecular beams with many large spaces, overlying flatter corneoscleral beams and numerous smaller spaces. In acute PACG eyes, the trabecular meshwork showed grossly swollen, irregular trabecular endothelial cells with intercellular and occasional basal separation with few spaces. Numerous activated macrophages, leucocytes and amorphous debris were present. Chronic PACG eyes had a few, thickened posterior uveal trabecular beams visible. A homogenous deposit covered the anterior uveal trabeculae and spaces. Converging, fan-shaped trabecular beam configuration corresponded to gonioscopic areas of peripheral anterior synechiae. In POAG eyes, anterior uveal trabecular beams were thin and strap-like, while those posteriorly were wide, with a homogenous deposit covering and bridging intertrabecular spaces, especially posteriorly. Underlying corneoscleral trabecular layers and spaces were visualized in some areas. Conclusions: In acute PACG a marked edema of the endothelium probably contributes for the acute and marked intraocular pressure (IOP elevation. Chronically raised IOP in chronic PACG and POAG probably results, at least in part, from decreased aqueous outflow secondary to widening and fusion of adjacent trabecular beams, together with the homogenous deposit enmeshing trabecular beams and spaces.

  1. Bioresorption mechanisms of chitosan physical hydrogels: A scanning electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaise, Sébastien; Rami, Lila; Montembault, Alexandra; Alcouffe, Pierre; Burdin, Béatrice; Bordenave, Laurence; Delmond, Samantha; David, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered biodegradable medical devices are widely studied and systems must present suitable balance between versatility and elaboration simplicity. In this work, we aim at illustrating that such equilibrium can be found by processing chitosan physical hydrogels without external cross-linker. Chitosan concentration, degree of acetylation, solvent composition, and neutralization route were modulated in order to obtain hydrogels exhibiting different physico-chemical properties. The resulting in vivo biological response was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. “Soft” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan of high degree of acetylation (35%) and by the neutralization with gaseous ammonia of a chitosan acetate aqueous solutions presenting low polymer concentration (Cp = 1.6% w/w). “Harder” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan with lower degree of acetylation (5%) and after neutralization in sodium hydroxide bath (1 M) of hydro-alcoholic chitosan solutions (50/50 w/w water/1,2-propanediol) with a polymer concentration of 2.5% w/w. Soft and hard hydrogels exhibited bioresorption times from below 10 days to higher than 60 days, respectively. We also evidenced that cell colonization and neo-vascularization mechanisms depend on the hydrogel-aggregated structure that is controlled by elaboration conditions and possibly in relation with mechanical properties. Specific processing conditions induced micron-range capillary formation, which can be assimilated to colonization channels, also acting on the resorption scenario. - Highlights: • We elaborated physical chitosan hydrogels presenting tuneable biological properties. • Cell colonization mechanism depends on biological and mechanical hydrogel properties. • Increasing the degree of acetylation will reduce the bioresorption time. • Capillaries played a role of cell colonization pathways

  2. Bioresorption mechanisms of chitosan physical hydrogels: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaise, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.malaise@gmail.com [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Rami, Lila [Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Inserm U1026, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Montembault, Alexandra; Alcouffe, Pierre [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Burdin, Béatrice [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre Technologique des Microstructure, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bordenave, Laurence [Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Inserm U1026, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, Bordeaux 33000 (France); CHU de Bordeaux, CIC-IT Biomaterials, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Delmond, Samantha [CHU de Bordeaux, CIC-IT Biomaterials, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); David, Laurent [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered biodegradable medical devices are widely studied and systems must present suitable balance between versatility and elaboration simplicity. In this work, we aim at illustrating that such equilibrium can be found by processing chitosan physical hydrogels without external cross-linker. Chitosan concentration, degree of acetylation, solvent composition, and neutralization route were modulated in order to obtain hydrogels exhibiting different physico-chemical properties. The resulting in vivo biological response was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. “Soft” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan of high degree of acetylation (35%) and by the neutralization with gaseous ammonia of a chitosan acetate aqueous solutions presenting low polymer concentration (Cp = 1.6% w/w). “Harder” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan with lower degree of acetylation (5%) and after neutralization in sodium hydroxide bath (1 M) of hydro-alcoholic chitosan solutions (50/50 w/w water/1,2-propanediol) with a polymer concentration of 2.5% w/w. Soft and hard hydrogels exhibited bioresorption times from below 10 days to higher than 60 days, respectively. We also evidenced that cell colonization and neo-vascularization mechanisms depend on the hydrogel-aggregated structure that is controlled by elaboration conditions and possibly in relation with mechanical properties. Specific processing conditions induced micron-range capillary formation, which can be assimilated to colonization channels, also acting on the resorption scenario. - Highlights: • We elaborated physical chitosan hydrogels presenting tuneable biological properties. • Cell colonization mechanism depends on biological and mechanical hydrogel properties. • Increasing the degree of acetylation will reduce the bioresorption time. • Capillaries played a role of cell colonization pathways.

  3. Evaluation of Human Corneal Lenticule Quality After SMILE With Different Cap Thicknesses Using Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shengbei; Liu, Manli; Yang, Xiaonan; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Yugui; Lin, Haiqin; Liu, Quan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the surface characteristics of lenticules created by small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) with different cap thicknesses. This prospective study included 20 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral SMILE. Surface regularity of the extracted corneal lenticule was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with 2 methods: qualitative and quantitative regularity. Qualitative regularity of SEM images was graded by masked observers using an established scoring system. Quantitative regularity of SEM images was assessed by counting the total number and areas of tissue bridges using Image-Pro Plus software. Four different cap thickness of 120, 130, 140, and 150 μm were compared. Refractive outcomes of patients were measured at baseline and 1 month after surgery. As 10 specimens were not analyzable, only 30 eyes were included. Postoperatively, all eyes had postoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better; 43% had an unchanged corrected distance visual acuity; 43% gained 1 line; 10% lost 1 line. Ultrastructurally, surface irregularity was primarily caused by tissue bridges. The average surface regularity score obtained was 10.87 ± 2.40 for 120 μm, 10.78 ± 2.60 for 130 μm, 8.76 ± 2.16 for 140 μm, and 8.70 ± 2.66 for 150 μm (P < 0.001). The total number and areas of tissue bridges of 120 to 130 μm were significantly less than 140 to 150 μm (P < 0.05). Surface regularity decreased as cap thickness increased (P < 0.05). There is smoother appearance of the lenticular surface as seen through SEM when a thin cap is created compared with a thick cap qualitatively and quantitatively.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of mouse intestinal mucosa after cobalt 60 and D-T neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, R [Belvidere Hospital, Glasgow (UK). Institute of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology; Carr, K R; Toner, P G; Nias, A H.W.

    1976-07-01

    The stem-cell population of the intestinal crypt is an important model system in experimental radiobiology. Standardized techniques have been developed to allow quantitation of the response of crypt cells to radiation injury following doses of 0 to 2 krad of D-T neutrons or /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. These techniques rely on the identification of regenerating crypt cells three-and-a-half days after irradiation. The results were expressed as the number of regenerating crypts per circumference of small intestine, as determined by conventional histological examination; the more profound the injury, the smaller the the crypt count. The practical relevance of crypt-counting techniques to clinical radiotherapy is limited by their relative insensitivity; the dose levels commonly used in fractionated radiotherapy produced no detectable response. Scanning electron microscopy of the mucosal surface provided a more sensitive measure of radiation injury. The earliest detectable changes occurred at the level of 300 rad of ..gamma.. radiation, well below the threshold of the crypt-counting technique. At around 1,000 rad, where the first drop in crypt counts occurred, there were well-marked morphological changes which became more severe with increasing dose levels. Some differences have been observed between the morphological effects of ..gamma.. and neutron irradiation at points of radiobiological equivalence in terms ofCrypt counts (using RBE value of about 2). The changes observed may reflect more than the disruption of epithelial cell kinetics. Mucosal morphology is the total expression of many different biological parameters of which the regenerative ability of the crypt cells is only one. The surface microanatomy of the gut may be the most sensitive indicator of radiation injury which is conveniently available for study.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of the oral apparatus and buccopharyngeal cavity of Atelognathus salai larvae (Anura, Neobatrachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinorah D. Echeverría

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to describe the horny structures of the buccal apparatus and buccopharyngeal cavity of A. salai by means ofscanning electron microscopy (SEM, and to compare them to those of the other known species of Atelognathus and related genera.

  6. Focusing on Environmental Biofilms With Variable-Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, L.; Wolfaardt, G. M.; Du Plessis, K.

    2006-12-01

    Since the term biofilm has been coined almost 30 years ago, visualization has formed an integral part of investigations on microbial attachment. Electron microscopic (EM) biofilm studies, however, have been limited by the hydrated extracellular matrix which loses structural integrity with conventional preparative techniques, and under required high-vacuum conditions, resulting in a loss of information on spatial relationships and distribution of biofilm microbes. Recent advances in EM technology enable the application of Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy (VP SEM) to biofilms, allowing low vacuum and hydrated chamber atmosphere during visualization. Environmental biofilm samples can be viewed in situ, unfixed and fully hydrated, with application of gold-sputter-coating only, to increase image resolution. As the impact of microbial biofilms can be both hazardous and beneficial to man and his environment, recognition of biofilms as a natural form of microbial existence is needed to fully assess the potential role of microbial communities on technology. The integration of multiple techniques to elucidate biofilm processes has become imperative for unraveling complex phenotypic adaptations of this microbial lifestyle. We applied VP SEM as integrative technique with traditional and novel analytical techniques to (1)localize lignocellulosic microbial consortia applied for producing alternative bio-energy sources in the mining wastewater industry, (2) characterize and visualize wetland microbial communities in the treatment of winery wastewater, and (3)determine the impact of recombinant technology on yeast biofilm behavior. Visualization of microbial attachment to a lignocellulose substrate, and degradation of exposed plant tissue, gave insight into fiber degradation and volatile fatty acid production for biological sulphate removal from mining wastewater. Also, the 3D-architecture of complex biofilms developing in constructed wetlands was correlated with

  7. Sample preparation methods for scanning electron microscopy of homogenized Al-Mg-Si billets: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Österreicher, Johannes Albert; Kumar, Manoj; Schiffl, Andreas; Schwarz, Sabine; Hillebrand, Daniel; Bourret, Gilles Remi

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of Mg-Si precipitates is crucial for optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of Al-Mg-Si alloys. Although sample preparation is key for high quality scanning electron microscopy imaging, most common methods lead to dealloying of Mg-Si precipitates. In this article we systematically evaluate different sample preparation methods: mechanical polishing, etching with various reagents, and electropolishing using different electrolytes. We demonstrate that the use of a nitric acid and methanol electrolyte for electropolishing a homogenized Al-Mg-Si alloy prevents the dissolution of Mg-Si precipitates, resulting in micrographs of higher quality. This preparation method is investigated in depth and the obtained scanning electron microscopy images are compared with transmission electron micrographs: the shape and size of Mg-Si precipitates appear very similar in either method. The scanning electron micrographs allow proper identification and measurement of the Mg-Si phases including needles with lengths of roughly 200 nm. These needles are β″ precipitates as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: •Secondary precipitation in homogenized 6xxx Al alloys is crucial for extrudability. •Existing sample preparation methods for SEM are improvable. •Electropolishing with nitric acid/methanol yields superior quality in SEM. •The obtained micrographs are compared to TEM micrographs.

  8. Sample preparation methods for scanning electron microscopy of homogenized Al-Mg-Si billets: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Österreicher, Johannes Albert; Kumar, Manoj [LKR Light Metals Technologies Ranshofen, Austrian Institute of Technology, Postfach 26, 5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Schiffl, Andreas [Hammerer Aluminium Industries Extrusion GmbH, Lamprechtshausener Straße 69, 5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Schwarz, Sabine [University Service Centre for Transmission Electron Microscopy, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Hillebrand, Daniel [Hammerer Aluminium Industries Extrusion GmbH, Lamprechtshausener Straße 69, 5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Bourret, Gilles Remi, E-mail: gilles.bourret@sbg.ac.at [Department of Materials Science and Physics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Straße 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2016-12-15

    Characterization of Mg-Si precipitates is crucial for optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of Al-Mg-Si alloys. Although sample preparation is key for high quality scanning electron microscopy imaging, most common methods lead to dealloying of Mg-Si precipitates. In this article we systematically evaluate different sample preparation methods: mechanical polishing, etching with various reagents, and electropolishing using different electrolytes. We demonstrate that the use of a nitric acid and methanol electrolyte for electropolishing a homogenized Al-Mg-Si alloy prevents the dissolution of Mg-Si precipitates, resulting in micrographs of higher quality. This preparation method is investigated in depth and the obtained scanning electron microscopy images are compared with transmission electron micrographs: the shape and size of Mg-Si precipitates appear very similar in either method. The scanning electron micrographs allow proper identification and measurement of the Mg-Si phases including needles with lengths of roughly 200 nm. These needles are β″ precipitates as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: •Secondary precipitation in homogenized 6xxx Al alloys is crucial for extrudability. •Existing sample preparation methods for SEM are improvable. •Electropolishing with nitric acid/methanol yields superior quality in SEM. •The obtained micrographs are compared to TEM micrographs.

  9. Scanning electronic microscopy on clays in soils used as road foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, N.

    1982-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the morphology, texture and fabric of clays in soils used as road foundation. It is also seen that certain samples are easier to examine by SEM because of their larger crystallite sizes, better crystallinities and open textures. (C.L.B.) [pt

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of dentition: methodology and ultrastructural morphology of tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurkin, G V; Almquist, A J; Pfeihofer, A A; Stoddard, E L

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were taken of sets of human molars-those of paleo-Indians used in mastication of, ostensibly, a highly abrasive diet, and those of contemporary Americans. Different ultrastructural patterns of enamel wear were observed between the groups.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of rat throat and trachea following the effects of radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.; Vaupotic, J.; Kobal, I.; Draslar, K.

    1996-01-01

    In two preliminary experiments, five laboratory rats were exposed in a small chamber to radon-rich air. In both experiments the exposure was about 0.9 WLM. The surface of throat and trachea was examined by scanning electron microscope. (author)

  12. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  13. Observations of localised dielectric excitations, secondary events and ionisation damage by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, A.

    1988-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) a high intensity /approximately/0.5nm diameter, probe of 100 keV electrons is formed. This can be positioned to collect energy loss spectra from surfaces, interfaces, small spheres or other particles at controlled values of impact parameter or can be scanned across the object (usually a thin film) to produce high resolution images formed from a variety of signals - small angle or large angle (Z contrast) elastic scattering, inelastic scattering (both valence and core losses), secondary electron emission and x-ray or optical photon emission. The high spatial resolution achievable in a variety of simple structures raises many unsolved theoretical problems concerning the generation, propagation and decay of excitations in inhomogeneous media. These range from quite well posed problems in the mathematical physics of dielectric excitation to problems of plasmon propagation and rather more exotic and less well understood problems of radiation damage. 15 refs., 4 figs

  14. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyses of the crystalline components of human and animal dental calculi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeGeros, R.Z.; Orly, I.; LeGeros, J.P.; Gomez, C.; Kazimiroff, J.; Tarpley, T.; Kerebel, B.

    1988-01-01

    A review of the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalyses in the study of dental calculus showed that such studies provided confirmatory and supplementary data on the morphological features of human dental calculi but gave only limited information on the identity of the crystalline or inorganic components. This study aimed to explore the potential of combined SEM and microanalyses in the identification of the crystalline components of the human and animal dental calculi. Human and animal calculi were analyzed. Identification of the crystalline components were made based on the combined information of the morphology (SEM) and Ca/P molar ratios of the crystals with the morphology and Ca/P molar ratio of synthetic calcium phosphates (brushite or DCPD; octacalcium phosphate, OCP; Mg-substituted whitlockite, beta-TCMP; CO 3 -substituted apatite, (CHA); and calcite. SEM showed similarities in morphological features of human and animal dental calculi but differences in the forms of crystals present. Microanalyses and crystal morphology data suggested the presence of CaCO 3 (calcite) and CHA in the animal (cat, dog, tiger) and of OCP, beta-TCMP and CHA in human dental calculi. X-ray diffraction and infrared (IR) absorption analyses confirmed these results. This exploratory study demonstrated that by taking into consideration what is known about the crystalline components of human and animal dental calculi, combined SEM and microanalyses can provide qualitative identification

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of the vestibular end organs. [morphological indexes of inner ear anatomy and microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, H. H.; Ades, H. W.; West, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vestibular end organs, after chemical fixation, were freeze dried, coated with gold and palladium, and studied in the scanning microscope. Scanning microscopy gives a good three dimensional view of the sensory areas and allows study of both gross anatomy and microstructures. Cross anatomical features of the structure of the ampullae are demonstrated. The form of the statoconia in different species of animals is shown. New aspects of the structure of the sensory hairs are revealed. The hair bundles in the central areas of the cristae and in the striola of the maculae differ structurally from the hair bundles at the periphery of the sensory regions. Furthermore, some hair bundles consisting of very short stereocilia were observed. The relationship between the cupula and the statoconial membrane to the epithelial surface is discussed.

  16. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Indu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 μm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE, also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 μm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 μm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 μm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV cells, and

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrese, James C.; Aceros, Juan; Donoghue, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Signal attenuation is a major problem facing intracortical sensors for chronic neuroprosthetic applications. Many studies suggest that failure is due to gliosis around the electrode tips, however, mechanical and material causes of failure are often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to progressive signal decline by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize structural changes in chronically implanted arrays and histology to examine the tissue response at corresponding implant sites. Approach. We examined eight chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) explanted from non-human primates at times ranging from 37 to 1051 days post-implant. We used SEM, in vivo neural recordings, and histology (GFAP, Iba-1, NeuN). Three MEAs that were never implanted were also imaged as controls. Main results. SEM revealed progressive corrosion of the platinum electrode tips and changes to the underlying silicon. The parylene insulation was prone to cracking and delamination, and in some instances the silicone elastomer also delaminated from the edges of the MEA. Substantial tissue encapsulation was observed and was often seen growing into defects in the platinum and parylene. These material defects became more common as the time in vivo increased. Histology at 37 and 1051 days post-implant showed gliosis, disruption of normal cortical architecture with minimal neuronal loss, and high Iba-1 reactivity, especially within the arachnoid and dura. Electrode tracts were either absent or barely visible in the cortex at 1051 days, but were seen in the fibrotic encapsulation material suggesting that the MEAs were lifted out of the brain. Neural recordings showed a progressive drop in impedance, signal amplitude, and viable channels over time. Significance. These results provide evidence that signal loss in MEAs is truly multifactorial. Gliosis occurs in the first few months after implantation but does

  18. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indu, V. R.; Lucy, K. M.; Chungath, J. J.; Ashok, N.; Maya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 µm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE), also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 µm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 µm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 µm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV) cells, and goblet cells. The

  19. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in dermatology--an up-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forslind, B.

    1988-01-01

    Dermatological papers comprising scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis data published 1983 through 1986 in international journals are reviewed, as an update to our 1984 paper on Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology. The present paper not only deals with a review of recent publications in this area but also presents the application of microincineration to hair and cryosectioned freeze-dried skin specimens. Examples of the increased contrast obtained in hair cross sections are presented and a discussion on the feasibility of microincineration at analysis of hair and skin cross sections is given. Particle probe analysis (EDX: energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PMP: proton microprobe analysis) as applied to hair and skin samples are presented with stress put on the proton probe analysis. The complementarity of EDX and PMP is demonstrated and future applications are suggested. 75 references

  20. Characterization of the host response to the myxosporean parasite, Ceratomyxa shasta (Noble), by histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunological techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Smith, C.E.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The tissue response of Salmo gairdneri Richardson, against the myxosporean parasite. Ceratomyxa shasta (Noble), was investigated using histological techniques, scanning electron microscopy and immunological methods. The progress of infection in C. shasta-susceptible and resistant steelhead and rainbow trout was examined by standard histological techniques and by indirect fluorescent antibody methods using monoclonal antibodies directed against C. shasta antigens. Trophozoite stages were first observed in the posterior intestine and there was indication that resistance was due to the inability of the parasite to penetrate this tissue rather than to an inflammatory response. Examination of a severely infected intestine by scanning electron microscopy showed extensive destruction of the mucosal folds of the posterior intestine. Western blotting and indirect fluorescent antibody techniques were used to investigate the immunological component of the host response. No antibodies specific for C. shasta were detected by either method.

  1. Impact of Membrane-Induced Particle Immobilization on Seeded Growth Monitored by In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Chen, Dennis P; Unocic, Raymond R; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2016-05-01

    In situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy probes seeded growth in real time. The growth of Pd on Au nanocubes is monitored as a model system to compare growth within a liquid cell and traditional colloidal synthesis. Different growth patterns are observed due to seed immobilization and the highly reducing environment within the liquid cell. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nanocrystals of [Cu3(btc)2] (HKUST-1): a combined time-resolved light scattering and scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Denise; Liu, Jianing; Huber, Klaus; Fischer, Roland A

    2009-03-07

    The formation of [Cu(3)(btc)(2)] (HKUST-1; btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) nanocrystals from a super-saturated mother solution at room temperature was monitored by time-resolved light scattering (TLS); the system is characterized by a rapid growth up to a size limit of 200 nm within a few minutes, and the size and shape of the crystallites were also determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  3. Posterior spiracles of fourth instar larvae of four species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae under scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessoa Felipe Arley Costa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, posterior spiracles of laboratory-reared fourth instar larvae of Lutzomyia longipalpis, L. migonei, L. lenti, and L. whitmani (Diptera: Psychodidae of the State of Ceará, Brazil, were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The number of papillae of spiracles examined varied according to the species examined, but no intraspecific differences were found. The importance of this structure to sand fly larva identification and phylogeny is commented.

  4. Autoradiographical Detection of Tritium in Cu-Ni Alloy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    高安, 紀; 中野, 美樹; 竹内, 豊三郎

    1981-01-01

    The autoradiograph of tritium dispersed in Cu-Ni alloy sheet by 6Li(n,α)3H reaction was obtained by a scanning electron microscope. Prior to the irradiation of neutrons 6Li was deposited on the sheet by evaporation. The liquid emulsion, Fuji-ER, was used in this study. The distribution of tritium was detected by the dispersion of silver grains remaining in the emulsion after the development was carried out.

  5. A new method using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for preparation of anisopterous odonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Palacio, Alejandro; Sarmiento, Patricia Laura; Javier, Muzón

    2017-10-01

    Anisopterous odonate male's secondary genitalia is a complex of several structures, among them the vesica spermalis is the most informative with important specific characters. The observation of those characters, mostly of membranous nature, is difficult in the Scanning Electron Microscope due to dehydration and metallization processes. In this contribution, we discuss a new and low cost procedure for the observation of these characters in the SEM, compatible with the most common agents used for preserving specimens. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Sub-nanometre resolution imaging of polymer-fullerene photovoltaic blends using energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Robert C; Pearson, Andrew J; Glen, Tom S; Sasam, Fabian-Cyril; Li, Letian; Dapor, Maurizio; Donald, Athene M; Lidzey, David G; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2015-04-24

    The resolution capability of the scanning electron microscope has increased immensely in recent years, and is now within the sub-nanometre range, at least for inorganic materials. An equivalent advance has not yet been achieved for imaging the morphologies of nanostructured organic materials, such as organic photovoltaic blends. Here we show that energy-selective secondary electron detection can be used to obtain high-contrast, material-specific images of an organic photovoltaic blend. We also find that we can differentiate mixed phases from pure material phases in our data. The lateral resolution demonstrated is twice that previously reported from secondary electron imaging. Our results suggest that our energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy approach will be able to make major inroads into the understanding of complex, nano-structured organic materials.

  7. Sub-nanometre resolution imaging of polymer–fullerene photovoltaic blends using energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Robert C.; Pearson, Andrew J.; Glen, Tom S.; Sasam, Fabian-Cyril; Li, Letian; Dapor, Maurizio; Donald, Athene M.; Lidzey, David G.; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The resolution capability of the scanning electron microscope has increased immensely in recent years, and is now within the sub-nanometre range, at least for inorganic materials. An equivalent advance has not yet been achieved for imaging the morphologies of nanostructured organic materials, such as organic photovoltaic blends. Here we show that energy-selective secondary electron detection can be used to obtain high-contrast, material-specific images of an organic photovoltaic blend. We also find that we can differentiate mixed phases from pure material phases in our data. The lateral resolution demonstrated is twice that previously reported from secondary electron imaging. Our results suggest that our energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy approach will be able to make major inroads into the understanding of complex, nano-structured organic materials. PMID:25906738

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts and histologic examination of pulmonary microvasculature in dogs with dirofilariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Yoshito

    2002-11-01

    To characterize structural changes in pulmonary vessels of dogs with dirofilariosis. 8 dogs with dirofilariosis and 2 unaffected control dogs. Pulmonary artery pressure was measured in affected dogs, and dogs then were euthanatized. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine vascular corrosion casts of pulmonary vasculature. Tissue sections of pulmonary vasculature were evaluated by use of histologic examination. Pulmonary artery pressure was higher in dogs with severely affected pulmonary vessels. In tissue sections, dilatation, as well as lesions in the tunica intima and proliferative lesions resulting in constriction or obstruction, were frequently observed in branches of the pulmonary artery. Numerous dilated bronchial arteries were observed around affected pulmonary arteries. Hyperplastic venous sphincters were observed in small pulmonary veins and venules. In corrosion casts, affected pulmonary lobar arteries had dilatation, pruning, abnormal tapering, constriction, and obstruction. In small arteries and arterioles, surface structures representing aneurisms and edema were seen. Bronchial arteries were well developed and extremely dilated, and they formed numerous anastomoses with pulmonary arteries at all levels, from the pulmonary trunk to peripheral vessels. Capillaries in the lungs were dilated with little structural change. Small pulmonary veins and venules had irregular annular constrictions that were caused by hyperplastic smooth muscle cells of venous sphincters. Scanning electron microscopy of microvascular casts delineated links between the bronchial and pulmonary circulations in dogs with dirofilariosis. Results of scanning electron microscopy provided a structural explanation for the development of pulmonary circulatory disturbances and pulmonary hypertension in dogs affected by dirofilariosis.

  9. A comparative analysis of bleached and sound enamel structure through scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, A.; Kaleem, M.; Anwar, R.

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the effects of bleaching agent on enamel structure and to characterize the morphological and chemical changes in enamel due to bleaching. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: School of Chemical and Material Engineering (SCME), NUST Islamabad from Feb to May 2013. Materials and Methods: Ten recently extracted pre molars between the 12-22 years age group were randomly assigned into two groups. Group one was a non-bleached control group with sound enamel. Group two was bleached with Everbrite In office tooth whitening system after specimen preparation, surface morphology was observed under SEM (scanned electron microscope) and AFM (Atomic force microscope). Results: The detrimental effects of hydrogen per-oxide on enamel were evident in bleached specimens under SEM, and AFM analysis. Conclusion: There were significant surface alterations found in the bleached specimens as compared to control group. However salivary buffering potentials could overcome the demineralizing effect of bleaching gel. (author)

  10. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... a broad tunnelling current-overpotential range at a constant (large) bias voltage of +0.2 V. The current is found to be constant over a 0.25 V overpotential range, which covers roughly the range where the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the energy tip. STM contrast and apparent...... of previous theoretical work on in situ STM of redox molecules, to large bias voltages, \\eV(bias)\\ > E-r. Large bias voltages give tunnelling contrasts independent of the overpotential over a broad range, as both the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the 'energy tip' between the substrate...

  11. EVALUATION OF THE ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE SMALL INTESTINE OF HIV INFECTED CHILDREN BY TRANSMISSION AND SCANNING ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Araujo Chaves LEITE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To describe HIV children's small intestinal ultrastructural findings. Methods Descriptive, observational study of small intestine biopsies performed between August 1994 and May 1995 at São Paulo, SP, Brazil. This material pertained to 11 HIV infected children and was stored in a laboratory in paraffin blocks. Scanning and transmission electronic microscopy were used to view those intestine samples and ultrastructural findings were described by analyzing digitalized photos of this material. Ethical Committee approval was obtained. Results In most samples scanning microscopy showed various degrees of shortening and decreasing number of microvilli and also completes effacements in some areas. Derangement of the enterocytes was seen frequently and sometimes cells well defined borders limits seemed to be loosened. In some areas a mucous-fibrin like membrane with variable thickness and extension appeared to partially or totally coat the epithelial surface. Fat drops were present in the intestinal lumen in various samples and a bacterium morphologically resembling bacilli was seen in two occasions. Scanning microscopy confirmed transmission microscopy microvilli findings and also showed little “tufts” of those structures. In addition, it showed an increased number of vacuoles and multivesicular bodies inside various enterocytes, an increased presence of intraepithelial lymphocytes, mitochondrial vacuolization and basement membrane enlargement in the majority of samples analyzed. However, some samples exhibited normal aspect. Conclusions Our study showed the common occurrence of various important intestinal ultrastructural alterations with variable degrees among HIV infected children, some of them in our knowledge not described before.

  12. Characterizing nanoscale scanning probes using electron microscopy: A novel fixture and a practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Tevis D. B., E-mail: tjacobs@pitt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, 3700 O’Hara St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15208 (United States); Wabiszewski, Graham E.; Goodman, Alexander J.; Carpick, Robert W., E-mail: carpick@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Pennsylvania, 220 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The nanoscale geometry of probe tips used for atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements determines the lateral resolution, contributes to the strength of the tip-surface interaction, and can be a significant source of uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of results. While inverse imaging of the probe tip has been used successfully to determine probe tip geometry, direct observation of the tip profile using electron microscopy (EM) confers several advantages: it provides direct (rather than indirect) imaging, requires fewer algorithmic parameters, and does not require bringing the tip into contact with a sample. In the past, EM-based observation of the probe tip has been achieved using ad hoc mounting methods that are constrained by low throughput, the risk of contamination, and repeatability issues. We report on a probe fixture designed for use in a commercial transmission electron microscope that enables repeatable mounting of multiple AFM probes as well as a reference grid for beam alignment. This communication describes the design, fabrication, and advantages of this probe fixture, including full technical drawings for machining. Further, best practices are discussed for repeatable, non-destructive probe imaging. Finally, examples of the fixture’s use are described, including characterization of common commercial AFM probes in their out-of-the-box condition.

  13. 3D scanning electron microscopy applied to surface characterization of fluorosed dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limandri, Silvina; Galván Josa, Víctor; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Chena, María Emilia; Castellano, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    The enamel surfaces of fluorotic teeth were studied by scanning electron stereomicroscopy. Different whitening treatments were applied to 25 pieces to remove stains caused by fluorosis and their surfaces were characterized by stereomicroscopy in order to obtain functional and amplitude parameters. The topographic features resulting for each treatment were determined through these parameters. The results obtained show that the 3D reconstruction achieved from the SEM stereo pairs is a valuable potential alternative for the surface characterization of this kind of samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of Deformation Phenomena in TRIP/TWIP Steels by Acoustic Emission and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderov, M. L.; Segel, C.; Weidner, A.; Biermann, H.; Vinogradov, A. Yu.

    2018-04-01

    Modern metastable steels with TRIP/TWIP effects have a unique set of physical-mechanical properties. They combine both high-strength and high-plasticity characteristics, which is governed by processes activated during deformation, namely, twinning, the formation of stacking faults, and martensitic transformations. To study the behavior of these phenomena in CrMnNi TRIP/TWIP steels and stainless CrNiMo steel, which does not have these effects in the temperature range under study, we used the method of acoustic emission and modern methods of signal processing, including the cluster analysis of spectral-density functions. The results of this study have been compared with a detailed microstructural analysis performed with a scanning electron microscope using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

  15. Healthy and diseased striated muscle studied by analytical scanning electron microscopy with special reference to fibre type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wroblewski, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray microanalytical investigations of striated muscles in the scanning electron microscope are reviewed. The main part of the studies was performed on cryosections cut with a conventional cryostat operating at -20 degrees C to -40 degrees C. The preparation procedure including different types of attachment of the sections to the specimen holder is described in detail. The elemental changes in muscle are related to the muscle fibre type as demonstrated by histochemical methods or to histochemically demonstrated inclusions in diseased muscles. This is of great importance, because muscle disorders are often characterised by selective involvement of different muscle fibre types. The preparation methods of muscle for analytical scanning electron microscopy and the obtained results are compared with studies performed on thin cryo and epoxy sections, analysed in the transmission and scanning-transmission electron microscope. It is evident that X-ray microanalysis performed on thick cryosections provide a quick survey of the elemental composition of whole cells, and should be followed in interesting cases by close examination on the organelle level studied in thin cryosections in the transmission and scanning-transmission electron microscope

  16. A New Approach to Studying Biological and Soft Materials Using Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, D J; Morrissey, F; Lich, B H

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade techniques such as confocal light microscopy, in combination with fluorescent labelling, have helped biologists and life scientists to study biological architectures at tissue and cell level in great detail. Meanwhile, obtaining information at very small length scales is possible with the combination of sample preparation techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is well known for the determination of surface characteristics and morphology. However, the desire to understand the three dimensional relationships of meso-scale hierarchies has led to the development of advanced microscopy techniques, to give a further complementary approach. A focused ion beam (FIB) can be used as a nano-scalpel and hence allows us to reveal internal microstructure in a site-specific manner. Whilst FIB instruments have been used to study and verify the three-dimensional architecture of man made materials, SEM and FIB technologies have now been brought together in a single instrument representing a powerful combination for the study of biological specimens and soft materials. We demonstrate the use of FIB SEM to study three-dimensional relationships for a range of length scales and materials, from small-scale cellular structures to the larger scale interactions between biomedical materials and tissues. FIB cutting of heterogeneous mixtures of hard and soft materials, resulting in a uniform cross-section, has proved to be of particular value since classical preparation methods tend to introduce artefacts. Furthermore, by appropriate selection, we can sequentially cross-section to create a series of 'slices' at specific intervals. 3D reconstruction software can then be used to volume-render information from the 2D slices, enabling us to immediately see the spatial relationships between microstructural components

  17. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  18. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skapin, A. Sever; Ropret, P.; Bukovec, P.

    2007-01-01

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods

  19. Determination of the cork bark porosity through the gamma ray transmission technology and electronic scanning microscopy image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Antonio M.C.; Moreira, Anderson C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.

    2007-01-01

    This work applies the gamma transmission techniques (GTR) and imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for determination of porosity in the sparkling wine bottle corks. The gamma transmission experimental apparatus consists of a micrometric table (ZX) of sample movement automated, a Am-241 source (59,53 keV, 100 mCi), lead collimators, sample-holder, Na I(Tl) detector and appropriated electronics. For the microscopic images an FEI (Quanta 200), electronic microscope with associated electronics was used, and the image analysis was performed with IMAGO software. The average porosity for 22 samples analysed by GTR was of φ=58 +- 4.6 percent. By the imaging technique the found average porosity was φ=60.0 +- 6.2 percent. (author)

  20. The Characterisation of Settled Dust by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilton, Vaughan; Giess, Paul; Mitchell, David; Williams, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Settled dust has been collected inside the main foyers oft hree University buildings in Wolverhampton City Centre,U.K. Two of the three buildings are located in a street canyon used almost exclusively by heavy duty diesel vehicles. The dust was collected on adhesive carbonspectro-tabs to be in a form suitable for analysis by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Using these analytical techniques, individual particle analysis was undertaken for morphology and chemistry. Seasonal variations and variations due to location were observed in both the morphological measurements and chemical analysis. Many of the differences appear attributable to the influence of road traffic, in particular, the heavy duty diesel vehicles, travelling along the street canyon

  1. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Addition of fish oil to industrially prepared food products is attractive to the food industry because of the well-documented health effects of the omega 3 fatty acids in the fish oil [1]. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids including omega 3 fatty acids are highly susceptible to lipid oxidation due...... to the many double bonds. Emulsions of fish oil in water are potential candidates for a delivery system of fish oil to food products. It has been suggested that oxidation of oil-in-water emulsions is initiated at the interface between oil and water. It has also been proposed that oxidation is to some extent...... is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations...

  2. Experimental white piedra: a robust approach to ultrastructural analysis, scanning electron microscopy and etiological discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Cicero P; Rocha, Ana Paula S; Barbosa, Renan do N; Oliveira, Neiva T; Silva, Josineide C; de Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia C; Neves, Rejane P

    2016-01-01

    White piedra is a fungal infection characterized by nodules comprised of Trichosporon species and restricted to the extrafollicular portion of the hair shaft. The diagnosis is based on clinical and mycological characteristics, and must be confirmed with a precise identification of the etiological agent. This research aimed to develop an in vitro infection model of white piedra and analyze its morphological and ultra-structural aspects. In the process, hair infection was induced using eight isolates of the genus Trichosporon maintained in the Culture Collection Micoteca URM. The ITS and IGS1 regions were sequenced for taxonomic confirmation. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was performed at the Strategic Center for Northeast Technologies (CETENE). The scanning electron microscope was equipped with an Energy Dispersion Spectrometer (EDS). The Trichosporon isolates were identified as Trichosporon asahii (6) and Trichosporon montevideense (2) by internal transcript spacer (ITS) region and intergenic spacer 1 region (IGS1) sequencing. All eight strains were used to induce the in vitro hair infection, and nodules formed after the incubation period. Temperature variations and high humidity were not observed to be related to the development of this hair disease. The main chemical constituents detected in the nodules were carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, as well as a low level of sulfur. The absence of calcium, combined with the low level of sulfur, might explain the soft nature of the white piedra nodules. This study demonstrated that several Trichosporon species may be responsible for causing white piedra. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hygroscopic analysis of individual Beijing haze aerosol particles by environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhangpeng; Ji, Yuan; Pi, Yiqun; Yang, Kaixiang; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yinqi; Zhai, Yadi; Yan, Zhengguang; Han, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Investigating the hygroscopic behavior of haze aerosol particles is essential for understanding their physicochemical properties and their impacts on regional weather and visibility. An environmental scanning electron microscope equipped with a home-made transmission-scattering electron imaging setup and an energy dispersive spectrometer was used for in-situ observations of pure water-soluble (WS) salts and Beijing haze particles. This imaging setup showed obvious advantages for improving the resolution and acquiring internal information of mixed particles in hydrated environments. We measured the deliquescence relative humidity of pure NaCl, NH4NO3, and (NH4)2SO4 by deliquescence-crystallization processes with an accuracy of up to 0.3% RH. The mixed haze particles showed hygroscopic activation like water uptake and morphological changes when they included WS components such as nitrates, sulfates, halides, ammoniums, and alkali metal salts. In addition, the hygroscopic behavior provides complementary information for analyzing possible phases in mixed haze particles.

  4. Theoretical and experimental study of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier epouse Mory, Claudie

    1985-01-01

    This thesis contains a theoretical and experimental study of image formation in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Using a detailed description of the different optical elements between the field emission source and the specimen, one calculates the shape and size of the primary probe of electrons impinging on the sample. This modelization enables to estimate the spatial resolution in the different imaging or microanalytical modes. The influence of the specimen and the role of the various detectors are taken into account to calculate the point spread function of the instrument in STEM imaging modes. An experimental study of the characteristic properties of phase contrast bright field micrographs and incoherent dark field ones is performed by comparison of digitally recorded images in similar conditions. Spatial resolution, contrast and signal/noise ratio are assessed by correlation methods, Fourier analysis and statistical considerations; one can deduce the optimum focusing conditions. Limits such as the point resolution on quasi-atomic metallic clusters are determined and an analysis of the capabilities of signal mixing concludes this work. Applications are offered in various domains such as the visualisation of small metallic particles, biomolecules and unstained biological sections. (author) [fr

  5. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report is based on a metrological investigation on confocal microscopy technique carried out by Uffe Rolf Arlø Theilade and Paolo Bariani. The purpose of the experimental activity was twofold a metrological instrument characterization and application to assessment of rough PP injection moulded...... replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of Turgida turgida (Nematoda: Spiruroidea), parasite of the Virginia opossum, Didelphis virginiana, from southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matey, V E; Kuperman, B I; Kinsella, J M

    2001-10-01

    Taxonomic characters for identification of Turgida turgida Rudolphi, 1819, a parasitic nematode of the Virginia opossum Didelphis virginiana, were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The distinguishing feature of the cephalic end is the presence of numerous denticles, structures associated with the internal tooth, and 2 spongelike areas on the inner side of each pseudolabia. The posterior end of male T. turgida differs from that in other species of Physalopteridae by the number of caudal papillae (22), truncated postcloacal papilla, and patterns of ventrocaudal ornamentation.

  7. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of a craniopharyngioma: x-ray microanalytical study of the intratumoral mineralized deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilches, J.; Lopez, A.; Martinez, M.C.; Gomez, J.; Barbera, J.

    This paper discusses the value of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis in the classification of craniopharyngiomas. This neoplasm shows epithelial nest, cords of cuboid cells, foci of squamous metaplasia, and microcystic degeneration. SEM reveals that the epithelial cysts are lined with elongated cells that possess numerous microvilli and blebs and that some cysts are lined with polyhedral cells. The microvilli are interpreted as characteristic of the fast growing craniopharyngiomas. A microanalytical study of the calcified areas reveals the presence of magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium.

  8. Phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of light and heavy atoms at the limit of contrast and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücelen, Emrah; Lazić, Ivan; Bosch, Eric G T

    2018-02-08

    Using state of the art scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is nowadays possible to directly image single atomic columns at sub-Å resolution. In standard (high angle) annular dark field STEM ((HA)ADF-STEM), however, light elements are usually invisible when imaged together with heavier elements in one image. Here we demonstrate the capability of the recently introduced Integrated Differential Phase Contrast STEM (iDPC-STEM) technique to image both light and heavy atoms in a thin sample at sub-Å resolution. We use the technique to resolve both the Gallium and Nitrogen dumbbells in a GaN crystal in [[Formula: see text

  9. [Scanning electron microscopy of peripheral blood erythrocytes in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic vasculitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaeva, T A; Balasheva, I I; Saratikov, A S; Bocharova, M N; Mikhalenko, A N

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-four children aged 3-15 years were examined, 16 of these with cutaneous and articulo-cutaneous hemorrhagic vasculitis (HV) and 8 normal controls. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 10 patients treated by basic therapy and 6 children whose treatment protocols were supplemented by membranoprotector locheine. The children were repeatedly examined 1 month after discharge from hospital. Scanning electron microscopy of peripheral blood erythrocytes provides valuable diagnostic data on erythrocyte membrane morphology and function in children with HV and can serve as a method for monitoring the efficiency of new approaches to therapy of this disease.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of third-instar sarcophagid (Diptera: Sarcophagidae recovered from a mummified human corpse in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukontason Kom

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The third-instar of an unidentified sarcophagid, recovered from a mummified body of a 32-yr-old Thai male was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Although the morphological features of this larva are similar to the other sarcophagid larvae, some features could be helpful for species identification, which is a basic requirement for estimation of postmortem interval in forensic investigation. These features included number and arrangement of papillae on the anterior spiracle, structure of spines, size of circumspiracular tubercles at caudal segment and branching peculiarity of the posterior spiracular hairs. This information could benefit future identification of the sarcophagid larvae that exist in Thailand.

  11. Analysis of archaeological materials through Scanning electron microscopy; Analisis de materiales arqueologicos a traves de la Microscopia electronica de barrido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, A.; Tenorio C, D. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Elizalde, S.; Mandujano, C.; Cassiano, G. [Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    With the purpose to know the uses and the chemical composition of some cultural objects in the pre hispanic epoch this work presents several types of analysis for identifying them by means of the Scanning electron microscopy and its techniques as the Functional analysis of artifacts based on the 'tracks of use' analysis, also the X-ray spectroscopy and the X-ray dispersive energy (EDS) are mentioned, all of them allowing a major approach to the pre hispanic culture in Mexico. (Author)

  12. Theory of bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy for tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Zachary H.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation transport theory is applied to electron microscopy of samples composed of one or more materials. The theory, originally due to Goudsmit and Saunderson, assumes only elastic scattering and an amorphous medium dominated by atomic interactions. For samples composed of a single material, the theory yields reasonable parameter-free agreement with experimental data taken from the literature for the multiple scattering of 300-keV electrons through aluminum foils up to 25 μm thick. For thin films, the theory gives a validity condition for Beer's law. For thick films, a variant of Moliere's theory [V. G. Moliere, Z. Naturforschg. 3a, 78 (1948)] of multiple scattering leads to a form for the bright-field signal for foils in the multiple-scattering regime. The signal varies as [t ln(e 1-2γ t/τ)] -1 where t is the path length of the beam, τ is the mean free path for elastic scattering, and γ is Euler's constant. The Goudsmit-Saunderson solution interpolates numerically between these two limits. For samples with multiple materials, elemental sensitivity is developed through the angular dependence of the scattering. From the elastic scattering cross sections of the first 92 elements, a singular-value decomposition of a vector space spanned by the elastic scattering cross sections minus a delta function shows that there is a dominant common mode, with composition-dependent corrections of about 2%. A mathematically correct reconstruction procedure beyond 2% accuracy requires the acquisition of the bright-field signal as a function of the scattering angle. Tomographic reconstructions are carried out for three singular vectors of a sample problem with four elements Cr, Cu, Zr, and Te. The three reconstructions are presented jointly as a color image; all four elements are clearly identifiable throughout the image

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  14. Scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainsbridge, B.

    1994-01-01

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, 'because we are too big'. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs

  15. Scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainsbridge, B [Murdoch Univ., WA (Australia). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, `because we are too big`. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Studies on silica deposition in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. ) using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, neutron activation analysis, and light microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, P B; Takeoka, Y; Carlson, T J; Bigelow, W C; Jones, J D; Moore, P H; Ghosheh, N S [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA)

    1979-06-01

    Marked differences in silicon content in internodes of two sugarcane cultivars as revealed by neutron activation analysis, were closely correlated with number of silica cells per unit area in the epidermal system of the internodes of the two cultivars, as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Light microscopy of epidermal peels showed that silica cells are capable of transmitting significantly more light through themselves than do other types of adjacent epidermal cells. This could be of great significance to total amount of carbon fixed by photosynthesizing mesophyll cells in leaves and cortical cells in internodes below the epidermis, especially in sugarcane cultivars with high densities of silica cells in their shoot epidermal systems. This has led to propose a window hypothesis, which indicates that silica cells in sugarcane, and in other grasses, act like windows in the epidermal system, allowing more light to be transmitted to photosynthetic tissue below than would occur if silica cells were absent.

  17. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  18. Electron transfer kinetics of cytochrome c immobilized on a phenolic terminated thiol self assembled monolayer determined by scanning electrochemical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Vali; Mousavi, Mir Fazlollah; Mehrgardi, Masoud Ayatollahi; Kazemi, Sayed Habib; Sharghi, Hashem

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Preparing a thiolated phenolic self-assembled monolayer surface (SAM). → Application of this SAM to immobilize cytochrome C. → Scanning electrochemical microscopy used for these studies. → Determination of both tunneling electron transfer and bimolecular rate constants between the immobilized protein-substrate and probe. - Abstract: In the present manuscript, the electrochemical behavior of cytochrome c (cyt-c) immobilized onto a phenolic terminated self assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold electrode is investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The tunneling electron transfer (ET) rate constant between the immobilized protein and the underlying electrode surface, and also the bimolecular ET rate constant between the immobilized protein and a probe has been obtained using approach curves that were obtained by SECM. The approach curves were recorded at different substrate overpotentials in the presence of various concentrations of ferrocyanide as a probe and various surface concentrations of cyt-c; then the standard tunneling ET and bimolecular rate constants are obtained as 3.4 ± 0.3 s -1 and (2.0 ± 0.5) x 10 7 cm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively.

  19. Electron transfer kinetics of cytochrome c immobilized on a phenolic terminated thiol self assembled monolayer determined by scanning electrochemical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Vali [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, Mir Fazlollah, E-mail: mousavim@modares.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrgardi, Masoud Ayatollahi [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, Sayed Habib [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sharghi, Hashem [Department of Chemistry, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: > Preparing a thiolated phenolic self-assembled monolayer surface (SAM). > Application of this SAM to immobilize cytochrome C. > Scanning electrochemical microscopy used for these studies. > Determination of both tunneling electron transfer and bimolecular rate constants between the immobilized protein-substrate and probe. - Abstract: In the present manuscript, the electrochemical behavior of cytochrome c (cyt-c) immobilized onto a phenolic terminated self assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold electrode is investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The tunneling electron transfer (ET) rate constant between the immobilized protein and the underlying electrode surface, and also the bimolecular ET rate constant between the immobilized protein and a probe has been obtained using approach curves that were obtained by SECM. The approach curves were recorded at different substrate overpotentials in the presence of various concentrations of ferrocyanide as a probe and various surface concentrations of cyt-c; then the standard tunneling ET and bimolecular rate constants are obtained as 3.4 {+-} 0.3 s{sup -1} and (2.0 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 7} cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  20. Evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopy for analysis of Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ on urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holling, Nina; Dedi, Cinzia; Jones, Caroline E; Hawthorne, Joseph A; Hanlon, Geoffrey W; Salvage, Jonathan P; Patel, Bhavik A; Barnes, Lara M; Jones, Brian V

    2014-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and frequently leads to blockage of catheters due to crystalline biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has proven to be a valuable tool in the study of these unusual biofilms, but entails laborious sample preparation that can introduce artefacts, undermining the investigation of biofilm development. In contrast, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) permits imaging of unprocessed, fully hydrated samples, which may provide much insight into the development of P. mirabilis biofilms. Here, we evaluate the utility of ESEM for the study of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ, on urinary catheters. In doing so, we compare this to commonly used conventional SEM approaches for sample preparation and imaging. Overall, ESEM provided excellent resolution of biofilms formed on urinary catheters and revealed structures not observed in standard SEM imaging or previously described in other studies of these biofilms. In addition, we show that energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) may be employed in conjunction with ESEM to provide information regarding the elemental composition of crystalline structures and demonstrate the potential for ESEM in combination with EDS to constitute a useful tool in exploring the mechanisms underpinning crystalline biofilm formation. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  1. Three-dimensional imaging of individual point defects using selective detection angles in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jared M.; Im, Soohyun; Windl, Wolfgang; Hwang, Jinwoo, E-mail: hwang.458@osu.edu

    2017-01-15

    We propose a new scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) technique that can realize the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of vacancies, lighter and heavier dopants with high precision. Using multislice STEM imaging and diffraction simulations of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}, we show that selecting a small range of low scattering angles can make the contrast of the defect-containing atomic columns substantially more depth-dependent. The origin of the depth-dependence is the de-channeling of electrons due to the existence of a point defect in the atomic column, which creates extra “ripples” at low scattering angles. The highest contrast of the point defect can be achieved when the de-channeling signal is captured using the 20–40 mrad detection angle range. The effect of sample thickness, crystal orientation, local strain, probe convergence angle, and experimental uncertainty to the depth-dependent contrast of the point defect will also be discussed. The proposed technique therefore opens new possibilities for highly precise 3D structural characterization of individual point defects in functional materials. - Highlights: • A new electron microscopy technique that can visualize 3D position of point defect is proposed. • The technique relies on the electron de-channeling signals at low scattering angles. • The technique enables precise determination of the depth of vacancies and lighter impurity atoms.

  2. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  3. Depth profiling: RBS versus energy-dispersive X-ray imaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is known to be one of the techniques ideal for analysis of thin films. Elemental concentrations of matrix components and impurities can be investigated as well as depth profiles of almost each element of the periodic table. Best of all, RBS has both a high sensitivity and a high depth resolution, and is a non-destructive analysis technique that does not require specific sample preparation. Solid-state samples are mounted without preparation inside a high-vacuum analysis chamber. However, depth-related interpretation of elemental depth profiles requires the material density of the specimen and stopping power values to be taken into consideration. In many cases, these parameters can be estimated with sufficient precision. However, the assumed density can be inaccurate for depth scales in the nanometer range. For example, in the case of Ge nanoclusters in 500 nm thick SiO 2 layers, uncertainty is related to the actual position of a very thin Ge nanocluster band. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission (EDX) spectroscopy, using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can assist in removing this uncertainty. By preparing a thin section of the specimen, EDX can be used to identify the position of the Ge nanocluster band very precisely, by correlating the Ge profile with the depth profiles of silicon and oxygen. However, extraction of the concentration profiles from STEM-EDX spectra is in general not straightforward. Therefore, a combination of the two very different analysis techniques is often the best and only successful way to extract high-resolution concentration profiles

  4. Adapted methods for scanning electron microscopy (SEM in assessment of human sperm morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Nussdorfer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a widespread problem, and in some cases, the routine basic semen analysis is not sufficient to detect the cause of male infertility. The use of the scanning electron microscope (SEM could provide a detailed insight into spermatozoa morphology, but it requires specific sample preparation techniques. The purpose of this study was to select, adjust, and optimize a method for the preparation of spermatozoa samples prior to SEM analysis, and to establish the protocol required for its use in clinical practice. We examined sperm samples of 50 men. The samples were fixed with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation. In the first method, dehydration of the cells and subsequent critical point drying (CPD were performed on a coverslip. In the second method, the samples were dehydrated in centrifuge tubes; hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS was used as a drying agent instead of CPD, and the samples were air-dried. The third procedure was based on a membrane filter. The samples were dehydrated and dried with HMDS in a Gooch crucible, continuously, without centrifugation or redispersion of the sample. Our results showed that the fixation with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation, and combined with dehydration and CPD on a coverslip, is the most convenient procedure for SEM sample preparation. In the case of small-size samples or low sperm concentration, dehydration and drying with HMDS on the membrane filter enabled the best reliability, repeatability, and comparability of the results. The presented procedures are suitable for routine use, and they can be applied to confirm as well as to correct a diagnosis.

  5. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  6. Surface structure and analysis with scanning tunneling microscopy and electron tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: charge-density waves in layer structures; charge-density waves in linear chain compounds; spectroscopy with the STM; STM studies of oxides; and development of atomic force microscopy. (LSP)

  7. Strain fields around dislocation arrays in a Σ9 silicon bicrystal measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, Martin; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2013-04-01

    Strain fields around grain boundary dislocations are measured by applying geometric phase analysis on atomic resolution images obtained from multiple fast acquisitions in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Maps of lattice distortions in silicon introduced by an array of pure edge dislocations located at a Σ9(122) grain boundary are compared with the predictions from isotropic elastic theory, and the atomic structure of dislocation cores is deduced from images displaying all the atomic columns. For strain measurements, reducing the acquisition time is found to significantly decrease the effects of instabilities on the high-resolution images. Contributions from scanning artefacts are also diminished by summing multiple images following a cross-correlation alignment procedure. Combined with the sub-Ångström resolution obtained with an aberration corrector, and the stable dedicated microscope's environment, therapid acquisition method provides the measurements of atomic displacements with accuracy below 10 pm. Finally, the advantages of combining strain measurements with the collection of various analytical signals in a scanning transmission electron microscope are discussed.

  8. New method for characterizing paper coating structures using argon ion beam milling and field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlström, C; Allem, R; Uesaka, T

    2011-02-01

    We have developed a new method for characterizing microstructures of paper coating using argon ion beam milling technique and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The combination of these two techniques produces extremely high-quality images with very few artefacts, which are particularly suited for quantitative analyses of coating structures. A new evaluation method has been developed by using marker-controlled watershed segmentation technique of the secondary electron images. The high-quality secondary electron images with well-defined pores makes it possible to use this semi-automatic segmentation method. One advantage of using secondary electron images instead of backscattered electron images is being able to avoid possible overestimation of the porosity because of the signal depth. A comparison was made between the new method and the conventional method using greyscale histogram thresholding of backscattered electron images. The results showed that the conventional method overestimated the pore area by 20% and detected around 5% more pores than the new method. As examples of the application of the new method, we have investigated the distributions of coating binders, and the relationship between local coating porosity and base sheet structures. The technique revealed, for the first time with direct evidence, the long-suspected coating non-uniformity, i.e. binder migration, and the correlation between coating porosity versus base sheet mass density, in a straightforward way. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Exceptionally Slow Movement of Gold Nanoparticles at a Solid/Liquid Interface Investigated by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verch, Andreas; Pfaff, Marina; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-06-30

    Gold nanoparticles were observed to move at a liquid/solid interface 3 orders of magnitude slower than expected for the movement in a bulk liquid by Brownian motion. The nanoscale movement was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid enclosure consisting of microchips with silicon nitride windows. The experiments involved a variation of the electron dose, the coating of the nanoparticles, the surface charge of the enclosing membrane, the viscosity, and the liquid thickness. The observed slow movement was not a result of hydrodynamic hindrance near a wall but instead explained by the presence of a layer of ordered liquid exhibiting a viscosity 5 orders of magnitude larger than a bulk liquid. The increased viscosity presumably led to a dramatic slowdown of the movement. The layer was formed as a result of the surface charge of the silicon nitride windows. The exceptionally slow motion is a crucial aspect of electron microscopy of specimens in liquid, enabling a direct observation of the movement and agglomeration of nanoscale objects in liquid.

  10. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  11. Detailed characterisation of focused ion beam induced lateral damage on silicon carbide samples by electrical scanning probe microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, F.; Abu Quba, A. A.; Singer, P.; Rumler, M.; Cherkashin, N.; Schamm-Chardon, S.; Cours, R.; Rommel, M.

    2018-03-01

    The lateral damage induced by focused ion beam on silicon carbide was characterized using electrical scanning probe microscopy (SPM), namely, scanning spreading resistance microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM). It is shown that the damage exceeds the purposely irradiated circles with a radius of 0.5 μm by several micrometres, up to 8 μm for the maximum applied ion dose of 1018 cm-2. Obtained SPM results are critically compared with earlier findings on silicon. For doses above the amorphization threshold, in both cases, three different areas can be distinguished. The purposely irradiated area exhibits resistances smaller than the non-affected substrate. A second region with strongly increasing resistance and a maximum saturation value surrounds it. The third region shows the transition from maximum resistance to the base resistance of the unaffected substrate. It correlates to the transition from amorphized to defect-rich to pristine crystalline substrate. Additionally, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and annular dark-field STEM were used to complement and explain the SPM results and get a further understanding of the defect spreading underneath the surface. Those measurements also show three different regions that correlate well with the regions observed from electrical SPM. TEM results further allow to explain observed differences in the electrical results for silicon and silicon carbide which are most prominent for ion doses above 3 × 1016 cm-2. Furthermore, the conventional approach to perform current-voltage measurements by c-AFM was critically reviewed and several improvements for measurement and analysis process were suggested that result in more reliable and impactful c-AFM data.

  12. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Sompetch, Kanganit [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarakonsri, Thapanee, E-mail: tsarakonsri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Analytical electron microscopy has revealed the structure of particles that were synthesized by chemical reaction of GeO{sub 2} with NaBH{sub 4} in the basic solution including graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) powders. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was arranged by recrystallization of melamine at 600 °C under N{sub 2} gas atmosphere. The samples were dried at 60 °C or 180 °C for 4 h. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was observed as lamellae of several ten nm or less in size and had an amorphous-like structure with a distorted lattice in an area as small as a few hundred pm in size. The reaction product was Ge(O) particles as fine as several nm in size and composed of Ge and O atoms. Most of the particles must be of GeO{sub 2−x} with the amorphous-like structure that has also a distorted lattice in an area of a few hundred pm in size. In the sample dried at 60 °C, the particles were found to be dispersed in a wide area on the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} lamella. It is hard to recognize those particles in TEM images. The particles in the sample dried at 180 °C became larger and were easily observed as isolated lumps. Hence, these powders can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites, and expected to be applicable to anode materials for high energy Li-ion batteries due to Ge catalysis effect, accordingly. - Graphical abstract: STEM analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder. - Highlights: • Graphitic (g)-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder was prepared at 600 °C by recrystallization of melamine. • Ge(O) was prepared by chemical reaction in a solution including the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powders. • The products can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. • GeO{sub 2} was amorphous several-nm particles and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was amorphous lamella of several 10 nm in size. • We expect them to be applicable for high energy Li-ion battery anode

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of autoclaved aerated concrete with supplementary raw materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straub, C.; Florea, M.V.A.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Nisperos, Arturo G.; Pöllmann, Herbert

    Microscopy is a key analysis technology for the understanding of the achieved properties of building materials. In the case of Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) it is even more important due to the phase transformation during the hydrothermal hardening. The incorporation of substitution materials in

  14. Use of scanning electron microscopy in the speciation of Gliocephalotrichum spp. in rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambutan is a tropical tree fruit crop native to Malaysia. Worldwide, fruit rot is a limiting factor for fruit quality. In 2011, fruit rot was observed on rambutan at the USDA-ARS Tropical Agricultural Station in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, and was attributed to Gliocephalotrichum spp. Light microscopy (...

  15. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havrdová, M.; Poláková, K.; Skopalík, J.; Vůjtek, M.; Mokdad, A.; Homolková, M.; Tuček, J.; Nebesářová, Jana; Zbořil, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, DEC 2014 (2014), s. 149-154 ISSN 0968-4328 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Field emission scanning electronmicroscopy (FE-SEM) * Stem cells * Iron oxide nanoparticles * Cellular morphology * Endosomes * Cell uptake Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2014

  16. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techni...

  17. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, M.L.; Chien, T.Y.; Preissner, C.; Madhavan, V.; Diesing, D.; Bode, M.; Freeland, J.W.; Rose, V.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  18. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, X; Cawley, J.; Rainforth, W.M.; Chen, L.

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 μm). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 μm), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). GDOES proved to be an excellent tool for the quantification of oxidation and element distribution as a function of depth, particularly when combined with SEM and TEM to identify oxide type and morphology

  19. 3D Plant Cell Architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae Using Focused Ion Beam–Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. Methods: Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. Results: Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. Discussion: The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies.

  20. Degradation of thin poly(lactic acid) films: Characterization by capacitance–voltage, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and contact-angle measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schusser, S.; Menzel, S.; Bäcker, M.; Leinhos, M.; Poghossian, A.; Wagner, P.; Schöning, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    For the development of new biopolymers and implantable biomedical devices with predicted biodegradability, simple, non-destructive, fast and inexpensive techniques capable for real-time in situ testing of the degradation kinetics of polymers are highly appreciated. In this work, a capacitive field-effect electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor (EIS) sensor has been applied for real-time in situ monitoring of degradation of thin poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) films over a long-time period of one month. Generally, the polymer-modified EIS (PMEIS) sensor is capable of detecting any changes in the bulk, surface and interface properties of the polymer (e.g., thickness, coverage, dielectric constant, surface potential) induced by degradation processes. The time-dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics of PMEIS structures were used as an indicator of the polymer degradation. To accelerate the PDLLA degradation, experiments were performed in alkaline buffer solution of pH 10.6. The results of these degradation measurements with the EIS sensor were verified by the detection of lactic acid (product of the PDLLA degradation) in the degradation medium. In addition, the micro-structural and morphological changes of the polymer surface induced by the polymer degradation have been systematically studied by means of scanning-electron microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, optical microscopy, and contact-angle measurements

  1. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix.

  2. Direct observation of the growth of voids in multifilamentary superconducting materials via hot stage scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.L.F.; Holthuis, J.T.; Pickus, M.R.; Lindberg, R.W.

    1978-11-01

    The need for large high field magnetic devices has focused attention on multifilamentary superconductors based on A15 compounds such as Nb 3 Sn. The commercial bronze process for fabricating multifilamentary superconducting Nb 3 Sn wires was developed. A major problem is strain sensitivity when long reaction times are employed. An improved hot stage for the scanning electron microscope was constructed to study the formation of the A15 phase by solid state diffusion. The nucleation and growth of voids near the interface of the A15 phase (Nb 3 Sn) and matrix were observed, monitored, and recorded on video tape. Successive layers of material heated in the hot stage were subsequently removed and the new surfaces were re-examined, using SEM-EDX and optical microscopy, to confirm the fact that the observed porosity was indeed a bulk rather than a surface phenomenon. These voids are considered to be a primary cause for degrading the mechanical, thermal and superconducting properties

  3. The influence of Cs/Cc correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (C s ) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (C c ) which augments those accomplishments. In this paper we will review and summarize how the combination of C s /C c technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationally mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments

  4. Microjet impingement followed by scanning electron microscopy as a qualitative technique to compare cellular adhesion to various biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, R G; ap Gwynn, I; Bundy, K J; Rahn, B A

    1995-12-01

    Adhesion of cells to biomaterial surfaces is one of the major factors which mediates their biocompatibility. Quantitative or qualitative cell adhesion measurements would be useful for screening new implant materials. Microjet impingement has been evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, to determine to what extent it measures cell adhesion. The shear forces of the impingement, on the materials tested here, are seen to be greater than the cohesive strength of the cells in the impinged area, causing their rupture. The cell bodies are removed during impingement, leaving the sites of adhesion and other cellular material behind. Thus the method is shown not to provide quantification of cell adhesion forces for the metals and culture plastic tested. It is suggested that with highly adherent biomaterials, the distribution and patterns of these adhesion sites could be used for qualitative comparisons for screening of implant surfaces.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization of experimental Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli infection in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Møller, Kristian; Boye, Mette

    2000-01-01

    Two groups of six 8-week-old pigs were challenged with 1X10(9) cfu Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli or Serpulina intermedia daily for 3 consecutive days to study the pathology of porcine colonic spirochetosis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH......; however, only two pigs developed transient watery diarrhea. S. intermedia was reisolated from four of the inoculated pigs, but clinical signs were not observed. Gross examination of the B. pilosicoli-infected pigs revealed dilated large intestines with a hyperemic mucosa, whereas the large intestines...... of the S. intermedia-inoculated pigs and the control pigs appeared normal. SEM examination of B. pilosicoli-infected pigs revealed degenerated epithelial cells and spirochetal colonization of the colonic mucosa in four pigs. By FISH, B. pilosicoli cells were found colonizing and invading the surface...

  6. PENGARUH PERBEDAAN DURASI APLIKASI KONDISIONER TERHADAP GAMBARAN PENETRASI SEMEN IONOMER KACA PADA DENTIN SULUNG (Evaluasi Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanty Ariany

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether different durations of conditioner application influenced glass ionomer cement penetration in dentin primary teeth. The conditioner being used was 10% polyacrylic acid. Samples in this study were 40 non-carious primary mandibular incisors. Samples were divided into 4 groups (10 samples each: group A, withoud conditioner, group B, with 10 seconds of conditioner application, group C, with 20 seconds of conditioner application, and group D with 30 seconds of conditioner application. Penetration of glass ionomer cement was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM with 200x magnification. One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test showed significant difference between groups. Longer conditioner application resulted in longer glass ionomer penetration in dentin of primary teeth.

  7. Morphology of gills of the seawater fish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz (Ariidae by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura R. Eiras-Stofella

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Gills of the seawater fish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829 were submitted to routine processing for observation in scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The wrinkled surface of the gill filaments showed well-defined cellular ultrastructures. Microridges on cellular surface were projected over all gill structures, including respiratory lamellae. Chloride cells were usually at primary lamellae. Some rodlet cells were found. Mucous secretory cells were uncommon at all parts of the gill arches. The pharyngeal region of the gill arches showed a lot of taste buds but no spines. There were small and strong rakers. Such morphology is indicative of fishes that swallow small food but do not have filtering habits. At the ultrastructural level the gills of C. spixii presented the typical morphological pattern of Teleostei fishes.

  8. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of Al x Ga 1-x As, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A scanning electron microscopy study of diseased root surfaces conditioned with EDTA gel plus Cetavlon after scaling and root planing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins Júnior, Walter; De Rossi, Andiara; Samih Georges Abi Rached, Ricardo; Rossi, Marcos Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation, a scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of the topical application of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) gel associated with Cetavlon (EDTAC) in removing the smear layer and exposing collagen fibers following root surface instrumentation. Twenty-eight teeth from adult humans, single rooted and scheduled for extraction due to periodontal reasons, were selected. Each tooth was submitted to manual (scaling and root planing) instrumentation alone or combined with ultrasonic instruments, with or without etching using a 24% EDTAC gel. Following extraction, specimens were processed and examined under a scanning electron microscope. A comparative morphological semi-quantitative analysis was performed; the intensity of the smear layer and the decalcification of cementum and dentinal surfaces were graded in 12 sets using an arbitrary scale ranging from 1 (area covered by a smear layer) to 4 (no smear layer). Root debridement with hand instruments alone or combined with ultrasonic instruments resulted in a similar smear layer covering the root surfaces. The smear layer was successfully removed from the surfaces treated with EDTAC, which exhibited numerous exposed dentinal tubules and collagen fibers. This study supports the hypothesis that manual instrumentation alone or instrumentation combined with ultrasonic instrumentation is unable to remove the smear layer, whereas the subsequent topical application of EDTAC gel effectively removes the smear layer, uncovers dentinal openings and exposes collagen fibers.

  10. Effect of processing on the microstructure of finger millet by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaraj, Usha; Parameswara, P; Somashekar, R; Malleshi, Nagappa G

    2014-03-01

    Finger millet is one of the important minor cereals, and carbohydrates form its major chemical constituent. Recently, the millet is processed to prepare hydrothermally treated (HM), decorticated (DM), expanded (EM) and popped (PM) products. The present research aims to study the changes in the microstructure of carbohydrates using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Processing the millet brought in significant changes in the carbohydrates. The native millet exhibited A-type pattern of X-ray diffraction with major peaks at 2θ values of 15.3, 17.86 and 23.15°, whereas, all other products showed V-type pattern with single major peak at 2θ values ranging from 19.39 to 19.81°. The corresponding lattice spacing and the number of unit cells in a particular direction of reflection also reduced revealing that crystallinity of starch has been decreased depending upon the processing conditions. Scanning electron microscopic studies also revealed that the orderly pattern of starch granules changed into a coherent mass due to hydrothermal treatment, while high temperature short time treatment rendered a honey-comb like structure to the product. However, the total carbohydrates and non-starch polysaccharide contents almost remained the same in all the products except for DM and EM, but the individual carbohydrate components changed significantly depending on the type of processing.

  11. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of multiwall carbon nanotube/nickel oxide nanocomposite thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kittessa T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their unique electronic and optical properties, nanocomposite thin films are widely used for converting solar radiation therapy into other conventional energy forms, such as heat and electricity. Carbon nanotube-based composites which can...

  12. Characterization of gold mineralizations of Cuba by means of scanning electron microscopy with X-ray analyzer and con focal Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo Sanchez, Carlos Alfredo; Santa Cruz Pacheco, Maria; Lopez Kramer, Jesus M.; Lisabet Sarracen, Evelio; Aguirre Guillot, Graciela; Capote Marrero, Carbeny; Llanes Castro, Angelica I.; Milia Gonzalez, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The technology selection for gold ore processing requires the characterization, not only of the gold carrier minerals but also its associations, so it is necessary to find out the mineral nature, morphology, particle size, purity and gold concentration, other factors to consider are liberation grade, minerals in association, surface accessibility and form to present themselves. In this research it is exposed the utilization of the optical and electron microscopy, with Raman and X ray micro analyzers, in order to obtain useful information about different gold mineralization of the country, including those of Delita, Meloneras-Descanso, Oro Jacinto and Oro Barita. It describes how the scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analyzer allowed the study of gold particles from nanometer order, determining its size, morphology, surface condition and purity. It was found that in some places the gold grains have a purity exceeding 99%, while in others the content of silver, copper and mercury are increasing, surpassing gold just 30% in some cases, resulting in other mineralogical forms. It was also observed variability in the degree of release of the gold particles. Moreover Raman con focal microscope allowed analyzes minerals micrometric volumes under study, particularly rock-forming. Being a structural technique, it was possible to identify minerals without causing damage to the samples, which usually is not achieved with other techniques. (Author)

  13. In Depth Analyses of LEDs by a Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Light Microscopy (LM) Correlated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Thomas, Christian; Tappe, Frank; Ogbazghi, Tekie

    2016-06-16

    In failure analysis, device characterization and reverse engineering of light emitting diodes (LEDs), and similar electronic components of micro-characterization, plays an important role. Commonly, different techniques like X-ray computed tomography (CT), light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used separately. Similarly, the results have to be treated for each technique independently. Here a comprehensive study is shown which demonstrates the potentials leveraged by linking CT, LM and SEM. In depth characterization is performed on a white emitting LED, which can be operated throughout all characterization steps. Major advantages are: planned preparation of defined cross sections, correlation of optical properties to structural and compositional information, as well as reliable identification of different functional regions. This results from the breadth of information available from identical regions of interest (ROIs): polarization contrast, bright and dark-field LM images, as well as optical images of the LED cross section in operation. This is supplemented by SEM imaging techniques and micro-analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  14. A study of phase separation in peptide-loaded HPMC films using T(zero)-modulated temperature DSC, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Samana; Grandy, David B; Reading, Mike; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2004-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of drug-loaded polymeric systems, there is still considerable uncertainty with regard to the nature of the distribution of the drug within the polymer matrix. The aim of this investigation was to develop thermal and microscopic techniques whereby the miscibility and spatial distribution of a model peptide, cyclosporin A (CyA), in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) films may be studied. The new technique of T(zero)-modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (T(zero) MTDSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and pulse force mode atomic force microscopy (PFM-AFM) were used in conjunction to study films prepared using a solvent evaporation process, with a solvent extraction study performed to elucidate the nature of the observed phases. T(zero) MTDSC studies showed glass transitions for both the HPMC and CycA, with the T(g) for the HPMC and CycA seen for the mixed systems. SEM showed two spherical phases of differing electron density. PFM-AFM also showed spheres of differing adhesion that increased in size on addition of drug. Pixel intensity analysis indicated that the smaller spheres corresponded to CycA. Exposure of the films to dichloromethane, in which CycA is soluble but HPMC is not, resulted in the presence of voids that corresponded well to the spheres suggested to correspond to the drug. It was concluded that the system had undergone extensive or complete phase separation, and that the thermal and microscopic techniques outlined above are an effective means by which this issue may be studied. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 93:1672-1681, 2004

  15. The Size and Morphological Study of Spherical Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Bučko, M.; Tihlaříková, Eva; Krajčovič, T.; Gemeiner, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S3 (2015), s. 1697-1698 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : PEC * ESEM * polymers * morphology Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  16. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy as a Useful Tool for Taxonomical Documentation of Parasitical Helminths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Mašová, Š.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1178-1179 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : parasitical Helminths * ESEM * taxonomical documentation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  17. Neuroanatomy from Mesoscopic to Nanoscopic Scales: An Improved Method for the Observation of Semithin Sections by High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; Turégano-López, Marta; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel

    2018-01-01

    Semithin sections are commonly used to examine large areas of tissue with an optical microscope, in order to locate and trim the regions that will later be studied with the electron microscope. Ideally, the observation of semithin sections would be from mesoscopic to nanoscopic scales directly, instead of using light microscopy and then electron microscopy (EM). Here we propose a method that makes it possible to obtain high-resolution scanning EM images of large areas of the brain in the millimeter to nanometer range. Since our method is compatible with light microscopy, it is also feasible to generate hybrid light and electron microscopic maps. Additionally, the same tissue blocks that have been used to obtain semithin sections can later be used, if necessary, for transmission EM, or for focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

  18. Development of high temperature scanning electron microscopy and applications to sintering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.N.K.; Miller, D.J.; Fulrath, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    The densification and microstructural changes of a metallic and/or ceramic powder compact during sintering is a critically important but incompletely understood process. Whether solely in the solid state or in the presence of a liquid phase, mass transport occurs at elevated temperatures to eliminate porosity and reduce the surface energy of the system. Changes in specimen dimensions, particle shape and pore morphology, formation of liquid phases and other direct evidence of the sintering process have been observed and recorded at temperature using video tape and 16mm time lapse movies of the TV scanning image. Materials that have been examined at elevated temperature are Ni, glass, Al 2 O 3 , UO 2 , W, Cu, WC-Co, and CaF 2

  19. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kuwajima

    Full Text Available Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2 (65.54 µm per side at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM system, which were only 66.59 µm(2 (8.160 µm per side at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2 and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm. Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems.

  20. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (SEM) FOR THE BIOAGENTS ASPERGILLUS NIGER AND PENICILLIUM OXALICUM AGAINST THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY, CERATITIS CAPITATA (WIED.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-AKHDAR, E.A.H.; OUDA, S.M

    2008-01-01

    As an alternative to chemical control or as a part of integrated pest management (IPM program), there is a resurgence of interest in using microbial agents for pest population suppression before the application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedmann). The insect-fungus interaction between the fungal isolates, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium oxalicum, when applied as a spore suspension against the adults of Medfly in the laboratory showed visual fungal development after 7 days from inoculation. Examination of the infected parts of the dead fly with light microscopy showed a markedly damage as evidenced by the occurrence of the attached conidia and features of pathogen penetration. Using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the abundant sporulation of both fungal isolates was investigated over all parts of the dead fly and their associated sensillae. The recognized shape of the fungal conidial spores and their arrangement on the hyphae of both bio agents was investigated. This ultra structural study may be helpful in evaluating the effectiveness of both fungal bio agents on the functions of all infected parts of the insect and their associated sensillae (the main communication system between insects, their internal and external environment) and their main role in the courtship, male mating ability, the selection of fruit host plants necessary for the adults food and also the selection of a suitable oviposition site

  1. Deleterious phases precipitation on superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750: characterization by light optical and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Pardal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious phases precipitation in superduplex stainless steels is the main concern in fabrication by welding and hot forming of this class of material. Sigma, chi and secondary austenite phases are considered deleterious phases because they produce negative effects on corrosion resistance. Besides, sigma and chi phases also promote strong decrease of toughness. In the present work, the precipitations of sigma, chi and secondary austenite under aging in the 800-950 °C interval were studied in two UNS S32750 steels with different grain sizes. The deleterious phases could be quantified by light optical microscopy, with no distinction between them. Scanning electron microscopy was used to distinguish the individual phases in various aging conditions. The results elucidate the influence of the aging temperature and grain size on the kinetics precipitation and morphology of deleterious phases. The kinetics of deleterious phases is higher in the fine grained material in the initial stage of aging, but the maximum amount of deleterious phases is higher in the coarse grained steel.

  2. A novel method of estimating dose responses for polymer gels using texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ting Shih

    Full Text Available Polymer gels are regarded as a potential dosimeter for independent validation of absorbed doses in clinical radiotherapy. Several imaging modalities have been used to convert radiation-induced polymerization to absorbed doses from a macro-scale viewpoint. This study developed a novel dose conversion mechanism by texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. The modified N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPAM gels were prepared under normoxic conditions, and were administered radiation doses from 5 to 20 Gy. After freeze drying, the gel samples were sliced for SEM scanning with 50×, 500×, and 3500× magnifications. Four texture indices were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM. The results showed that entropy and homogeneity were more suitable than contrast and energy as dose indices for higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. After parameter optimization, an R (2 value of 0.993 can be achieved for homogeneity using 500× magnified SEM images with 27 pixel offsets and no outlier exclusion. For dose verification, the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the measured dose for 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy were -7.60%, 5.80%, 2.53%, and -0.95%, respectively. We conclude that texture analysis can be applied to the SEM images of gel dosimeters to accurately convert micro-scale structural features to absorbed doses. The proposed method may extend the feasibility of applying gel dosimeters in the fields of diagnostic radiology and radiation protection.

  3. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  4. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  5. Novel insights into pericarp, protein body globoids of aleurone layer, starchy granules of three cereals gained using atomic force microscopy and environmental scanning electronic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Elena; Zara, Carolina; Valentini, Laura; Gobbi, Pietro; Ninfali, Paolino; Menotta, Michele

    2018-02-05

    In this study, we applied Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (ESEM-EDS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis to three different cereal caryopses: barley, oat and einkorn wheat. The morphological structures, chemical elemental composition and surface characteristics of the three cereals were described. Regarding the morphology, barley showed the thickest pericarp, providing a strong barrier digestion and absorption of nutrients. The aleurone layer of each cereal type contained protein body globoids within its cells. Large type-A and small type-B starchy granules were revealed in the endosperm of barley and einkorn wheat, whereas irregular starchy granules were found in oats. The starchy granule elemental composition, detected by ESEM-EDS, was rather homogenous in the three cereals, whereas the pericarp and protein body globoids showed heterogeneity. In the protein body globoids, oats showed higher P and K concentrations than barley and einkorn wheat. Regarding the topographic profiles, detected by AFM, einkorn wheat starchy granules showed a surface profile that differed significantly from that of oats and barley, which were quite similar to one another. The present work provides insights into the morphological and chemical makeup of the three grains shedding light on the higher bio-accessibility of einkorn wheat nutrients compared to barley and oats, providing important suggestions for human nutrition and technological standpoints.

  6. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the rat meninges and choroid plexus: three-dimensional localisation by environmental scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G; Wealthall, Rosamund J; Deverall, Marie; Cooper, Stephanie J; Griffin, Brendan

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation provides novel information on the topographical distribution of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in normal meninges and choroid plexus of the rat central nervous system (CNS). Whole-mounts of meninges and choroid plexus of Lewis rats were incubated with various anti-leucocyte monoclonal antibodies and either visualised with gold-conjugated secondary antibody followed by silver enhancement and subsequent examination by environmental scanning electron microscopy or by the use of fluorochromes and confocal microscopy. Large numbers of MHC class II(+) putative DCs were identified on the internal or subarachnoid aspect of dural whole-mounts, on the surface of the cortex (pia/arachnoid) and on the surface of the choroid plexus. Occupation of these sites would allow DCs access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and therefore allow antigens into the subarachnoid space and ventricles. By contrast, macrophages were less evident at sites exposed to CSF and were more frequently located within the connective tissue of the dura/arachnoid and choroid plexus stroma and also in a sub-pial location. The present data suggest that DC may be strategically located within the CNS to sample CSF-borne antigens. Furthermore, the data suggest that CNS tissue samples collected without careful removal of the meninges may inadvertently be contaminated by DCs and meningeal macrophages.

  7. Novel insights into pericarp, protein body globoids of aleurone layer, starchy granules of three cereals gained using atomic force microscopy and environmental scanning electronic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Elena; Zara, Carolina; Valentini, Laura; Gobbi, Pietro; Menotta, Michele

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we applied Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (ESEM-EDS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis to three different cereal caryopses: barley, oat and einkorn wheat. The morphological structures, chemical elemental composition and surface characteristics of the three cereals were described. Regarding the morphology, barley showed the thickest pericarp, providing a strong barrier to digestion and absorption of nutrients. The aleurone layer of each cereal type contained protein body globoids within its cells. Large type-A and small type-B starchy granules were revealed in the endosperm of barley and einkorn wheat, whereas irregular starchy granules were found in oats. The starchy granule elemental composition, detected by ESEM-EDS, was rather homogenous in the three cereals, whereas the pericarp and protein body globoids showed heterogeneity. In the protein body globoids, oats showed higher P and K concentrations than barley and einkorn wheat. Regarding the topographic profiles, detected by AFM, einkorn wheat starchy granules showed a surface profile that differed significantly from that of oats and barley, which were quite similar to one another. The present work provides insights into the morphological and chemical makeup of the three grains shedding light on the higher bio-accessibility of einkorn wheat nutrients compared to barley and oats, providing important suggestions for human nutrition and technological standpoints. PMID:29569870

  8. Determination of line edge roughness in low dose top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, T.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We investigated off-line metrology for LER determination in low-dose SEM images to reduce the acquisition time and the risk of shrinkage. Our first attempts are based on filtering noisy (experimental) SEM images and use peak detection to measure the edge displacements and calculating the discrete PSD. However, the result of the filtering is that the power spectrum of the filter leaks into the PSD. So it is better to avoid a filter at all. We subsequently developed a method to detect edge displacements without the use of a filter. This method considers the signal profile of a SEM by integrating an experimental image of lines in the direction of the edges. The signal profile of an isolated edge is modeled as two merged Gaussians. This signal profile is then fitted against the raw (unfiltered) data of the edge pattern using an interior trust-region-reflective minimization procedure. This gives the edge displacements without the use of a filter and a filter-free version of the discrete PSD is obtained. The determination of edge displacements without the use of a filter, enables us to study how much noise is acceptable and still determine LER. To answer this question we generate random lines using the model of Palasantzas and the algorithm of Thorsos. This gives random generated edge displacements for typical values of experimental lines for the parameters of the model: 2 μm long lines (256 pixels), a correlation length ξ of 25 nm and a roughness exponent of 0.75. A noise-free top-down SEM-like image of lines is created by shifting the profile signal according to the random generated edge displacements. The image is further processed by adding Poisson-distributed noise. We consider three noise cases where the average electron density is about 2, 20 and 200 electrons per pixel. This corresponds to a charge density of (in respective order) 10 μC/cm2, 100 μC/cm2 and 1000 μC/cm2. The edge displacements of the random generated images are determined using our new

  9. Sample preparation method for scanning force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jankov, I R; Szente, R N; Carreno, M N P; Swart, J W; Landers, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a method of sample preparation for studies of ion implantation on metal surfaces. The method, employing a mechanical mask, is specially adapted for samples analysed by Scanning Force Microscopy. It was successfully tested on polycrystalline copper substrates implanted with phosphorus ions at an acceleration voltage of 39 keV. The changes of the electrical properties of the surface were measured by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy and the surface composition was analysed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

  10. Intensive care unit environmental surfaces are contaminated by multidrug-resistant bacteria in biofilms: combined results of conventional culture, pyrosequencing, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Johani, K; Gosbell, I B; Jacombs, A S W; Almatroudi, A; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Jensen, S; Vickery, K

    2015-09-01

    Hospital-associated infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and are expensive to treat. Organisms causing these infections can be sourced from the inanimate environment around a patient. Could the difficulty in eradicating these organisms from the environment be because they reside in dry surface biofilms? The intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral hospital was decommissioned and the opportunity to destructively sample clinical surfaces was taken in order to investigate whether multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) had survived the decommissioning process and whether they were present in biofilms. The ICU had two 'terminal cleans' with 500 ppm free chlorine solution; items from bedding, surrounds, and furnishings were then sampled with cutting implements. Sections were sonicated in tryptone soya broth and inoculated on to chromogenic plates to demonstrate MDROs, which were confirmed with the Vitek2 system. Genomic DNA was extracted directly from ICU samples, and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for femA to detect Staphylococcus aureus and the microbiome by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed on environmental samples. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were cultured from 52% (23/44) of samples cultured. S. aureus PCR was positive in 50%. Biofilm was demonstrated in 93% (41/44) of samples by CLSM and/or SEM. Pyrosequencing demonstrated that the biofilms were polymicrobial and contained species that had multidrug-resistant strains. Dry surface biofilms containing MDROs are found on ICU surfaces despite terminal cleaning with chlorine solution. How these arise and how they might be removed requires further study. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  12. Quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for nanoparticle atom-counting: What are the limits?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Backer, A; De Wael, A; Gonnissen, J; Martinez, G T; Béché, A; Van Aert, S; MacArthur, K E; Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative atomic resolution annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) has become a powerful technique for nanoparticle atom-counting. However, a lot of nanoparticles provide a severe characterisation challenge because of their limited size and beam sensitivity. Therefore, quantitative ADF STEM may greatly benefit from statistical detection theory in order to optimise the instrumental microscope settings such that the incoming electron dose can be kept as low as possible whilst still retaining single-atom precision. The principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for atom-counting. This enables us to decide between different image performance measures and to optimise the experimental detector settings for atom-counting in ADF STEM in an objective manner. To demonstrate this, ADF STEM imaging of an industrial catalyst has been conducted using the near-optimal detector settings. For this experiment, we discussed the limits for atomcounting diagnosed by combining a thorough statistical method and detailed image simulations. (paper)

  13. Automated scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for in situ quantification of gadolinium deposits in skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Jerrold L.

    2007-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) has been identified as a possible causative agent of an emerging cutaneous and systemic fibrosing disorder, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), which can cause serious disability and even death. To date, there are only two known associations with this disorder - renal insufficiency and Gd enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We developed an automated quantitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) method for Gd in tissue of NSF patients. Freshly cut paraffin block surfaces examined using the variable pressure mode under standardized conditions and random search of the tissue area allow in situ detection and semiquantitative morphometric (volumetric) analysis of insoluble higher atomic number features using backscattered electron imaging. We detected Gd ranging from 1 to 2270 cps/mm 2 in 57 cutaneous biopsies of NSF. Gd was associated with P, Ca, and usually Na in tissue deposits. Our method reproducibly determines the elemental composition, relative concentration, and spatial distribution of detected features within the tissue. However, we cannot detect features below our spatial resolution, nor concentrations below the detection limit of our SEM/EDS system. The findings confirm transmetallation and release of toxic Gd ions in NSF and allow dose-response analysis at the histologic level. (author)

  14. Tridimensional architecture of the collagen element in the arachnoid granulations in humans: a study on scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conegero Celso Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The arachnoid granulations of adult individual of both sexes were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The dura mater and arachnoid meninges of individuals were collected at the Service of Death Verification of São Paulo - USP and fixed in Karnovsky solution. After this period the material was prepared for analysis in electron microscope. Our results demonstrated that the arachnoid granulations are formed by a pedicle, body and apex, being surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue, which in turn is composed of, basically, bundles of collagen fibers that line pores of different shapes and sizes. The smaller pores are lined by tiny bundles and are located at the apical region of the granulation and the larger are lined by thicker bundles and are located at the lateral regions. In the body we verified that the bundles of collagen fibers compose a fibrous meshwork and in some regions these bundles have circular orientation, forming pores similar to those found at the region of the capsule.

  15. Electrochemical gating in scanning electrochemical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahonen, P.; Ruiz, V.; Kontturi, K.; Liljeroth, P.; Quinn, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can be used to determine the conductivity of nanoparticle assemblies as a function of assembly potential. In contrast to conventional electron transport measurements, this method is unique in that electrical connection to the film is not

  16. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  17. Scanning probe recognition microscopy investigation of tissue scaffold properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuan; Chen, Qian; Ayres, Virginia M; Baczewski, Andrew D; Udpa, Lalita; Kumar, Shiva

    2007-01-01

    Scanning probe recognition microscopy is a new scanning probe microscopy technique which enables selective scanning along individual nanofibers within a tissue scaffold. Statistically significant data for multiple properties can be collected by repetitively fine-scanning an identical region of interest. The results of a scanning probe recognition microscopy investigation of the surface roughness and elasticity of a series of tissue scaffolds are presented. Deconvolution and statistical methods were developed and used for data accuracy along curved nanofiber surfaces. Nanofiber features were also independently analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, with results that supported the scanning probe recognition microscopy-based analysis. PMID:18203431

  18. 3D imaging of cells and tissues by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobne, Damjana

    2013-01-01

    Integration of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) technology into a single FIB/SEM system permits use of the FIB as a nano-scalpel to reveal site-specific subsurface microstructures which can be examined in great detail by SEM. The FIB/SEM technology is widely used in the semiconductor industry and material sciences, and recently its use in the life sciences has been initiated. Samples for FIB/SEM investigation can be either embedded in a plastic matrix, the traditional means of preparation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens, or simply dried as in samples prepared for SEM imaging. Currently, FIB/SEM is used in the life sciences for (a) preparation by the lift-out technique of lamella for TEM analysis, (b) tomography of samples embedded in a matrix, and (c) in situ site-specific FIB milling and SEM imaging using a wide range of magnifications. Site-specific milling and imaging has attracted wide interest as a technique in structural research of single eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, small animals, and different animal tissue, but it still remains to be explored more thoroughly. In the past, preparation of samples for site-specific milling and imaging by FIB/SEM has typically adopted the embedding techniques used for TEM samples, and which have been very well described in the literature. Sample preparation protocols for the use of dried samples in FIB/SEM have been less well investigated. The aim of this chapter is to encourage application of FIB/SEM on dried biological samples. A detailed description of conventional dried sample preparation and FIB/SEM investigation of dried biological samples is presented. The important steps are described and illustrated, and direct comparison between embedded and dried samples of same tissues is provided. The ability to discover links between gross morphology of the tissue or organ, surface characteristics of any selected region, and intracellular structural details on the nanometer

  19. Comparison of three retreatment techniques with ultrasonic activation in flattened canals using micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, R A; Duarte, M A H; Vivan, R R; Alcalde, M P; Vasconcelos, B C; Bramante, C M

    2015-08-17

    To use micro-CT to quantitatively evaluate the amount of residual filling material after using several techniques to remove root fillings with and without ultrasonic activation and to analyse the cleanliness of the root canal walls and dentine tubules with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The root canals of one hundred and eight human mandibular incisors were selected and instrumented with rotary files using the BioRace system up to file size 40, .04 taper. After instrumentation, the teeth were filled using a hybrid technique with gutta-percha and sealer then divided into three groups according to the method used for removing the root filling: G1-Reciproc (using only instrument R50), G2-ProTaper Universal retreatment system and G3-Manual (hand files and Gates-Glidden burs). All groups were divided into two subgroups depending on whether ultrasonic agitation was used with the irrigants. Micro-CT scans were taken before and after removal of the filling material to detect residual material in the canal. After micro-CT analysis, the roots were cut in half, imaged by SEM and scored based on the amount of surface covered by root filling remnants. The data were analysed statistically using a significance level of 5%. All groups had retained material in the root canals after instrumentation. The Reciproc method was associated with less retained material than the ProTaper and Manual methods. Ultrasonic activation significantly reduced the amount of residual root filling in all groups (P material. Ultrasonic activation improved the removal of root filling material in all groups. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy - useful tools in the analysis of pharmaceutical products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarecka-Hujar, Beata; Balwierz, Radoslaw; Ostrozka-Cieslik, Aneta; Dyja, Renata; Lukowiec, Dariusz; Jankowski, Andrzej

    2017-11-01

    The quality of the drug, its purity and identification of degradation products provide the highest quality of pharmaceutical products. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) method analyses the percentage of each element form as well as their distribution, and morphological characteristics of the drug form. We analysed the usefulness of EDS method in testing orally disintegrating tablets (ODT) with trimetazidine hydrochloride with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM, SUPRA25 Carl Zeiss company) with spectrophotometer equipped with an X-ray energy dispersion (EDAX Company). The samples of the analysed tablets were imaged after applying conductive layers of gold on their surface. In the EDS analysis the compositions of each sample of the obtained tablets were observed to be virtually identical. The differences in the content of carbon and oxygen came from differences in the composition of particular tablets. The presence of gold in the composition resulted from the sputtering the surface of tablets with gold during the analysis. Knowing the composition of the tablet, SEM-EDS method helps to locate and identify the impurities and degradation products of the compounds, leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms of their formation.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the interaction pattern between dentin and resin after cavity preparation using Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schein, Marcelo Thome

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the interaction pattern formed between dentin and resin on cavities prepared with an erbium laser (Er:YAG). The morphological aspect of the irradiated dentin after acid etching was also observed. Ten dentin disks were obtained from fresh extracted third molars. Each disk received two cavities, one prepared with a conventional high-speed drill, while the other cavity was obtained by the use of an Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser, KaVo Co.). The laser treatment was performed with 250 mJ/pulse, 4 Hz, non contact mode, focused beam, and a fine water mist was used. Five disks were prepared for morphological analysis of the acid etched dentin. The other five disks had their cavities restored with Single Bond (3M) followed by Z100 resin (3M). The specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy after dentin-resin interface demineralization and deproteinization. It was observed that the morphological characteristics of the acid-etched irradiated dentin were not favorable to the diffusion of monomers through the collagen network. The dentin resin interfacial aspect of irradiated dentin, after acid etching, showed thin tags and scarce hybridization zones, which agreed with the morphology of the irradiated and acid-etched dentin substrate observed. (author)

  2. Petrological features of selected components of the Cergowa sandstones (Outer Carpathians) recorded by scanning electron microscopy - preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszonka, Joanna

    2017-11-01

    The scanning electron microscope analysis of the Cergowa sandstones brings new data on their petrological features and chemical composition. Previous work in standard petrographic examination, e.g. polarising (PL) or cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, displayed limited information on grain surface topography and only assumptions to their geochemistry. Both identification and characterisation of minerals are fundamental in the progress of mining and minerals processing systems. Detrital grains of the Cergowa sandstones are bound by calcite and dolomitic cement and commonly corroded by diagenetic fluids, however, in varying degrees, which is illustrated here by feldspar, quartz and dolomite minerals. Dissolution processes of marginal parts of these mineral grains resulted in corrosion, which increased the contact surface between the grains and the cement. The difference in resistance to these processes was observed not only among distinct groups of minerals, but also within the group of feldspars: between K-feldspars and minerals of plagioclase. That combination resulted in exceptionally strong cementation of the Cergowa sandstones, which is expressed by their high hardness and resistance to abrasion, freezing, and thawing. Inherent parameters of sandstones are characterised by their petrographical properties.

  3. Petrological features of selected components of the Cergowa sandstones (Outer Carpathians recorded by scanning electron microscopy – preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pszonka Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scanning electron microscope analysis of the Cergowa sandstones brings new data on their petrological features and chemical composition. Previous work in standard petrographic examination, e.g. polarising (PL or cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy, displayed limited information on grain surface topography and only assumptions to their geochemistry. Both identification and characterisation of minerals are fundamental in the progress of mining and minerals processing systems. Detrital grains of the Cergowa sandstones are bound by calcite and dolomitic cement and commonly corroded by diagenetic fluids, however, in varying degrees, which is illustrated here by feldspar, quartz and dolomite minerals. Dissolution processes of marginal parts of these mineral grains resulted in corrosion, which increased the contact surface between the grains and the cement. The difference in resistance to these processes was observed not only among distinct groups of minerals, but also within the group of feldspars: between K–feldspars and minerals of plagioclase. That combination resulted in exceptionally strong cementation of the Cergowa sandstones, which is expressed by their high hardness and resistance to abrasion, freezing, and thawing. Inherent parameters of sandstones are characterised by their petrographical properties.

  4. X-ray diffraction, XAFS and scanning electron microscopy study of otolith of a crevalle jack fish (caranx hippos)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanaik, Sidhartha [Bailey Hall 703, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3101 S. Wabash Avenue, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)]. E-mail: sidpattanaik@yahoo.com

    2005-04-01

    The otolith of a crevalle jack fish (caranx hippos) has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results suggest that the biomineralization of otolith occurs predominantly in the aragonite phase. A detailed X-ray Rietveld analysis showed that the first shell Ca-O distances in otolith lay in the range 2.371-2.652 A, with each calcium atom coordinated to 9 oxygen atoms. While the average Ca-O distance remains same in both otolith and aragonite, certain Ca-O distances in otolith differ markedly from those in aragonite. Such difference reflects the remarkable degree of control that the protein matrix exercised over packing of calcium and carbonate ions to promote growth of rarer aragonite otolith. In view of the complex coordination chemistry of calcium in otoliths, the EXAFS analysis was limited to obtaining local atomic environment about calcium up to the first Ca-O shell. EXAFS data showed an asymmetric distribution of Ca-O bond distances with the centroid of distribution at 2.48 A, which is closer to the average Ca-O distance in aragonite than in calcite. The asymmetry in the Ca-O peak is consistent with an apparent departure of Ca-O distances from a near regular distribution, as expected of an aragonite otolith.

  5. X-ray diffraction, XAFS and scanning electron microscopy study of otolith of a crevalle jack fish (caranx hippos)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattanaik, Sidhartha

    2005-01-01

    The otolith of a crevalle jack fish (caranx hippos) has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results suggest that the biomineralization of otolith occurs predominantly in the aragonite phase. A detailed X-ray Rietveld analysis showed that the first shell Ca-O distances in otolith lay in the range 2.371-2.652 A, with each calcium atom coordinated to 9 oxygen atoms. While the average Ca-O distance remains same in both otolith and aragonite, certain Ca-O distances in otolith differ markedly from those in aragonite. Such difference reflects the remarkable degree of control that the protein matrix exercised over packing of calcium and carbonate ions to promote growth of rarer aragonite otolith. In view of the complex coordination chemistry of calcium in otoliths, the EXAFS analysis was limited to obtaining local atomic environment about calcium up to the first Ca-O shell. EXAFS data showed an asymmetric distribution of Ca-O bond distances with the centroid of distribution at 2.48 A, which is closer to the average Ca-O distance in aragonite than in calcite. The asymmetry in the Ca-O peak is consistent with an apparent departure of Ca-O distances from a near regular distribution, as expected of an aragonite otolith

  6. Characterization of stainless steel through Scanning Electron Microscopy, nitrided in the process of implantation of immersed ions in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno S, H.

    2003-01-01

    The present project carries out the investigation of the nitridation of the austenitic stainless steel schedule 304, applying the novel technology of installation of nitrogen ions in immersed materials in plasma (Plll), by means of which they modify those properties of the surface of the steel. The obtained results by means of tests of Vickers microhardness, shows that the hardness was increment from 266 to 740 HV (microhardness units). It was determined by means of scanning electron microscopy, the one semiquantitative chemical analysis of the elements that constitute the austenitic stainless steel schedule 304; the obtained results, show to the nitrogen like an element of their composition in the pieces where carried out to end the PIII technology. The parameters of the plasma with which carried out the technology Plll, were monitored and determined by means of electric probes, and with which it was determined that the density of particles is stable in the interval of 1x10 -1 at 3x10 -1 Torr, and it is where better results of hardness were obtained. That reported in this work, they are the first results obtained when applying the technology Plll in Mexico, and with base in these, it is even necessary to investigate and to deepen until to dominate the process and to be in possibilities of proposing it to be carried out and exploited in an industrial way. (Author)

  7. Structural characterization of annatto seeds (Bixa orellana) by transmission and scanning electron microscopy submitted to gamma radiation for dormancy break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Marcia N.C.; Nogueira, Neusa L.; Arthur, Valter; Rossi, Monica L.; Rodriguez, Adriana P.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: mnharder@cena.usp.br; nogueira@cena.usp.br; arthur@cena.usp.br; mnicalr@cena.usp.br; riana@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    The annatto (Bixa orellana) is the only species of the Bixaceae family. From the seeds an important food colorant is obtained, bixin, for the industry and domestic use. More recently studies have focused more extensively in medicinal purpose of the species. Due to structural and physiologic characteristics, the seeds have low germination rate, around 30 %. The irradiation of seeds with gamma radiation can promote the increase and/or acceleration of germination, better plant development and productivity, among other aspects. The radiation doses used for this purpose should not cause genetic modifications in the organism, hence experimentation is needed to define the appropriate doses. Absence of research done annatto related to the use of the irradiation aiming at the increase of germination rates lead to the structural characterization of the annatto seeds submitted to gamma radiation through transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The objective of this study was to verify the effect of radiation on the seeds structures during the process of dormancy break. Dry seeds and seeds immersed in distilled water for 24 hours were submitted to gamma radiation from source of Co{sup 60} type Gammacell-220 at CENA/USP, at doses 100 Gy. After irradiation the seeds were processed for TEM and SEM. Preliminary results, showed structural modifications in the seeds. (author)

  8. Efficacy of Two Irrigants Used with Self-Adjusting File System on Smear Layer: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç Şen, Özgür; Kaya, Sadullah; Er, Özgür; Alaçam, Tayfun

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical instrumentation of root canals produces a smear layer that adversely affects the root canal seal. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of MTAD and citric acid solutions used with self-adjusting file (SAF) system on smear layer. Twenty-three single-rooted human teeth were used for the study. Canals were instrumented manually up to a number 20 K file size. SAF was used to prepare the root canals. The following groups were studied: Group 1: MTAD + 5.25% NaOCl, Group 2: 20% citric acid + 5.25% NaOCl, and Group 3: Control (5.25% NaOCl). All roots were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer in the coronal, middle, and apical thirds was evaluated using a five-score evaluation system. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. In the coronal third, Group 2 exhibited the best results and was statistically different froms the other groups (P 0.05). The solutions used in Group 1 and 2 could effectively remove smear layer in most of the specimens. However, citric acid was more effective than MTAD in the three thirds of the canal.

  9. Analysis of the dopant distribution in Co-deposited organic thin films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Yolanda A.; Campos, Andrea P.C.; Achete, Carlos A.; Cremona, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes using phosphorescent dyes (PHOLEDs) have excellent performance, with internal quantum efficiencies approaching 100%. To maximize their performance, PHOLED devices use a conductive organic host material with a sufficiently dispersed phosphorescent guest to avoid concentration quenching. Fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium, [Ir(ppy)_3] is one of the most widely used green phosphorescent organic compounds. In this work, we used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) equipped with HAADF (high-angle annular dark-field) and EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) detectors to analyze the distribution of the [Ir(ppy)_3] concentration in the host material. This analysis technique, employed for the first time in co-deposited organic thin films, can simultaneously obtain an image and its respective chemical information, allowing for definitive characterization of the distribution and morphology of [Ir(ppy)_3]. The technique was also used to analyze the effect of the vibration of the substrate during thermal co-deposition of the [Ir(ppy)_3] molecules into an organic matrix. - Highlights: • We present a methodology to analyze the dopant distribution in organic thin films. • The method combines HAADF-STEM imaging and EDS X-ray spectroscopy. • Ir(ppy)_3 dopant was co-deposited into Spiro2-CBP organic matrix. • The dopant was co-deposited with and without substrate vibration. • Images and chemical information of the dopant were simultaneously obtained.

  10. Study of Polymer Material Aging by Laser Mass Spectrometry, UV-Visible Spectroscopy, and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junien Exposito

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyed natural rubber (NR and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR, designed for outdoor applications, were exposed to an accelerated artificial aging in xenon light. The aging results in the deterioration of the exposed surface material properties. The ability of dyed polymers to withstand prolonged sunlight exposure without fading or undergoing any physical deterioration is largely determined not only by the photochemical characteristics of the absorbing dyestuff itself but also by the polymer structure and fillers. Results obtained by laser mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectroscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy indicate that dyed filled NR and SBR samples behave differently during the photo-oxidation. The fading of the dyed polymers was found to be promoted in the NR sample. This can be correlated with LDI-FTICRMS results, which show the absence of [M-H]− orange pigment pseudomolecular ion and also its fragment ions after aging. This is confirmed by both EDX and UV/Vis spectroscopy. EDX analysis indicates a concentration of chlorine atoms, which can be considered as a marker of orange pigment or its degradation products, only at the surface of SBR flooring after aging. Reactivity of radicals formed during flooring aging has been studied and seems to greatly affect the behavior of such organic pigments.

  11. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation:a scanning electron microscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Sang Yoo; Qiang Zhu; Kee-Yeon Kum; Seok-Woo Chang; So Ram Oh; Hiran Perinpanayagam; Sang-Min Lim; Yeon-Jee Yoo; Yeo-Rok Oh; Sang-Bin Woo; Seung-Hyun Han

    2014-01-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n560) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows:Group 1 (n510) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS);Group 2 (n510) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS;Group 3 (n520) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS;and Group 4 (n520) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA–PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization.

  12. Neutron activation analysis and scanning electron microscopy of phytoplankton in the coastal zone of the Crimea (Black sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekhoroshkov, P.S.; Kravtsova, A.V.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Tokarev, Yu.N.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time the concentrations of 45 elements in the coastal phytoplankton communities used as bioindicator of inorganic contamination of the Black Sea coastal area near Sevastopol, Ukraine, were determined by means of neutron activation analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer. Phytoplankton samples were collected by total tows of the plankton net with 35 μm pore size at 3 stations situated in polluted and relatively pristine water areas of the Sevastopol coastal zone during autumn period of the phytoplankton active growth. The concentration of Mg, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, As, Rb, Ba, Th and Fe, Cr increases exponentially from relatively pristine station to more polluted station and 10 and 3 times greater, respectively, in the phytoplankton of the Sevastopol Bay. The rare-earth elements have relatively the same concentration values of about 1 μg/g and tend to accumulate in the phytoplankton from the polluted station in the Sevastopol Bay. The obtained results are in good agreement with the elemental concentration data in the oceanic plankton, plankton communities from the White Sea and the Black Sea. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry the mineral particles of unknown origin and impurities of copper (0.42% by weight) in the phytoplankton at the polluted station and zinc (0.57% by weight) at the relatively pristine station were determined

  13. Comparison of the external physical damages between laser-assisted and mechanical immobilized human sperm using scanning electronic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y L Chan

    Full Text Available We aim to visualize the external physical damages and distinct external phenotypic effects between mechanical and laser-assisted immobilized human spermatozoa using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM. Human spermatozoa were immobilized mechanically or with laser assistance for SEM examination and the membrane integrities were checked on both types of immobilized spermatozoa. We found evidence of external damages at SEM level on mechanically kinked sperm, but not on laser-assisted immobilized sperm. Although no external damage was found on laser-assist immobilized sperm, there were two distinct types of morphological changes when spermatozoa were stricken by infra-red laser. Coiled tails were immediately formed when Laser pulse was applied to the sperm end piece area, whereas laser applied to the sperm principal piece area resulted in a sharp bend of sperm tails. Sperm immobilized by laser did not exhibit any morphological change if the laser did not hit within the on-screen central target zone or if the laser hit the sperm mid piece or head. Our modified membrane integrity assay revealed that the external membrane of more than half of the laser-assisted immobilized sperm remained intact. In conclusion, mechanical immobilization produced membrane damages whilst laser-assisted immobilization did not result in any external membrane damages besides morphological changes at SEM level.

  14. Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: particle masses of the complex and component enzymes measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CaJacob, C.A.; Frey, P.A.; Hainfeld, J.F.; Wall, J.S.; Yang, H.

    1985-01-01

    Particle masses of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex and its component enzymes have been measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The particle mass of PDH complex measured by STEM is 5.28 X 10(6) with a standard deviation of 0.40 X 10(6). The masses of the component enzymes are 2.06 X 10(5) for the dimeric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), 1.15 X 10(5) for dimeric dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3), and 2.20 X 10(6) for dihydrolipoyl transacetylase (E2), the 24-subunit core enzyme. STEM measurements on PDH complex incubated with excess E3 or E1 failed to detect any additional binding of E3 but showed that the complex would bind additional E1 under forcing conditions. The additional E1 subunits were bound too weakly to represent binding sites in an isolated or isolable complex. The mass measurements by STEM are consistent with the subunit composition 24:24:12 when interpreted in the light of the flavin content of the complex and assuming 24 subunits in the core enzyme (E2)

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of male terminalia and its application to species recognition and phylogenetic reconstruction in the Drosophila saltans group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Tiago Alves Jorge; Noll, Fernando Barbosa; Bicudo, Hermione Elly Melara de Campos; Madi-Ravazzi, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila saltans group consists of five subgroups and 21 species, most of which have been identified only by morphological aspects of the male terminalia revealed by drawings using a camera lucida and a bright-field microscope. However, several species in the group, mainly those included in the saltans subgroup, are difficult to differentiate using only these characteristics. In this study, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze 19 structures of the male terminalia in 10 species from the five saltans subgroups. Among these structures, nine could be identified only through SEM analysis. We aimed to find other characteristics useful for morphological recognition of these species and to use these characteristics for phylogenetic reconstruction. These morphological differences enabled us to effectively distinguish among sibling species. These findings confirmed the monophyly of this group as previously determined in evolutionary studies based on other markers. The single most parsimonious tree (CI = 87 and RI = 90) indicated that the cordata subgroup is the most basal lineage and the saltans subgroup is the most apical lineage, as shown in earlier studies based on morphological data. However, our findings differed somewhat from these studies with respect to the phylogenetic relationships of species in the saltans group indicating that this group is still a puzzle that remains to be deciphered.

  16. Three-dimensional ultrastructure of osteocytes assessed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoka; Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hongo, Hiromi; Qiu, Zixuan; Abe, Miki; Kanesaki, Takuma; Tanaka, Kawori; Endo, Takashi; de Freitas, Paulo Henrique Luiz; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the application of focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy, FIB-SEM for revealing the three-dimensional features of osteocytic cytoplasmic processes in metaphyseal (immature) and diaphyseal (mature) trabeculae. Tibiae of eight-week-old male mice were fixed with aldehyde solution, and treated with block staining prior to FIB-SEM observation. While two-dimensional backscattered SEM images showed osteocytes' cytoplasmic processes in a fragmented fashion, three-dimensional reconstructions of FIB-SEM images demonstrated that osteocytes in primary metaphyseal trabeculae extended their cytoplasmic processes randomly, thus maintaining contact with neighboring osteocytes and osteoblasts. In contrast, diaphyseal osteocytes extended thin cytoplasmic processes from their cell bodies, which ran perpendicular to the bone surface. In addition, these osteocytes featured thick processes that branched into thinner, transverse cytoplasmic processes; at some point, however, these transverse processes bend at a right angle to run perpendicular to the bone surface. Osteoblasts also possessed thicker cytoplasmic processes that branched off as thinner processes, which then connected with cytoplasmic processes of neighboring osteocytes. Thus, FIB-SEM is a useful technology for visualizing the three-dimensional structures of osteocytes and their cytoplasmic processes.

  17. Surface topography of hairy cell leukemia cells compared to other leukemias as seen by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2011-06-01

    This short review deals with the ultrastructural surface architecture of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) compared to other leukemic cells, as seen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The development of improved techniques for preparing blood cells for SEM in the 1970s readily enabled these features to be visualized more accurately. This review returns us to the earlier history of SEM, when the surface topography of normal and neoplastic cells was visualized and reported for the first time, in an era before the emergence and use of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry, now used routinely to define cells by their immunophenotype. Surface microvilli are characteristic for normal and leukemic lymphoid cells, myelo-monocytic cells lack microvilli and show surface ruffles, while leukemic plasma and myeloma cells and megakaryocytes display large surface blebs. HCL cell surfaces are complex and typically 'hybrid' in nature, displaying both lymphoid and monocytic features with florid ruffles of varying sizes interspersed with clumps of short microvilli cytoplasm. The surface features of other leukemic cells and photomicrographs of immuno-SEM labeling of cells employing antibodies and colloidal gold, reported more than 20 years ago, are shown.

  18. Measuring surface topography with scanning electron microscopy. I. EZEImage: a program to obtain 3D surface data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponz, Ezequiel; Ladaga, Juan Luis; Bonetto, Rita Dominga

    2006-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is widely used in the science of materials and different parameters were developed to characterize the surface roughness. In a previous work, we studied the surface topography with fractal dimension at low scale and two parameters at high scale by using the variogram, that is, variance vs. step log-log graph, of a SEM image. Those studies were carried out with the FERImage program, previously developed by us. To verify the previously accepted hypothesis by working with only an image, it is indispensable to have reliable three-dimensional (3D) surface data. In this work, a new program (EZEImage) to characterize 3D surface topography in SEM has been developed. It uses fast cross correlation and dynamic programming to obtain reliable dense height maps in a few seconds which can be displayed as an image where each gray level represents a height value. This image can be used for the FERImage program or any other software to obtain surface topography characteristics. EZEImage also generates anaglyph images as well as characterizes 3D surface topography by means of a parameter set to describe amplitude properties and three functional indices for characterizing bearing and fluid properties.

  19. Irradiation of root cervical dentin by using the Nd:YAG laser in vitro study and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britto, Cynthia Tannure Coelho

    2003-01-01

    The dentin hypersensitivity occurs as a result of the dentine exposition to the oral environment, due to loss or removal of enamel or cementum, or both. The hypersensitivity can persist, unless the sealing of the dentin tubules be carried out. Several treatments have been considered, but with less satisfactory and only temporary results. Among these treatments we can cite methods that promote the mechanical occlusion by deposition of substances inside of tubules, by topic application. Nowadays, among the treatments studied, there is the use of lasers, which leads to better clinical efficiency by promoting fusion and re-solidification of the dentin surface, obliterating total or partially the dentin tubules. This in-vitro study was carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of the Nd:YAG laser in promoting the fusion and re-solidification of the dentin surface, and to evaluate parameters of irradiation typically used, comparing results using photoinitiator with those without it. By observation of the dentin surface, using Scanning Electron Microscopy, it was found extensive areas of fusion and re-solidification, in those groups with photoinitiator, being this technique an efficient resource in the treatment of the dentin hypersensitivity. (author)

  20. Analysis of the dopant distribution in Co-deposited organic thin films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Yolanda A. [Center of Nanotechnology and Nanoscience, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Sangolqui 171-5-31B (Ecuador); Campos, Andrea P.C.; Achete, Carlos A. [DIMAT—INMETRO, Xerém, Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Cremona, Marco [DIMAT—INMETRO, Xerém, Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22453-970 (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes using phosphorescent dyes (PHOLEDs) have excellent performance, with internal quantum efficiencies approaching 100%. To maximize their performance, PHOLED devices use a conductive organic host material with a sufficiently dispersed phosphorescent guest to avoid concentration quenching. Fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium, [Ir(ppy){sub 3}] is one of the most widely used green phosphorescent organic compounds. In this work, we used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) equipped with HAADF (high-angle annular dark-field) and EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) detectors to analyze the distribution of the [Ir(ppy){sub 3}] concentration in the host material. This analysis technique, employed for the first time in co-deposited organic thin films, can simultaneously obtain an image and its respective chemical information, allowing for definitive characterization of the distribution and morphology of [Ir(ppy){sub 3}]. The technique was also used to analyze the effect of the vibration of the substrate during thermal co-deposition of the [Ir(ppy){sub 3}] molecules into an organic matrix. - Highlights: • We present a methodology to analyze the dopant distribution in organic thin films. • The method combines HAADF-STEM imaging and EDS X-ray spectroscopy. • Ir(ppy){sub 3} dopant was co-deposited into Spiro2-CBP organic matrix. • The dopant was co-deposited with and without substrate vibration. • Images and chemical information of the dopant were simultaneously obtained.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of real and artificial kidney stones before and after Thulium fiber laser ablation in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated proposed mechanisms of laser lithotripsy, specifically for the novel, experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL). Previous lithotripsy studies with the conventional Holmium:YAG laser noted a primary photothermal mechanism (vaporization). Our hypothesis is that an additional mechanical effect (fragmentation) occurs due to vaporization of water in stone material from high absorption of energy, called micro-explosions. The TFL irradiated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and uric acid (UA) stones, as well as artificial stones (Ultracal30 and BegoStone), in air and water environments. TFL energy was varied to determine the relative effect on the ablation mechanism. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study qualitative and characteristic changes in surface topography with correlation to presumed ablation mechanisms. Laser irradiation of stones in air produced charring and melting of the stone surface consistent with a photothermal effect and minimal fragmentation, suggesting no mechanical effect from micro-explosions. For COM stones ablated in water, there was prominent fragmentation in addition to recognized photothermal effects, supporting dual mechanisms during TFL lithotripsy. For UA stones, there were minimal photothermal effects, and dominant effects were mechanical. By increasing TFL pulse energy, a greater mechanical effect was demonstrated for both stone types. For artificial stones, there was no significant evidence of mechanical effects. TFL laser lithotripsy relies on two prominent mechanisms for stone ablation, photothermal and mechanical. Water is necessary for the mechanical effect which can be augmented by increasing pulse energy. Artificial stones may not provide a predictive model for mechanical effects during laser lithotripsy.

  2. Characterization of wood dust from furniture by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Yepes, Milena Elizabeth; Cremades, Lázaro V

    2011-01-01

    Study characterized and analyzed form factor, elementary composition and particle size of wood dust, in order to understand its harmful health effects on carpenters in Quindío (Colombia). Once particle characteristics (size distributions, aerodynamic equivalent diameter (D(α)), elemental composition and shape factors) were analyzed, particles were then characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXRA). SEM analysis of particulate matter showed: 1) cone-shaped particle ranged from 2.09 to 48.79 µm D(α); 2) rectangular prism-shaped particle from 2.47 to 72.9 µm D(α); 3) cylindrically-shaped particle from 2.5 to 48.79 µm D(α); and 4) spherically-shaped particle from 2.61 to 51.93 µm D(α). EDXRA reveals presence of chemical elements from paints and varnishes such as Ca, K, Na and Cr. SEM/EDXRA contributes in a significant manner to the morphological characterization of wood dust. It is obvious that the type of particles sampled is a complex function of shapes and sizes of particles. Thus, it is important to investigate the influence of particles characteristics, morphology, shapes and D(α) that may affect the health of carpenters in Quindío.

  3. New directions in scanning-tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrell, T.L.; Warmack, R.J.; Reddick, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    The tunneling of electrons in scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) has permitted imaging of the electronic distribution about individual atoms on surfaces. The need for use of conducting surfaces in STM limits its applicability, and new forms of scanning microscopy have emerged as a result of interest in poorly conducting samples. Atomic force microscopy has demonstrated that the force between a surface and a probe tip can be used to image selected materials. Now being developed are magnetic probe STM's and photon tunneling microscopes in which the probe is a sharpened optical fiber. Also of great interest presently is the measurement of differential conductance of surfaces using electron STM's. This method supplies spectral information and contrast enhancement in images. At present there remains much theoretical work to be carried out in order to better characterize related data on inelastic electron tunneling, and valuable insight may be gained from data being gathered on the local work function of materials. As matters stand today, the key problems lie in determining tip and contamination effects, preparation of samples, and understanding conductivity mechanisms in very thin materials on conducting substrates. Resolution of these problems and introduction of new forms of scanning microscopy may permit novel and important applications in biology as well as surface science

  4. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  5. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doube, M; Firth, E C; Boyde, A; Bushby, A J

    2010-06-03

    Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3) is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site that linear defects and condylar fracture occur in older Thoroughbreds and questioned whether this tissue had altered mechanical properties. We embedded bone slices in PMMA, prepared flat surfaces normal to the articular surface and studied ACC and SCB using combined quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (qBSE) and nanoindentation testing: this allowed correlation of mineralisation density and tissue stiffness (E) at the micron scale. We studied both normal and affected grooves, and also normal condylar regions. Large arrays of indentations could be visualised as 2-dimensional maps of E with a limit to resolution of indentation spacing, which is much larger than qBSE pixel spacing. ACC was more highly mineralised but less stiff in early linear defects than in control regions, while subchondral bone was more highly mineralised and stiffer in specimens with early linear defects than those without. Thus both ACC and SCB mineralisation may be abnormal in a class of early linear defect in 18-month-old Thoroughbred horses, and this may possibly contribute to later fracture of the Mc3 condyle.

  6. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Doube

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3 is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site that linear defects and condylar fracture occur in older Thoroughbreds and questioned whether this tissue had altered mechanical properties. We embedded bone slices in PMMA, prepared flat surfaces normal to the articular surface and studied ACC and SCB using combined quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (qBSE and nanoindentation testing: this allowed correlation of mineralisation density and tissue stiffness (E at the micron scale. We studied both normal and affected grooves, and also normal condylar regions. Large arrays of indentations could be visualised as 2-dimensional maps of E with a limit to resolution of indentation spacing, which is much larger than qBSE pixel spacing. ACC was more highly mineralised but less stiff in early linear defects than in control regions, while subchondral bone was more highly mineralised and stiffer in specimens with early linear defects than those without. Thus both ACC and SCB mineralisation may be abnormal in a class of early linear defect in 18-month-old Thoroughbred horses, and this may possibly contribute to later fracture of the Mc3 condyle.

  7. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Melnikov, Vasily; Khan, Jafar Iqbal; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    , we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions

  8. Low temperature–scanning electron microscopy to evaluate morphology and predation of Scolothrips sexmaculatus Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) against spider mites (Acari: Tetranychidae: Tetranychus species)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper evaluates the potential usefulness of low temperature-scanning electron microscopy (LT-SEM) to evaluate morphology and predation behavior of the six-spotted thrips (Scolothrips sexmaculatus Pergande) against the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae (Koch)). Morphological features...

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of the heavy-electron superconductor TlNi2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfert, Stefan; Schmitt, Martin; Schmidt, Henrik; Mauerer, Tobias; Sessi, Paolo; Wang, Hangdong; Mao, Qianhui; Fang, Minghu; Bode, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    We report on the structural and superconducting electronic properties of the heavy-electron superconductor TlNi2Se2 . By using a variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (VT-STM) the coexistence of (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ and (2 ×1 ) surface reconstructions is observed. Similar to earlier observations on the "122" family of Fe-based superconductors, we find that their respective surface fraction strongly depends on the temperature during cleavage, the measurement temperature, and the sample's history. Cleaving at low temperature predominantly results in the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ -reconstructed surface. A detailed analysis of the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ -reconstructed domains identifies (2 ×1 ) -ordered dimers, tertramers, and higher order even multimers as domain walls. Higher cleaving temperatures and the warming of low-temperature-cleaved samples increases the relative weight of the (2 ×1 ) surface reconstruction. By slowly increasing the sample temperature Ts inside the VT-STM we find that the (√{2 }×√{2 }) R 45∘ surface reconstructions transforms into the (2 ×1 ) structure at Ts=123 K. We identify the polar nature of the TlNi2Se2 (001) surface as the most probable driving mechanism of the two reconstructions, as both lead to a charge density ρ =0.5 e- , thereby avoiding divergent electrostatic potentials and the resulting "polar catastrophe." Low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) performed with normal metal and superconducting probe tips shows a superconducting gap which is best fit with an isotropic s wave. We could not detect any correlation between the local surface reconstruction, suggesting that the superconductivity is predominantly governed by TlNi2Se2 bulk properties. Correspondingly, temperature- and field-dependent data reveal that both the critical temperature and critical magnetic field are in good agreement with bulk values obtained earlier from transport measurements. In the superconducting state

  10. Characterization of Burnt Clays by X-ray Diffraction Analysis, Chemical Analysis and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Eva; Neděla, Vilém

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1862-1863 ISSN 1431-9276 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : burnt clays * pozzolanic activity * amorphous phase * environmental scanning electron microscope Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  11. Scanning probe microscopy in material science and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cricenti, A; Colonna, S; Girasole, M; Gori, P; Ronci, F; Longo, G; Dinarelli, S; Luce, M; Rinaldi, M; Ortenzi, M

    2011-01-01

    A review of the activity of scanning probe microscopy at our Institute is presented, going from instrumentation to software development of scanning tunnelling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Some of the most important experiments in material science and biology performed by our group through the years with these SPM techniques will be presented. Finally, infrared applications by coupling a SNOM with a free electron laser will also be presented.

  12. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  13. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the naupliar musculature and a scanning electron microscopy atlas of nauplius development of Balanus improvisus (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    , as is the setation pattern of the first antennae. The naupliar musculature of B. improvisus was stained with phalloidin to visualise F-actin, followed by analysis using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with subsequent application of 3D imaging software. The larval musculature is already fully established......An atlas of the naupliar development of the cirripede Balanus improvisus Darwin, 1854 using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is provided. Existing spikes on the hindbody increase in number with each moult and are an applicable character for identification of the different nauplius stages...

  14. Calcium detection in secretion granules of avian oviduct by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makita, T.; Hatsuoka, M.; Sugi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Secretion granules in the shell gland, isthmus, and albumin-secreting region of the hen oviduct were analyzed with WET-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX, a combination of wide-angle backscattered electron detector (BED) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyzer (EDX). Glutaraldehyde-fixed but unhydrated, unstained, and uncoated samples were analyzed; Ca was localized in all secretion granules in all three sections of the hen oviduct studied

  15. The effect of sidewall roughness on line edge roughness in top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated in a numerical study the determination of sidewall roughness (SWR) from top down scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In a typical metrology application, top-down SEM images are acquired in a (critical-dimension) SEM and the roughness is analyzed. However, the true size, shape and roughness characteristics of resist features are not fully investigated in the analysis of top-down SEM images. In reality, rough resist features are complex three-dimensional structures and the characterization naturally extends to the analysis of SWR. In this study we randomly generate images of rough lines and spaces, where the lines are made of PMMA on a silicon substrate. The lines that we study have a length of 2 µm, a width of 32nm and a height of 32 nm. The SWR is modeled by using the power spectral density (PSD) function of Palasantzas, which characterizes roughness by the standard deviation σ, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α . The actual roughness is generated by application of the method of Thorsos in two dimensions. The images are constructed by using a home-built program for simulating electron-specimen interactions. The program that we have developed is optimized for complex arbitrary geometries and large number of incident low energy primary electrons by using multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The program uses the dielectric function model for inelastic scattering events and has an implementation specifically for low energy electrons. A satisfactory comparison is made between the secondary electron yields from the home-built program and another program found in literature. In order to reduce the risk of shrinkage, we use a beam energy of 300 eV and a spot size of 3 nm. Each pixel is exposed with 20 electrons on average (≍ 276 µC/cm2), following the Poisson distribution to account for illumination shot noise. We have assumed that the detection of electrons is perfect and does not introduce additional noise. We measure line edge

  16. Labeling surface epitopes to identify Cryptosporidium life stages using a scanning electron microscopy-based immunogold approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Hanna; Thompson, R C Andrew; Koh, Wan H; Clode, Peta L

    2012-02-01

    The Apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is responsible for the widespread disease cryptosporidiosis, in both humans and livestock. The nature of C. parvum infection is far from understood and many questions remain in regard to host-parasite interactions, limiting successful treatment of the disease. To definitively identify a range of C. parvum stages in cell culture and to begin to investigate host cell interactions in some of the lesser known life stages, we have utilized a combined scanning electron microscopy and immunolabeling approach, correlating high resolution microstructural information with definitive immunogold labeling of Cryptosporidium stages. Several life cycle stages, including oocysts, merozoites I, trophozoites, gamonts and microgametocytes, were successfully immunolabeled in an in vitro model system. Developing oocysts were clearly immunolabeled, but this did not persist once excystation had occurred. Immunolabeling visualized on the host cell surface adjacent to invasive merozoites is likely to be indicative of receptor shedding, with merozoites also initiating host responses that manifested as abnormal microvilli on the host cell surface. Small sub-micron stages such as microgametocytes, which were impossible to identify as single entities without immunolabeling, were readily visualized and observed to attach to host cells via novel membranous projections. Epicellular parasites also expressed Cryptosporidium-derived epitopes within their encapsulating membrane. These data have allowed us to confidently identify a variety of C. parvum stages in cell culture at high resolution. With this, we provide new insight into C. parvum - host cell interactions and highlight future opportunities for investigating and targeting receptor-mediated interactions between Cryptosporidium life cycle stages and host cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydroxyapatite, fluor-hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite produced via the sol-gel method: bonding to titanium and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredwin, Christopher J; Georgiou, George; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA), fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) with varying levels of fluoride ion substitution and fluorapatite (FA) production has been characterised and optimised by the sol-gel method and the dissolution and biological properties of these materials were investigated. It was the objective of this study to investigate the potential bond strength and interaction of these materials with titanium. HA, FHA and FA were synthesised by a sol-gel method. Calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphite were used as precursors under an ethanol-water based solution. Different amounts of ammonium fluoride (NH4F) were incorporated for the preparation of the FHA and FA sol-gels. Using a spin coating technique the sol-gels were coated onto commercially pure titanium disks and crystallised at various temperatures. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis, the surface characteristics, coating thickness and interaction of the Ti substrate and coating were investigated. The bond strengths of the coating to the Ti were investigated using an Instron Universal Load Testing Machine. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-way analysis of variance and post hoc testing with a Bonferroni correction. (1) Coating speed inversely influenced the coating thickness. (2) Increasing fluoride ion substitution and heating temperature significantly increased bond strength and (3) increasing fluoride ion substitution increased the coating thickness. FHA and FA synthesised using the sol-gel technique may offer a superior alternative to coating titanium implants with HA and plasma spraying. HA, FHA and FA materials synthesised by the sol-gel method may also have a use as bone grafting materials. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphological evidence by scanning electron microscopy of excretion of metacyclic forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in vector's urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Zeledon

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparision by scanning electron microscopy (SEM of Trypanosoma cruzi flagellates attached to the cuticle of the rectal gland of infected Dipetalogaster maxima nymphs, showed marked differences before amd after feeding. Before feeding numerous metacyclic trypomastigotes were observed among the abundant epimastigotes that formed the carpet of flagellates. On the other hand, in insects that were allowed to urinate for 24 hours after a meal, the metacyclics were scarce,indicating that they had been detached by the urine flow. An asymetric type of cell division, probably originating both an epi-and a trypomastigote, was occasionally observed. The occurrence of swellings at different levels of the flagella of epimastigotes suggests that secondary sites of attachment may be common.Observando-se, em microscopia eletrônica de varedura, formas flageladas do Trypanosoma cruzi presas a cutícula da glândula retal de ninfas infectadas de Dipetalogaster maxima verificaram-se nítidas diferenças antes e depois da alimentação. Antes, viam-se numerosos tripomastigotas metacíclicos entre os abundantes epimastigotas que formavam o tapete de flagelados, ao passo que nos insetos que urinavam dentro das 24 horas após o repasto os metacíclicos eram raros, indicando que haviam sido desprendidos pelo fluxo urinário. Foi notado, as vezes, um tipo assimétrico de divisão celular, originando um epi e um tripomastigota. Nos flagelados dos epimastigotas a presença de dilatações a diferentes níveis sugere que lugares secundários de aderência podem ser comuns.

  19. Evaluation of early changes induced by diuron in the rat urinary bladder using different processing methods for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Rafaela Marono; Ferragut Cardoso, Ana Paula; da Rocha, Mitscheli Sanches; Nascimento E Pontes, Merielen Garcia; de Camargo, João Lauro Viana; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor

    2015-07-03

    Diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] is a substituted urea herbicide carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The suggested non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA) of diuron encompasses cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative hyperplasia. Prenecrotic swollen cells as observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been reported as early morphological alterations, putatively related to diuron cytotoxicity. However, these changes were not observed in a previous SEM study conducted in this laboratory. This study evaluated whether these early alterations are actually due to diuron cytotoxicity or artifacts related to different processing methods used for SEM analysis. Male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with basal diet, 7.1% sodium saccharin (NaS) or 2.500ppm diuron for seven days or 15 weeks. The urinary bladders were processed for histological and labeling indices examinations and for SEM using two different processing methods. The incidence of simple hyperplasia after 15 weeks of exposure to diuron or to NaS was significantly increased. By SEM, the incidences and severity of lesions were significantly increased in the diuron group independently of exposure time. The different SEM processing methods used allowed for visualization of swollen superficial cells after seven days of diuron exposure. Probably the absence these cells in a previous study was due to the use very few animals. Our results support the hypothesis that the swollen cell is an early key event due to diuron-induced cytotoxicity and is the result of a degenerative process involved in the non-genotoxic carcinogenic mode of action of high doses of diuron. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of early changes induced by diuron in the rat urinary bladder using different processing methods for scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fava, Rafaela Marono; Ferragut Cardoso, Ana Paula; Sanches da Rocha, Mitscheli; Nascimento e Pontes, Merielen Garcia; Viana de Camargo, João Lauro; Cotrim Sartor de Oliveira, Maria Luiza

    2015-01-01

    Diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] is a substituted urea herbicide carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The suggested non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA) of diuron encompasses cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative hyperplasia. Prenecrotic swollen cells as observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been reported as early morphological alterations, putatively related to diuron cytotoxicity. However, these changes were not observed in a previous SEM study conducted in this laboratory. This study evaluated whether these early alterations are actually due to diuron cytotoxicity or artifacts related to different processing methods used for SEM analysis. Male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with basal diet, 7.1% sodium saccharin (NaS) or 2.500 ppm diuron for seven days or 15 weeks. The urinary bladders were processed for histological and labeling indices examinations and for SEM using two different processing methods. The incidence of simple hyperplasia after 15 weeks of exposure to diuron or to NaS was significantly increased. By SEM, the incidences and severity of lesions were significantly increased in the diuron group independently of exposure time. The different SEM processing methods used allowed for visualization of swollen superficial cells after seven days of diuron exposure. Probably the absence these cells in a previous study was due to the use very few animals. Our results support the hypothesis that the swollen cell is an early key event due to diuron-induced cytotoxicity and is the result of a degenerative process involved in the non-genotoxic carcinogenic mode of action of high doses of diuron

  1. Characterization of banana peel by scanning electron microscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy and its use for cadmium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Jamil R; Memon, Saima Q; Bhanger, M I; Memon, G Zuhra; El-Turki, A; Allen, Geoffrey C

    2008-10-15

    This study describes the use of banana peel, a commonly produced fruit waste, for the removal of Cd(II) from environmental and industrial wastewater. The banana peel was characterized by FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The parameters pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were investigated and found to be rapid ( approximately 97% within 10 min). The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to describe partitioning behavior for the system at room temperature. The value of Q(L) was found to be (35.52 mg g(-1)) higher than the previously reported materials. The binding of metal ions was found to be pH-dependent with the optimal sorption occurring at pH 8. The retained species were eluted with 5 mL of 5 x 10(-3)M HNO(3) with the detection limit of 1.7 x 10(-3)mg L(-1). Kinetics of sorption followed the pseudo-first-order rate equation with the rate constant k, equal to 0.13+/-0.01 min(-1). Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy at 303K (-7.41+/-0.13 kJ mol(-1)) and enthalpy (40.56+/-2.34 kJ mol(-1)) indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the sorption process. The developed method was utilized for the removal of Cd(II) ions from environmental and industrial wastewater samples using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS).

  2. Analysis of Surface Characteristics of ProTaper Universal and ProTaper Next Instruments by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffery; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Fong, Hanson; Johnson, James; Paranjpe, Avina

    2017-07-01

    Many new rotary files systems have been introduced, however, limited research has been conducted related to the surface irregularities of these files and if these have any effects on the files themselves. Hence, the aim of the present study was to analyze surface irregularities of the ProTaper® Universal rotary files (PTU) and the ProTaper Next™ rotary files (PTN) before and after instrumentation in curved canals. The main objective was to investigate the nature of these irregularities and how they might influence the use and fracture of rotary files during root-canal treatments. The files were examined pre-operatively using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) to analyze surface imperfections and the presence of particles. Mesial roots of forty extracted mandibular molars were selected. Each instrument was used to prepare one of the mesial canals. The files were then rinsed with alcohol, and autoclaved and analyzed again. Of the 80 files used in this study, five files fractured, five files unwound and seven files were curved or bent and they all belonged to the PTU group. Irregularities and debris could be visualized with the SEM on both unused PTU and PTN files. Most of the debris was found associated with deeper milling grooves and defects on the surface of the metal. Surface analysis of the files that were used and sterilized were performed and the SEM images demonstrated organic debris, metal flash, and crack formation and initiation of fractures for both file types. All files showed machining grooves, metal flash, debris, and defects on cutting edges. These irregularities appear to be critical in the accumulation of debris and initiation of fatigue and crack propagation within the NiTi alloy. The accumulation of debris could be a concern due to the potential exchange of organic debris between patients. Key words: ProTaper® Universal, ProTaper Next™, surface characteristics, SEM.

  3. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy discloses differences in dehydration of frozen boar semen stored in large containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwall, H

    2009-02-01

    In general, freezing in flat plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bags (FlatPacks) at 50 degrees C/min gives better post-thaw viability, in terms of sperm motility and membrane integrity, than does freezing in plastic maxi-straws, probably owing to differences in cryobiology. To test the hypothesis that this better survival post-thaw relates to the degree of sperm dehydration during freezing, the present study investigated the structure of boar semen in a frozen state using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) to compare two different packages (FlatPacks and maxi-straws) for single artificial insemination (AI) doses, and three different freezing rates. The semen was split-sample frozen in maxi-straws or FlatPacks (both holding 5 ml) using 3% glycerol as cryoprotectant. Three freezing rates were applied from -5 degrees C to -100 degrees C, namely 2 degrees C/min, 50 degrees C/min and 1200 degrees C/min, the lattermost by plunging the samples into liquid nitrogen (LN(2)). The samples were thereafter fractured into LN(2) and larger areas of extra-cellular, unbound frozen water ('ice lakes') were measured to determine the degree of dehydration of the spermatozoa. These areas decreased in size with an increase in cooling rate, the differences in size being more dramatic for maxi-straws than for FlatPacks. Size of ice lakes was also influenced by location within package in relation to cooling rate, the central values being always smaller in maxi-straws than in Flatpacks (p < 0.05 at 2 degrees C/min and 50 degrees C/min) but not at 1200 degrees C/min, which suggested the FlatPack allows for more homogenous freezing of boar semen.

  4. A new method to detect and correct sample tilt in scanning transmission electron microscopy bright-field imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.G. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ishikawa, R.; Sánchez-Santolino, G. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lugg, N.R., E-mail: shibata@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Important properties of functional materials, such as ferroelectric shifts and octahedral distortions, are associated with displacements of the positions of lighter atoms in the unit cell. Annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is a good experimental method for investigating such phenomena due to its ability to image light and heavy atoms simultaneously. To map atomic positions at the required accuracy precise angular alignment of the sample with the microscope optical axis is necessary, since misalignment (tilt) of the specimen contributes to errors in position measurements of lighter elements in annular bright-field imaging. In this paper it is shown that it is possible to detect tilt with the aid of images recorded using a central bright-field detector placed within the inner radius of the annular bright-field detector. For a probe focus near the middle of the specimen the central bright-field image becomes especially sensitive to tilt and we demonstrate experimentally that misalignment can be detected with a precision of less than a milliradian, as we also confirm in simulation. Coma in the probe, an aberration that can be misidentified as tilt of the specimen, is also investigated and it is shown how the effects of coma and tilt can be differentiated. The effects of tilt may be offset to a large extent by shifting the diffraction plane detector an amount equivalent to the specimen tilt and we provide an experimental proof of principle of this using a segmented detector system. - Highlights: • Octahedral distortions are associated with displacements of lighter atoms. • Annular bright-field imaging is sensitive to light and heavy atoms simultaneously. • Mistilt of the specimen leads to errors in position measurements of lighter elements. • It is possible to detect tilt using images taken by a central bright-field detector. • Tilt may be offset by shifting the diffraction plane detector by an equivalent amount.

  5. Investigations on the electronic surface properties of the stoichiometric superconductor LiFeAs using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    This work presents scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy investigations on the stoichiometric superconductor lithium iron arsenide (LiFeAs). To reveal the electronic properties, measurements on defect-free surfaces as well as near defects have been performed. The former shows a shift of atomic position with respect to the applied bias voltage. Furthermore, temperature dependent spectroscopic measurements indicate the coupling of quasiparticles in the vicinity of the superconducting coherence peaks. LiFeAs surfaces influenced by atomic defects show a spacial variation of the superconducting gap. The defects can be characterized by their symmetry and thus can be assigned to a position in the atomic lattice. Detailed spectroscopic investigations of defects reveal their influence on the quasiparticle density of states. In particular, Fe-defects show a small effect on the superconductivity while As-defects strongly disturb the superconducting gap. Measurements in magnetic field have been performed for the determination of the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length ξ GL . For this purpose, a suitable fit-function has been developed in this work. This function allows to fit the differential conductance of a magnetic vortex at E F . The fit results in a coherence length of ξ GL = 3,9 nm which corresponds to an upper critical field of 21 Tesla. Besides measurements on a single vortex, investigation on the vortex lattice have been performed. The vortex lattice constant follows thereby the predicted behavior of a trigonal vortex lattice. However, for magnetic fields larger than 6 Tesla an increasing lattice disorder sets in, presumably due to vortex-vortex-interactions.

  6. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 , with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN 4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P6 3 (α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce 4-0.5x Li 3 P 18 N 35-1.5x O 1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  7. Experimental study of water sorption and clays swelling by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes-Hernandez, G.

    2002-10-01

    This work deals with the study of water sorption and clays swelling (MX80 bentonite and Paris basin argilites). A new approach by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) coupled to digital image analysis is proposed to estimate the swelling with time and the relative humidity. The ESEM is a new generation tool, not much used in the clays domain, which allows to study hydrated materials in different conditions of relative humidity. In this work, it is shown that qualitative and quantitative information about clays swelling at the aggregate scale can be obtained. The study of the kinetics allows to identify three swelling steps which are described by a first order kinetic model. The study of water sorption by raw bentonite and the exchange of different cation (Na + , Li + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) has permitted to analyze the cation influence on the swelling potential. The adsorption kinetics, described by a second order model, depends directly on the relative humidity, on the mass of the sample and on the compensating cation. The study of the texture of the compacted MX80 bentonite in dry and humid conditions has permitted to observe the morphological evolution of the porous network (macro-porosity) during the hydration/dehydration. From different analytical approaches, a diminution of the macro-pores and/or meso-pores size and the opening of inter-aggregate pores is observed when the apparent density increases. The study of the influence of the instantaneous water condensation/evaporation on the argilites shows that the sensitiveness to water increases when the proportion of clay increases. In particular, it is characterized by a cracking partially reversible or irreversible after several condensation/evaporation cycles. (J.S.)

  8. Multimodal sensing and imaging technology by integrated scanning electron, force, and nearfield microwave microscopy and its application to submicrometer studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hänßler, Olaf C.

    2018-01-01

    The work covers a multimodal microscope technology for the analysis, manipulation and transfer of materials and objects in the submicrometer range. An atomic force microscope (AFM) allows imaging of the surface topography and a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) detects electromagnetic properties, both operating in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The described technology demonstrator allows to observe the region-of-interest live with the SEM, while at the same time a characterization w...

  9. Multifunctional scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ashley; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based technique that has traditionally been used to image topography or to deliver species to an interface, particularly in a biological setting. This article highlights the recent blossoming of SICM into a technique with a much greater diversity of applications and capability that can be used either standalone, with advanced control (potential–time) functions, or in tandem with other methods. SICM can be used to elucidate functional information about interfaces, such as surface charge density or electrochemical activity (ion fluxes). Using a multi-barrel probe format, SICM-related techniques can be employed to deposit nanoscale three-dimensional structures and further functionality is realized when SICM is combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), with simultaneous measurements from a single probe opening up considerable prospects for multifunctional imaging. SICM studies are greatly enhanced by finite-element method modelling for quantitative treatment of issues such as resolution, surface charge and (tip) geometry effects. SICM is particularly applicable to the study of living systems, notably single cells, although applications extend to materials characterization and to new methods of printing and nanofabrication. A more thorough understanding of the electrochemical principles and properties of SICM provides a foundation for significant applications of SICM in electrochemistry and interfacial science. PMID:28484332

  10. Morphology and ultrastructure of the freshwater rotifer Brachionus bidentatus (Monogononta: Brachionidae) using scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Jiménez, Gerardo; Zavala-Padilla, Guadalupe; Silva-Briano, Marcelo; Rico-Martínez, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    The study of sexual reproductive behavior supported by ultrastructural evidence is important in rotifers to describe differences among potential cryptic species. In this research, the morphology of the rotifer Brachionus bidentatus is described at the ultrastructural level, using electronic microscopy, together with a brief description and discussion of its sexual reproductive behavior. The characteristics of the (a) male, (b) the female, (c) the sexual egg or cyst, (d) the partenogenic egg, (e) the no-fecundated sexual egg (male egg), and (f) the trophi, were described. Another part of this research is dedicated to the ultrastructure of the sex cells of the male rotifer B. bidentatus. Samples were obtained from La Punta pond in Cosio, Aguascalientes, Mexico (22 degrees 08' N - 102 degrees 24' W), and a culture was maintained in the laboratory. Fifty organisms, from different stages of the rotifer Brachionus bidentatus, were fixed in Formol at 4% and then prepared; besides, for the trophi, 25 female rotifer Brachionus bidentatus were prepared for observation in a JEOL 5900 LV scanning electronic microscope. In addition, for the observation of male sex cells, 500 males of Brachionus bidentatus were isolated, fixed and observed in a JEOL 1010 transmission microscope. Females of B. bidentatus in laboratory cultures had a lifespan of five days (mean+one SD = 4.69 +/- 0.48; N=13), and produced 4.5 +/- 3.67 (N=6) parthenogenetic eggs during such lifespan. In the case of non-fertilized sexual eggs, they produced up to 18 eggs (mean+one SD = 13 +/- 4.93; N=7). Sexual females produced a single cyst on average (mean +/- one SD = I +/- 0; N=20). For the sexual cycle, the time of copulation between male and female ranged from 10 to 40 seconds (mean +/- one SD = 17.33 +/- 10.55, N=7). The spermatozoa are composed of a celular body and a flagellum, the size of the body is of 300 nm while the flagellum measures 1 700nm. The rods have a double membrane. Their mean length is almost

  11. An in-situ analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of structure-property relationships in electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andrew James

    As electronic and mechanical devices are scaled downward in size and upward in complexity, macroscopic principles no longer apply. Synthesis of three-dimensionally confined structures exhibit quantum confinement effects allowing, for example, silicon nanoparticles to luminesce. The reduction in size of classically brittle materials reveals a ductile-to-brittle transition. Such a transition, attributed to a reduction in defects, increases elasticity. In the case of silicon, elastic deformation can improve electronic carrier mobility by over 50%, a vital attribute of modern integrated circuits. The scalability of such principles and the changing atomistic processes which contribute to them presents a vitally important field of research. Beginning with the direct observation of dislocations and lattice planes in the 1950s, the transmission electron microscope has been a powerful tool in materials science. More recently, as nanoscale technologies have proliferated modern life, their unique ability to spatially resolve nano- and atomic-scale structures has become a critical component of materials research and characterization. Signals produced by an incident beam of high-energy electrons enables researchers to both image and chemically analyze materials at the atomic scale. Coherently and elastically-scattered electrons can be collected to produce atomic-scale images of a crystalline sample. New specimen stages have enabled routine investigation of samples heated up to 1000 °C and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. MEMS-based transducers allow for sub-nm scale mechanical testing and ultrathin membranes allow study of liquids and gases. Investigation of a myriad of previously "unseeable" processes can now be observed within the TEM, and sometimes something new is found within the old. High-temperature annealing of pure a Si:H films leads to crystallization of the film. Such films provide higher carrier mobility compared to amorphous films, offering improved

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of the four larval instars of the Dengue fever vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schaper

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the main insect vector of Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome and represents the only vulnerable element in the control of this disease. Therefore, the identification and quantification of this mosquito is an important task; however, the majority of taxonomic keys are based on the 4th larval instar. For that reason, this study describes the four larval instars of A. aegypti using scanning electron microscopy. Morphological changes during larval development were observed at the pecten, comb scales and the ventral brush of the abdominal segment X; however, the 3rd and 4th instars showed similar structures with only a slight variation. The structures described in this study will be helpful in the identification of the four instars of A. aegypti, a fundamental task for comprehending the natural history of dengue mainly in new territories affected. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (3: 847-852. Epub 2006 Sept. 29.Aedes aegypti es el principal insecto vector de la fiebre del dengue y del dengue hemorrágico/síndrome del choque por dengue y es el único elemento atacable para el control de esta virosis. La identificación y cuantificación de éste es una tarea importante; no obstante, la mayoría de las llaves taxonómicas se basan en el cuarto estadio larval. Por esta razón, en este trabajo se describen los cuatro estadios larvales de A. aegypti los cuales fueron examinados mediante microscopia electrónica de rastreo. Los cambios morfológicos ocurridos durante el desarrollo larval fueron observados en el pecten, las escamas del peine, el cepillo ventral del décimo segmento. El 3ero y 4to estadios larvales mostraron estructuras similares con sólo ligeras variaciones. Las estructuras descritas en este artículo permiten identificar cualquiera de los cuatro estadios larvales de A. aegypti, lo cual representa una tarea importante en la comprensión de la historia natural del dengue en los nuevos territorios afectados.

  13. Laser Fenestration of Aortic Stent-Grafts Followed by Noncompliant vs Cutting Balloon Dilation: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Parikh, Niraj; Udgiri, Naval; Wang, Shaoxia; Miller, Daniel F; Li, Chaojing; Panneton, Jean; Nutley, Mark; Zhang, Ze; Huang, Yunfan; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Jingyi; Wang, Lu; Guidoin, Robert

    2018-06-01

    To examine the effects of in situ laser fenestration and subsequent balloon dilation (noncompliant vs cutting) on the graft fabric of 4 aortic stent-graft models. In an in vitro setup, the Zenith TX2, Talent, Endurant, and Anaconda aortic stent-grafts (all made of polyester graft material) were subjected to laser fenestration with a 2.3-mm-diameter probe at low and high energy in a physiologic saline solution followed by balloon dilation of the hole. For the first series of tests, 6-mm-diameter noncompliant balloons were used and replaced for the second series by 6-mm-diameter cutting balloons. Each procedure was performed 5 times (5 fenestrations per balloon type). The fenestrations were examined visually and with light and scanning electron microscopy. Each fenestration demonstrated various degrees of fraying and/or tearing regardless of the device. The monofilament twill weave of the Talent endograft tore in the warp direction up to 7.09±0.46 mm at high energy compared with 2.41±0.26 mm for the Endurant multifilament device. The fenestrations of the 3 endografts with multifilament weave (Zenith, Anaconda, and Endurant) showed more fraying; fenestration areas in the multifilament Endurant were >10 mm 2 at low and high energy. The fenestrations were free of melted fibers, but minor blackening of the filaments was observed in all devices. Overall, the cutting balloons resulted in worse tearing and damage. Of note, the edges of the dilated laser-formed fenestrations of the Talent and the Endurant grafts demonstrated evidence of additional shredded yarns. In situ fenestration does not cause any melting of the polyester; however, the observed structural damage to the fabric construction must be carefully considered. Cutting balloons caused various levels of tearing compared to the noncompliant balloons and cannot be recommended for use in this application. Rather, noncompliant balloons should be employed, but only with endografts constructed from multifilament yarns

  14. Laser ablation ICPMS study of trace element chemistry in molybdenite coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - An important tool for identification of different types of mineralization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pašava, J.; Svojtka, Martin; Veselovský, F.; Ďurišová, Jana; Ackerman, Lukáš; Pour, O.; Drábek, M.; Halodová, P.; Haluzová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2016), s. 874-895 ISSN 0169-1368 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : molybdenite * trace-element geochemistry * Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass * spectrometry * scanning electron microscopy * nano- to micro-inclusions * Bohemian Massif * Uzbekistan Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.095, year: 2016

  15. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically tunneling current

  16. Vacuum scanning capillary photoemission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseyev, S A; Cherkun, A P; Mironov, B N; Petrunin, V V; Chekalin, S V

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of a conical capillary in a scanning probe microscopy for surface analysis. The probe can measure photoemission from a substrate by transmitting photoelectrons along the capillary as a function of probe position. The technique is demonstrated on a model substrate consisting of a gold reflecting layer on a compact disc which has been illuminated by an unfocused laser beam with a wavelength 400nm, from a femtosecond laser with a beam size of 4mm. A quartz capillary with a 2-µm aperture has been used in the experiments. The period of gold microstructure, shown to be 1.6µ, was measured by the conical probe operating in shear force mode. In shear force regime, the dielectric capillary has been used as a "classical" SPM tip, which provided images reflecting the surface topology. In a photoelectron regime photoelectrons passed through hollow tip and entered a detector. The spatial distribution of the recorded photoelectrons consisted of periodic mountain-valley strips, resembling the surface profile of the sample. Submicron spatial resolution has been achieved. This approach paves the way to study pulsed photodesorption of large organic molecular ions with high spatial and element resolution using the combination of a hollow-tip scanner with time-of-flight technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D.; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We present STEMsalabim, a modern implementation of the multislice algorithm for simulation of STEM images. • Our package is highly parallelizable on high-performance computing clusters, combining shared and distributed memory architectures. • With STEMsalabim, computationally and memory expensive STEM image simulations can be carried out within reasonable time. - Abstract: We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space.

  18. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver, E-mail: jan.oliver.oelerich@physik.uni-marburg.de; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D.; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We present STEMsalabim, a modern implementation of the multislice algorithm for simulation of STEM images. • Our package is highly parallelizable on high-performance computing clusters, combining shared and distributed memory architectures. • With STEMsalabim, computationally and memory expensive STEM image simulations can be carried out within reasonable time. - Abstract: We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space.

  19. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2018-02-26

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current–Voltage (I–V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of ~10 kΩ. It was found that I–V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I–V cycles until reproducible I–V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I–V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler–Nordheim (F–N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F–N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.Graphical Abstract

  20. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant V.

    2018-03-01

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of 10 kΩ. It was found that I-V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I-V cycles until reproducible I-V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I-V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F-N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.

  1. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  2. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  3. Characterization of oxidation protection coatings for high temperature applications by means of nanoindentation and scanning electron microscopy methods; Charakterisierung von Oxidationsschutzschichten fuer Hochtemperaturanwendungen mittels Nanoindentierung und rasterelektronenmikroskopischen Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webler, R.; Neumeier, S.; Goeken, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften

    2014-10-01

    Oxidation protection coatings are required for thermally highly stressed components such as turbine blades in aircraft engines. Cyclic oxidation experiments were performed on a NiCoCrAlY protective coating of a nickel-based superalloy and hardness and modulus of elasticity (mechanical properties) were determined by nanoindentation before and after the experiments. Microstructure and chemical composition were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy. Here, the focus is on the phase identification by combining electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Findings indicate that the chemical composition strongly influences the mechanical properties.

  4. A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Hans Ulrik; Thomsen, J.S.; Hougen, Hans Petter

    1999-01-01

    To determine the possibility for adaptive growth in human condyles, quantifying the thickness of fibrocartilage and the constitution of cells with potential activity, the trabecular bone volume, and the structural parameter: marrow space star volume in a larger sample of human autopsy condyles....... EXPERIMENTAL SETTING AND DESIGN: A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopic analysis of cartilage characteristics and bone remodelling activity. The Departments of Orthodontics and Cell Biology at Aarhus University, Denmark. An autopsy sample of condyles from 20 individuals, 18-31 years of age...

  5. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Marcelo E.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo; Kremer, German; Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simón; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos; Munoz, Raul C.

    2012-01-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, δ and the lateral correlation length, ξ corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using (δ, ξ) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low temperatures.

  6. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules

  7. External morphology of sensory structures of fourth instar larvae of neotropical species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae under scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessoa Felipe Arley Costa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, some morphological structures of antennae, maxillary palps and caudal setae of fourth instar larvae of laboratory-reared phlebotomine sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis, L. migonei, L. evandroi, L. lenti, L. sericea, L. whitmani and L. intermedia of the State of Ceará, Brazil, were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The antennal structures exhibited considerable variation in the morphology and position. A prominent digitiform distal segment has been observed only on the antenna of species of the subgenus Nyssomyia. The taxonomic relevance of this and other antennal structure is discussed. The papiliform structures found in the maxillae and the porous structures of the caudal setae of all species examined may have chemosensory function. Further studies with transmission electron microscopy are needed to better understand the physiological function of these external structures.

  8. Scanning Capacitance Microscopy | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    obtained using scanning capacitance microscopy. Top Right: Image of p-type and n-type material, obtained 'fingers' of light-colored n-type material on a yellow and blue background representing p-type material material, obtained using scanning capacitance microscopy, in a sample semiconductor device; the image shows

  9. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium

  10. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium.

  11. Investigation of secondary hardening in Co–35Ni–20Cr–10Mo alloy using analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, D.; Li, B.Q.; Gerberich, W.W.; Mkhoyan, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of secondary hardening in MP35N (Co–35Ni–20Cr–10Mo) alloy due to exposures at elevated temperatures has been studied. It was observed that short exposure to elevated temperatures increased the ultimate tensile strength and yield stress while decreasing the elongation of MP35N wires. Upon aging at temperatures from 300 to 900 °C the elastic modulus increased although no changes in crystallographic orientation or microstructure were observed. The grain size and major texture components were unchanged following aging. Analytical scanning transmission electron microscope investigation showed that MP35N is hardened by preferential segregation of molybdenum to stacking faults and deformation twins. It also revealed that the concentration of molybdenum segregation was proportional to the amount of initial cold work before aging

  12. 3D printing scanning electron microscopy sample holders: A quick and cost effective alternative for custom holder fabrication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel N Meloni

    Full Text Available A simple and cost effective alternative for fabricating custom Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM sample holders using 3D printers and conductive polylactic acid filament is presented. The flexibility of the 3D printing process allowed for the fabrication of sample holders with specific features that enable the high-resolution imaging of nanoelectrodes and nanopipettes. The precise value of the inner semi cone angle of the nanopipettes taper was extracted from the acquired images and used for calculating their radius using electrochemical methods. Because of the low electrical resistivity presented by the 3D printed holder, the imaging of non-conductive nanomaterials, such as alumina powder, was found to be possible. The fabrication time for each sample holder was under 30 minutes and the average cost was less than $0.50 per piece. Despite being quick and economical to fabricate, the sample holders were found to be sufficiently resistant, allowing for multiple uses of the same holder.

  13. Three-dimensional characterization of pigment dispersion in dried paint films using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jui-Ching; Heeschen, William; Reffner, John; Hook, John

    2012-04-01

    The combination of integrated focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) serial sectioning and imaging techniques with image analysis provided quantitative characterization of three-dimensional (3D) pigment dispersion in dried paint films. The focused ion beam in a FIB-SEM dual beam system enables great control in slicing paints, and the sectioning process can be synchronized with SEM imaging providing high quality serial cross-section images for 3D reconstruction. Application of Euclidean distance map and ultimate eroded points image analysis methods can provide quantitative characterization of 3D particle distribution. It is concluded that 3D measurement of binder distribution in paints is effective to characterize the order of pigment dispersion in dried paint films.

  14. Immobilization, hybridization, and oxidation of synthetic DNA on gold surface: Electron transfer investigated by electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Gerald D.; Chen Fan [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States); Zhou Anhong, E-mail: Anhong.Zhou@usu.edu [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States)

    2009-06-08

    Fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer (ET) among electrolyte/DNA/solid-surface will facilitate the design for electrical detection of DNA molecules. In this report, the electron transfer characteristics of synthetic DNA (sequence from pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum) self-assembled on a gold surface was electrochemically studied. The effects of immobilization order on the interface ET related parameters such as diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), surface coverage ({theta}{sub R}), and monolayer thickness (d{sub i}) were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). DNA surface density ({Gamma}{sub DNA}) was determined by the integration of the charge of the electro-oxidation current peaks during the initial cyclic voltammetry scans. It was found that the DNA surface densities at different modifications followed the order: {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (MCH/dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/MCH/Au). It was also revealed that the electro-oxidation of the DNA modified gold surface would involve the oxidation of nucleotides (guanine and adenine) with a 5.51 electron transfer mechanism and the oxidative desorption of DNA and MCH molecules by a 3 electron transfer mechanism. STM topography and current image analysis indicated that the surface conductivity after each surface modification followed the order: dsS-DNA/Au < MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < Hoechst/oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au. The results from this study suggested a combination of variations in immobilization order may provide an alternative approach for the optimization of DNA hybridization and the further development for electrical detection of DNA.

  15. Correlative two-photon and serial block face scanning electron microscopy in neuronal tissue using 3D near-infrared branding maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Robert M; Peddie, Christopher J; Collinson, Lucy M; Ashby, Michael C; Verkade, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Linking cellular structure and function has always been a key goal of microscopy, but obtaining high resolution spatial and temporal information from the same specimen is a fundamental challenge. Two-photon (2P) microscopy allows imaging deep inside intact tissue, bringing great insight into the structural and functional dynamics of cells in their physiological environment. At the nanoscale, the complex ultrastructure of a cell's environment in tissue can be reconstructed in three dimensions (3D) using serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). This provides a snapshot of high resolution structural information pertaining to the shape, organization, and localization of multiple subcellular structures at the same time. The pairing of these two imaging modalities in the same specimen provides key information to relate cellular dynamics to the ultrastructural environment. Until recently, approaches to relocate a region of interest (ROI) in tissue from 2P microscopy for SBF-SEM have been inefficient or unreliable. However, near-infrared branding (NIRB) overcomes this by using the laser from a multiphoton microscope to create fiducial markers for accurate correlation of 2P and electron microscopy (EM) imaging volumes. The process is quick and can be user defined for each sample. Here, to increase the efficiency of ROI relocation, multiple NIRB marks are used in 3D to target ultramicrotomy. A workflow is described and discussed to obtain a data set for 3D correlated light and electron microscopy, using three different preparations of brain tissue as examples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies of the chorion, plasma membrane and syncytial layers of the gastrula-stage embryo of the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio : a consideration of the structural and functional relationships with respect to cryoprotectant penetration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawson, DM; Zhang, T; Kalicharan, D; Jongebloed, WL

    The structure of the chorion and plasma membranes of gastrula-stage zebrafish Brachydanio rerio embryos were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These studies confirm the outer chorion membrane complex to be 1.5-2.5 mu m in

  17. Electron microscopy in metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loretto, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review briefly the contribution which (TEM) transmission electron microscopy (including high voltage electron microscopy (HVEM)) has made to metallurgy. Since it is straightforward with modern electron microscopes to extract the crystallographic information which provides the basis for any interpretation, the major problem in most metallurgical work lies in assessing how the structure (which TEM has characterised) has arisen and which properties of the specimen can be understood in terms of this structure. Radiation damage, quenching, phase transformations, grain boundaries and plastic deformation have been the main fields in which TEM has contributed significantly. After briefly summarising the role of TEM in each field, examples of recent work will be used to indicate current TEM activity in physical metallurgy. (author)

  18. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levrini L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Luca Levrini, Francesca Novara, Silvia Margherini, Camilla Tenconi, Mario Raspanti Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, Dental Hygiene School, Research Centre Cranio Facial Disease and Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy Background: Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Methods: Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1 running water (control condition; 2 effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3 brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste. At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Results: The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. Conclusion: On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental

  19. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  20. Towards the low-dose characterization of beam sensitive nanostructures via implementation of sparse image acquisition in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sunghwan; Han, Chang Wan; Ortalan, Volkan; Venkatakrishnan, Singanallur V; Bouman, Charles A

    2017-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been successfully utilized to investigate atomic structure and chemistry of materials with atomic resolution. However, STEM’s focused electron probe with a high current density causes the electron beam damages including radiolysis and knock-on damage when the focused probe is exposed onto the electron-beam sensitive materials. Therefore, it is highly desirable to decrease the electron dose used in STEM for the investigation of biological/organic molecules, soft materials and nanomaterials in general. With the recent emergence of novel sparse signal processing theories, such as compressive sensing and model-based iterative reconstruction, possibilities of operating STEM under a sparse acquisition scheme to reduce the electron dose have been opened up. In this paper, we report our recent approach to implement a sparse acquisition in STEM mode executed by a random sparse-scan and a signal processing algorithm called model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). In this method, a small portion, such as 5% of randomly chosen unit sampling areas (i.e. electron probe positions), which corresponds to pixels of a STEM image, within the region of interest (ROI) of the specimen are scanned with an electron probe to obtain a sparse image. Sparse images are then reconstructed using the MBIR inpainting algorithm to produce an image of the specimen at the original resolution that is consistent with an image obtained using conventional scanning methods. Experimental results for down to 5% sampling show consistency with the full STEM image acquired by the conventional scanning method. Although, practical limitations of the conventional STEM instruments, such as internal delays of the STEM control electronics and the continuous electron gun emission, currently hinder to achieve the full potential of the sparse acquisition STEM in realizing the low dose imaging condition required for the investigation of beam-sensitive materials

  1. Pleomorphism and Viability of the Lyme Disease Pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi Exposed to Physiological Stress Conditions: A Correlative Cryo-Fluorescence and Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vancová, Marie; Rudenko, Natalia; Vaněček, Jiří; Golovchenko, Maryna; Strnad, Martin; Rego, Ryan O. M.; Tichá, Lucie; Grubhoffer, Libor; Nebesářová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, 11 April (2017), č. článku 596. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 - ANTIGONE Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cryo-fluorescence * cryo-scanning electron microscopy * Borrelia burgdorferi * Lyme disease * round body * pleomorphism * viability staining Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  2. Analysis of shape and spatial interaction of synaptic vesicles using data from focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanmohammadi, Mahdieh; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge; Sporring, Jon

    2015-01-01

    deviations from spherical shape and systematic trends in their orientation. We studied three-dimensional representations of synapses obtained by manual annotation of focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) images of male mouse brain. The configurations of synaptic vesicles were regarded...... in excitatory synapses appeared to be of oblate ellipsoid shape and in inhibitory synapses appeared to be of cigar ellipsoid shape, and followed a systematic pattern regarding their orientation towards the active zone. Moreover, there was strong evidence of spatial alignment in the orientations of pairs...

  3. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  5. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  6. Study of non stoichiometric pure and Zr-Doped yttria surfaces by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, M.; Duraud, J.P.; Jollet, F.; Thromat, N.; Maire, P.; Le Gressus, C.

    1988-01-01

    Surfaces of oxygen-deficient yttrium oxide, pure or Zr-doped, have been studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The bulk local geometric structure of these non-stoichiometric compounds was previously determined around the Y atom by an EXAFS (Extended X-ray absorption fine structure) study. The local electronic structure around both Y and O, at the surface, was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The partial transfer of the electronic distribution between the anion and the cation was probed using the Auger parameter. Coupling of these experiments with microscopic observations show that: - In the pure oxygen-deficient sample, the concentration of oxygen vacancies appears to be increased at the grain boundaries. - The Auger parameter shows upon reduction an evolution of the Y-O bond towards a more covalent one, this evolution being modulated with the presence of Zr0 2

  7. Dark-field image contrast in transmission scanning electron microscopy: Effects of substrate thickness and detector collection angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor, E-mail: tjwoehl@umd.edu; Keller, Robert

    2016-12-15

    An annular dark field (ADF) detector was placed beneath a specimen in a field emission scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV to calibrate detector response to incident beam current, and to create transmission images of gold nanoparticles on silicon nitride (SiN) substrates of various thicknesses. Based on the linear response of the ADF detector diodes to beam current, we developed a method that allowed for direct determination of the percentage of that beam current forward scattered to the ADF detector from the sample, i.e. the transmitted electron (TE) yield. Collection angles for the ADF detector region were defined using a masking aperture above the detector and were systematically varied by changing the sample to detector distance. We found the contrast of the nanoparticles, relative to the SiN substrate, decreased monotonically with decreasing inner exclusion angle and increasing substrate thickness. We also performed Monte Carlo electron scattering simulations, which showed quantitative agreement with experimental contrast associated with the nanoparticles. Together, the experiments and Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the decrease in contrast with decreasing inner exclusion angle was due to a rapid increase in the TE yield of the low atomic number substrate. Nanoparticles imaged at low inner exclusion angles (<150 mrad) and on thick substrates (>50 nm) showed low image contrast in their centers surrounded by a bright high-contrast halo on their edges. This complex image contrast was predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, which we interpreted in terms of mixing of the nominally bright field (BF) and ADF electron signals. Our systematic investigation of inner exclusion angle and substrate thickness effects on ADF t-SEM imaging provides fundamental understanding of the contrast mechanisms for image formation, which in turn suggest practical limitations and optimal imaging conditions for different substrate thicknesses. - Highlights: • Developed a

  8. Scanning vector Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Bending, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scanning vector Hall probe microscope for mapping magnetic field vector over magnetic samples. The microscope is based on a micromachined Hall sensor and the cryostat with scanning system. The vector Hall sensor active area is ∼5x5 μm 2 . It is realized by patterning three Hall probes on the tilted faces of GaAs pyramids. Data from these 'tilted' Hall probes are used to reconstruct the full magnetic field vector. The scanning area of the microscope is 5x5 mm 2 , space resolution 2.5 μm, field resolution ∼1 μT Hz -1/2 at temperatures 10-300 K

  9. Scanning probe microscopy competency development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M.E.; Reagor, D.W.; Jia, Quan Xi [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project collaborators developed an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) capability, integrated it with existing scanning probe microscopes, and developed new, advanced air-based scanning force techniques (SPMs). Programmatic, basic, and industrially related laboratory research requires the existence of SPMs, as well as expertise capable of providing local nano-scale information. The UHV-STM capability, equipped with load-lock system and several surface science techniques, will allow introduction, examination, and reaction of surfaces prepared under well-controlled vacuum conditions, including the examination of morphology and local bonding associated with the initial stages of film growth under controlled growth conditions. The resulting capabilities will enable the authors to respond to a variety of problems requiring local characterization of conducting and nonconducting surfaces in liquids, air, and UHV.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of marginal adaptation of composite resines to enamel after using of standard and gradual photopolimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dačić Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bonding between composite and hard dental tissue is most commonly assessed by measuring bonding strength or absence of marginal gap along the restoration interface. Marginal index (MI is a significant indicator of the efficiency of the bond between material and dental tissue because it also shows the values of width and length of marginal gap. Objective. The aim of this investigation was to estimate quantitative and qualitative features of the bond between composite resin and enamel and to determine the values of MI in enamel after application of two techniques of photopolymerization with two composite systems. Methods. Forty Class V cavities on extracted teeth were prepared and restored for scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis of composite bonding to enamel. Adhesion to enamel was achieved by Adper Single Bond 2 - ASB (3M ESPE, or by Adper Easy One - AEO (3M ESPE. Photopolymerization of Filtek Ultimate - FU (3M ESPE was performed using constant halogen light (HIP or soft start program (SOF. Results. Quantitative and qualitative analysis, showed better mikromorphological bonding with SOF photopolymerization and ASB/FU composite system. Differences in MI between different photopolymerization techniques (HIP: 0.6707; SOF: 0.2395 were statistically significant (p<0.001, as well as differences between the composite systems (ASB/FU: 0.0470; AEO/ FU: 0.8651 (p<0.001 by two-way ANOVA test. Conclusion. Better marginal adaptation of composite to enamel was obtained with SOF photopolymerization in both composite systems.

  11. Photogrammetry of the three-dimensional shape and texture of a nanoscale particle using scanning electron microscopy and free software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Schierholz, Roland; Yu, Shicheng; Cintas, Jesús; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2016-01-01

    We apply photogrammetry in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the three-dimensional shape and surface texture of a nanoscale LiTi_2(PO_4)_3 particle. We highlight the fact that the technique can be applied non-invasively in any SEM using free software (freeware) and does not require special sample preparation. Three-dimensional information is obtained in the form of a surface mesh, with the texture of the sample stored as a separate two-dimensional image (referred to as a UV Map). The mesh can be used to measure parameters such as surface area, volume, moment of inertia and center of mass, while the UV map can be used to study the surface texture using conventional image processing techniques. We also illustrate the use of 3D printing to visualize the reconstructed model. - Highlights: • 3D shape and surface texture of a nanoscale LiTi_2(PO_4)_3 particle. • The technique can be applied non-invasively in any SEM using freeware software. • The mesh can be used to measure parameters such as surface area, volume, moment of inertia and center of mass. • The UV map can be processed using 2D image processing software.

  12. Photogrammetry of the three-dimensional shape and texture of a nanoscale particle using scanning electron microscopy and free software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontard, Lionel C., E-mail: lionelcg@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11510 (Spain); Faico PCT Cartuja. Edif. TI Marie Curie, C/ Leonardo da Vinci 18, 4a Planta, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Schierholz, Roland; Yu, Shicheng [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Fundamental Electrochemistry (IEK-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Cintas, Jesús [Servicio de Microscopía Centro de Investigación, Tecnología e Innovación (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    We apply photogrammetry in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the three-dimensional shape and surface texture of a nanoscale LiTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} particle. We highlight the fact that the technique can be applied non-invasively in any SEM using free software (freeware) and does not require special sample preparation. Three-dimensional information is obtained in the form of a surface mesh, with the texture of the sample stored as a separate two-dimensional image (referred to as a UV Map). The mesh can be used to measure parameters such as surface area, volume, moment of inertia and center of mass, while the UV map can be used to study the surface texture using conventional image processing techniques. We also illustrate the use of 3D printing to visualize the reconstructed model. - Highlights: • 3D shape and surface texture of a nanoscale LiTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} particle. • The technique can be applied non-invasively in any SEM using freeware software. • The mesh can be used to measure parameters such as surface area, volume, moment of inertia and center of mass. • The UV map can be processed using 2D image processing software.

  13. Ultrastructural analysis of oral exfoliated epithelial cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers: A scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sameera Shamim; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Kamboj, Mala

    2016-01-01

    The study was undertaken to correlate epithelial surface pattern changes of oral exfoliated cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers and also to compare them with patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy individuals. In this cross-sectional study, a total of fifty persons were included in the study, out of which thirty formed the study group (15 each tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers) and twenty formed the control group (ten each of OSCC patients - positive control and ten normal buccal mucosa - negative control). Their oral exfoliated cells were scraped, fixed, and studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The statistical analysis was determined using ANOVA, Tukey honestly significant difference, Chi-square test, and statistical SPASS software, P betel nut chewers compared to normal oral mucosa have been tabulated. In normal oral mucosa, cell surface morphology depends on the state of keratinization of the tissue. Thus, it could prove helpful in detecting any carcinomatous change at its incipient stage and also give an insight into the ultra-structural details of cellular differentiations in epithelial tissues.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of highly complex microscopic samples using scanning electron microscopy and optical flow estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Baghaie

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM as one of the major research and industrial equipment for imaging of micro-scale samples and surfaces has gained extensive attention from its emerge. However, the acquired micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D. In the current work a novel and highly accurate approach is proposed to recover the hidden third-dimension by use of multi-view image acquisition of the microscopic samples combined with pre/post-processing steps including sparse feature-based stereo rectification, nonlocal-based optical flow estimation for dense matching and finally depth estimation. Employing the proposed approach, three-dimensional (3D reconstructions of highly complex microscopic samples were achieved to facilitate the interpretation of topology and geometry of surface/shape attributes of the samples. As a byproduct of the proposed approach, high-definition 3D printed models of the samples can be generated as a tangible means of physical understanding. Extensive comparisons with the state-of-the-art reveal the strength and superiority of the proposed method in uncovering the details of the highly complex microscopic samples.

  15. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  16. Serial section scanning electron microscopy (S3EM) on silicon wafers for ultra-structural volume imaging of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Heinz; Körber, Christoph; Sätzler, Kurt; Aydin, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High resolution, three-dimensional (3D) representations of cellular ultrastructure are essential for structure function studies in all areas of cell biology. While limited subcellular volumes have been routinely examined using serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM), complete ultrastructural reconstructions of large volumes, entire cells or even tissue are difficult to achieve using ssTEM. Here, we introduce a novel approach combining serial sectioning of tissue with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a conductive silicon wafer as a support. Ribbons containing hundreds of 35 nm thick sections can be generated and imaged on the wafer at a lateral pixel resolution of 3.7 nm by recording the backscattered electrons with the in-lens detector of the SEM. The resulting electron micrographs are qualitatively comparable to those obtained by conventional TEM. S(3)EM images of the same region of interest in consecutive sections can be used for 3D reconstructions of large structures. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by reconstructing a 31.7 µm(3) volume of a calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. The approach introduced here, Serial Section SEM (S(3)EM), for the first time provides the possibility to obtain 3D ultrastructure of large volumes with high resolution and to selectively and repetitively home in on structures of interest. S(3)EM accelerates process duration, is amenable to full automation and can be implemented with standard instrumentation.

  17. Serial section scanning electron microscopy (S3EM on silicon wafers for ultra-structural volume imaging of cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Horstmann

    Full Text Available High resolution, three-dimensional (3D representations of cellular ultrastructure are essential for structure function studies in all areas of cell biology. While limited subcellular volumes have been routinely examined using serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM, complete ultrastructural reconstructions of large volumes, entire cells or even tissue are difficult to achieve using ssTEM. Here, we introduce a novel approach combining serial sectioning of tissue with scanning electron microscopy (SEM using a conductive silicon wafer as a support. Ribbons containing hundreds of 35 nm thick sections can be generated and imaged on the wafer at a lateral pixel resolution of 3.7 nm by recording the backscattered electrons with the in-lens detector of the SEM. The resulting electron micrographs are qualitatively comparable to those obtained by conventional TEM. S(3EM images of the same region of interest in consecutive sections can be used for 3D reconstructions of large structures. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by reconstructing a 31.7 µm(3 volume of a calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. The approach introduced here, Serial Section SEM (S(3EM, for the first time provides the possibility to obtain 3D ultrastructure of large volumes with high resolution and to selectively and repetitively home in on structures of interest. S(3EM accelerates process duration, is amenable to full automation and can be implemented with standard instrumentation.

  18. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giulia M R; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Brandt, Rick A J; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H C; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required.

  19. Qualitative and Quantitative Characterization of Porosity in a Low Porous and Low Permeable Organic Rich Shale by Combining Broad Ion Beam and Scanning Electron Microscopy (BIB-SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaver, Jop; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the characterization of porosity in low porous shale using a broad ion beam (BIB) polishing technique combined with a conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Porosity was traced in certain representative elementary areas (REA) and pores detected are segmented from mosaics of secondary electron (SE) images. Traced pores could be classified into two major pore-size classes. Relative large pores (> 0.5 μm 2 ) were found in the organic matter and matrix. They contribute strongly to the overall porosity con-tent of the shale. Nevertheless the far majority of the pores traced have equivalent radius less than 400 nm. Including the latter pore class, the imaged porosity from both samples gives similar results in the order of < 1 %. (authors)

  20. Exceptional case of bone resorption in an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiazza, S.; Falcinelli, G.; Pintucci, S.

    1990-01-01

    This article reports the findings of investigations on an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis in an eye that was enucleated owing to severe complications 12 years after implantation. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed extensive resorption of the bone that was used as a supporting element in the kind of transcorneal prosthesis developed by Strampelli. The destructive process, in addition to surgical trauma, has been associated with the early and recurrent bacterial infections relating to the presence of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The need to control the occurrence of primary bacterial infections in traumatized tissues during operations as well as further infectious situations, given the enhanced antibiotic-resistence of bacteria, is emphasized

  1. Exceptional case of bone resorption in an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiazza, S.; Falcinelli, G.; Pintucci, S. (Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    This article reports the findings of investigations on an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis in an eye that was enucleated owing to severe complications 12 years after implantation. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed extensive resorption of the bone that was used as a supporting element in the kind of transcorneal prosthesis developed by Strampelli. The destructive process, in addition to surgical trauma, has been associated with the early and recurrent bacterial infections relating to the presence of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The need to control the occurrence of primary bacterial infections in traumatized tissues during operations as well as further infectious situations, given the enhanced antibiotic-resistence of bacteria, is emphasized.

  2. Evaluation of chemical and/or mechanical treatments of the smear layer as revealed by scanning electron microscopy - a blind comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUZ Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A blind comparative study of chemical and/or mechanical treatments of the smear layer, according to scanning electron microscopy images, was carried out. The effect of the treatments was analyzed on the smear layer of mesio-occlusodistal cavity walls prepared in vitro in human third molars. The agents used were air/water spray, 37% phosphoric acid, 5% tannic acid, biologic detergent, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, and enamel hatchet alone or in association with the previous agents. Electron micrographs were evaluated by three professionals according to the degree of visualization of underlying dentin or enamel. Phosphoric acid received the highest scores due to the complete removal of the smear layer. However, statistical analyses revealed diverse performances of non or slightly demineralizing agents, according to the cavity walls in dentin, while there was equivalent effect on the enamel of gingival walls.

  3. Magnetism in grain-boundary phase of a NdFeB sintered magnet studied by spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohashi, Teruo, E-mail: teruo.kohashi.fc@hitachi.com; Motai, Kumi [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan); Nishiuchi, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Satoshi [Magnetic Materials Research Laboratory, Hitachi Metals Ltd., Osaka 618-0013 (Japan)

    2014-06-09

    The magnetism in the grain-boundary phase of a NdFeB sintered magnet was measured by spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM). A sample magnet was fractured in the ultra-high-vacuum chamber to avoid oxidation, and its magnetizations in the exposed grain-boundary phase on the fracture surface were evaluated through the spin polarization of secondary electrons. Spin-SEM images were taken as the fracture surface was milled gradually by argon ions, and the magnetization in the grain-boundary phase was quantitatively obtained separately from that of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase. The obtained magnetization shows that the grain-boundary phase of this magnet has substantial magnetization, which was confirmed to be ferromagnetic.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy of hexagonal BN grown on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, H.; Hamada, T.; Endo, T.; Osaka, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The microscopic surface topography of thin BN x films grown on graphite by electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical vapor deposition have been imaged with scanning tunneling microscopy in air. The scanning tunneling microscope has generated images of hexagonal BN with atomic resolution

  5. Cardiac Myocyte Diversity and a Fibroblast Network in the Junctional Region of the Zebrafish Heart Revealed by Transmission and Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lafontant, Pascal J.

    2013-08-23

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart. © 2013 Lafontant et al.

  6. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart.

  7. Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houselt, Arie; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, study, and manipulate solid surfaces on the size scale of atoms. One important limitation of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is, however, its poor time resolution. Recording a standard image with a STM typically takes

  8. Characterization of high Tc materials and devices by electron microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browning, Nigel D; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2000-01-01

    ..., and microanalysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Ensuing chapters examine identi®cation of new superconducting compounds, imaging of superconducting properties by lowtemperature scanning electron microscopy, imaging of vortices by electron holography and electronic structure determination by electron energy loss spectro...

  9. Scanning probe microscopy experiments in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobek, Tanja; Reiter, Michael; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2004-01-01

    The scanning probe microscopy setups are small, lightweight and do not require vacuum or high voltage supply. In addition, samples can be investigated directly without further preparation. Therefore, these techniques are well-suited for applications in space, in particular, for operation on the International Space Station (ISS) or for high resolution microscopy on planetary missions. A feasibility study for a scanning tunneling microscopy setup was carried out on a parabolic flight campaign in November 2001 in order to test the technical setup for microgravity applications. With a pocket-size design microscope, a graphite surface was imaged under ambient conditions. Atomic resolution was achieved although the quality of the images was inferior in comparison to laboratory conditions. Improvements for future scanning probe microscopy experiments in microgravity are suggested

  10. Scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The principle underlying the design of the scanning electron microscope (SEM), the design and functioning of SEM are described. Its applications in the areas of microcircuitry and materials science are outlined. The development of SEM in India is reviewed. (M.G.B.)

  11. Extremely thin layer plastification for focused-ion beam scanning electron microscopy: an improved method to study cell surfaces and organelles of cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN Donselaar, E G; Dorresteijn, B; Popov-Čeleketić, D; VAN DE Wetering, W J; Verrips, T C; Boekhout, T; Schneijdenberg, C T W M; Xenaki, A T; VAN DER Krift, T P; Müller, W H

    2018-03-25

    Since the recent boost in the usage of electron microscopy in life-science research, there is a great need for new methods. Recently minimal resin embedding methods have been successfully introduced in the sample preparation for focused-ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). In these methods several possibilities are given to remove as much resin as possible from the surface of cultured cells or multicellular organisms. Here we introduce an alternative way in the minimal resin embedding method to remove excess of resin from two widely different cell types by the use of Mascotte filter paper. Our goal in correlative light and electron microscopic studies of immunogold-labelled breast cancer SKBR3 cells was to visualise gold-labelled HER2 plasma membrane proteins as well as the intracellular structures of flat and round cells. We found a significant difference (p flat cell contained 2.46 ± 1.98 gold particles, and a round cell 5.66 ± 2.92 gold particles. Moreover, there was a clear difference in the subcellular organisation of these two cells. The round SKBR3 cell contained many organelles, such as mitochondria, Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum, when compared with flat SKBR3 cells. Our next goal was to visualise crosswall associated organelles, septal pore caps, of Rhizoctonia solani fungal cells by the combined use of a heavy metal staining and our extremely thin layer plastification (ETLP) method. At low magnifications this resulted into easily finding septa which appeared as bright crosswalls in the back-scattered electron mode in the scanning electron microscope. Then, a septum was selected for FIB-SEM. Cross-sectioned views clearly revealed the perforate septal pore cap of R. solani next to other structures, such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, lipid bodies, dolipore septum, and the pore channel. As the ETLP method was applied on two widely different cell types, the use of the ETLP method will be beneficial to correlative studies of other cell

  12. Superconductivity and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, P.W.; Valdre, U.

    1977-01-01

    In this review article, two aspects of the role of superconductivity in electron microscopy are examined: (i) the development of superconducting devices (mainly lenses) and their incorporation in electron microscopes; (ii) the development of electron microscope techniques for studying fundamental and technological problems associated with superconductivity. The first part opens with a brief account of the relevant properties of conventional lenses, after which the various types of superconducting lenses are described and their properties compared. The relative merits and inconveniences of superconducting and conventional lenses are examined, particular attention being paid to the spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients at accelerating voltages above a megavolt. This part closes with a survey of the various microscope designs that have been built or proposed, incorporating superconducting components. In the second part, some methods that have been or might be used in the study of superconductivity in the electron microscope are described. A brief account of the types of application for which they are suitable is given. (author)

  13. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Marta; Ravasenga, Tiziana; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Falqui, Andrea; Marotta, Roberto; Barberis, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABAA Receptors (GABAARs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABAAR clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABAAR clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  14. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Marta

    2017-10-17

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABAA Receptors (GABAARs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABAAR clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABAAR clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  15. The neural elements in the lining of the ventricular-subventricular zone: making an old story new by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Dos Santos Haemmerle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical description of the neural elements that compose the lining of brain ventricles introduces us to the single layer of ependymal cells. However, new findings, especially in the lateral ventricle - the major niche for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain - have provided information about additional cell elements that influence the organization of this part of the ventricular system and produce important contributions to neurogenesis. To complement the cell neurochemistry findings, we present a three-dimensional in situ description that demonstrates the anatomical details of the different types of ciliated cells and the innervation of these elements. After processing adult rat brains for ultrastructural analysis by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we observed a heterogeneous pattern of cilia distribution at the different poles of the lateral ventricle surface. Furthermore, we describe the particular three-dimensional aspects of the ciliated cells of the lateral ventricle, in addition the fiber bundles and varicose axons surrounding these cells. Therefore, we provide a unique ultrastructural description of the three-dimensional in situ organization of the lateral ventricle surface, highlighting its innervation, to corroborate the available neurochemical and functional findings regarding the factors that regulate this neurogenic niche.

  16. In-situ investigation of crack propagation in {gamma}-TiAl alloys using atomic force, focus ion beam and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Farasat; Goeken, Mathias [Lehrstuhl Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Pyczak, Florian [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The present study is focused on crack propagation mechanism in Ti-45Al-1Cr and Ti-45Al-5Nb alloys with lamellar microstructure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile technique to study the crack propagation in-situ. AFM was employed to investigate the local deformations near the crack tip. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supplements the in-situ observations and was used to get a basic understanding of the crack propagation path over larger distances.A focused ion beam (FIB) was used to investigate the structures and deformation traces underneath the surface. It is concluded that the {gamma}/{alpha}2 interfaces act as favorable sites for new interfacial crack nucleation and also for interlamellar crack propagation. Nucleation of new cracks was often preceded by the interaction of deformation twins with interfaces and also by strong shear band activity in the {gamma}-TiAl lamellae visible as significant surface topography in AFM.Mostly the underneath crack path follows the {gamma}/{alpha}2 interface similar to the situation observed at the surface. The local misorientation measured with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) shows {gamma}-lamellae as the region of high deformation as compare to neighboring {alpha}2 -lamellae around the crack tip and its surroundings.

  17. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Marta; Ravasenga, Tiziana; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Falqui, Andrea; Marotta, Roberto; Barberis, Andrea

    2017-10-23

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABA A Receptors (GABA A Rs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABA A R clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABA A R clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  18. Stenostomum cf. leucops (Platyhelminthes in Thailand: a surface observation using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetic analysis based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arin Ngamniyom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stenostomum contains small turbellaria that are widely distributed in freshwater environments worldwide. However, there are only rare reports or studies of this genus from Thailand. Therefore, the objective of this study was to report S. cf. leucops in Thailand collected from Pathum Thani Province. The worm morphology and surface topography using scanning electron microscopy were determined. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree of S. cf. leucops was analysed with 17 flatworms based on the 18S ribosomal DNA sequences. The phylogenetic relationship shared a common ancestry of Catenulida species, and S. cf. leucops displayed a monophyletic pattern within Stenostomum spp. The results of the morphological and molecular data are discussed. These results may increase the knowledge of freshwater microturbellarians in Thailand.

  19. Characterisation of corrosion processes of using electron micro-probe, scanning probe microscopy and synchrotron-generated x-ray fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, A.K.; Cole, I.S.; Furman, S.A.; Isaacs, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: With recent advances in computerized technology, the study of chemical reactions can now be visualized as they occur in real time and has resulted in analytical techniques with orders of magnitude greater sensitivity and resolution. This ability offers the corrosion scientist a unique opportunity to study the processes relevant to degradation science which could only be theoretically considered. Neufeld el al (1,2) have attempted to explain in great detail the mechanism of corrosion initiation of zinc by using X-ray micro-probe, Scanning Kelvin probe, and more recently by using synchrotron-generated X-rays and X-ray fluorescence imaging. New results are presented from the synchrotron studies where the transport of ions in-situ has been investigated. The synthesis of information from the techniques will also be discussed in its relevance to atmospheric corrosion processes. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  20. Direct observation of dislocation dissociation and Suzuki segregation in a Mg–Zn–Y alloy by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhiqing; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Duscher, Gerd; Ma Xiuliang; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal defects in a plastically deformed Mg–Zn–Y alloy have been studied on the atomic scale using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, providing important structural data for understanding the material’s deformation behavior and strengthening mechanisms. Atomic scale structures of deformation stacking faults resulting from dissociation of different types of dislocations have been characterized experimentally, and modeled. Suzuki segregation of Zn and Y along stacking faults formed through dislocation dissociation during plastic deformation at 300 °C is confirmed experimentally on the atomic level. The stacking fault energy of the Mg–Zn–Y alloy is evaluated to be in the range of 4.0–10.3 mJ m −2 . The newly formed nanometer-wide stacking faults with their Zn/Y segregation in Mg grains play an important role in the superior strength of this alloy at elevated temperatures.

  1. Visualising reacting single atoms under controlled conditions: Advances in atomic resolution in situ Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward D.; Gai, Pratibha L.

    2014-02-01

    Advances in atomic resolution Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM) for probing gas-solid catalyst reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions of gas environment and temperature are described. The recent development of the ESTEM extends the capability of the ETEM by providing the direct visualisation of single atoms and the atomic structure of selected solid state heterogeneous catalysts in their working states in real-time. Atomic resolution E(S)TEM provides a deeper understanding of the dynamic atomic processes at the surface of solids and their mechanisms of operation. The benefits of atomic resolution-E(S)TEM to science and technology include new knowledge leading to improved technological processes with substantial economic benefits, improved healthcare, reductions in energy needs and the management of environmental waste generation. xml:lang="fr"

  2. In situ observation of the impact of surface oxidation on the crystallization mechanism of GeTe phase-change thin films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, R.; Bernier, N.; Cooper, D.; Sabbione, C.; Hippert, F.; Noé, P.

    2017-09-01

    The crystallization mechanisms of prototypical GeTe phase-change material thin films have been investigated by in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy annealing experiments. A novel sample preparation method has been developed to improve sample quality and stability during in situ annealing, enabling quantitative analysis and live recording of phase change events. Results show that for an uncapped 100 nm thick GeTe layer, exposure to air after fabrication leads to composition changes which promote heterogeneous nucleation at the oxidized surface. We also demonstrate that protecting the GeTe layer with a 10 nm SiN capping layer prevents nucleation at the surface and allows volume nucleation at a temperature 50 °C higher than the onset of crystallization in the oxidized sample. Our results have important implications regarding the integration of these materials in confined memory cells.

  3. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the tegument of Paranaella luquei Kohn, Baptista-Farias & Cohen, 2000 (Microcotylidae, Monogenea, parasite of a Brazilian catfish, Hypostomus regani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SC Cohen

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The surface topography and ultrastructure of the tegument of Paranaella luquei Kohn, Baptista-Farias & Cohen, 2000, a microcotylid monogenean parasite from the gills of Hypostomus regani (Ihering, 1905 (Loricariidae was studied by scanning (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. By SEM, it was observed that the tegument presents transversal ridges, forming folds in the ventral and dorsal surfaces and microvillous-like tegumental projections in the anterior and median regions of body. These projections were also observed by TEM. The tegument is made up of a syncytium delimited by apical and basal plasma membranes, containing inclusion bodies and mitochondria, connected to the nucleated region by means of cytoplasmatic processes. The tegumental cells present a well developed nucleus and cytoplasm containing inclusion bodies, similar to those found on the external layer, mitochondria, rough endoplasmatic reticulum and free ribossomes.

  4. The influence of C{sub s}/C{sub c} correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, Nestor J., E-mail: zaluzec@microscopy.com

    2015-04-15

    Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (C{sub s}) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (C{sub c}) which augments those accomplishments. In this paper we will review and summarize how the combination of C{sub s}/C{sub c} technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationally mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments.

  5. Nanometer-scale, quantitative composition mappings of InGaN layers from a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, K; Voss, P L; Ougazzaden, A; Patriarche, G; Largeau, L; Mauguin, O; Troadec, D; Gautier, S; Moudakir, T; Suresh, S

    2012-01-01

    Using elastic scattering theory we show that a small set of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements is sufficient to experimentally evaluate the scattering function of electrons in high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission microscopy (HAADF-STEM). We then demonstrate how to use this function to transform qualitative HAADF-STEM images of InGaN layers into precise, quantitative chemical maps of the indium composition. The maps obtained in this way combine the resolution of HAADF-STEM and the chemical precision of EDX. We illustrate the potential of such chemical maps by using them to investigate nanometer-scale fluctuations in the indium composition and their impact on the growth of epitaxial InGaN layers. (paper)

  6. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray dispersive spectrometry evaluation of direct laser metal sintering surface and human bone interface: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Carlo; Piattelli, Adriano; Raspanti, Mario; Mangano, Francesco; Cassoni, Alessandra; Iezzi, Giovanna; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that direct laser metal sintering (DLMS) produces structures with complex geometry and consequently that allow better osteoconductive properties. The aim of this patient report was to evaluate the early bone response to DLMS implant surface retrieved from human jaws. Four experimental DLMS implants were inserted in the posterior mandible of four patients during conventional dental implant surgery. After 8 weeks, the micro-implants and the surrounding tissue were removed and prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histomorphometric analysis to evaluate the bone-implant interface. The SEM and EDX evaluations showed a newly formed tissue composed of calcium and phosphorus. The bone-to-implant contact presented a mean of 60.5 ± 11.6%. Within the limits of this patient report, data suggest that the DLMS surfaces presented a close contact with the human bone after a healing period of 8 weeks.

  7. Electron microscopy (nonbiological)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The period 1982-1985, which is covered by this review, has seen major advances in the capabilities of the commercially available instruments. The new electron microscopes operating in the range of 300-400 keV have provided important improvements in the resolution available and in the possibilities for microanalysis of very small specimen areas. Correspondingly there has been a broadening in the range of possible applications of the techniques. Electron microscopy has become a much more powerful tool for studies of semiconductors and catalysts, for example, and offers promise of a major revolution in surface science. The major industrial laboratories, in particular, are investing in million-dollar instruments and in the highly skilled scientists needed to run them because the capabilities of the new instruments are seen to have immediate practical applications to current industrial research. Unfortunately all of the new instruments and most of the skilled users come from overseas. The American instrument industry, although showing some limited signs of life, is not yet in a position to compete in this lucrative market and the training of electron optics specialists in this country is far from meeting the demand. The increased sophistication required for both the operation of the instruments and the interpretation of the observation requires that the quality as well as the quantity of trainees must be improved. 62 references

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of dental calculus from the great moravian necropolis Znojmo-Hradiště

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fialová, D.; Drozdová, E.; Skoupý, Radim; Mikulík, P.; Klíma, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2017), s. 343-351 ISSN 0323-1119 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : dental calculus * SEM * bacteria * bio-archaeological samples * early Middle Ages * Znojmo-Hradiště Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering

  9. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  10. Scanning tunnel microscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, C.

    1997-09-01

    In this work a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is utilized as a surface sensitive tool for local characterization of internal potential profiles of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. The STM is operated at variable temperatures under ambient conditions, i.e. either in air or in the variable temperature insert of a cryostat. Distinct local differences between current-voltage curves taken on inverted heterostructures, which were patterned by wet chemically etching, are found. The spectroscopic differences can be ascribed to the internal potential profile in the subsurface regions of the sample. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) is applied to study quantum wire regions. It is found that the magnitude of the CITS-current is an indirect measure of edge depletion zones, which are much larger at 4.2 K. Direct measurements of relevant energy levels in quantum structures were obtained by ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM). It is shown that this 3-terminal technique is an excellent tool for transport characterization of minibands formed in semiconductor superlattices. Furthermore, low dimensional electron gases are shown to act as very efficient collector electrodes at low temperatures. For the first time, BEEM experiments were performed at 4.2 K. The enhanced thermal resolution at 4.2 K allows an analysis of the relevant scattering processes. It is found that the collector current is strongly influenced by diffusive scattering at the metal/semiconductor interface. (author)

  11. The distinguishing effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation of different extremely high frequencies on Enterococcus hirae: growth rate inhibition and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovnanyan, K; Kalantaryan, V; Trchounian, A

    2017-09-01

    A low-intensity electromagnetic field of extremely high frequency has inhibitory and stimulatory effects on bacteria, including Enterococcus hirae. It was shown that the low-intensity (the incident power density of 0·06 mW cm -2 ) electromagnetic field at the frequencies of 51·8 GHz and 53 GHz inhibited E. hirae ATCC 9790 bacterial growth rate; a stronger effect was observed with 53 GHz, regardless of exposure duration (0·5 h, 1 h or 2 h). Scanning electron microscopy analysis of these effects has been done; the cells were of spherical shape. Electromagnetic field at 53 GHz, but not 51·8 GHz, changed the cell size-the diameter was enlarged 1·3 fold at 53 GHz. These results suggest the difference in mechanisms of action on bacteria for electromagnetic fields at 51·8 GHz and 53 GHz. A stronger inhibitory effect of low-intensity electromagnetic field on Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 bacterial growth rate was observed with 53 GHz vs 51·8 GHz, regardless of exposure duration. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that almost all irradiated cells in the population have spherical shapes similar to nonirradiated ones, but they have increased diameters in case of irradiated cells at 53 GHz, but not 51·8 GHz. The results are novel, showing distinguishing effects of low-intensity electromagnetic field of different frequencies. They could be applied in treatment of food and different products in medicine and veterinary, where E. hirae plays an important role. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Novara, Francesca; Margherini, Silvia; Tenconi, Camilla; Raspanti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1) running water (control condition); 2) effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3) brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste). At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental hygienists should strongly advise patients wearing orthodontic aligners to clean them using a combination of brushing and commercially available tablets for cleaning oral appliances.

  13. Generación de modelos 3D a partir de imágenes SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy)

    OpenAIRE

    MÍNGUEZ HERNÁNDEZ, MARÍA TERESA

    2017-01-01

    [ES] Con la realización del presente trabajo, se pretenden obtener Modelos Digitales 3D (MD-3D) de imágenes de muy alta resolución obtenidas con un Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido (SEM), utilizando la técnica fotogramétrica Structure from Motion (SfM) mediante el software Agisoft-PhotoScan. El objetivo es comprobar si este tipo de software, que utiliza la técnica SfM, es apto para imágenes obtenidas con equipos SEM y generar Modelos 3D. Esto permitiría poder realizar impr...

  14. Morphological and Chemical Analysis of Impurities in Ice Using the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Runštuk, Jiří; Krausko, J.; Klán, P.; Heger, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S3 (2015), s. 1699-1700 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Ice * ESEM * impurities * morphology Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  15. Scanning electron microscopy and recording of the physiological activity of tracheal ciliated cells treated by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertsson, M.; Hakansson, C.H.; Mecklenburg, C. von

    1983-01-01

    The ciliated epithelium of the rabbit's trachea was irradiated with daily fractions of 2 Gy to an accumulated dose of 20 Gy. The beat frequency of the cilia was recorded and specimens were taken for SEM-, TEM- and LM-investigations. Examination was made 1-10 days after each fractionation schedule. An increased ciliary beat frequency was recorded at 2 Gy and 4 Gy. With increasing dose, there was an inverted relationship to the frequency. Light-microscopy showed edema and an increased amount of goblet cells in relation to the increasing dose. With SEM an increased number of ciliary blebs could be seen. These could be classified according to size and number, and showed a positive correlation to the dose. TEM-investigations showed signs of increased intracellular activity at higher doses in the form of multilobulated nuclei and an increasing number of nuclear pores. At lower doses, an increased amount of mitochondria appeared in the apical part of the cell. It is at present difficult to evaluate any correlation between the physiological activity and the morphology. More biological data are needed to explain the early irradiation effects

  16. Characterization of the ashes from the 2014-2015 Turrialba Volcano eruptions by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucke, Oscar H.; Calderon, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    The Turrialba Volcano is a stratovolcano located approximately 35 km northwest from San Jose, Costa Rica's capital city. A series of eruptions since October 29, 2014 until at least late 2015, has represented the most significant activity of this volcano since the 1860s. A significant volume of ash was dispersed with this eruptions that reached the most populous areas of the country. The characteristics of the ash particles are analyzed in order to establish the nature of the eruptive events that occurred on 2014 and 2015, and to monitor the evolution of the eruptive processes. The analysis was carried out utilizing optical microscopy and stereomicroscopy techniques, as well as novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods that involve imaging and element composition analysis by means of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The evolution of the Turrialba eruptions is showed from phreatic events in 2014, with ashes composed entirely of non-juvenile fragments, to phreatomagmatic events starting on March 12, 2015 with the appearance of a significant fraction of juvenile components in the ash. (author)

  17. Qualitative histologic evaluation of the tissue reaction to the polyurethane resin (ricinus communis - based biopolymer implantation assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Campos Belmonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue reaction of bone tissue accessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM images after polyurethane resin implantation is presented in this study. Twenty four male rabbits were used, divided into two groups of 12 animals each (experimental group and control group in which full-thickness cranial defect was surgically created. At 30 and 90 days post operation 6 animals of each group were euthanized and bone samples were removed for analysis. The microscopic results indicated no inflammatory foreign body reaction, a perfect union between the polymer and surgical bone bed surface, lack of bone resorption and presence of a thin layer of osteogenic material covering the polymer surface in contact with the surgical bone bed. The SEM images demonstrate the porosity of the resin, with diameters from 120 to 500 µm. This important feature of this polymer is associated with its osteoconductivity, allowing the bone growth inside it, improving the integration betwe