WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron level crossings

  1. Determination of deep level capture cross sections in wide band-gap semiconductors by means of an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Roos, O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a general theory for the determination of the short circuit current generated by a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated electron beam in the presence of recombination centers with an arbitrary number of charge states. It is shown that a measurement of the coherent phase shift with respect to the incident beam as a function of the modulation frequency of the beam ascertains the magnitudes of electron and hole capture cross sections. The surface exposed to the electron beam must have a negligible surface recombination velocity for the measurements to be unambiguous.

  2. Electron-phonon interaction effect on the energy levels and diamagnetic susceptibility of quantum wires: Parallelogram and triangle cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.; Bahramiyan, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, optical phonon modes are studied within the framework of dielectric continuum approach for parallelogram and triangular quantum wires, including the derivation of the electron-phonon interaction Hamiltonian and a discussion on the effects of this interaction on the electronic energy levels. The polaronic energy shift is calculated for both ground-state and excited-state electron energy levels by applying the perturbative approach. The effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the expectation value of r2 and diamagnetic susceptibility for both quantum wires are discussed.

  3. Electronic Coherence Provides a Direct Proof for Energy-Level Crossing in Photoexcited Lutein and β-Carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, Evgeny; Müller, Marc G.; Marian, Christel M.; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate femtosecond transient absorption dynamics of lutein and β-carotene. Strong oscillations up to about 400 fs are observed, depending on excitation or detection wavelength and solvent. We propose electronic quantum beats as the origin of these oscillations. They provide direct proof for strong coupling of the 1Bu+ with another electronic “dark” state predicted by quantum chemical calculations to be the 1Bu- state resulting in a crossing within a dynamic relaxation model. The overall dynamics can be described well by an optical Bloch equation approach.

  4. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with the acetylene (HCCH) molecule. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2016.

  5. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi-Young, E-mail: mysong@nfri.re.kr; Yoon, Jung-Sik [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Osikdo-dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyuck [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Itikawa, Yukikazu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Karwasz, Grzegorz P. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Informatics, University Nicolaus Copernicus, Grudziadzka 5, 87100 Toruń (Poland); Kokoouline, Viatcheslav [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Nakamura, Yoshiharu [6-1-5-201 Miyazaki, Miyamae, Kawasaki 216-0033 (Japan); Tennyson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  6. LEVEL CROSSING SAFETY IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kobosil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes safety threats at level crossings according to the different type of security equipment. Initially were explored statistical data, which consist of numbers of level crossings classified by crossing type and numbers of traffic accidents on level crossings. Afterwards paper describes specific problems of each individual level crossing type. Specifically their causation and consequences, which are being discussed between professional and general public. In conclusion paper describes possible solutions to these problems leading to reducing risks at level crossings. At first is mentioned the statistics - number of crossing and number of accidents on the crossing. Then paper describes specific problems, which are discussed in professional and general public. They are also solutions of this problems, which brings another point of view and search the actual causes.

  7. Electron Capture Cross Sections for Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Giannaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first stage of this work, we perform detailed calculations for the cross sections of the electron capture on nuclei under laboratory conditions. Towards this aim we exploit the advantages of a refined version of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA and carry out state-by-state evaluations of the rates of exclusive processes that lead to any of the accessible transitions within the chosen model space. In the second stage of our present study, we translate the abovementioned e--capture cross sections to the stellar environment ones by inserting the temperature dependence through a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution describing the stellar electron gas. As a concrete nuclear target we use the 66Zn isotope, which belongs to the iron group nuclei and plays prominent role in stellar nucleosynthesis at core collapse supernovae environment.

  8. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  9. Electron Elastic-Scattering Cross-Section Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 64 NIST Electron Elastic-Scattering Cross-Section Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of differential elastic-scattering cross sections, corresponding total elastic-scattering cross sections, phase shifts, and transport cross sections for elements with atomic numbers from 1 to 96 and for electron energies between 50 eV and 20,000 eV (in steps of 1 eV).

  10. Large level crossings of a random polynomial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Farahmand

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available We know the expected number of times that a polynomial of degree n with independent random real coefficients asymptotically crosses the level K, when K is any real value such that (K2/n→0 as n→∞. The present paper shows that, when K is allowed to be large, this expected number of crossings reduces to only one. The coefficients of the polynomial are assumed to be normally distributed. It is shown that it is sufficient to let K≥exp(nf where f is any function of n such that f→∞ as n→∞.

  11. Effect of Secondary Electron Emission on Electron Cross-Field Current in E×B Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yevgeny Raitses, Igor D. Kaganovich, Alexander Khrabrov, Dmytro Sydorenko, Nathaniel J. Fisch and Andrei Smolyakov

    2011-02-10

    This paper reviews and discusses recent experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies of plasma-wall interaction in a weakly collisional magnetized plasma bounded with channel walls made from different materials. A lowpressure ExB plasma discharge of the Hall thruster was used to characterize the electron current across the magnetic field and its dependence on the applied voltage and electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel wall. The presence of a depleted, anisotropic electron energy distribution function with beams of secondary electrons was predicted to explain the enhancement of the electron cross-field current observed in experiments. Without the SEE, the electron crossfield transport can be reduced from anomalously high to nearly classical collisional level. The suppression of SEE was achieved using an engineered carbon velvet material for the channel walls. Both theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the electron emission from the walls can limit the maximum achievable electric field in the magnetized plasma. With nonemitting walls, the maximum electric field in the thruster can approach a fundamental limit for a quasineutral plasma.

  12. Modelling of Signal - Level Crossing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Novak

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The author presents an object-oriented model of a railway level-crossing system created for the purpose of functional requirements specification. Unified Modelling Language (UML, version 1.4, which enables specification, visualisation, construction and documentation of software system artefacts, was used. The main attention was paid to analysis and design phases. The former phase resulted in creation of use case diagrams and sequential diagrams, the latter in creation of class/object diagrams and statechart diagrams.

  13. Self-consistency of electron-THF cross sections using electron swarm techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M. J. E.; de Urquijo, J.; Serkovic Loli, L. N.; Cocks, D. G.; Boyle, G. J.; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; White, R. D.

    2017-11-01

    The drift velocity and first Townsend ionization coefficient of electrons in gaseous tetrahydrofuran are measured over the range of reduced electric fields 4-1000 Td using a pulsed-Townsend technique. The measured drift velocities and Townsend ionization coefficients are subsequently used, in conjunction with a multi-term Boltzmann equation analysis, as a further discriminative assessment on the accuracy and completeness of a recently proposed set of electron-THF vapor cross sections. In addition, the sensitivity of the transport coefficients to uncertainties in the existing cross sections is presented. As a result of that analysis, a refinement of the momentum transfer cross section for electron-THF scattering is presented, along with modifications to the neutral dissociation and dissociative electron attachment cross sections. With these changes to the cross section database, we find relatively good self-consistency between the measured and simulated drift velocities and Townsend coefficients.

  14. Cross section calculations for electron scattering from platinum chemotherapeutic compounds. Electron scattering from carboplatin and oxaliplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żywicka, B.; Możejko, P.

    2013-10-01

    Cross section for electron impact ionization of carboplatin, C6H12N2O4Pt, and oxaliplatin, C8H14N2O4Pt, have been calculated within binary-encounter-Bethe model for energies from the ionization threshold up to 5000 eV. Cross section for elastic electron scattering from carboplatin and oxaliplatin molecules have also been derived using independent atom method (IAM) and additivity rule for collision energies ranging from 50 eV to 3000 eV. Obtained cross sections have been compared with relevant cross sections for cisplatin molecules.

  15. Total cross sections for positron and electron scattering from pyrimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, A; Chiari, L; Trainotti, E [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Povo, I-38123, Trento (Italy); GarcIa, G [Instituto de Matematicas y FIsica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de FIsica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Complutense, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Brunger, M J, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.a [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2010-11-14

    In this paper we report original measurements of total cross sections for positron scattering from the important biomolecule pyrimidine. The energy range of these measurements was 0.3-45 eV, while the energy resolution was {approx}260 meV. In addition, we report theoretical results, calculated within the independent atom-screened additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) formalism, for the corresponding electron impact total cross sections. In that case the energy range is 1-10 000 eV. Total cross sections are very important input data for codes that seek to simulate charged-particle tracks in matter, as they define the mean-free path between collisions. As the present data and computations are to the best of our knowledge the first total cross sections to be reported for either positron or electron scattering from pyrimidine, they fill an important void in our available knowledge in the literature.

  16. Differential cross sections of electron silver scattering at varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The differential scattering cross sections of electron - silver atom are calculated using the Eikonal approximation at incident energies of 50 eV, 60 eV and 70 eV, with the Lenz-Jensen potential. Results obtained are in good agreement with the NIST SRD 64 at scattering angles of about 80 to 180 degrees; and are in very ...

  17. Communication: Electronic flux induced by crossing the transition state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongming; Manz, Jörn; Yang, Yonggang

    2018-01-01

    We present a new effect of chemical reactions, e.g., isomerizations, that occurs when the reactants pass along the transition state, on the way to products. It is based on the well-known fact that at the transition state, the electronic structure of one isomer changes to the other. We discover that this switch of electronic structure causes a strong electronic flux that is well distinguishable from the usual flux of electrons that travel with the nuclei. As a simple but clear example, the effect is demonstrated here for bond length isomerization of Na2 (21Σu+), with adiabatic crossing the barrier between the inner and outer wells of the double minimum potential that support different "Rydberg" and "ionic" type electronic structures, respectively.

  18. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Mašín, Zdeněk [Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Straße 2A, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gorfinkiel, Jimena D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  19. Electron transport in silicon nanowires having different cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscato Orazio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport phenomena in silicon nanowires with different cross-section are investigated using an Extended Hydrodynamic model, coupled to the Schrödinger-Poisson system. The model has been formulated by closing the moment system derived from the Boltzmann equation on the basis of the maximum entropy principle of Extended Thermodynamics, obtaining explicit closure relations for the high-order fluxes and the production terms. Scattering of electrons with acoustic and non polar optical phonons have been taken into account. The bulk mobility is evaluated for square and equilateral triangle cross-sections of the wire.

  20. Short electron bunches generated by perpendicularly crossing laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    Optical injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator by a low intensity orthogonally colliding laser pulse is investigated using 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The collision of the main laser pulse driving the plasma wave in the cavitated regime and the low intensity injection pulse affects the trajectories of electrons in the crossing region. As a consequence, some electrons are ejected into the front part of the bubble, and these electrons are subsequently trapped in the rear part of the bubble. The injected and accelerated electron bunch reaches a peak energy of 630 MeV after 8 ps of acceleration being as short as 7.0 fs and is quasimonoenergetic with a low energy spread of 20 MeV (3.8%), having a charge of several dozens of pC and a relatively large emittance of 2.27 π . mm . mrad. Two main injection mechanisms—crossing beatwave injection and injection by laser field preacceleration—were identified.

  1. Assessment of accident rate at lithuanian railways level crossings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionginas Liudvinavichius

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The most pressing problem facing the rail traffic safety experts is an accident rate at the railway level crossings. The purpose is to investigate the circumstances, which affect traffic safety at the level crossings, and to offer effective tools for experts to improve the safety the problems of these dangerous spaces of railway infrastructure. Methodology. This paper observes the logistic regression as a method to estimate the accident rate at level crossings in Lithuania. The authors have studied and evaluated the key factors affecting the safety of railway crossings. These factors are the intensity of trains and road transport means through the railway level crossing, the visibility of the approaching train from both sides of the traffic, the maximum permissible speed of the trains, the number of tracks (single track, double track, and multi-track, the level of installed alarm and automatic equipment, a density of population in this area, etc. Finally, only the factors, which might be described by mathematical expressions (numbers, were identified. Findings. By using logistic regression method, it was found that the most determinant factors at level crossings are the maximum speed of trains, poor visibility crossing (less than 1,000 m, intensity of the road traffic at crossings, and inappropriate implementation of roads crossing the rails. Based on the study results, the conclusions and recommendations were formulated which primary measures to prevent accidents at level crossing and on what level crossing should be taken urgently. Originality.Revealed trends and major causes of accidents at railway crossings of Lithuania for 2004-2011 year. The necessity of implementation of progressive technical measures for the prevention accidents on railway level crossing is proved. Practical value. About 50% of Lithuanian railway crossings do not meet the requirements of the level crossing legislation. This parameter is one of the key risk

  2. Level crossing analysis of the stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, G. R.; Movahed, M. S.; Fazeli, S. M.; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza; Masoudi, S. F.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the average frequency of positive slope να+ crossing for the returns of market prices. The method is based on stochastic processes in which no scaling feature is explicitly required. Using this method we define a new quantity to quantify the stage of development and activity of stock exchanges. We compare the Tehran and western stock markets and show that some, such as the Tehran (TEPIX) and New Zealand (NZX) stock exchanges, are emerging, and also that TEPIX is a non-active market and is financially motivated to absorb capital.

  3. Electron impact ionization cross sections of beryllium-tungsten clusters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukuba, Ivan; Kaiser, Alexander; Huber, Stefan E.; Urban, Jan; Probst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report calculated electron impact ionization cross sections (EICSs) of beryllium-tungsten clusters, BenW with n = 1,...,12, from the ionization threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The positions of the maxima of DM and BEB cross sections are mostly close to each other. The DM cross sections are more sensitive with respect to the cluster size. For the clusters smaller than Be4W they yield smaller cross sections than BEB and vice versa larger cross sections than BEB for clusters larger than Be6W. The maximum cross section values for the singlet-spin groundstate clusters range from 7.0 × 10-16 cm2 at 28 eV (BeW) to 54.2 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the DM cross sections and from 13.5 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (BeW) to 38.9 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the BEB cross sections. Differences of the EICSs in different isomers and between singlet and triplet states are also explored. Both the DM and BEB cross sections could be fitted perfectly to a simple expression used in modeling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60583-7

  4. Electron cross talk and asymmetric electron distributions near the Earth's bowshock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Mitchell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron distributions in the magnetosheath display a number of far from equilibrium features. It has been suggested that one factor influencing these distributions may be the large distances separating locations at which electrons with different energies and pitch angles must cross the bowshock in order to reach a given point in the magnetosheath. The overall heating requirements at these distant locations depends strongly on the shock geometry. In the absence of collisions or other isotropization processes this suggests that the convolution of electrons arriving from different locations should give rise to asymmetries in the distribution functions. Moreover, such cross-talk could influence the relative electron to ion heating, rendering the shock heating problem intrinsically non-local in contrast to classic shock physics. Here, we study electron distributions measured simultaneously by the Plasma Electron and Current Experiment (PEACE on board the Cluster spacecraft and the Electrostatic Analyser (ESA on board THEMIS b during a time interval in which both the Cluster spacecraft and THEMIS b are in the magnetosheath, close to the bowshock, and during which the local magnetic field orientation makes it likely that electron trajectories may connect both spacecraft. We find that the relevant portions of the velocity distributions of such electrons measured by each spacecraft display remarkable similarities. We map trajectories of electrons arriving at each spacecraft back to the locations at which they crossed the bowshock, as a function of pitch angle and energy. We then use the Rankine-Hugoniot relations to estimate the heating of electrons and compare this with temperature asymmetries actually observed. We conclude that the electron distributions and temperatures in the magnetosheath depend heavily on non-local shock properties.

  5. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We report electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron oxide molecules, FexOx and FexOx+1 with x = 1, 2, 3, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV, obtained with the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) methods. The maxima of the EICSs range from 3.10 to 9 . 96 × 10-16 cm2 located at 59-72 eV and 5.06 to 14.32 × 10-16 cm2 located at 85-108 eV for the DM and BEB approaches, respectively. The orbital and kinetic energies required for the BEB method are obtained by employing effective core potentials for the inner core electrons in the quantum chemical calculations. The BEB cross sections are 1.4-1.7 times larger than the DM cross sections which can be related to the decreasing population of the Fe 4s orbitals upon addition of oxygen atoms, together with the different methodological foundations of the two methods. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted excellently to a simple analytical expression used in modelling and simulation codes employed in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80308-2.

  6. Spin and valley resolved Landau level crossing in tri-layer ABA stacked graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Biswajit; Gupta, Vishakha; Borah, Abhinandan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deshmukh, Mandar

    We present quantum Hall measurements on a high quality encapsulated tri-layer graphene device. Low temperature field effect mobility of this device is around 500,000 cm2/Vs and we see SdH oscillations at a magnetic field as low as 0.3 T. Quantum Hall measurements confirm that the chosen tri layer graphene is Bernal (ABA) stacked. Due to the presence of both mass-less monolayer like Dirac fermions and massive bi-layer like Dirac fermions in Bernal stacked tri-layer graphene, there are Landau level crossings between monolayer and bi-layer bands in quantum Hall regime. Although most of the Landau Level crossings are predominantly present on the electron sides, we also observe signatures of the crossings on the hole side. This behaviour is consistent with the asymmetry of electron and hole in ABA tri-layer graphene. We observe a series of crossings of the spin and valley resolved Landau Levels.

  7. Luminosity Anti-leveling with Crossing Angle (MD 1669)

    CERN Document Server

    Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Ponce, Laurette; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    A significant fraction of the LHC luminosity ($\\sim$30\\% in 2016) is lost due to the presence (and necessity) of the crossing angles at the IPs. At the LHC the crossing angle is typically set to a value that provides sufficient separation of the beams at the start of fills for the peak bunch intensities. As the bunch intensity decays during a fill, it is possible to reduce the crossing angle and recover some luminosity. A smooth crossing angle reduction procedure must be developed to take advantage of this option during stable beam operation. During this MD a smooth procedure for luminosity leveling with crossing angle was tested. It was demonstrated that the orbit was well controlled, beam losses were low and the offset leveled experiments ALICE and LHCb were not affected by crossing angle leveling in ATLAS and CMS.

  8. Mean level signal crossing rate for an arbitrary stochastic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yura, Harold T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the mean signal level crossing rate for various probability density functions with primary relevance for optics is discussed based on a new analytical method. This method relies on a unique transformation that transforms the probability distribution under investigation into a normal...... probability distribution, for which the distribution of mean level crossings is known. In general, the analytical results for the mean level crossing rate are supported and confirmed by numerical simulations. In particular, we illustrate the present method by presenting analytic expressions for the mean level...

  9. Photoionization and electron impact excitation cross sections for Fe I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Manuel A.; Lind, Karin; Bergemann, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Context. Iron is a major contributor to the opacity in the atmospheres of late-type stars, as well as a major contributor to the observed lines in their visible spectrum. Iron lines are commonly used to derive basic stellar parameters from medium/high resolution spectroscopy, that is, spectroscopy which shows metal content, effective temperature, and surface gravity. Aims: Here we present large R-matrix calculations for photoionization cross sections and electron impact collision strengths. Methods: The photoionization calculations included 35 configurations and 134 LS close coupling terms of the target ion. The eigenfunction expansion accounts for the photoionization of the outer nl subshells, with n ≥ 4, as well as the open inner 3d subshell. Our results include total and partial (term-to-term) photoionization cross sections for 936 energy terms of iron with principal quantum number ≤10, and total angular momentum from zero to seven. Our electron impact collision strengths include the lowest 46 LS terms of the atom. Results: The present photoionization cross sections should be considerably more accurate than those currently available in the literature. On the other hand, the electron impact cross sections, which are being reported for the first time, are needed in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) modeling of the solar spectrum and late-type stars in general. Tables 5 and 6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A127

  10. Calculated low-energy electron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections for CO2 molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Celiberto, R

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational-excitation cross sections of ground electronic state of carbon dioxide molecule by electron-impact through the CO2-(2\\Pi) shape resonance is considered in the separation of the normal modes approximation. Resonance curves and widths are computed for each vibrational mode. The calculations assume decoupling between normal modes and employ the local complex potential model for the treatment of the nuclear dynamics, usually adopted for the electron-scattering involving diatomic molecules. Results are presented for excitation up to 10 vibrational levels in each mode and comparison with data present in the literature is discussed.

  11. Differential electron-Cu{sup 5+} elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Grabbe, S.R.; Cocke, C.L.; Richard, P. [J. R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Liao, C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60{degree} and 180{degree}. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. New methods for the condition monitoring of level crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Márquez, Fausto Pedro; Pedregal, Diego J.; Roberts, Clive

    2015-04-01

    Level crossings represent a high risk for railway systems. This paper demonstrates the potential to improve maintenance management through the use of intelligent condition monitoring coupled with reliability centred maintenance (RCM). RCM combines advanced electronics, control, computing and communication technologies to address the multiple objectives of cost effectiveness, improved quality, reliability and services. RCM collects digital and analogue signals utilising distributed transducers connected to either point-to-point or digital bus communication links. Assets in many industries use data logging capable of providing post-failure diagnostic support, but to date little use has been made of combined qualitative and quantitative fault detection techniques. The research takes the hydraulic railway level crossing barrier (LCB) system as a case study and develops a generic strategy for failure analysis, data acquisition and incipient fault detection. For each barrier the hydraulic characteristics, the motor's current and voltage, hydraulic pressure and the barrier's position are acquired. In order to acquire the data at a central point efficiently, without errors, a distributed single-cable Fieldbus is utilised. This allows the connection of all sensors through the project's proprietary communication nodes to a high-speed bus. The system developed in this paper for the condition monitoring described above detects faults by means of comparing what can be considered a 'normal' or 'expected' shape of a signal with respect to the actual shape observed as new data become available. ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) models were employed for detecting faults. The statistical tests known as Jarque-Bera and Ljung-Box have been considered for testing the model.

  13. Low energy cross sections for electron scattering from tetrafluoroallene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Choi, Heechol; Song, Mi-Young; Chakrabarti, Kalyan; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2017-08-01

    We report elastic, total, excitation, differential and momentum-transfer cross sections for scattering of low-energy electrons by tetrafluoroallene (C3F4) using the close-coupling (CC) approximation in the R-matrix method with Quantemol-N. We have tested various target models initially to check for the convergence of the result and the final results are provided with the best target model. We have detected shape resonances of symmetry 2 E(2B1,2B2) at 3.08 eV and 3.71 eV with a close-coupling and static exchange models which is seen as a sharp feature in the elastic and momentum transfer cross sections. We also detected other resonances of symmetry 2 E at 11.26 eV and of symmetry 2A2 at 11.12 eV below the ionization threshold of the target respectively. The present elastic and total cross sections are compared with the elastic and total cross sections of allene (C3H4), propene (C3H6) and hexafluoropropene (C3F6) as there were no results available for C3F4. The effect of fluorination is clearly seen with the shape resonance for C3F4 getting slightly shifted to higher energies compared to allene. Finally, we also report the ionization cross section calculated using the Binary-Encounter Bethe (BEB) method. The present calculation is a maiden attempt to find cross sections for C3F4 molecule which could be useful for fluorocarbon plasma modeling.

  14. Empirical Fit to Inelastic Electron-Deuteron and Electron-Neutron Resonance Region Transverse Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Bosted; M. E. Christy

    2007-11-08

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-deuteron cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<10$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.2<3$ GeV. The deuteron fit relies on a fit of the ratio $R_p$ of longitudinal to transverse cross sections for the proton, and the assumption $R_p=R_n$. The underlying fit parameters describe the average cross section for proton and neutron, with a plane-wave impulse approximation (PWIA) used to fit to the deuteron data. Pseudo-data from MAID 2007 were used to constrain the average nucleon cross sections for $W<1.2$ GeV. The mean deviation of data from the fit is 3\\%, with less than 5\\% of the data points deviating from the fit by more than 10\\%.

  15. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field.

  16. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5d metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tal, A.A.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Ekholm, M.; Jonsson, H.J.M.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Abrikosov, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P approximate to 400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)]. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5d series (Hf, Ta,

  17. Cross section database for collision processes of helium atom with charged particles. 1. Electron impact processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralchenko, Yu.V.; Janev, R.K.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I. [Flinder Univ., Adelaide (Australia); Heer, F.J. de [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive and critically assessed cross section database for the inelastic collision processes of ground state and excited helium atoms colliding with electrons, protons and multiply-charged ions has been prepared at the Data and Planning Center at NIFS. The present report describes the first part of the database containing the recommended data for electron impact excitation and ionization of neutral helium. An states (atomic terms) with n {<=} 4 are treated individually while the states with n > 4 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n > 4 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of electron impact transitions, both from the ground and excited states, new convergent close coupling (CCC) calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in a graphical form. (author)

  18. Cross sections of EUV PAGs: influence of concentration, electron energy, and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeskowiak, Steven; Narasimhan, Amrit; Wisehart, Liam; Schad, Jonathon; Neisser, Mark; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Brainard, Robert L.; Denbeaux, Greg

    2016-03-01

    Optimizing the photochemistry of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresists should provide faster, more efficient resists which would lead to greater throughput in manufacturing. The fundamental reaction mechanisms in EUV resists are believed to be due to interactions with energetic electrons liberated by ionization. Identifying the likelihood (or cross section) of how these photoelectrons interact with resist components is critical to optimizing the performance of EUV resists. Chemically amplified resists utilize photoacid generators (PAGs) to improve sensitivity; measuring the cross section of electron induced decomposition of different PAGs will provide insight into developing new resist materials. To study the interactions of photoelectrons generated by EUV absorption, photoresists were exposed to electron beams at energies between 80 and 250 eV. The reactions between PAG molecules and electrons were measured using a mass spectrometer to monitor the levels of small molecules produced by PAG decomposition that outgassed from the film. Comparing the cross sections of a variety of PAG molecules can provide insight into the relationship between chemical structure and reactivity to the electrons in their environments. This research is a part of a larger SEMATECH research program to understand the fundamentals of resist exposures to help in the development of new, better performing EUV resists.

  19. Electrically controlled crossing of energy levels in quantum dots in two-dimensional topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, Aleksei A.

    2017-05-15

    We study the energy spectra of bound states in quantum dots (QDs) formed by an electrostatic potential in two-dimensional topological insulator (TI) and their transformation with changes in QD depth and radius. It is found that, unlike a trivial insulator, the energy difference between the levels of the ground state and first excited state can decrease with decreasing the radius and increasing the depth of the QD so that these levels intersect under some critical condition. The crossing of the levels results in unusual features of optical properties caused by intraceneter electron transitions. In particular, it leads to significant changes of light absorption due to electron transitions between such levels and to the transient electroluminescence induced by electrical tuning of QD and TI parameters. In the case of magnetic TIs, the polarization direction of the absorbed or emitted circularly polarized light is changed due to the level crossing.

  20. Absolute differential cross sections for electron excitation of silver at small scattering angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tošić, S. D.; Pejčev, V.; Šević, D.; McEachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.; Marinković, B. P.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of our experimental and theoretical investigations of the electron excitation of the ground 4d105s state of silver. Differential cross sections (DCSs) for the excitation of the first combined resonant 4d105p state (two fine-structure levels with total angular momentum J = 1/2 and 3/2 which cannot be distinguished in the present experiment) were measured at electron-impact energies (E0) of 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 eV and for a range of scattering angles (θ) from 3° up to 15°. Absolute DCSs were obtained by the normalization of relative differential cross sections to the optical oscillator strengths. The relativistic distorted wave (RDW) method was used to calculate DCSs and generalized oscillator strengths for each level separately and the combined results are compared with the measurements.

  1. Crossing points in the electronic band structure of vanadium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav N. Shrivastava

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structures of several models of vanadium oxide are calculated. In the models 1-3, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 4 vanadium atoms. In model 1, a=b=c 2.3574 Å; in model 2, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 2.3574 Å; and in model 3, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 4.7148 Å. In the models 4-6, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 2 vanadium atoms. In model 4, a=b= 4.551 Å and c= 2.851 Å; in model 5, a=b=c= 3.468 Å; and in model 6, a=b=c= 3.171 Å. We have searched for a crossing point in the band structure of all the models. In model 1 there is a point at which five bands appear to meet but the gap is 7.3 meV. In model 2 there is a crossing point between G and F points and there is a point between F and Q with the gap ≈ 3.6608 meV. In model 3, the gap is very small, ~ 10-5 eV. In model 4, the gap is 5.25 meV. In model 5, the gap between Z and G points is 2.035 meV, and in model 6 the gap at Z point is 4.3175 meV. The crossing point in model 2 looks like one line is bent so that the supersymmetry is broken. When pseudopotentials are replaced by a full band calculation, the crossing point changes into a gap of 2.72 x 10-4 eV.

  2. Electron-Impact Excitation Cross Sections for Modeling Non-Equilibrium Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Munafo, Alessandro; Wray, Alan; Carbon, Duane F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a database for modeling hypersonic entry in a partially ionized gas under non-equilibrium, the electron-impact excitation cross sections of atoms have been calculated using perturbation theory. The energy levels covered in the calculation are retrieved from the level list in the HyperRad code. The downstream flow-field is determined by solving a set of continuity equations for each component. The individual structure of each energy level is included. These equations are then complemented by the Euler system of equations. Finally, the radiation field is modeled by solving the radiative transfer equation.

  3. Tin-vacancy acceptor levels in electron-irradiated n-type silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A. Nylandsted; Goubet, J. J.; Mejlholm, P.

    2000-01-01

    annihilation. Two tin-vacancy (Sn-V) levels at E-c - 0.214 eV and E-c - 0.501 eV have been identified (E-c denotes the conduction band edge). Based on investigations of the temperature dependence of the electron-capture cross sections, the electric-field dependence of the electron emissivity, the anneal...

  4. Electronic levels of cubic quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristone, Flavio [Federal De Mato Grosso Do Sul Univ., Campo Grande (Brazil); Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Autonoma De Madrid Univ., Madrid (Spain); Marques, Gilmar E. [Federal De Sao Carlos Univ., Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2003-09-01

    We introduce an efficient variational method to solve the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation for any arbitrary potential V(x,y,z). The method uses a basis set of localized functions which are build up as products of one-dimensional cubic {beta}-splines. We calculated the energy levels of GaAs/AlGaAs cubic quantum dots and make a comparison with the results from two well-known simplification schemes based on a decomposition of the full potential problem into three separate one-dimensional problems. We show that the scheme making a sequential decomposition gives eigenvalues in better agreement with the ones obtained variationally, but an exact solution is necessary when looking for highly precise values.

  5. Electron induced dissociation of trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum (IV) : Total cross section as a function of incident electron energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp, W.F.; Wnuk, J.D.; Gorham, J.M.; Fairbrother, D.H.; Madey, T.E.; Hagen, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    The total cross section has been measured for the electron induced dissociation of trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum (IV) [MeCpPt(IV)Me3], a Pt precursor often used in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), for incident electron energies ranging between 3–3 keV. Measurements

  6. Electron transfer-induced four-membered cyclic intermediate formation: Olefin cross-coupling vs. olefin cross-metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Yohei [Department of Applied Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Chiba, Kazuhiro, E-mail: chiba@cc.tuat.ac.j [Department of Applied Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    An electron transfer-induced four-membered cyclic intermediate, formed between a radical cation of an enol ether and an unactivated olefin, played a key role in the pathway toward either cross-coupling or cross-metathesis. The presence of an alkoxy group on the phenyl ring of the olefin entirely determined the synthetic outcome of the reaction, which mirrored the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer.

  7. Gate-Tunable Landau Level Filling and Spectroscopy in Coupled Massive and Massless Electron Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bin; Wu, Yong; Wang, Peng; Pan, Cheng; Taniguchi, T; Watanabe, K; Bockrath, M

    2016-07-08

    We report transport studies on coupled massive and massless electron systems, realized using twisted monolayer-graphene-natural bilayer-graphene stacks. We incorporate the layers in a dual-gated transistor geometry enabling independently tuning their charge density and the perpendicular electric field. In a perpendicular magnetic field, we observe a distinct pattern of gate-tunable Landau level crossings. Screening and interlayer electron-electron interactions yield a nonlinear monolayer gate capacitance. Data analysis enables determination of the monolayer's Fermi velocity and the bilayer's effective mass. The mass obtained is larger than that expected for isolated bilayers, suggesting that the interlayer interactions renormalize the band structure.

  8. Electron Energy Level Statistics in Graphene Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Katsnellson, M. I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations of size quantization of electron energy levels in graphene quantum dots [7] we investigate the level statistics in the simplest tight-binding model for different dot shapes by computer simulation. The results are in a reasonable agreement with the

  9. Differential cross sections for the ionization of oriented H2 molecules by electron-impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pindzola, M S [AUBURN UNIV; Kaiser, C [UNIV MANCHESTER; Madison, D H [MISSOURI INST.; Robicheaux, F [AUBURN UNIV; Balance, J [ROLLINS COLLEGE

    2008-01-01

    A nonperturbative close-coupling technique is used to calculate differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of H{sub 2} at an energy of 35.4 eV. Our approach allows cross sections for any orientation of the molecule with respect to the incident electron beam to be analyzed. New features in the resulting cross sections are found compared with the case where the molecular orientation is averaged, and also with cross sections for He at equivalent electron kinematics. When averaged over all possible molecular orientations, good agreement is found with recent experimental results.

  10. Electron--impact resonant vibration excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for carbon monoxide

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J; Celiberto, R; 10.1088/0963-0252/21/4/045005

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrational and rotation-vibration excitation cross sections for electron-CO scattering are calculated in the 0-10 eV energy range for all 81 vibrational states of CO, assuming that the excitation occur via the 2{\\Pi} shape resonance. Static exchange plus polarization calculations performed using the R-matrix method are used to estimate resonance positions and widths as functions of internuclear separation. The effects of nuclear motion are considered using a local complex potential model. Good agreement is obtained with available experimental data on excitation from the vibrational ground state. Excitation rates and cross sections are provided as a functions of the initial CO vibrational state for all ground state vibrational levels.

  11. Effectiveness of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate for the electron-beam-irradiation-induced cross-linking of polylactic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Hon-Meng [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Bee, Soo-Tueen, E-mail: beest@utar.edu.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ratnam, C.T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sin, Lee Tin; Phang, Yee-Yao; Tee, Tiam-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahmat, A.R. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) on electron beam irradiated PLA. • Irradiated PLA blends were weakened by incorporation of high amount of TMPTMA. • TMPTMA interacts with polymer free radicals to build crosslinking network. -- Abstract: The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of various loading levels of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA) cross-linked via electron-beam irradiation. PLA was compounded with 3–5 wt.% of TMPTMA to induce cross-linking upon subjection to electron-beam irradiation doses of 25–250 kGy. The physical properties of the PLA samples were characterised by means of X-ray diffraction, gel fraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses on fractured surfaces after tensile tests. The presence of TMPTMA in PLA was found to effectively increase the crystallite size and gel fraction. However, higher loading levels of TMPTMA could compromise the properties of the PLA/TMPTMA samples, indicating that a larger amount of monomer free radicals might promote degradation within the substantially cross-linked amorphous phase. Irradiation-induced cross-linking in the samples could improve the cross-linking density while decreasing the elongation and interfering with the crystallisation. These effects are caused by the intensive irradiation-induced chain scission that is responsible for the deterioration of the mechanical and crystalline properties of the samples.

  12. Electron collision cross sections of CHF3 and electron transport in CHF3 and CHF3-Ar mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    A set of electron collision cross sections for trifluoromethane (CHF3) is estimated by the electron swarm method. Electron transport coefficients in CHF3, such as the electron drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionisation coefficient, are calculated from the estimated cross section set by the Monte Carlo method, and the values are compared with the measured data. In the case of the transport coefficients, good agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured values in a wide range of reduced electric fields. Furthermore, the transport coefficients described above and the characteristic energy in CHF3-Ar mixtures are calculated, and the values are found to agree well with the measured data. This confirms the validity of the cross section set for CHF3 estimated here.

  13. Vanadium fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmeri, P., E-mail: patrick.palmeri@umons.ac.be [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Université de Mons - UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Quinet, P., E-mail: pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Université de Mons - UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); IPNAS, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Batani, D., E-mail: batani@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Université de Bordeaux, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2015-09-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al. (2012)), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the vanadium isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent vanadium ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 20 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic behavior of the modified relativistic binary encounter Bethe model (MRBEB) of Guerra et al. (2012) with the density-effect correction proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  14. Doctors' use of electronic medical records systems in hospitals: cross sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lærum, Hallvard; Ellingsen, Gunnar; Faxvaag, Arild

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the use of three electronic medical records systems by doctors in Norwegian hospitals for general clinical tasks. Design Cross sectional questionnaire survey. Semistructured telephone interviews with key staff in information technology in each hospital for details of local implementation of the systems. Setting 32 hospital units in 19 Norwegian hospitals with electronic medical records systems. Participants 227 (72%) of 314 hospital doctors responded, equally distributed between the three electronic medical records systems. Main outcome measures Proportion of respondents who used the electronic system, calculated for each of 23 tasks; difference in proportions of users of different systems when functionality of systems was similar. Results Most tasks listed in the questionnaire (15/23) were generally covered with implemented functions in the electronic medical records systems. However, the systems were used for only 2-7 of the tasks, mainly associated with reading patient data. Respondents showed significant differences in frequency of use of the different systems for four tasks for which the systems offered equivalent functionality. The respondents scored highly in computer literacy (72.2/100), and computer use showed no correlation with respondents' age, sex, or work position. User satisfaction scores were generally positive (67.2/100), with some difference between the systems. Conclusions Doctors used electronic medical records systems for far fewer tasks than the systems supported. What is already known on this topicElectronic information systems in health care have not undergone systematic evaluation, and few comparisons between electronic medical records systems have been madeGiven the information intensive nature of clinical work, electronic medical records systems should be of help to doctors for most clinical tasksWhat this study addsDoctors in Norwegian hospitals reported a low level of use of all electronic medical records systems

  15. Improved calculation of displacements per atom cross section in solids by gamma and electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piñera, Ibrahin, E-mail: ipinera@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Cruz, Carlos M.; Leyva, Antonio; Abreu, Yamiel; Cabal, Ana E. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Espen, Piet Van; Remortel, Nick Van [University of Antwerp, CGB, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We present a calculation procedure for dpa cross section in solids under irradiation. • Improvement about 10–90% for the gamma irradiation induced dpa cross section. • Improvement about 5–50% for the electron irradiation induced dpa cross section. • More precise results (20–70%) for thin samples irradiated with electrons. - Abstract: Several authors had estimated the displacements per atom cross sections under different approximations and models, including most of the main gamma- and electron-material interaction processes. These previous works used numerical approximation formulas which are applicable for limited energy ranges. We proposed the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method (MCCM), which relates the established theories about atom displacements to the electron and positron secondary fluence distributions calculated from the Monte Carlo simulation. In this study the MCCM procedure is adapted in order to estimate the displacements per atom cross sections for gamma and electron irradiation. The results obtained through this procedure are compared with previous theoretical calculations. An improvement in about 10–90% for the gamma irradiation induced dpa cross section is observed in our results on regard to the previous evaluations for the studied incident energies. On the other hand, the dpa cross section values produced by irradiation with electrons are improved by our calculations in about 5–50% when compared with the theoretical approximations. When thin samples are irradiated with electrons, more precise results are obtained through the MCCM (in about 20–70%) with respect to the previous studies.

  16. Tree-level equivalence between a Lorentz-violating extension of QED and its dual model in electron-electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toniolo, Giuliano R.; Fargnoli, H.G.; Brito, L.C.T. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Scarpelli, A.P.B. [Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Departamento de Policia Federal, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    S-matrix amplitudes for the electron-electron scattering are calculated in order to verify the physical equivalence between two Lorentz-breaking dual models. We begin with an extended Quantum Electrodynamics which incorporates CPT-even Lorentz-violating kinetic and mass terms. Then, in a process of gauge embedding, its gauge-invariant dual model is obtained. The physical equivalence of the two models is established at tree level in the electron-electron scattering and the unpolarized cross section is calculated up to second order in the Lorentz-violating parameter. (orig.)

  17. Effects of electronic structure on ion stopping cross section in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoriev, V.G.; Neshov, F.G.; Puzanov, A.A.; Urmanov, A.R. (Ural' skij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1984-06-16

    A model for the proton stopping cross section in solids is suggested, which treats stopping in collisions with electrons of different electronic structure subsystems as independent processes. A number of effects due to the influence of the electronic structure on energy losses of protons moving randomly are described. Good agreement between theoretical results and experimental data is obtained. A 'fine structure' for the maximum of the stopping cross section energy dependence is predicted. The reasons for the difference in stopping cross sections between protons moving randomly in diamond and graphite are discussed.

  18. Comparison of fatal motor vehicle accidents at passive and active railway level crossings in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirkku Laapotti

    2016-07-01

    Active warning devices are effective in preventing accidents due to road user errors. Equipping the most dangerous passive level crossings with warning devices – low cost or conventional – would increase safety. Alternatively, some level crossings could be removed altogether. A minimum requirement is that the environmental factors at passive level crossings support safe crossing.

  19. Total, direct and dissociative electron impact ionization cross sections of the acetylene molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILAN KUREPA

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The total electron impact ionization cross sections of the acetylene molecule have been measured in the incident electron energy range from threshold to 1000 eV. These results are compared with other existing data, obtained by direct measurements of this molecular property or by indirect ones, via the partial ionization cross sections for the formation of different ions. Using three semiempirical equations, the total ionization cross sections were calculated and compared to available data, too. Direct and dissociative ionization cross sections were also calculated by a semiempirical equation and compared to existing data.

  20. Mechanisms of molecular electronic rectification through electronic levels with strong vibrational coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2002-01-01

    , corresponding to the fully diabatic limit. The rectification process then reduces to a sequence of vibrationally relaxed single-electron transfer steps. In the limits where the interactions are strong, denoted as the partially and fully adiabatic limits, the character of the rectification process is different......, and electron flow proceeds coherently, without vibrational relaxation. In still another class of mechanisms the electronic level broadening of either donor or acceptor from the adjacent electrode is so strong that it is comparable to the vibrational broadening. The process then reduces to a three...

  1. The partial circulant diallel cross at the interpopulation level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José B. Miranda Filho

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The partial circulant diallel cross mating scheme of Kempthorne and Curnow (Biometrics 17: 229-250, 1961 was adapted for the evaluation of genotypes in crosses at the interpopulation level. Considering a random sample of n lines from base population I, and that each line is crossed with s lines from opposite population II, there will be ns sampled crosses that are evaluated experimentally. The means of the ns sampled crosses and the remaining n(n - s crosses can be predicted by the reduced model where Yij is the mean of the cross between line i (i = 1,2,...,n of population I and line j (j = 1',2',...,n' of population II; µ is the general mean, and gi and gj refer to general combining ability effects of lines from populations I and II, respectively. Specific combining ability (Sij is estimated by the difference . The sequence of crosses for each line (i is [i x j], [i x (j + 1], [i x (j + 2], ..., [i x (j + s -1], starting with i = j = 1 for convenience. Any j + s -1 > n is reduced by subtracting n. A prediction procedure is suggested by changing gi and gj by the contrasts i = i. - .. and j = .j - ..; the correlation coefficient (r was used to compare the efficiency of 's and 's for selection of lines and crosses. The analysis of variance is performed with the complete model Yij = µ + gi + gj + sij + ij, and the sum of squares due to general combining ability is considered for each population separately. An alternative analysis of variance is proposed for estimation of the variance components at the interpopulation level. An analysis of ear length of maize in a partial diallel cross with n = 10 and s = 3 was used for illustration. For the 30 interpopulation crosses analyzed the coefficient of determination (R2, involving observed and estimated hybrid means, was high for the reduced (g model [R2 (ij, Yij = 0.960] and smaller for the simplified ( model [R2 (ij, Yij = 0.889]. Results indicated that the proposed procedure may furnish reliable

  2. Cross-linking of the electron-transfer flavoprotein to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase with heterobifunctional reagents.

    OpenAIRE

    Steenkamp, D J

    1988-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) is a heterodimer containing only one FAD. In previous work on the structure-function relationships of ETF, its interaction with the general acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (GAD) was studied by chemical cross-linking with heterobifunctional reagents [D. J. Steenkamp (1987) Biochem. J. 243, 519-524]. GAD whose lysine residues were substituted with 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionyl groups was preferentially cross-linked to the small subunit of ETF, the ly...

  3. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) by 11-16 eV electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelin, V; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2016-11-07

    Absolute cross section (CS) data on the interaction of low energy electrons with DNA and its molecular constituents are required as input parameters in Monte-Carlo type simulations, for several radiobiological applications. Previously [V. Lemelin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 074701 (2016)], we measured absolute vibrational CSs for low-energy electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran, a convenient surrogate for the deoxyribose. Here we report absolute electronic CSs for energy losses of between 6 and 11.5 eV, by electrons with energies between 11 and 16 eV. The variation of these CSs with incident electron energy shows no evidence of transient anion states, consistent with theoretical and other experimental results, indicating that initial electron capture leading to DNA strand breaks occurs primarily on DNA bases or the phosphate group.

  4. 75 FR 1617 - Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule State Authorized Program Revision Approval: State of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... AGENCY Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule State Authorized Program Revision Approval: State of New...'s approval, under regulations for Cross-Media Electronic Reporting, of the State of New York's..., the final Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule (CROMERR) was published in the Federal Register (70 FR...

  5. Level crossings and turning points of random hyperbolic polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Farahmand

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show that the asymptotic estimate for the expected number of K-level crossings of a random hyperbolic polynomial a1sinhx+a2sinh2x+⋯+ansinhnx, where aj(j=1,2,…,n are independent normally distributed random variables with mean zero and variance one, is (1/πlogn. This result is true for all K independent of x, provided K≡Kn=O(n. It is also shown that the asymptotic estimate of the expected number of turning points for the random polynomial a1coshx+a2cosh2x+⋯+ancoshnx, with aj(j=1,2,…,n as before, is also (1/πlogn.

  6. Ionisation cross sections of rare-gas atoms by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, E.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed electron beam and ion extraction method is used to measure normalized values of partial ionization cross sections for rare gases from threshold to 1000 eV. Cross sections obtained for singly ionized species are used to calibrate the mass transmission efficiency of the ion extraction/analyzer/detection system by the relative flow technique, and this mass transmission curve is then used to determine the absolute cross sections of the multiply ionized species. Total ion cross sections are found by summation of the individual partial cross sections with proper weighting for charge.

  7. Low-energy electron impact cross-sections and rate constants of NH2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This systematic study reports various electron impact cross-sections, rate constants and transport properties of N H 2 radical in the low-energy limit. The collision study is based on R -matrix formalism and involves the use of various scattering models employing different active spaces. Both electron excited ...

  8. 78 FR 77121 - Cross-Media Electronic Reporting: Authorized Program Revision Approval, State of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... AGENCY Cross-Media Electronic Reporting: Authorized Program Revision Approval, State of New York AGENCY... State of New York's request to modify its State Operating Permit Programs EPA- authorized program to allow electronic reporting. DATES: EPA's approval is effective on December 20, 2013 for the State of New...

  9. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, Jeremy [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  10. Apparatus for measurement of electronic-ionization cross sections of metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovach, D.G.; Rakhovskii, V.I.; Shustryakov, V.M.

    1987-06-01

    Automated apparatus is described for measurement of the absolute cross section of multiple and total electronic of metal atoms. Intersecting electron and modulated atomic beams with time separation of the processes of ionization and ion extraction are used. The results of measurements of the dependences of ..gamma../sub +/, ..gamma../sup +/, and ..gamma../sup + +/ of Pb and Ba on electron energy are given and compared with the data in the literature.

  11. Math modeling of electronic processes and deep level ionization kinetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Budanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model of kinetics of charge deep levels in the forbidden band of the semiconductor, which takes into account the processes of carriers charge exchange between deep levels and both allowed bands, which adequately describes the nature of the non-exponential relaxation capacity, is proposed. A method for determining the spectrum of deep level transient spectroscopy having greater accuracy and resolution in comparison with traditional methods using a relaxation time approximation. The results of numerical experiments using the kinetics charge deep levels model in the frameworks of proposed approximations are presented. Account of generational and recombination components of charge exchange processes of all deep levels in the forbidden band of the semiconductor leads to the conclusion that the kinetics of ionization of these centers, in general, does not obey the Boltzmann statistics. Account of charge exchange processes between the deep levels a significantly effects on their recharge kinetics. Numerical analysis results show that the processes of deep levels ionization are more complicated than the staged-type kinetics. It is shown that in most cases stagedtype kinetics at deep level transient spectroscopy leads to significant methodological error in the parameters determination. From the results of numerical analysis follows, that the density of surface electronic states has a significant impact on the overall recharged kinetics of deep levels. Donor deep levels recharge analysis revealed not only the features of the deep levels ionization in semiconductors, but also allowed to answer some questions that are typical to all deep-level transient spectroscopy in general.

  12. Nicotine and Cotinine Levels With Electronic Cigarette: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, A; Simon, N

    2016-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2004, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have gained popularity worldwide. E-cigarettes are marketed as nicotine delivery devices. Commonly reported reasons for use include to quit smoking, to reduce urge to smoke, or the perceived lower risk alternative to smoking. But what are the actual amounts of nicotine delivered? This review summarizes all the published studies concerning nicotine or cotinine levels following e-cigarette use. A literature search was conducted from the PubMed database, from 1985 to January 2014, using the following terms: electronic cigarette(s), e-cigarette(s), electronic nicotine delivery system, cotinine, and nicotine. Articles were excluded if they were not pertinent according to our criteria. References of all relevant articles were also evaluated. Eight studies were included in this review. The following information was extracted from the articles: population size, age of participants, recruitment, inclusion and exclusion criteria, concentration of nicotine in refills liquids, study sample design, and observed concentrations. Following design of studies, plasma nicotine Cmax was observed between 0 and 5 ng/mL (no significant changes) or between 13.9 and 16.3 ng/mL (similar to a tobacco cigarette) with a Tmax between 70 and 75 minutes. Cotinine levels after "vaping" an e-cigarette are similar to a tobacco cigarette. This review summarizes e-cigarette studies that contain information on nicotine or cotinine levels. The peak concentration of nicotine appears to be dependent on the use and dose level of e-cigarette cartridge. The value of this peak concentration is similar to the value found with a tobacco cigarette. However, the time corresponding to the peak concentration is delayed compared to a tobacco cigarette. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Adaptive Reference Levels in a Level-Crossing Analog-to-Digital Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Singer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Level-crossing analog-to-digital converters (LC ADCs have been considered in the literature and have been shown to efficiently sample certain classes of signals. One important aspect of their implementation is the placement of reference levels in the converter. The levels need to be appropriately located within the input dynamic range, in order to obtain samples efficiently. In this paper, we study optimization of the performance of such an LC ADC by providing several sequential algorithms that adaptively update the ADC reference levels. The accompanying performance analysis and simulation results show that as the signal length grows, the performance of the sequential algorithms asymptotically approaches that of the best choice that could only have been chosen in hindsight within a family of possible schemes.

  14. Model development for MODIS thermal band electronic cross-talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghong; Brinkmann, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack)

    2016-10-01

    MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 bands. Among them, 16 thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 μm. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands develop substantial issues which cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on band 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 μm and band 29 at 8.5 μm increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk issue can be observed from nearly monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. Most of MODIS thermal bands are saturated at moon surface temperatures and the development of an alternative approach is very helpful for verification. In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS band 29 empirically for correction of Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detector nonlinear response is considered. The impacts of the electronic crosstalk are assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detector nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending bands. The crosstalk impact on calibration coefficients was calculated. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector nonlinearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving bands. The correction

  15. The Hanle effect and level-crossing spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Strumia, Franco

    1991-01-01

    I am most pleased and, in a way, I feel honored to write the Foreword for the book The Hanle Effect and Level-Crossing Spectroscopy, which covers such a very wide range of applications not only in the initial areas of atomic and molecular physics, but also in solid state physics, solar physics, laser physics, and gravitational metrology. To link these fields together in a coherent way has been the merit of the editors of the book, who attracted most distinguished authors for writing the chapters. In retrospect to Hanle's discovery of quantum mechanical coherence between two quantum states about 65 years ago, this book demonstrates the enormous impact and central importance the effect has had, and most vividly still has, on modern physics. On the other hand, the concept of quantum mechanical coherence, which is an outgrowth of the linear super­ position principle of quantum states, has been evident through a consider­ able number of experimental methods beyond the original Hanle effect; some of these methods...

  16. Predicting civil religion at a cross-cultural level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrič Miran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of civil religion has caught major attention among scholars studying the junction of religion and politics (J.-J. Rousseau, E. Durkheim, R. Bellah. The notion focuses on the phenomenon of cultural contents sacralizing and ritualizing the ruling political institutions of a society, extending support to the integration of the political and social system at a cultural level. The notion of civil religion has recently been operationalized crossculturally, but light has not been shed upon its predictors. In this paper authoritarianism is tested as a predictor of civil religion cross-culturally. Four student samples of Bosnian, Serbian, Slovenian and US students were analyzed. Very strong, significant associations between authoritarianism, as operationalized by a modified Lane scale, and civil religion were found in all cases. Moreover, upon introducing femininity, anxiety and gender into the analysis, a strong, dominant and significant impact on the part of authoritarianism was still found when civil religion was observed crossculturally. When the same predictors were applied to explaining general religiosity, authoritarianism fell short of being a significant predictor in most of the environments observed. Such results suggest an especially close link between civil religion and authoritarianism.

  17. Total and elastic electron scattering cross sections from Xe at intermediate and high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Pablos, J L de [Departamento de Fusion y Particulas Elementales, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Williart, A [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-11-28

    Experimental total electron scattering cross sections from Xe in the energy range 300-5000 eV have been obtained with experimental errors of about 3%. The method was based on the measurement of the attenuation of a linear electron beam through a Xe gas cell in combination with an electron spectroscopy technique to analyse the energy of the transmitted electrons. Differential and integral elastic cross sections have been calculated using a scattering potential method which includes relativistic effects. The consistency of our theoretical and experimental results is also discussed in the paper. Finally, analytical formulae depending on two parameters, namely the number of target electrons and the atomic polarizability, are given to reproduce the experimental data for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe in the energy range 500-10 000 eV.

  18. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  19. Differential cross sections for the electron impact ionization of Ar (3 p) atoms for equal energy final state electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Ghanshyam; Singh, Prithvi

    2017-06-01

    The electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing conditions has been studied in detail. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. We report in this communication the results of triple differential cross sections (TDCSs) for electron impact ionization of Ar (3 p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. We calculate TDCS in the modified distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) formalism including post collision interaction (PCI) and polarization potential. We compare the results of our calculation with available measurements [Phys. Rev. A 87, 022712 (2013)]. We study the effect of PCI, target polarization on the trends of TDCS for the single ionization of Ar (3 p) targets.

  20. Urinary cotinine levels of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göney, Gülşen; Çok, İsmet; Tamer, Uğur; Burgaz, Sema; Şengezer, Tijen

    2016-07-01

    The popularity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is rapidly increasing in many countries. These devices are designed to imitate regular cigarettes, delivering nicotine via inhalation without combusting tobacco but currently, there is a lack of scientific evidence on the presence or absence of nicotine exposure. Such research relies on evidence from e-cigarette users urine samples. In this study, we aimed to determine the levels and compare the amount of nicotine to which e-cigarette users, cigarette smokers and passive smokers are exposed. Therefore, urine samples were collected from e-cigarette users, cigarette smokers, passive smokers, and healthy nonsmokers. The urinary cotinine levels of the subjects were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mean (±SD) urinary cotinine levels were determined as 1755 ± 1848 ng/g creatinine for 32 e-cigarette users, 1720 ± 1335 ng/g creatinine for 33 cigarette smokers and 81.42 ± 97.90 ng/g creatinine for 33 passive smokers. A significant difference has been found between cotinine levels of e-cigarette users and passive smokers (p differences between e-cigarette users and cigarette smokers (p > 0.05). This is a seminal study to demonstrate the e-cigarette users are exposed to nicotine as much as cigarette smokers.

  1. Low-energy electron impact cross-sections and rate constants of NH_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadvaja, Anand; Kaur, Savinder; Baluja, K. L.

    2017-08-01

    This systematic study reports various electron impact cross-sections, rate constants and transport properties of NH_2 radical in the low-energy limit. The collision study is based on R-matrix formalism and involves the use of various scattering models employing different active spaces. Both electron excited inelastic cross-sections and resonances are found influenced by correlation and polarization effects. The non-relativistic molecular bremsstrahlung radiation cross-section for soft photons, binary encounter Bethe model-based ionization cross-sections and a few molecular properties of the target radical are also reported. The present calculations are found to be in agreement with the available results. This theoretical study provides a pathway to understand collision dynamics and generates data required in various fields of applied physics.

  2. Measurements of the electron and muon inclusive cross-sections in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present the measurements of the differential cross-sections for inclusive electron and muon production in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s = 7 TeV, using ∼ 1.4 pb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The muon cross-section is measured as a function of muon ...

  3. Partial cross sections for positive and negative ion formation following electron impact on uracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, S.; Gluch, K.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Scheier, P.; Limtrakul, J.; Probst, M.; Deutsch, H.; Becker, K.; Stamatovic, A.; Märk, T. D.

    2004-08-01

    We report absolute partial cross sections for the formation of selected positive and negative ions resulting from electron interactions with uracil. Absolute calibration of the measured partial cross sections for the formation of the three most intense positive ions, the parent C4H4N2O+2 ion and the C3H3NO+ and OCN+ fragment ions, was achieved by normalization of the total single uracil ionization cross section (obtained as the sum of all measured partial single ionization cross sections) to a calculated cross section based on the semi-classical Deutsch-Märk formalism at 100 eV. Subsequently, we used the OCN+ cross section in conjunction with the known sensitivity ratio for positive and negative ion detection in our apparatus (obtained from the well-known cross sections for SF+4 and SF-4 formation from SF6) to determine the dissociative attachment cross section for OCN- formation from uracil. This cross section was found to be roughly an order of magnitude smaller, about 5 × 10-22 m2 at 6.5 eV, compared to our previously reported preliminary value. We attribute this discrepancy to the difficult determination of the uracil target density in the earlier work. Using a reliably calculated cross section for normalization purposes avoids this complication.

  4. Spin-resolved Andreev levels and parity crossings in hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eduardo J H; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Houzet, Manuel; Aguado, Ramón; Lieber, Charles M; De Franceschi, Silvano

    2014-01-01

    The physics and operating principles of hybrid superconductor-semiconductor devices rest ultimately on the magnetic properties of their elementary subgap excitations, usually called Andreev levels. Here we report a direct measurement of the Zeeman effect on the Andreev levels of a semiconductor quantum dot with large electron g-factor, strongly coupled to a conventional superconductor with a large critical magnetic field. This material combination allows spin degeneracy to be lifted without destroying superconductivity. We show that a spin-split Andreev level crossing the Fermi energy results in a quantum phase transition to a spin-polarized state, which implies a change in the fermionic parity of the system. This crossing manifests itself as a zero-bias conductance anomaly at finite magnetic field with properties that resemble those expected for Majorana modes in a topological superconductor. Although this resemblance is understood without evoking topological superconductivity, the observed parity transitions could be regarded as precursors of Majorana modes in the long-wire limit.

  5. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenny Heeter, Philipp Beiter, Francisco Flores-Espino, David Hurlbut, Chang Liu

    2015-02-01

    This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand how cross-state transactions have been used to meet RPS compliance. Data on regional renewable energy flow use generator-specific information primarily sourced from EIA, SNL Energy, and FERC Form 1 filings. The renewable energy examined through this method may or may not have actually been used to meet RPS compliance.

  6. Towards a Cross-domain Infrastructure to Support Electronic Identification and Capability Lookup for Cross-border ePrescription/Patient Summary Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehakis, Dimitrios G; Masi, Massimiliano; Wisniewski, Francois; Bittins, Sören

    2016-01-01

    Seamless patient identification, as well as locating capabilities of remote services, are considered to be key enablers for large scale deployment of facilities to support the delivery of cross-border healthcare. This work highlights challenges investigated within the context of the Electronic Simple European Networked Services (e-SENS) large scale pilot (LSP) project, aiming to assist the deployment of cross-border, digital, public services through generic, re-usable technical components or Building Blocks (BBs). Through the case for the cross-border ePrescription/Patient Summary (eP/PS) service the paper demonstrates how experience coming from other domains, in regard to electronic identification (eID) and capability lookup, can be utilized in trying to raise technology readiness levels in disease diagnosis and treatment. The need for consolidating the existing outcomes of non-health specific BBs is examined, together with related issues that need to be resolved, for improving technical certainty and making it easier for citizens who travel to use innovative eHealth services, and potentially share personal health records (PHRs) with other providers abroad, in a regulated manner.

  7. Privacy Issues of Electronic Monitoring Of Employees: A Cross-Cultural Examination Of Gender Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond E. Taylor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript presents the results of a study which examined the privacy issues of electronic monitoring of employees from a cross-cultural perspective comparing participants from Taiwan with those from the United States. The results of the study suggest that gender differences exist between Taiwanese and American respondents’ attitudes concerning privacy issues of electronic monitoring of employees. The study suggests that monitoring with notice was an important parameter in determining how privacy issues of electronic monitoring of employees were viewed by the participants.

  8. Cross-Border Electronic Commerce : Distance Effects and Express Delivery in European Union Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.Y. Kim (Thai Young); R. Dekker (Rommert); C. Heij (Christiaan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis empirical study examines distance effects on cross-border electronic commerce and in particular the importance of express delivery in reducing the time dimension of distance. E-commerce provides suppliers with a range of opportunities to reduce distance as perceived by online

  9. Differential cross sections for the one electron two center symmetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidagan, J.M.; Piacentini, R.D. (Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica); Rivarola, R.D. (Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France). Lab. d' Astrophysique; Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica y Quimica Cuantica)

    1982-03-01

    We use the two-state atomic expansion with variable nuclear charge to study charge-exchange differential cross sections for symmetrical one-electron systems at intermediate energy. The nonclassical small angle diffraction scattering is discussed. Our results are compared with data for H/sup +/-H collisions.

  10. Absolute experimental cross sections for the electron impact ionization of rubidium. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.W.; Feeney, R.K.

    1980-03-31

    The absolute cross sections for the double, triple, and quadruple ionization of Rb/sup +/ ions by electron impact have been measured from below their respective thresholds to approximately 3000 eV. This determination has been accomplished using a crossed beam facility in which monoenergetic beams of ions and electrons are caused to intersect at right angles in a well-defined collision volume. Multiply charged, product ions born as a result of the electron impact are deflected into their respective detectors by cascaded electrostatic analyzers. The multiply charged beam current component is measured by means of a vibrating reed electrometer operating in the rate-of-charge mode. The required singly charged rubidium ions are produced in a thermionic ion source and pass through a series of focusing, collimating and deflecting structures before entering the interaction region. A thermionically generated, rectangular electron beam intercepts the target ions in a spatially designated collision volume. Just prior to entering this interaction region the two beams can be made to pass through a movable slit scanner which determines their spatial profiles. The various charged particle currents, energies and beam current density distributions represent the experimental data from which the desired absolute cross sections have been determined. The results obtained with this technique are compared with available theoretical predictions of the appropriate cross sections.

  11. Calculation of differential cross section for dielectronic recombination with two-electron uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin N.; Andreev, Oleg Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Calculation of the differential cross section for the dielectronic recombination with two-electron uranium within the framework of QED is presented. The polarization of the emitted photon is investigated. The contributions of the Breit interaction and the interference of the photon multipoles are studied.

  12. Ab-initio electron scattering cross-sections and transport in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Brunger, Michael; Buckman, Steve; Dujko, Sasa; White, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Ab-initio electron - liquid phase xenon fully differential cross-sections for electrons scattering in liquid xenon are developed from a solution of the Dirac-Fock scattering equations, using a recently developed framework [1] which considers multipole polarizabilities, a non-local treatment of exchange, and screening and coherent scattering effects. A multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation accounting for the full anisotropic nature of the differential cross-section is used to calculate transport properties of excess electrons in liquid xenon. The results were found to agree to within 25% of the measured mobilities and characteristic energies over the reduced field range of 10^{-4} to 1 Td. The accuracies are comparable to those achieved in the gas phase. A simple model, informed by highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections, is presented to transform highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections to improve the liquid cross-sections, which was found to enhance the accuracy of the transport coefficient calculatio...

  13. Random walk study of electron motion in helium in crossed electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Random walk theory, previously adapted to electron motion in the presence of an electric field, is extended to include a transverse magnetic field. In principle, the random walk approach avoids mathematical complexity and concomitant simplifying assumptions and permits determination of energy distributions and transport coefficients within the accuracy of available collisional cross section data. Application is made to a weakly ionized helium gas. Time of relaxation of electron energy distribution, determined by the random walk, is described by simple expressions based on energy exchange between the electron and an effective electric field. The restrictive effect of the magnetic field on electron motion, which increases the required number of collisions per walk to reach a terminal steady state condition, as well as the effect of the magnetic field on electron transport coefficients and mean energy can be quite adequately described by expressions involving only the Hall parameter.

  14. Absolute cross section measurements for the scattering of low- and intermediate-energy electrons from PF3. I. Elastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishiyama, N.; Hoshino, M.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Tanaka, H.

    2017-12-01

    We report absolute elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron collisions with phosphorus trifluoride, PF3, molecules (e- + PF3) in the impact energy range of 2.0-200 eV and over a scattering angle range of 10°-150°. Measured angular distributions of scattered electron intensities were normalized by reference to the elastic DCSs of He. Corresponding integral and momentum-transfer cross sections were derived by extrapolating the angular range from 0° to 180° with the help of a modified phase-shift analysis. In addition, due to the large dipole moment of the considered molecule, the dipole-Born correction for the forward scattering angles has also been applied. As a part of this study, independent atom model calculations in combination with screening corrected additivity rule were also performed for elastic and inelastic (electronic excitation plus ionization) scattering using a complex optical potential method. Rotational excitation cross sections have been estimated with a dipole-Born approximation procedure. Vibrational excitations are not considered in this calculation. Theoretical data, at the differential and integral levels, were found to reasonably agree with the present experimental results. Furthermore, we explore the systematics of the elastic DCSs for the four-atomic trifluoride molecules of XF3 (X = B, N, and P) and central P-atom in PF3, showing that, owing to the comparatively small effect of the F-atoms, the present angular distributions of elastic DCSs are essentially dominated by the characteristic of the central P-atom at lower impact energies. Finally, these quantitative results for e- - PF3 collisions were compiled together with the previous data available in the literature in order to obtain a cross section dataset for modeling purposes. To comprehensively describe such a considerable amount of data, we proceed by first discussing, in this paper, the vibrationally elastic scattering processes whereas vibrational and electronic

  15. Energy deposition model based on electron scattering cross section data from water molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A; Oiler, J C [Centra de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gorfinkiel, J D [Department of Physiscs and Astronomy, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Limao-Vieira, P [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Maira-Vidal, A; Borge, M J G; Tengblad, O [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid, Spam (Spain); Huerga, C; Tellez, M [Hospital Universitario La Paz, paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientifIcas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: g.garcia@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2008-10-01

    A complete set of electrons scattering cross sections by water molecules over a broad energy range, from the me V to the Me V ranges, is presented in this study. These data have been obtained by combining experiments and calculations and cover most relevant processes, both elastic and inelastic, which can take place in the considered energy range. A new Monte Carlo simulation programme has been developed using as input parameter these cross sectional data as well as experimental energy loss spectra. The simulation procedure has been applied to obtain electron tracks and energy deposition plots in water when irradiated by a Ru-106 plaque as those used for brachytherapy of ocular tumours. Finally, the low energy electron tracks provided by the present model have been compared with those obtained with other codes available in the literature.

  16. Total and elastic electron scattering cross sections from ozone at intermediate and high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablos, J.L. de; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fusion y Particulas Elementales, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Kendall, P.A.; Mason, N.J.; Tegeder, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Williart, A. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-02-28

    Total cross sections for electron scattering from O{sub 3} molecules in the energy range 350-5000 eV have been measured for the first time. The experimental method used was based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through an O{sub 3}-O{sub 2} mixture in combination with use of an electron energy loss technique to determine the purity of the ozone sample. Differential and integral elastic cross sections have also been calculated using a scattering potential in the framework of the independent-atom model. The present theoretical and experimental results are compared with earlier calculations available in the literature. (author)

  17. Quantum-mechanical calculations of cross sections for electron collisions with atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bartschat, Klaus; Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    An overview of quantum-mechanical methods to generate cross-section data for electron collisions with atoms and molecules is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on the time-independent close-coupling approach, since it is particularly suitable for low-energy collisions and also allows for systematic improvements as well as uncertainty estimates. The basic ideas are illustrated with examples for electron collisions with argon atoms and methane. For many atomic systems, such as e-Ar collisions, highly reliable cross sections can now be computed with quantified uncertainties. On the other hand, while electron collision calculations with molecules do provide key input data for plasma models, the methods and computer codes presently used require further development to make these inputs robust.

  18. Rosetta Mission: Electron Scattering Cross Sections—Data Needs and Coverage in BEAMDB Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratislav P. Marinković

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission of [O I] lines in the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission have been explained by electron impact dissociation of water rather than the process of photodissociation. This is the direct evidence for the role of electron induced processing has been seen on such a body. Analysis of other emission features is handicapped by a lack of detailed knowledge of electron impact cross sections which highlights the need for a broad range of electron scattering data from the molecular systems detected on the comet. In this paper, we present an overview of the needs for electron scattering data relevant for the understanding of observations in coma, the tenuous atmosphere and on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission. The relevant observations for elucidating the role of electrons come from optical spectra, particle analysis using the ion and electron sensors and mass spectrometry measurements. To model these processes electron impact data should be collated and reviewed in an electron scattering database and an example is given in the BEAMD, which is a part of a larger consortium of Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre—VAMDC.

  19. Cross-level relationships between justice climate and organizational citizenship behavior: perceived organizational support as mediator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Li; Teng, Eryue; Qiu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the mediating role of perceived organizational support in the cross-level relationships between procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice climate and organizational citizenship behavior...

  20. Differential cross sections for ionization and excitation of laser-aligned atoms by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Differential cross section measurements will be presented for electron impact ionization and excitation of atoms prepared using high resolution continuous wave laser radiation. In the case of ionization, low energy coplanar asymmetric (e,2e) experiments were performed from laser excited Mg atoms that were aligned using radiation around 285nm. The atoms were subjected to linearly polarized radiation whose polarization vector was varied from in the plane to perpendicular to the scattering plane. Ionization measurements were then conducted from the laser-excited 3P state, and the differential cross section determined. By careful analysis of the laser pumping, these measurements were directly compared to those from the ground state. Such experiments provide valuable information on the ionization of aligned targets. In the second experiment to be described here, a resonant enhancement cavity has been placed around the interaction region and super-elastic scattering measurements have been carried out from laser-excited atoms inside the cavity. This new technique opens up many new targets for study, since the cavity increases the effective intensity of the laser radiation that is exciting the atoms by a factor of up to 50. As such, new ionization and excitation measurements are possible using deep UV radiation where the laser power is only a few mW. Results from calcium will be presented, and progress towards studies from silver, copper and gold will be discussed. We are also advancing this new technique to allow simultaneous excitation from the hyperfine levels of different targets (such as Rb), which will allow the method to be adopted in different fields, such as laser cooling and trapping.

  1. Effects of low-energy electrons on DNA constituents: effective cross sections for condensed thymidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panajotovic, Radmila

    2009-05-01

    Since the first experiments of low-energy electron scattering from condensed DNA [1] have been performed, the interest in studying low-energy electron-biomolecule interactions has been increasing. Knowledge of effective cross sections for single- and double-strand breaks of DNA and for vibrational and electronic excitation of nucleic bases and nucleosides are opening the door to better understanding of effects of radiation on live tissue and possibly indicating interaction pathways leading to gene mutations and cancer. The strong variation of effective cross sections for DNA single-strand breaks with incident electron energy and the resonant enhancement at 1 eV suggested that considerable damage is inflicted by very low-energy electrons to DNA, and indicates the important role of π* shape resonances in the bond-breaking process. However, the complexity of DNA, even if studied as a short single-strand chain, imposes a need to perform measurements on its isolated constituents, such as nucleic bases and nucleosides. Thymidine is one of the most important nucleosides of DNA and an important component of antiviral compounds. In the condensed phase, thymidine's 2'-deoxyribose ring is in the pentose sugar ring form, which is a true conformation of this nucleoside in DNA. Results from High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss [2] study of monomolecular films of thymidine will be discussed and the presence of resonances in the effective cross sections at incident energy below 5 eV will be commented as a possible indication of the dissociative electron attachment. In addition, results on the resonance structures in the effective cross sections for electronic excitations for the incident electron energy from 1.5 to 12 eV will be discussed as a possible pathway for strand brakes in DNA. [4pt] [1] Boudaiffa B, Cloutier P, Hunting D, Huels M A and Sanche L 2002 Rad. Res. 157 227-234[0pt] [2] Panajotovic R, Martin F, Cloutier P, Hunting, D, and Sanche L, 2006 Rad.Res. 165 452

  2. Cross sections and rate coefficients for electron-impact ionization of hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Murakami, I.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Wang, J.G. [Univ. of Georgia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, GA (United States)

    2001-10-01

    A critical assessment of available experimental and theoretical cross sections for electron-impact direct and dissociative ionization of hydrocarbon molecules, C{sub x}H{sub y} (x=1 - 3, 1 {<=} y {<=} 2x + 2), has been carried out. Recommended cross sections are suggested in the energy range from threshold to 10 keV for those reaction channels for which more than one set of data were found in the literatures. For the molecules for which no cross section information was found available, the cross sections for the dominant ionization channels were derived on the basis semi-empirical cross section relationships. The recommended and derived cross sections are represented by analytic fit functions, the coefficients of which are provided. The rate coefficients for all the ionization channels have been calculated in the temperature range from 1 eV to 1 keV. The cross sections and rate coefficients for all studied ionization channels are presented in graphical form as well. (author)

  3. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, the electrons can tunnel in- elastically from the left to the right electrode. This is the process behind inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS), which is a single-molecule spectroscopic method, where the vibrational ngerprint of a molecule is di- rectly observed by the tunnelling current...... This process has been studied in detail for ordinary conjugated or saturated molecules. Selection rules does not exist in IETS, but some modes are favoured over others, and this is the bases for the propensity rules in IETS that has been rationalised. In this thesis, we study IETS for cross...

  4. Second-order asymptotics in level crossing for differences of renewal processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Dirk; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    1992-01-01

    We consider level crossing for the difference of independent renewal processes. Second-order expansions for the distribution function of the crossing time of level n are found, as n - oo. As a by-product several other results on the difference process are found. The expected minimum of the

  5. Band electron spectrum and thermodynamic properties of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ya.Farenyuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels is considered. Generalization of dynamic mean-field method for systems with correlated hopping was applied to the investigation of the model. Electron spectra, electron concentrations, average values of pseudospins and grand canonical potential were calculated within the alloy-analogy approximation. Electron spectrum and dependencies of the electron concentrations on chemical potential were obtained. It was shown that in the alloy-analogy approximation, the model possesses the first order phase transition to ferromagnetic state with the change of chemical potential and the second order phase transition with the change of temperature.

  6. Quantum Anomaly Dissociation of Quasibound States Near the Saddle-Point Ionization Limit of a Rydberg Electron in Crossed Electric and Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian-zu; He, Li-Ming; Zhu, Yun-Xia

    2005-01-01

    In the combination of crossed electric and magnetic fields and the Coulomb field of the atomic nucleus the spectrum of the Rydberg electron in the vicinity of the Stark saddle-point are investigated at a quantum mechanical level. The results expose a quantum anomaly dissociation: quasibound states near and above the saddle-point ionization limit predicted at the semi-classical level disappear at a quantum mechanical level.

  7. A review of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung cross sections between 1 and 10 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, A.; Martins, M. N.

    2017-12-01

    More than 80 years have passed since the first calculations of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung cross sections were published by Sommerfeld, for non-relativistic electrons, and, independently, by Sauter, Bethe and Heitler, and Racah, for relativistic electrons. The Bethe-Heitler expression, that is based on the first Born approximation and includes the screening of the Coulomb field of the nucleus by the atomic electrons, has proven to work well at moderately high energies where the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect is negligible. We review the current theoretical and experimental status with a highlight on electrons with kinetic energies between 1 and 10 MeV. The choice is motivated by the peculiar difficulties present in this energy region, where it is necessary to treat simultaneously the interaction with the Coulomb field beyond the first Born approximation and the effect of screening. A fully numerical approach within the S-matrix formalism has proven to be extremely difficult above a few MeV, because the number of partial waves needed for an accurate evaluation is prohibitively large. Here we focus on analytic results, including the more complex ones employing the Furry-Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions and taking into account the next-to-leading order, and discuss the advantages and limitations in light of the best available data. The influence of multiple scattering in the target is investigated under the actual experimental conditions. A comparison with the widely used cross section tabulations by Seltzer and Berger is also presented.

  8. Cross sections measurements for dissociation of CHClF{sub 2} by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigaud, L; Ferreira, Natalia; Wolff, W; Santos, A C F dos; Montenegro, E C [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barros, A L F de [CEFET/RJ, Av. Maracana 229, 20271-110 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jesus, V L B de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia, R. Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil); Shah, M B, E-mail: lucassigaud@hotmail.co, E-mail: montenegro@if.ufrj.b [The Queen' s University Belfast, University Road Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    CFC compounds at the atmosphere play a crucial role to the environment, being the main responsible for the increase of the ozone hole. Recent studies show that electron impact is the most likely process for the dissociation of these molecules, creating atomic chlorine, which breaks down ozone molecules. An experimental setup was built in order to analyse the collisional processes of CHClF{sub 2} (one of the CFC compounds still in use by the industry) by electron impact. Total and partial cross sections have been obtained, showing the predominance of the channel of chlorine atom production.

  9. Giant increase in cross-magnetic-field transport rate as an electron-positron plasma cools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, F. F.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2017-10-01

    An electron-positron plasma in thermal equilibrium within a uniform magnetic field is studied using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-magnetic-field single-particle diffusion coefficient is evaluated as a function of the magnetic field strength and plasma temperature. The transport rate is found to increase by many orders of magnitude as the plasma temperature is lowered, for a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The sharp dependence on temperature is due to electrons and positrons becoming temporarily correlated and drifting across the magnetic field before dissociating.

  10. Pressure-induced core-level crossing transitions in 5d metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikosov, Igor

    Considering hexagonal closed-packed Os compressed to over 770 GPa, we discuss the anomaly observed experimentally in the behavior of the unit cells parameters ratio c/a at about 440 GPa. We argue that the anomaly is related to a new type of electronic transition, the core level crossing (CLC) transition, associated with interactions between the core electrons induced by pressure. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at 1500 GPa, at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements. The Swedish Research Council (VR) Grant No. 2015-04391 and the Grant from the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (Grant No. 14.Y26.31.0005) are gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Communicating Ebola through social media and electronic news media outlets: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa

    2016-09-01

    Social media and electronic news media activity are an important source of information for the general public. Yet, there is a dearth of research exploring the use of Twitter and electronic news outlets during significant worldly events such as the recent Ebola Virus scare. The purpose of this article is to investigate the use of Twitter and electronic news media outlets in communicating Ebola Virus information. A cross-sectional survey of Twitter data and Google News Trend data from 30 September till 29 October, 2014 was conducted. Between 30 September and 29 October, there were approximately 26 million tweets (25,925,152) that contained the word Ebola. The highest number of correlated activity for Twitter and electronic news outlets occurred on 16 October 2014. Other important peaks in Twitter data occurred on 1 October, 6 October, 8 October, and 12 October, 2014. The main influencers of the Twitter feeds were news media outlets. The study reveals a relationship between electronic news media publishing and Twitter activity around significant events such as Ebola. Healthcare organizations should take advantage of the relationship between electronic news media and trending events on social media sites such as Twitter and should work on developing social media campaigns in co-operation with leading electronic news media outlets (e.g. CNN, Yahoo, Reuters) that can have an influence on social media activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Use of electronic cigarettes among Romanian university students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrean, Lucia Maria

    2015-04-11

    Because electronic cigarettes are relatively new, data on usage patterns and factors which influence them are sparse. Hence, this study aims at assessing awareness, beliefs about electronic cigarettes and experimentation with them among university students from Romania- a country where the sales and marketing of these products are widespread. Secondly, correlates of electronic cigarette experimentation will also be investigated. A cross-sectional study was performed by means of anonymous questionnaires among 480 students, aged 19-24, from Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between April-May 2013. The results show that 92.5% of the students have heard about e-cigarettes; out of these, one quarter (53.3% of the smokers, 25% of the ex-smokers, 5.5% of the non-smokers) have tried electronic cigarettes at least once during lifetime. The results of the multinomial logistic regression point out that the correlates of electronic cigarette experimentation were: male gender, being a smoker of traditional cigarettes, having friends who experimented with electronic cigarettes, having stronger beliefs that electronic cigarettes could help them quit smoking and being less convinced that they are used only by smokers. The explained variance was 59%. The results underline the importance of addressing the issue of e-cigarette use through health education programs and regulatory interventions, since e-cigarettes are a reality faced by the Romanian youth.

  13. Internal magnetic fluctuations and electron heat transport in the TORE SUPRA Tokamak. Observation by cross polarisation scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colas, L.; Paume, M.; Zou, X.L.; Chareau, J.M.; Guiziou, L.; Hoang, G.T.; Michelot, Y. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Gresillon, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1997-03-01

    Magnetic fluctuations (radial size {approx} 5 mm) are measured by a cross polarisation scattering (CPS) diagnostic in TORE SUPRA. These fluctuations are investigated quantitatively in the ohmic and low confinement regimes over a wide range of plasma currents, densities and additional heating powers. Simultaneously, electron heat diffusivities expected from these fluctuations are compared to those obtained by profile analysis. A radial profile of the magnetic fluctuations in the gradient region ( 0.3 < r/a < 0.7) is established from these measurements. The magnetic fluctuation levels are found to increase towards the plasma edge, and this measurements. The magnetic fluctuation levels are found to increase towards the plasma edge, and this feature is compatible with that of electron heat diffusivity. A strong correlation between the measured magnetic turbulence and the local temperature gradient is observed during the additional heating. A local electron heat diffusivity induced by magnetic fluctuations is estimated using the non-collisional quasi-linear formula: {chi}{sub e}{sup mag} = {pi}qRv{sub th} ({delta} B{sub r} / B){sup 2}. Both the order of magnitude and the parametric dependence of {chi}{sub e}{sup mag} show similarities with electron diffusivities determined by transport analysis. In particular, a threshold is observed for the dependence of fluctuation-induced heat fluxes on the local temperature gradient, which is close to the critical gradient observed for the measured heat fluxes. (author). 38 refs.

  14. Cross section for production of low-energy electron-positron pairs by relativistic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    Starting with the lowest-order unscreened QED matrix element for electron-positron pair production by heavy charged particles, the paper calculates the cross section for this process differential in all independent variables and valid for all pair energies small compared to the incident particle energy. Integration over the possible emission angles of one of the pair members gives an expression that is valid for low-energy pairs that can be compared with previous work based on the Weizsaecker-Williams method. Integration over the possible angles of the other pair member then yields an expression identical to one derived by Racah. The high energy-transfer limit of the expression for the cross section integrated over electron and positron angles is found to be identical to that of Kelner in the unscreened case.

  15. Patterns of electronic cigarette use in current and ever users among college students in France: a cross?sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Vasiliu, Anca; Romo, Lucia; Kotbagi, Gayatri; Kern, Laurence; Ladner, Jo?l

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is sparse information on electronic cigarette use and health behaviours among college student populations. Our objectives were to identify the patterns of electronic cigarette use in current and ever users among college students in France. Design Cross-sectional study. Settings A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted on two major campuses in France. Students filled in an anonymous questionnaire on their use of electronic cigarettes and on targeted behaviours such as ...

  16. Cross Sections and Rate Coefficients for Vibrational Excitation of HeH+ Molecule by Electron Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ayouz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross sections and thermally-averaged rate coefficients for vibration (de-excitation of HeH + by an electron impact are computed using a theoretical approach that combines the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the UK R-matrix code. Fitting formulas with a few numerical parameters are derived for the obtained rate coefficients. The interval of applicability of the formulas is from 40 to 10,000 K.

  17. Associations of attitudes towards electronic cigarettes with advertisement exposure and social determinants: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhold, Benjamin; Fischbein, Rebecca; Bhamidipalli, Surya Sruthi; Bryant, Jennifer; Kenne, Deric R.

    2017-01-01

    Background The exposure of young adults to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) advertisements has risen rapidly. E-cigarette ads have been shown to increase short term perceived acceptability of using e-cigarettes in places where traditional cigarettes are banned. We set out to investigate if advertising exposure was related to perceptions of harm, addictiveness, and acceptability of use of e-cigarettes in places where traditional cigarettes are banned. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, ...

  18. Electronic media exposure and its association with activity-related outcomes in female adolescents: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobelo, Felipe; Dowda, Marsha; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Pate, Russell R

    2009-03-01

    Few investigations have assessed in adolescent girls the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between elevated exposure to electronic media (EM) and activity-related outcomes such as compliance with physical activity (PA) standards or cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). Four-hundred thirty-seven white and African American girls were assessed at the 8th, 9th, and 12th grades. PA and EM (TV/video watching, electronic games, Internet use) were self-reported, and CRF was estimated using a cycle-ergometer test. Hi EM exposure was defined as >or=four 30-minute blocks/d. 8th-, 9th-, and 12th-grade girls in the Hi EM group showed lower compliance with PA standards and had lower CRF than the Low EM group (Pgrades had lower vigorous PA and CRF levels at 12th grade than girls reporting less EM exposure (PInternet use to a combined maximum of 2 hours.

  19. Electron microscopy study of an Old Russian (XII century) encolpion cross with black inlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobylina, N. N.; Greshnikov, E. A.; Vasiliev, A. L.; Tereschenko, E. Yu.; Zaytseva, I. E.; Makarov, N. A.; Kashkarov, P. K.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2017-07-01

    The phase compositions of the basic material (alloy) of a pre-Mongolian Old Russian encolpion cross found near Suzdal and its black inlay have been investigated by methods of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The cross material is lead-zinc-tin α-bronze, and the black is copper sulfide with lead inclusions. As a result of the corrosion, tin and copper oxides and zinc sulfides, which made the cross dark gray, were formed on its surface. It is shown that the corrosion depth is as large as 50 μm; thus, laps must be prepared to accurately determine the morphology and phase composition of the corrosion layer. Decoration with black was apparently performed by pouring with copper sulfide melt or melting a powder preliminarily placed in grooves forming an image on the surface.

  20. Temperature dependence of the cross section for the fragmentation of thymine via dissociative electron attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopyra, Janina [Faculty of Science, Siedlce University, 3 Maja 54, 08-110 Siedlce (Poland); Abdoul-Carime, Hassan, E-mail: hcarime@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2015-05-07

    Providing experimental values for absolute Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) cross sections for nucleobases at realistic biological conditions is a considerable challenge. In this work, we provide the temperature dependence of the cross section, σ, of the dehydrogenated thymine anion (T − H){sup −} produced via DEA. Within the 393-443 K temperature range, it is observed that σ varies by one order of magnitude. By extrapolating to a temperature of 313 K, the relative DEA cross section for the production of the dehydrogenated thymine anion at an incident energy of 1 eV decreases by 2 orders of magnitude and the absolute value reaches approximately 6 × 10{sup −19} cm{sup 2}. These quantitative measurements provide a benchmark for theoretical prediction and also a contribution to a more accurate description of the effects of ionizing radiation on molecular medium.

  1. Triple differential cross sections for the ionization of formic acid by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouawad, L.; Hervieux, P. A.; Dal Cappello, C.; Pansanel, J.; Osman, A.; Khalil, M.; El Bitar, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Theoretical triple differential cross sections for the simple ionization of the two outermost valence orbitals of formic acid monomer are given in this work. The first Born approximation is used to describe the collision dynamics with one Coulomb wave function for the ejected electron. Single-center molecular wave functions are generated using the Gaussian 09 program. The cross sections are calculated for an average molecular orientation with the proper average method. The results show that the proposed framework provides better agreement with experimental data than the previously used orientation averaged molecular orbital approximation. Consequently, this work shows the importance of performing the orientation averaging on the cross sections and not on the molecular wave functions. It also provides a methodology that reduces the complexity of calculations while maintaining a good quality of the results.

  2. Measurement of the Inclusive Electron Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section on Carbon with the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    The T2K off-axis near detector, ND280, is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ~1 GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged $\

  3. Electron beam relaxation in a beam-plasma discharge in crossed fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadeev, K.K.; Erastov, E.M.; Ivanov, A.A.; Muksunov, A.M.; Nikiforov, V.A.; Severnyj, V.V.; Khripunov, B.I.; Shapkin, V.V. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    Experimental investigation into production conditions of high- degree ionization plasma with an electron beam Usub(b)=5 kV, Isub(b)=0.7 A in crypton n/sub 0/=3x10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ in crossed electric and magnetic fields is stated. It is shown that resonance electric field can lead both to starting up of volume discharge-under these conditions electron beam power dissipation sharply increases, and discharge breakdown. Power dissipation increases when incresing magnetic field intensity from 8 to 12 kGs. Dependence of electron beam power dissipation on a longitudinal size of working volume has been investigated. A minimum length of the beam and gas interaction range, at which generation of volume discharge is still possible, has been determined. The data obtained can be useful during construction of a plasma centrifuge on the basis of beam-plasma discharge.

  4. Cross-section measurements for the fragmentation of CHClF{sub 2} by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigaud, L; Ferreira, Natalia; Wolff, W; Santos, A C F dos; Montenegro, E C [Instituto de FIsica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); De Jesus, V L B; Menezes, R S [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Campus Nilopolis, R. Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil); De Barros, A L F [CEFET/RJ, Av. Maracana 229, 20271-110 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, A B [Instituto de QuImica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria-Ilha do Fundao, 21941-614 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Shah, M B, E-mail: lucas@if.ufrj.b [School of Maths and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, University Road. Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-28

    CFC compounds present in the upper atmosphere have a significant effect on the environment, strongly contributing to the increase of the hole in the ozone layer. Recent studies show that low-energy electron impact is an important process in the dissociation of these molecules, creating atomic chlorine, which breaks down ozone molecules. In this work, the CHClF{sub 2} fragmentation by electron impact in the 40-400 eV energy range is measured. Total and partial cross sections have been obtained, showing the predominance of the release of neutral chlorine, which amounts to around 60% of the total yield. There is a strong indication that this chlorine is being released as a result of the ionization of electrons from both chlorine and fluorine orbitals.

  5. Cross-Level Effects Between Neurophysiology and Communication During Team Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jamie C; Martin, Melanie J; Dunbar, Terri A; Stevens, Ronald H; Galloway, Trysha L; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Likens, Aaron D

    2016-02-01

    We investigated cross-level effects, which are concurrent changes across neural and cognitive-behavioral levels of analysis as teams interact, between neurophysiology and team communication variables under variations in team training. When people work together as a team, they develop neural, cognitive, and behavioral patterns that they would not develop individually. It is currently unknown whether these patterns are associated with each other in the form of cross-level effects. Team-level neurophysiology and latent semantic analysis communication data were collected from submarine teams in a training simulation. We analyzed whether (a) both neural and communication variables change together in response to changes in training segments (briefing, scenario, or debriefing), (b) neural and communication variables mutually discriminate teams of different experience levels, and (c) peak cross-correlations between neural and communication variables identify how the levels are linked. Changes in training segment led to changes in both neural and communication variables, neural and communication variables mutually discriminated between teams of different experience levels, and peak cross-correlations indicated that changes in communication precede changes in neural patterns in more experienced teams. Cross-level effects suggest that teamwork is not reducible to a fundamental level of analysis and that training effects are spread out across neural and cognitive-behavioral levels of analysis. Cross-level effects are important to consider for theories of team performance and practical aspects of team training. Cross-level effects suggest that measurements could be taken at one level (e.g., neural) to assess team experience (or skill) on another level (e.g., cognitive-behavioral). © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  6. Measurements of absolute M-subshell X-ray production cross sections of Th by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, A., E-mail: aurelien.moy@cea.fr [GM, CNRS, Université de Montpellier II, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); CEA, DEN, DTEC, SGCS, LMAC, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Merlet, C. [GM, CNRS, Université de Montpellier II, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Dugne, O. [CEA, DEN, DTEC, SGCS, LMAC, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • The M X-ray production cross sections of Th were measured by electron impact. • The M-subshell ionization cross sections of Th were determined from 3 to 38 keV. • Theoretical ionization cross-sections are in agreement with our experimental results. - Abstract: Measurements of absolute M-subshell X-ray production cross sections for element Th were made by electron impact for energies ranging from the ionization threshold up to 38 keV. Experimental data were obtained by measuring the X-ray intensity emitted from ultrathin Th films deposited onto self-supporting C backing films. The measurements were conducted with an electron microprobe using high-resolution wavelength dispersive spectrometers. Recorded intensities were converted into absolute X-ray production cross sections by means of atomic data and estimation of the number of primary electrons, target thickness, and detector efficiency. Our experimental X-ray production cross sections, the first to be reported for the M subshells of Th, are compared with X-ray production cross sections calculated with the mean of ionization cross sections obtained from the distorted-wave Born approximation. The Mα X-ray production cross section calculated is in excellent agreement with the measurements, allowing future use for standardless quantification in electron probe microanalysis.

  7. Towards a Cross-Level Theory of Neural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Anthony J.

    2007-11-01

    This paper reviews ideas and results from unsupervised learning theory that have given the best explanation yet of how neural firing rates self-organise to code natural images in area V1 of visual cortex. It then discusses the generalisation of these ideas to self-organising spike-coding networks. A mismatch between the resulting spike-learning algorithm and the known physiological processes of synaptic plasticity is then used as a motivation to introduce the rather obvious idea that neurons are not sending their information to other neurons, but to synapses—more microscopic structures. This prompts a survey of other inter-level communications in the brain and inside cells. It is proposed on the basis of this that information flows all the way up and down the reductionist hierarchy—an idea that transforms many of our ideas about machine learning and neuroscience. What it transforms them into is not yet clear, but the remainder of the paper discusses this.

  8. Strong overtones modes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with cross-conjugated molecules: a prediction from theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2013-10-22

    Cross-conjugated molecules are known to exhibit destructive quantum interference, a property that has recently received considerable attention in single-molecule electronics. Destructive quantum interference can be understood as an antiresonance in the elastic transmission near the Fermi energy and leading to suppressed levels of elastic current. In most theoretical studies, only the elastic contributions to the current are taken into account. In this paper, we study the inelastic contributions to the current in cross-conjugated molecules and find that while the inelastic contribution to the current is larger than for molecules without interference, the overall behavior of the molecule is still dominated by the quantum interference feature. Second, an ongoing challenge for single molecule electronics is understanding and controlling the local geometry at the molecule-surface interface. With this in mind, we investigate a spectroscopic method capable of providing insight into these junctions for cross-conjugated molecules: inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). IETS has the advantage that the molecule interface is probed directly by the tunneling current. Previously, it has been thought that overtones are not observable in IETS. Here, overtones are predicted to be strong and, in some cases, the dominant spectroscopic features. We study the origin of the overtones and find that the interference features in these molecules are the key ingredient. The interference feature is a property of the transmission channels of the π system only, and consequently, in the vicinity of the interference feature, the transmission channels of the σ system and the π system become equally transmissive. This allows for scattering between the different transmission channels, which serves as a pathway to bypass the interference feature. A simple model calculation is able to reproduce the results obtained from atomistic calculations, and we use this to interpret these findings.

  9. Precise Cross-Sectional Measurement of Photoresist Shrinkage Caused by Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-06-01

    A mechanism of the photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied in detail. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern is obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after HfO2 atomic layer deposition on a sample. Photoresist lines and spaces formed on either of bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) layer or spin-on-glass (SOG) layer were exposed to EB at a much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation showed that EB irradiation causes necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. In addition, it was suggested that the BARC layer shrinkage results in the elastic deformation of the pattern profile, whereas the SOG layer does not shrink. Furthermore, EB irradiation only to the lines or spaces was performed. The EB irradiation to spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and necking of the pattern profile, although no electron was irradiated directly into the pattern. This result is considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation showed that the distribution of the deposited energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the change of the pattern shape. Consequently, our study clarifies the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer to the sidewall on photoresist shrinkage.

  10. Electron Acceleration by Beating of Two Intense Cross-Focused Hollow Gaussian Laser Beams in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Saleh T.; Gauniyal, Rakhi; Ahmad, Nafis; Rawat, Priyanka; Purohit, Gunjan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents propagation of two cross-focused intense hollow Gaussian laser beams (HGBs) in collisionless plasma and its effect on the generation of electron plasma wave (EPW) and electron acceleration process, when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are simultaneously operative. Nonlinear differential equations have been set up for beamwidth of laser beams, power of generated EPW, and energy gain by electrons using WKB and paraxial approximations. Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of typical laser-plasma parameters on the focusing of laser beams in plasmas and further its effect on power of excited EPW and acceleration of electrons. It is observed that focusing of two laser beams in plasma increases for higher order of hollow Gaussian beams, which significantly enhanced the power of generated EPW and energy gain. The amplitude of EPW and energy gain by electrons is found to enhance with an increase in the intensity of laser beams and plasma density. This study will be useful to plasma beat wave accelerator and in other applications requiring multiple laser beams. Supported by United Arab Emirates University for Financial under Grant No. UPAR (2014)-31S164

  11. Inelastic cross sections for low-energy electrons in liquid water: exchange and correlation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-11-01

    Low-energy electrons play a prominent role in radiation therapy and biology as they are the largest contributor to the absorbed dose. However, no tractable theory exists to describe the interaction of low-energy electrons with condensed media. This article presents a new approach to include exchange and correlation (XC) effects in inelastic electron scattering at low energies (below ∼10 keV) in the context of the dielectric theory. Specifically, an optical-data model of the dielectric response function of liquid water is developed that goes beyond the random phase approximation (RPA) by accounting for XC effects using the concept of the many-body local-field correction (LFC). It is shown that the experimental energy-loss-function of liquid water can be reproduced by including into the RPA dispersion relations XC effects (up to second order) calculated in the time-dependent local-density approximation with the addition of phonon-induced broadening in N. D. Mermin's relaxation-time approximation. Additional XC effects related to the incident and/or struck electrons are included by means of the vertex correction calculated by a modified Hubbard formula for the exchange-only LFC. Within the first Born approximation, the present XC corrections cause a significantly larger reduction (∼10-50%) to the inelastic cross section compared to the commonly used Mott and Ochkur approximations, while also yielding much better agreement with the recent experimental data for amorphous ice. The current work offers a manageable, yet rigorous, approach for including non-Born effects in the calculation of inelastic cross sections for low-energy electrons in liquid water, which due to its generality, can be easily extended to other condensed media.

  12. Cross-correlation based high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and electron channelling contrast imaging for strain mapping and dislocation distributions in InAlN thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G; Nouf-Allehiani, M.; Gamarra, P.; di Forte-Poisson, M. A.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development of cross-correlation based high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), in the scanning electron microscope (SEM), to quantitatively map the strain variation and lattice rotation and determine the density and identify dislocations in nitride semiconductor thin films. These techniques can provide quantitative, rapid, non-destructive analysis of the structural properties of materials with a spatial resol...

  13. Corneal collagen cross-linking: a confocal, electron, and light microscopy study of eye bank corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Jasmeet S; Kaufman, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphological changes induced by corneal collagen cross-linking in a human ex vivo cornea, using confocal, electron, and light microscopy. The central epithelium was partially removed from ex vivo human corneal buttons. Riboflavin 0.1% solution was applied before ultraviolet A light treatment and then for every 2 minutes for 30 minutes while the corneas were exposed to ultraviolet A light at a wavelength of 370 nm and intensity of 3 mW/cm(2). Each cornea was evaluated using confocal, electron, and light microscopy. Confocal microscopy demonstrated normal-appearing corneas on their initial pretreatment examination, with reduced stromal detail. After treatment, a superficial layer of highly reflective spherical structures (4-10 microm) was observed. Many of these hyperreflective structures appeared up to a depth of 300 microm. The remainder of the corneal stroma and endothelium appeared normal. Electron microscopy showed keratocyte apoptotic changes to a depth of 300 microm. No observable pathologic changes were seen on histology. Based on clinical studies, corneal cross-linking is a promising treatment that appears to be safe and to halt ectatic corneal disease progression. Initial European studies used animal models to extrapolate human protocols. In conjunction with clinical studies, we believe that human ex vivo corneal studies provide a means to evaluate the structural and morphological changes associated with this procedure, within human corneas, in a manner that cannot be accomplished in vivo.

  14. Electron impact excitation cross sections and rates from the ground state of atomic calcium

    CERN Document Server

    Samson, A M

    2001-01-01

    New R-matrix calculations are presented for electron excitation of atomic calcium. The target state expansion includes 22 states: 4s sup 2 sup 1 S; 4snl sup 1 sup , sup 3 L, where nl is 3d, 4p, 5s, 5p, 4d and 4f; 3d4p sup 1 sup , sup 3 P,D,F; and 4p sup 2 sup 3 P, sup 1 D, sup 1 S terms. The calculation is in LS coupling, and configuration interaction involving 3p subshell correlation is included. Electron impact excitation cross sections from the 4s sup 2 ground state to the next 10 states are tabulated for low energies, and thermally averaged effective collision strengths are tabulated over a range of electron temperatures from 1000 to 10,000 K. Comparisons are made with previous cross sections calculations for the 4s sup 2 -4s4p sup 3 P deg. transition; excellent agreement is found with experimentally derived rates for 4s sup 2 -4s4p sup 1 P deg

  15. Electron ionization of open/closed chain isocarbonic molecules relevant in plasma processing: Theoretical cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Umang R., E-mail: umangpatel193@yahoo.ca [Gandhinagar Institute of Technology, Moti Bhoyan, Gandhinagar-382721, Gujarat (India); Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar-388120, Gujarat (India); Joshipura, K. N.; Pandya, Siddharth H. [Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar-388120, Gujarat (India); Kothari, Harshit N. [Universal College of Engineering and Technology, Moti Bhoyan, Gandhinagar-382721, Gujarat (India)

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we report theoretical electron impact ionization cross sections from threshold to 2000 eV for isocarbonic open chain molecules C{sub 4}H{sub 6}, C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, C{sub 4}F{sub 6} including their isomers, and closed chain molecules c-C{sub 4}H{sub 8} and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}. Theoretical formalism employed presently, viz., Complex Scattering Potential-ionization contribution method has been used successfully for a variety of polyatomic molecules. The present ionization calculations are very important since results available for the studied targets are either scarce or none. Our work affords comparison of C{sub 4} containing hydrocarbon versus fluorocarbon molecules. Comparisons of the present ionization cross sections are made wherever possible, and new ionization data are also presented.

  16. Electron-ion collisional ionization cross sections and rates for the Na isoelectronic sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Y; Wang, Y S; Yang, F J; Xu, X J; Sun, Y S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electron-impact ionization cross sections for eight highly charged Na-like ions in the range 18<=Z<=39 calculated by means of a distorted-wave Born exchange approximation method including relativistic corrections. Direct ionization from the ground and excited states (n=3-5) is calculated. For the ground state, contributions due to excitation-autoionization are also calculated, taking account of branching ratios and configuration interaction. A systematic study of the dependence of the cross sections on impact energy and nuclear charge is carried out for the direct ionization of all states and for excitation-autoionization. The results of the calculations are fitted by empirical formulas to facilitate use in practical applications; the fitted values are found to be in good agreement with the calculated results. An accurate empirical formula for calculating ionization rates is also given.

  17. Storage Ring Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact Ionization of Fe 7+

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, M; Bernhardt, D; Grieser, M; Krantz, C; Lestinsky, M; Müller, A; Novotný, O; Repnow, R; Schippers, S; Spruck, K; Wolf, A; Savin, D W

    2015-01-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization (EII) for Fe 7+ from the ionization threshold up to 1200 eV. The measurements were performed using the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The ions were stored long enough prior to measurement to remove most metastables, resulting in a beam of 94% ground state ions. Comparing with the previously recommended atomic data, we find that the Arnaud & Raymond (1992) cross section is up to about 40\\% larger than our measurement, with the largest discrepancies below about 400~eV. The cross section of Dere (2007) agrees to within 10%, which is about the magnitude of the experimental uncertainties. The remaining discrepancies between measurement and the most recent theory are likely due to shortcomings in the theoretical treatment of the excitation-autoionization contribution.

  18. Irreversibility on the Level of Single-Electron Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Küng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a low-temperature experimental test of the fluctuation theorem for electron transport through a double quantum dot. The rare entropy-consuming system trajectories are detected in the form of single charges flowing against the source-drain bias by using time-resolved charge detection with a quantum point contact. We find that these trajectories appear with a frequency that agrees with the theoretical predictions even under strong nonequilibrium conditions, when the finite bandwidth of the charge detection is taken into account.

  19. Evaluation of oxygen exposure levels and polyphenolic content of red wines using an electronic panel formed by an electronic nose and an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mendez, M L; Apetrei, C; Gay, M; Medina-Plaza, C; de Saja, J A; Vidal, S; Aagaard, O; Ugliano, M; Wirth, J; Cheynier, V

    2014-07-15

    An electronic panel formed by an electronic nose and an electronic tongue has been used to analyse red wines showing high and low phenolic contents, obtained by flash release and traditional soaking, respectively, and processed with or without micro-oxygenation. Four oxygen transfer rate conditions (0.8, 1.9, 8.0, and 11.9 μl oxygen/bottle/day) were ensured by using synthetic closures with controlled oxygen permeability and storage under controlled atmosphere. Twenty-five chemical parameters associated with the polyphenolic composition, the colour indices and the levels of oxygen were measured in triplicate and correlated with the signals registered (seven replicas) by means of the electronic nose and the electronic tongue using partial least squares regression analysis. The electronic nose and the electronic tongue showed particularly good correlations with those parameters associated with the oxygen levels and, in particular, with the influence of the porosity of the closure to oxygen exposure. In turn, the electronic tongue was particularly sensitive to redox species including oxygen and phenolic compounds. It has been demonstrated that a combined system formed from the electronic nose and the electronic tongue provides information about the chemical composition of both the gas and the liquid phase of red wines. This complementary information improves the capacity to predict values of oxygen-related parameters, phenolic content and colour parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  1. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Calculating Electron Capture Cross Sections: A Space- Physics Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of electroncapture cross sections at energies relevant to the modeling of the transport, acceleration, and interaction of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in space (approximately few MeV per nucleon) and especially for multi-electron ions must rely on detailed, but computationally expensive, quantum-mechanical description of the collision process. Kuang's semi-classical approach is an elegant and efficient way to arrive at these estimates. Motivated by ENA modeling efforts for apace applications, we shall briefly present this approach along with sample applications and report on current progress.

  2. Threshold-energy region in the electron-excitation cross sections of the sodium resonant transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, C.H.; Perales, F.; Vuskovic, L.; Bederson, B. (Physics Department, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States))

    1993-08-01

    We present measurements of absolute excitation differential cross sections for electron scattering by ground-state sodium in the 3[ital P] manifold at 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.0, 3.3, and 3.7 eV in the angular range 1[degree] to 60[degree]. No calibration or normalization procedures are involved. Comparisons with computational results of the close-coupling approximation and experimentally obtained [Delta][ital M][sub [ital s

  3. Strong overtones modes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with cross-conjugated molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Cross-conjugated molecules are known to exhibit destructive quantum interference, a property that has recently received considerable attention in single-molecule electronics. Destructive quantum interference can be understood as an antiresonance in the elastic transmission near the Fermi energy...... is larger than for molecules without interference, the overall behavior of the molecule is still dominated by the quantum interference feature. Second, an ongoing challenge for single molecule electronics is understanding and controlling the local geometry at the molecule-surface interface...... that overtones are not observable in IETS. Here, overtones are predicted to be strong and, in some cases, the dominant spectroscopic features. We study the origin of the overtones and find that the interference features in these molecules are the key ingredient. The interference feature is a property...

  4. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  5. Evidence of electron saddle swap oscillations in angular differential ion-atom charge exchange cross sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otranto, S.; Blank, I.; Olson, R. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    State selective charge exchange processes in 1-10 keV/amu Ne8+ +Na(3s) collisions were measured by means of the magneto-optical trap recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy technique and compared to classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations. We find that for electron capture to n-levels >= 10, the

  6. Total cross-sections for positron and electron scattering from {alpha}-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, A; Chiari, L; Trainotti, E [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Povo, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GarcIa, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Brunger, M J, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, we report original measurements of total cross-sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from an important biomolecule, {alpha}-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these measurements was 0.15-50.15 eV, whereas the energy resolution was {approx}260 meV. In addition, we report theoretical results, calculated within the independent-screened additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) formalism, on the corresponding electron impact total cross-sections. In this case, the energy range is 1-10 000 eV. With the advent of new particle track simulation codes, which incorporate accurate atomic and molecular data in order to provide interaction details at the nanoscale, interest in positron and electron TCSs has enjoyed something of a recent renaissance as they specify the mean free path between collisions in such codes. Because the present data are, to the best of our knowledge, the first TCSs to be reported for positron scattering from THFA, they fill an important void in the knowledge available to us from the literature.

  7. Electronic-cigarette use among young people in Wales: evidence from two cross-sectional surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Graham; Hewitt, Gillian; Evans, John; Littlecott, Hannah J; Holliday, Jo; Ahmed, Nilufar; Moore, Laurence; Murphy, Simon; Fletcher, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence of electronic(e)-cigarette use, prevalence of e-cigarette and tobacco use by age, and associations of e-cigarette use with sociodemographic characteristics, tobacco and cannabis use among young people in Wales. Design Data from two nationally-representative cross-sectional surveys undertaken in 2013–2014. Logistic regression analyses, adjusting for school-level clustering, examined sociodemographic characteristics of e-cigarette use, and associations between e-cigarette use and smoking. Setting Primary and secondary schools in Wales. Participants Primary-school children aged 10–11 (n=1601) and secondary-school students aged 11–16 (n=9055). Results Primary-school children were more likely to have used e-cigarettes (5.8%) than tobacco (1.6%). Ever use of e-cigarettes remained more prevalent than ever use of tobacco until age 14–15. Overall, 12.3% of secondary-school students (aged 11–16) reported ever using e-cigarettes, with no differences according to gender, ethnicity or family affluence. The percentage of ‘never smokers’ reporting having used e-cigarettes was 5.3% at age 10–11 to 8.0% at age 15–16. The proportion of children who had ever used an e-cigarette and reported currently smoking increased from 6.9% among 10–11 year olds to 39.2% in 15–16 year olds. Only 1.5% (n=125) of 11–16 year-olds, including 0.3% of never smokers, reported regular e-cigarette use (use at least once a month). Current weekly smokers were 100 times more likely than non-smokers to report regular e-cigarette use (relative risk ratio (RRR=121.15; 95% CI 57.56 to 254.97). Regular e-cigarette use was also more likely among those who had smoked cannabis (RRR 53.03; 95% CI 38.87 to 80.65). Conclusions Many young people (including never-smokers) have tried e-cigarettes. However, regular use is less common, and is associated with tobacco cigarette use. Longitudinal research is needed to understand age-related trajectories of e

  8. Patterns of electronic cigarette use and level of psychological distress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hyun Park

    Full Text Available Psychological distress has been correlated with higher levels of nicotine dependence. To date, the possible association between individuals' levels of psychological distress and e-cigarette use has not been investigated, despite the dramatic growth of e-cigarette use in the US. We examined this possible association using a nationally representative sample of US adults.A total of 36,697 adults from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS were included. The Kessler 6 scale was used to measure psychological distress. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between level of psychological distress and e-cigarette use.Both e-cigarette and cigarette use varied according to level of psychological distress as well as multiple socio-demographic characteristics. In a multivariate model, psychological distress was significantly associated with the following groups: (a exclusive e-cigarette ever-use (aOR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.6, 8.6, (b current dual use of e-cigarettes and cigarettes (aOR = 4.6; 95% CI = 3.1, 6.7, (c former cigarette use and ever use of e-cigarette (aOR = 3.2; 95% CI = 2.2, 4.8 and (d current use of cigarettes only (aOR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.7, 2.6.These are the first data to demonstrate that, as is true for cigarettes, e-cigarette use is associated with increased levels of psychological distress. Further large-scale, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the direction of this relationship and to evaluate the long-term positive and negative consequences of such use.

  9. Meeting and Working on an Electronic Social Space: Behavioural Considerations and Implications for Cross-Cultural End User Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sajda

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of behavior on an electronic social space (electronic bulletin boards) revealed complex linages in which a few types of behaviors occurred most frequently. Interpretation indicates that cross-cultural implications for end-user computing involve practical considerations relating to three types of adaptation: technological, work, and…

  10. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; Meydbray, J.; Donovan, M.; Forrest, J.

    2012-05-01

    This document describes a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations, as would be experienced by typical residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. This type of shading test is particularly useful to evaluate the impact of different power conversion setups, including microinverters, DC power optimizers and string inverters, on overall system performance. The performance results are weighted based on annual estimates of shade to predict annual performance improvement. A trial run of the test procedure was conducted with a side by side comparison of a string inverter with a microinverter, both operating on identical 8kW solar arrays. Considering three different shade weighting conditions, the microinverter was found to increase production by 3.7% under light shading, 7.8% under moderate shading, and 12.3% under heavy shading, relative to the reference string inverter case. Detail is provided in this document to allow duplication of the test method at different test installations and for different power electronics devices.

  11. Preclinical medical students′ usage of electronic devices in lectures: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex W. H. Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Electronic devices such as laptops, tablets, and smartphones are commonly used in clinical clerkships, problem-based learning, and practicals. However, there is limited literature on electronic device usage in medical lectures. This study aimed to (1 assess preclinical medical students′ pattern and reason for electronic device usage in lectures and (2 assess the effect of lecture content and student factors on device usage. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study from the year 1 to 3 medical students of the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong. The data was collected through self-administrated questionnaires. The questionnaire was distributed twice to the same cohort of students, once after their basic medical science lectures, another after humanities lectures. Categorical variables were compared by Chi-squared test or Fisher′s exact test; continuous variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U-test or Kruskal-Wallis H-test. Results: Five hundred and seventy-nine valid questionnaires were collected. Students spent more time on electronic devices for learning in science lectures when compared with humanities lectures (P < 0.001. In contrast, students spent more time for nonlearning purposes in humanities lectures (P < 0.001. In science lectures, the mode of admission to medical school (P < 0.05 and year of study (P < 0.001 were factors affecting the device usage. Conclusions: Lecture content, mode of admission, and year of study have a significant impact on the electronic device usage in preclinical medical lectures. Appropriate interventions are necessary to help the students make better use of their devices and decrease the time spent on nonlearning purposes, particularly in humanities lectures.

  12. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    We present an analytical theory for electron flow through a molecule with several redox levels, enclosed between a pair of metallic electrodes. The levels can be electronic or electronic-vibrational levels. Vibrational energy spacing characterises the latter sets. The levels are further coupled...... relations at fixed electrochemical overpotential or gate voltage, and current-overpotential or current-gate voltage relations at fixed bias voltage are equivalent in the two systems. Due to the activation-less nature of the processes, electron flow between the electrodes through the molecular redox levels...... can be only achieved when the latter are located between the Fermi levels of the substrate and tip or source and drain electrodes. The redox levels can be brought into this "energy window", either by the overpotential or bias and gate voltages, or by vibrational relaxation of (a) given (set of) redox...

  13. Study of luminosity leveling with crossing angle for polarized proton program at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blackler, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Luminosity leveling has been requested by experiments in the past and it is also foreseen in the future at RHIC. There are some options to do this, some well tested and some are potential. In this report, we present the theoretical and experimental study on leveling luminosity by crossing angle.

  14. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for argon (Ar). About 1,960 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1921 through 2000 for Ar. Finally, author's recommended Ar electron collision cross section set is given in numerical tables. (author)

  15. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Sulphur hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). About 920 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1934 through 2000 for SF{sub 6}. Finally, author's comments for SF{sub 6} electron collision cross section are given. (author)

  16. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  17. Programmable Logic Controllers for Systems of Automatic of the Level Crossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczyslaw Kornaszewski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The railway crossings are vulnerable to incidence of high number of accidents often deadly. In order to face this problem, the modern systems of automatic of the level crossing have been introduced. These systems are based on Programmable Logic Controllers, which allow the designers to exploit self-control mechanisms, events acquiring, technical diagnostic which in turn enable remote control and acquisition of faults.

  18. Energetic Electron Acceleration Observed by MMS in the Vicinity of an X-Line Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Turner, D. L.; Wilder, F. D.; Osmane, A.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Reeves, G. D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    During the first months of observations, the Magnetospheric Multiscale Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer instrument has observed several instances of electron acceleration up to greater than 100 keV while in the vicinity of the dayside reconnection region. While particle acceleration associated with magnetic reconnection has been seen to occur up to these energies in the tail region, it had not yet been reported at the magnetopause. This study reports on observations of electron acceleration up to hundreds of keV that were recorded on 19 September 2015 around 1000 UT, in the midst of an X-line crossing. In the region surrounding the X-line, whistler-mode and broadband electrostatic waves were observed simultaneously with the appearance of highly energetic electrons which exhibited significant energization in the perpendicular direction. The mechanisms by which particles may be accelerated via reconnection-related processes are intrinsic to understanding particle dynamics among a wide range of spatial scales and plasma environments.

  19. Importance of level structure in nuclear reaction cross-section calculations. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, M.A.; Gardner, D.G.

    1985-11-07

    It is shown that level-density expressions cannot adequately represent or substitute for level structure information when making calculations of the Hauser-Feshbach type for cross sections or isomer-ratios for nuclei in the first few MeV above their ground state. It is stated that such discrete level information should include both experimentally confirmed and theoretically predicted levels. The utility of discrete level information to optimize level density calculations, to compute isomer ratios, in deriving dipole strength functions, and in the analysis of primary gamma ray spectra is emphasized, especially for nuclei far from the line of stability. 29 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs. (DWL)

  20. A Framework for the Multi-Level Fusion of Electronic Nose and Electronic Tongue for Tea Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruicong Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic nose (E-nose and electronic tongue (E-tongue can mimic the sensory perception of human smell and taste, and they are widely applied in tea quality evaluation by utilizing the fingerprints of response signals representing the overall information of tea samples. The intrinsic part of human perception is the fusion of sensors, as more information is provided comparing to the information from a single sensory organ. In this study, a framework for a multi-level fusion strategy of electronic nose and electronic tongue was proposed to enhance the tea quality prediction accuracies, by simultaneously modeling feature fusion and decision fusion. The procedure included feature-level fusion (fuse the time-domain based feature and frequency-domain based feature and decision-level fusion (D-S evidence to combine the classification results from multiple classifiers. The experiments were conducted on tea samples collected from various tea providers with four grades. The large quantity made the quality assessment task very difficult, and the experimental results showed much better classification ability for the multi-level fusion system. The proposed algorithm could better represent the overall characteristics of tea samples for both odor and taste.

  1. Total cross sections for electron scattering by 1-propanol at impact energies in the range 40-500 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, D. G. M.; Gomes, M.; Ghosh, S.; Silva, I. F. L.; Pires, W. A. D.; Jones, D. B.; Blanco, F.; Garcia, G.; Buckman, S. J.; Brunger, M. J.; Lopes, M. C. A.

    2017-11-01

    Absolute total cross section (TCS) measurements for electron scattering from 1-propanol molecules are reported for impact energies from 40 to 500 eV. These measurements were obtained using a new apparatus developed at Juiz de Fora Federal University—Brazil, which is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the molecules to be studied at a given pressure. Besides these experimental measurements, we have also calculated TCS using the Independent-Atom Model with Screening Corrected Additivity Rule and Interference (IAM-SCAR+I) approach with the level of agreement between them being typically found to be very good.

  2. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral argon; Compilacion de resultados de secciones eficaces de excitacion para niveles del Argon neutro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, F.

    1993-07-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4to 12), np(n=4to8) and nd(n=3to8)of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4 to 7), np (n=4 to 7) and nd (n=3 to 8). 3.- comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author) 35 refs.

  3. Analysis of Traffic Safety Factors at Level Rail-Road Crossings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Mlinarić

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the main factors of traffic safety andreliabilityat level crossings. The number and causes of accidentsare stated, that result from ignorance, insufficient training ofthe traffic participants, their ilnsponsibility and insufficient orincomplete legislation, as well as from insufficiently professionaland scientifically not serious enough approach to solvingthis cardinal problem in road and railway traffic. Based on theanalysis the causes are determined and solutions proposed, aswell as more efficient methods to improve safety and reduce thenumber of traffic accidents at level crossings.

  4. Unusual temperature dependence of the dissociative electron attachment cross section of 2-thiouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopyra, Janina [Faculty of Science, Siedlce University, 3 Maja 54, 08-110 Siedlce (Poland); Abdoul-Carime, Hassan [Université de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2016-01-21

    At low energies (<3 eV), molecular dissociation is controlled by dissociative electron attachment for which the initial step, i.e., the formation of the transient negative ion, can be initiated by shape resonance or vibrational Feshbach resonance (VFR) mediated by the formation of a dipole bound anion. The temperature dependence for shape-resonances is well established; however, no experimental information is available yet on the second mechanism. Here, we show that the dissociation cross section for VFRs mediated by the formation of a dipole bound anion decreases as a function of a temperature. The change remains, however, relatively small in the temperature range of 370-440 K but it might be more pronounced at the extended temperature range.

  5. PERCEPTION LEVEL EVALUATION OF RADIO ELECTRONIC MEANS TO A PULSE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method for evaluating the perception level of electronic means to pulsed electromagnetic radiation is consid- ered in this article. The electromagnetic wave penetration mechanism towards the elements of electronic systems and the impact on them are determined by the intensity of the radiation field on the elements of electronic systems. The impact of electromagnetic radiation pulses to the electronic systems refers to physical and analytical parameters of the relationship between exposure to pulses of electromagnetic radiation and the sample parameters of electronic systems. A physical and mathematical model of evaluating the perception level of electronic means to pulsed electromagnetic radiation is given. The developed model was based on the physics of electronics means failure which represents the description of electro- magnetic, electric and thermal processes that lead to the degradation of the original structure of the apparatus elements. The conditions that lead to the total equation electronic systems functional destruction when exposed to electromagnetic radia- tion pulses are described. The internal characteristics of the component elements that respond to the damaging effects are considered. The ratio for the power failure is determined. A thermal breakdown temperature versus pulse duration of expo- sure at various power levels is obtained. The way of evaluation the reliability of electronic systems when exposed to pulses of electromagnetic radiation as a destructive factor is obtained.

  6. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction versus electron back-scattering diffraction: A case study on an electron transparent cross-section of TWIP steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Elkhodary, Khalil I; Nancarrow, Mitchell J B; Saleh, Ahmed A

    2017-12-01

    The present case study compares transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) with electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD) on the same area of an electron transparent cross-section of a twinning induced plasticity steel. While TKD expectedly provides better clarity of internal defect substructures in the band contrast map, EBSD returns orientation data that approaches the quality of the TKD map. This was rationalised by Monte Carlo simulations of the electron energy spreads, which showed that due to the geometry-based compromises associated with adapting a conventional EBSD detector (which is off-axis with respect to the incident electron beam) to TKD, a broadening in the electron energy distribution of the forward-scattered electrons collected on the detector phosphor screen, is unavoidable. In this circumstance, the values of the full-widths at half-maximum of the energy distributions for TKD and EBSD are of the same order. It follows that EBSD on electron transparent cross-sections may be a viable alternative to TKD when: (i) conventional EBSD detectors are adapted to TKD and, (ii) sample microstructures comprise features whose sizes do not mandate the application of TKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of electron spin resonance for evaluation of the level of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    logic processes, ranging from intermediates in enzyme reaction to effectors. Electron spin resonance (ESR) or electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be used to provide insight into the free radical state of cells, bio- chemical reactions and measure free radical levels in human tissues (Zyrianov and Sumovskaya 2001).

  8. Toward the Next Level of PCB Usage in Power Electronic Converters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, E.C.W.; Ferreira, B.J.A.; Bauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    A means for power electronics to exploit the level of 3-D packaging already being implemented in compact consumer products, such as digital cameras, is investigated in order to increase its power density. The increase in functionality and usage of printed circuit board (PCB) in power electronic

  9. Angular differential studies of electron transfer in collisions of He-like ions with Na(3s) : The role of electron saddle crossings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, I.; Otranto, S.; Meinema, C.; Olson, R. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic experimental and theoretical study of angular differential cross sections of single-electron transfer in collisions of N5+, O6+, and Ne8+ with ground-state Na(3s) in the collision energy range from 1 to 8 keV/amu. Experiments were performed using recoil-ion momentum

  10. Age differences in the association of childhood obesity with area-level and school-level deprivation: cross-classified multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, N; Rutter, H; Foster, C

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that area-level deprivation is associated with obesity independently of individual socioeconomic status; however, although the school may also have an impact on child health, few studies have investigated the association between school-level deprivation and the body mass index (BMI) of students. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the BMI for children of different ages and area-level and school-level deprivation. BMI measurements were collected through the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) that samples from two school years: 396,171 reception year pupils (4-5-year olds) and 392,344 year 6 pupils (10-11-year olds) from 14,054 primary schools in England. Cross-classified multilevel models with four levels: individual (n=788,525), lower super output areas corresponding to area of residence (n=29,606), schools (n=14,054) and primary care trusts (PCTs, n=143), which coordinate the collection of data within a large area, were used to study the relationship between measures of deprivation at an area and school level, and childhood BMI within England. A positive association was found between the area and school measures of deprivation, and student BMI. Both the measures of deprivation explained a greater proportion of variance in BMI z-scores for year 6 students than for the reception year students, with a greater difference between the year groups found with the school-level measure of socioeconomic status than for the the area-level measure. Deprivation explains a greater proportion of the variance in BMI for older compared with younger children, perhaps reflecting the impact of deprivation as children age, highlighting the widening of health inequalities through childhood. The association with school-level deprivation illustrates the impact of the school on BMI status throughout the primary school years.

  11. Real-time observation of intersystem crossing induced by charge recombination during bimolecular electron transfer reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2016-09-21

    Real-time probing of intersystem crossing (ISC) and triplet-state formation after photoinduced electron transfer (ET) is a particularly challenging task that can be achieved by time-resolved spectroscopy with broadband capability. Here, we examine the mechanism of charge separation (CS), charge recombination (CR) and ISC of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between poly[(9,9-di(3,3′-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and dicyanobenzene (DCB) using time-resolved spectroscopy. PET from PFN to DCB is confirmed by monitoring the transient absorption (TA) and infrared spectroscopic signatures for the radical ion pair (DCB─•-PFN+•). In addition, our time-resolved results clearly demonstrate that CS takes place within picoseconds followed by CR within nanoseconds. The ns-TA data exhibit the clear spectroscopic signature of PFN triplet-triplet absorption, induced by the CR of the radical ion pairs (DCB─•-PFN+•). As a result, the triplet state of PFN (3PFN*) forms and subsequently, the ground singlet state is replenished within microseconds. © 2016

  12. On the level crossing of multi-dimensional delayed renewal processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jewgeni H. Dshalalow

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the behavior of an (l+3th-dimensional, delayed renewal process with dependent components, the first three (called active of which are to cross one of their respective thresholds. More specifically, the crossing takes place when at least one of the active components reaches or exceeds its assigned level. The values of the other two active components, as well as the rest of the components (passive, are to be registered. The analysis yields the joint functional of the “crossing level” and other characteristics (some of which can be interpreted as the first passage time in a closed form, refining earlier results of the author. A brief, informal discussion of various applications to stochastic models is presented.

  13. The difference of two renewal processes level crossing and the infimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Dirk

    1992-01-01

    We consider the difference process N of two independent renewal (counting) processes. Second-order approximations to the distribution function of the level crossing time are given. Direct application of the second-order approximation is complicated by the occurrence of an (in general) unknown term

  14. Advantages and Disadvantages of Cross Grade Level Collaboration to Improve Collegial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Fidelia

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have connected student achievement to teacher collaboration; however, there is a paucity of studies conducted on how teachers use identified advantages and disadvantages of cross grade level collaboration to improve collegial interactions to achieve better student performance, professional development, teacher effectiveness, and job…

  15. Polymers and Cross-Linking: A CORE Experiment to Help Students Think on the Submicroscopic Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Bruce, Alice E.; Avargil, Shirly; Amar, Francois G.; Wemyss, Thomas M.; Flood, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers and Cross-Linking experiment is presented via a new three phase learning cycle: CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation), which is designed to model productive chemical inquiry and to promote a deeper understanding about the chemistry operating at the submicroscopic level. The experiment is built on two familiar…

  16. A cross-national multi-level study of family meals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, R.; Gauthier, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to broaden the understanding of the factors that predict the frequency of meals a family takes as a unit, as well as to assess the potential role country-level variables may have in accounting for cross-national differences in the frequency of family meals. Logistic regression and

  17. To imitate or differentiate: Cross-level identity work in an innovation network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I Fortin (Israël); Oliver, D. (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSurvival in global high-tech industries requires many organizations to participate in specialized innovation networks. However, sustained participation in these networks often proves more challenging than expected for organizations and their representatives, due to complex cross-level

  18. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Beiter, P.; Flores, F.; Hurlbut, D.; Liu, C.

    2015-02-01

    This presentation and associated spreadsheet examine the level of cross-state renewable energy transactions. Most state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies allow for out-of-state renewable energy or renewable energy certificates to count towards compliance. This analysis focuses on compliance for 2012 and provides stakeholders with an understanding of the extent to which RPSs are being met.

  19. Analysis of Traffic Safety Factors at Level Rail-Road Crossings

    OpenAIRE

    Tomislav Mlinarić; Rašid Zuko; Milivoj Gregurić

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyses the main factors of traffic safety andreliabilityat level crossings. The number and causes of accidentsare stated, that result from ignorance, insufficient training ofthe traffic participants, their ilnsponsibility and insufficient orincomplete legislation, as well as from insufficiently professionaland scientifically not serious enough approach to solvingthis cardinal problem in road and railway traffic. Based on theanalysis the causes are determined and solutions proposed...

  20. Level crossings, excess times and transient plasma-wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma-wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  1. Level crossings, excess times, and transient plasma–wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorsen, A., E-mail: audun.theodorsen@uit.no; Garcia, O. E., E-mail: odd.erik.garcia@uit.no [Department of Physics and Technology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2016-04-15

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma–wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with a radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  2. Cross-Ontology Multi-level Association Rule Mining in the Gene Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Prashanti; Ozkan, Seval; Wang, Hui; McCarthy, Fiona; Bridges, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) has become the internationally accepted standard for representing function, process, and location aspects of gene products. The wealth of GO annotation data provides a valuable source of implicit knowledge of relationships among these aspects. We describe a new method for association rule mining to discover implicit co-occurrence relationships across the GO sub-ontologies at multiple levels of abstraction. Prior work on association rule mining in the GO has concentrated on mining knowledge at a single level of abstraction and/or between terms from the same sub-ontology. We have developed a bottom-up generalization procedure called Cross-Ontology Data Mining-Level by Level (COLL) that takes into account the structure and semantics of the GO, generates generalized transactions from annotation data and mines interesting multi-level cross-ontology association rules. We applied our method on publicly available chicken and mouse GO annotation datasets and mined 5368 and 3959 multi-level cross ontology rules from the two datasets respectively. We show that our approach discovers more and higher quality association rules from the GO as evaluated by biologists in comparison to previously published methods. Biologically interesting rules discovered by our method reveal unknown and surprising knowledge about co-occurring GO terms. PMID:23071802

  3. Total electron scattering cross sections of some important biomolecules at 0.2-6.0 keV energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Meera Devi; Ariyasinghe, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The total electron scattering cross sections (TCS) of five nucleic bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine and uracil), phosphoric acid, three amino acids (glycine, lysine, and L-histidine), D-glucose, alpha-D-glucose, tetrahydropyran (THP), 3-hydroxytetrahydrofuran and furan have been determined in the energy range 0.2-6.0 keV using a simple model based on the effective atomic total electron scattering cross sections (EATCS). The reliability of the model is confirmed by comparing the determined TCS with the predictions of those by existing theoretical models.

  4. A method for utilizing biocytin to study retinofugal pathways at the light and electron microscopic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, G A; Palmer, P E; Simmons, N E; diPierro, C G; Ebbesson, S O

    1993-08-01

    Numerous methods have been utilized in the past to study the retinofugal pathway at both the light and electron microscopic levels. However, many of these techniques have technical drawbacks that make them difficult to use in electron microscopic studies. We present herein a method for utilizing the anterograde tracer biocytin to study the retinal pathways at both the light and electron microscopic levels. Biocytin is an especially useful tracer since it clearly labels very small axons and boutons in addition to the larger fibers. In addition, the synaptic ultrastructure is left intact and the technique can be utilized in numerous double-labeling neuroanatomical studies.

  5. Electronic and exchange coupling in a cross-conjugated D-B-A biradical: mechanistic implications for quantum interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Martin L; Shultz, David A; Stasiw, Daniel E; Habel-Rodriguez, Diana; Stein, Benjamin; Boyle, Paul D

    2013-10-02

    A combination of variable-temperature EPR spectroscopy, electronic absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed on Tp(Cum,Me)Zn(SQ-m-Ph-NN) (1-meta) a donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) biradical that possesses a cross-conjugated meta-phenylene (m-Ph) bridge and a spin singlet ground state. The experimental results have been interpreted in the context of detailed bonding and excited-state computations in order to understand the excited-state electronic structure of 1-meta. The results reveal important excited-state contributions to the ground-state singlet-triplet splitting in this cross-conjugated D-B-A biradical that contribute to our understanding of electronic coupling in cross-conjugated molecules and specifically to quantum interference effects. In contrast to the conjugated isomer, which is a D-B-A biradical possessing a para-phenylene bridge, admixture of a single low-lying singly excited D → A type configuration into the cross-conjugated D-B-A biradical ground state makes a negligible contribution to the ground-state magnetic exchange interaction. Instead, an excited state formed by a Ph-NN (HOMO) → Ph-NN (LUMO) one-electron promotion configurationally mixes into the ground state of the m-Ph bridged D-A biradical. This results in a double (dynamic) spin polarization mechanism as the dominant contributor to ground-state antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the SQ and NN spins. Thus, the dominant exchange mechanism is one that activates the bridge moiety via the spin polarization of a doubly occupied orbital with phenylene bridge character. This mechanism is important, as it enhances the electronic and magnetic communication in cross-conjugated D-B-A molecules where, in the case of 1-meta, the magnetic exchange in the active electron approximation is expected to be J ~ 0 cm(-1). We hypothesize that similar superexchange mechanisms are common to all cross-conjugated D-B-A triads. Our results are compared to

  6. Panel Data with Cross-Sectional Dependence Characterized by a Multi-Level Factor Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir

    A panel data model with a multi-level cross-sectional dependence is proposed. The factor structure is driven by top-level common factors as well as non-pervasive factors. I propose a simple method to filter out the full factor structure that overcomes limitations in standard procedures which may...... mix up both levels of unobservable factors and may hamper the identification of the model. The model covers both stationary and non-stationary cases and takes into account other relevant features that make the model well suited to the analysis of many types of time series frequently addressed...... in macroeconomics and finance. The model makes it possible to examine the time series and cross-sectional dynamics of variables allowing for a rich fractional cointegration analysis. A Monte Carlo simulation is conducted to examine the finite sample features of the suggested procedure. Findings indicate...

  7. Crossed-beam scattering studies of electron-transfer processes between the dication CO2(2+) and neutral CO2: electronic states of reactants and products involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabka, Jan; Ricketts, Claire L; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Schwarz, Helmut; Thissen, Roland; Dutuit, Odile; Price, Stephen D; Herman, Zdenek

    2010-06-17

    Crossed-beam scattering experiments were carried out at collision energies of 4.51 and 2.71 eV to elucidate the electronic states involved in the nondissociative and dissociative electron-transfer reactions observed following CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) collisions. Specifically, we focus on the observation that, in the dissociative electron-transfer reaction, forming CO(+), the majority of the CO(+) product ions are formed via electron capture by the CO(2)(2+) rather than via ejection of an electron from the neutral CO(2) reaction partner. The main channels resulting in nondissociative electron transfer are reactions of the ground (X(3)Sigma(g)(-)) and excited states of CO(2)(2+) to give different combinations of the ground and excited states of the product pair of CO(2)(+) ions in which the combination AA appears to be significant. The CO(+) ions appear mainly to arise from slow dissociation of CO(2)(+)(b(4)Pi(u)) formed following electron capture by the ground state of the dication reactant (X(3)Sigma(g)(-)), with possible contributions from electron capture by higher triplet excited states of the dication.

  8. Cross sections for electron collision with fluoroacetylene: A comparative study with acetylene and difluoroacetylene along with fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Choi, Heechol; Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2017-09-01

    Low energy electron impact cross sections of fluoroacetylene (HCCF) are investigated using the R-matrix method. The best target model, which gave good target properties in comparison with literature values, is used for the final scattering calculation. The fluorination effect on the various elastic, momentum transfer, differential, excitation and ionization cross section is studied by comparing the present results with the recent theoretical results of difluoroacetylene (FCCF) and acetylene (HCCH). This is the first reported detailed investigation of cross sections for HCCF along with the fluorination effect.

  9. A Measurement of Inclusive Quasielastic Electron Cross Sections at X > 1 and High Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitjean, Thomas [Univ. of Erlangen, Nurnberg (Germany)

    2002-07-04

    Experiment E89-008 measured inclusive electron scattering cross sections from different nuclei in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. Cross sections on the low energy loss side of the quasi-elastic peak (xBj > 1) are extracted for carbon, aluminum, iron and gold. The data cover four-momentum transfers squared of 0.97 to 5.73 GeV 2 =c 2 . The measured cross sections are compared to cross sections calculated using a microscopic spectral function. The cross section results are also analyzed in terms of the two scaling functions F (y) and f(Ψ'). For both the data is found to be independent of the momentum transfer (scaling of the first kind). For f(Ψ') the data is in addition independent of the mass number A (scaling of the second kind) and thus exhibits superscaling properties.

  10. Comparison Between Path Lengths Traveled by Solar Electrons and Ions in Ground-Level Enhancement Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lun C.; Malandraki, Olga E.; Reames, Donald; NG, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua; Patsou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the Wind/3DP/SST electron and Wind/EPACT/LEMT ion data to investigate the path length difference between solar electrons and ions in the ground-level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23. Assuming that the onset time of metric type II or decameter-hectometric (DH) type III radio bursts is the solar release time of non-relativistic electrons, we have found that within an error range of plus or minus 10% the deduced path length of low-energy (approximately 27 keV) electrons from their release site near the Sun to the 1 AU observer is consistent with the ion path length deduced by Reames from the onset time analysis. In addition, the solar longitude distribution and IMF topology of the GLE events examined are in favor of the coronal mass ejection-driven shock acceleration origin of observed non-relativistic electrons.We have also found an increase of electron path lengths with increasing electron energies. The increasing rate of path lengths is correlated with the pitch angle distribution (PAD) of peak electron intensities locally measured, with a higher rate corresponding to a broader PAD. The correlation indicates that the path length enhancement is due to the interplanetary scattering experienced by first arriving electrons. The observed path length consistency implies that the maximum stable time of magnetic flux tubes, along which particles transport, could reach 4.8 hr.

  11. Merging of Landau levels in a strongly-interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Shashkin, A.A.; Dolgopolov, V.T.; Clark, J. W.; Shaginyan, V. R.; Zverev, M. V.; Khodel, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the merging of the spin- and valley-split Landau levels at the chemical potential is an intrinsic property of a strongly-interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon. Evidence for the level merging is given by available experimental data.

  12. Merging of Landau levels in a strongly interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkin, A A; Dolgopolov, V T; Clark, J W; Shaginyan, V R; Zverev, M V; Khodel, V A

    2014-05-09

    We show that the merging of the spin- and valley-split Landau levels at the chemical potential is an intrinsic property of a strongly interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon. Evidence for the level merging is given by available experimental data.

  13. Simulation of distributed-emission and injected-beam crossed-field amplifiers. Part 2: The crossed-field electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, D. M.; Fontana, T. P.; Rowe, J. E.

    1980-04-01

    Numerical models developed for the crossed-field electron gun predict the current and the beam shape and stability for varied voltages or magnetic field. These programs use a deformable triangular mesh to reproduce the realistic electrode boundaries. A static iterative analysis predicts beam currents about 5 percent higher than measured for a short Kino gun, but is not stable for long cathodes with returning electrodes. However, the alternative time-dependent method predicts a stable, well-defined beam in both cases. Excess shot noise in a long-cathode crossed-field gun is believed to be due to cycloiding electrons which return to the cathode from well beyond the potential minimum. Of three theories compared here, only the Ho and Van Duzer model includes these electrons and predicts an instability. With added shot noise the computer simulation may be capable of reproducing the effect. Experimental measurements have been obtained by subcontract for a Northrop gridded crossed-field gun. The two dimensional time-dependent analysis, which ignores the grids, predicts the beam current with good order-of-magnitude agreement.

  14. Evaluation of Railway Level Crossing Attributes on Accident Causation in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeolu O Dina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study examines the contribution of Railway Level Crossing (RLCphysical attributes to accident occurrence using the12 major level crossings within the Lagos metropolis. The 48km single track mainline section under consideration which barely make up 1.1% of the entire narrow gauge track network of the country within a 5 year period contributed about 45% of the total National crossing accidents recorded in Nigeria. The method of investigation involved recording the individual attributes of each RLC such asgates, pedestrian traffic, car traffic light, proximity of signage to crossing, vehicular traffic as dummy variables.The regression analysis  was used to measure their effect on accidents.The result indicates gates, pedestrians and the location of signage had significant impact on accidents occurrence at level crossings within Lagos metropolis. Based on the findings, enhancement of active warning systems among other recommendations was suggested as potent counter measures for RLC accident reduction. Abstrak Penelitian menguji tingkat kontribusi atribut fisik dari perlintasan jalan kereta api terhadap kejadian kecelakaan menggunakan 12 perlintasan utama dalam kota metropolis Lagos. 48 km jalan utama tunggal menjadi pertimbangan yang hampir meningkat 1.1% dari seluruh trek sempit jaringan negara dalam jangka waktu 5 tahun menyumbang sekitar 45% dari total kecelakaan perlintasan secara Nasional di Nigeria. Metode penelitian melibatkan catatan dari masing-masing atribut RLC seperti pintu gerbang, pejalan kaki, lampu lalu lintas mobil, kedekatan tanda penyebarangan, lalu lintas kendaraan sebagai variabel dumi. Analisis regresi digunakan untuk mengukur pengaruh dari atribut terhadap kecelakaan. Hasilnya menunjukkan pintu gerbang, pejalan kaki, dan lokasi tanda perlintasan mempunyai dampak signifikan pada kecelakaan dalam kota metropolis Lagos.Berdasarkan penemuan tersebut, perbaikan dari sistem peringatan aktif disarankan sebagai upaya

  15. A semi-empirical formula for calculation of absolute cross sections for ionization and excitation of atoms by electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, L.

    A simple analytical expression for the absolute ionization and (optically allowed) excitation cross sections, as a function of the electron energy, is “derived”. In this expression there are two parameters. The first one is proportional to the optical oscillator strength and the second one is

  16. Total Hadron Cross Section, New Particles, and Muon Electron Events in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at SPEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, B.

    1976-01-01

    The review of total hadron electroproduction cross sections, the new states, and the muon--electron events includes large amount of information on hadron structure, nine states with width ranging from 10's of keV to many MeV, the principal decay modes and quantum numbers of some of the states, and limits on charm particle production. 13 references. (JFP)

  17. Influence of the electron injection energy on ballistic transport in nanoscale GaAs/AlGaAs cross junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, Matthias; Cetinkaya, Ayhan; Wieser, Ulrich; Kunze, Ulrich [Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik - Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas [Angewandte Festkoerperphysik - Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Ballistic electron transport is studied in a modified nanoscale cross junction prepared from a high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The device is defined by combining electron-beam lithography with standard photo lithography and is transferred by wet-chemical etching. The lateral geometry is given by a central orthogonal cross junction and two additional branches which orthogonally merge in the vertical bar on each side of the central junction. A potential barrier is formed by a nanoscale Schottky top-gate finger, which crosses the vertical bar near the central cross junction. The barrier enables to vary the kinetic energy of injected electrons. If an input bias is applied between the vertical bar embedding the barrier and an orthogonal lead of the central cross junction, negative bend resistance is found in the nonlocal I-V transfer characteristics. In this configuration V describes the potential difference between the voltage probes opposite to the current leads. If the transfer voltage is detected between the barrier free part of the vertical bar and its neighboring branch, gate-voltage dependent nonlinearities are observed.

  18. Manipulating low-dimensional materials down to the level of single atoms with electron irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Meyer, Jannik C; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) instrumentation have made it possible to focus electron beams with sub-atomic precision and to identify the chemical structure of materials at the level of individual atoms. Here we discuss the dynamics that are observed in the structure of low-dimensional materials under electron irradiation, and the potential use of electron beams for single-atom manipulation. As a demonstration of the latter capability, we show how momentum transfer from the electrons of a 60-keV Ångström-sized STEM probe can be used to move silicon atoms embedded in the graphene lattice with atomic precision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  20. Electronic Cigarette Use and Smoking Abstinence in Japan: A Cross-Sectional Study of Quitting Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tomoyasu; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Nakahara, Rika; Kunugita, Naoki; Mochizuki-Kobayashi, Yumiko

    2017-02-17

    The benefit of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in smoking cessation remains controversial. Recently, e-cigarettes have been gaining popularity in Japan, without evidence of efficacy on quitting cigarettes. We conducted an online survey to collect information on tobacco use, difficulties in smoking cessation, socio-demographic factors, and health-related factors in Japan. Among the total participants (n = 9055), 798 eligible persons aged 20-69 years who smoked within the previous five years were analyzed to assess the relationship between the outcome of smoking cessation and quitting methods used, including e-cigarettes, smoking cessation therapy, and unassisted. E-cigarette use was negatively associated with smoking cessation (odds ratio (OR) = 0.632; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.414-0.964) after adjusting for gender, age, health-related factors, and other quitting methods. Conversely, smoking cessation therapy (i.e., varenicline) was significantly associated with smoking cessation (OR = 1.885; 95% CI = 1.018-3.492) in the same model. For effective smoking cessation, e-cigarette use appears to have low efficacy among smokers in Japan. Allowing for the fact that this study is limited by its cross-sectional design, follow-up studies are needed to assess the prospective association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation.

  1. Relaxation of an electron beam in a crossed-field beam-plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadeev, K.; Erastov, E.; Ivanov, A.; Muksunov, A.; Nikiforov, V.; Severnyi, V.; Khripunov, B.; Shapkin, V.

    1981-09-01

    The conditions for the formation of a plasma with a high degree of ionization by an electron beam (U/sub b/ = 5 kV, I/sub b/ = 0.07 A) have been studied experimentally in krypton at a density n/sub 0/ = 3 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Imposing a resonant electric field can cause both the onset of a volume discharge (under these conditions the dissipation of the beam power increases sharply) and a cutoff of the discharge. An increase in the magnetic field from 8 and 12 kG causes an increase in the power dissipation. The dissipation of the beam power has been studied as a function of the longitudinal dimension of the working volume, in which the beam interacts with the gas. Below a certain minimum length of this region a volume discharge can no longer be formed. The results of this study may prove useful for developing a plasma centrifuge which operates by means of a beam-plasma discharge.

  2. A State-Space Approach to Optimal Level-Crossing Prediction for Linear Gaussian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander

    2009-01-01

    In many complex engineered systems, the ability to give an alarm prior to impending critical events is of great importance. These critical events may have varying degrees of severity, and in fact they may occur during normal system operation. In this article, we investigate approximations to theoretically optimal methods of designing alarm systems for the prediction of level-crossings by a zero-mean stationary linear dynamic system driven by Gaussian noise. An optimal alarm system is designed to elicit the fewest false alarms for a fixed detection probability. This work introduces the use of Kalman filtering in tandem with the optimal level-crossing problem. It is shown that there is a negligible loss in overall accuracy when using approximations to the theoretically optimal predictor, at the advantage of greatly reduced computational complexity. I

  3. The communication skills and the empathic tendency levels of nursing students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazar, Berrin; Demiralp, Meral; Erer, İmren

    2017-06-01

    The most basic component of communication skills is the complex and multidimensional skill of empathy. This study was conducted to assess the communication skills and empathic tendency levels of female nursing students Turkish university. This cross-sectional study sample consisted of 342 nurse student. There was a significant difference between the classes in terms of communication skills (0.021, p  .05). The mean communication skills score increased in the final year but empathic tendency levels did not increase with increasing school years. This result suggests that the empathic tendency level could not be increased with the courses in the curriculum in our study. The results suggest that empathic tendency levels were not increased with subsequent nursing coursework. Determining empathic predisposition levels prior to entry into nursing programs should therefore be considered.

  4. Speaking up in groups: a cross-level study of group voice climate and voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Elizabeth Wolfe; Wheeler-Smith, Sara L; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing body of research on employee voice—defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or opinions intended to improve organizational or unit functioning—the effects of shared or collective-level cognitions have received scant attention. There has also been relatively little research on voice within work groups. Our goal in this study was to address these important gaps by focusing on the effects of group-level beliefs about voice (i.e., group voice climate) on individual voice behavior within work groups. We conducted a cross-level investigation of voice behavior within 42 groups of engineers from a large chemical company. Consistent with our hypotheses, group voice climate was highly predictive of voice and explained variance beyond the effects of individual-level identification and satisfaction, and procedural justice climate. Also consistent with predictions, the effect of identification on voice was stronger in groups with favorable voice climates. These findings provide evidence that voice is shaped not just by individual attitudes and perceptions of the work context, as past research has shown, but also by group-level beliefs. The results also highlight the importance of broadening our conceptual models of voice to include shared cognitions and of conducting additional cross-level research on voice.

  5. Noise Levels in Two Emergency Departments Before and After the Introduction of Electronic Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Hospital work generates noise. This article investigates the noise level in emergency departments (EDs) to assess the need to address this aspect of the work environment and to investigate whether the replacement of dry-erase with electronic whiteboards lowers the noise level. Method....... The maximum equivalent continuous noise levels across 1 second were above 80 dB(A) at all four coordination centres. At two of the centres above 80 dB(A) noises also occurred at night. After the introduction of electronic whiteboards the noise level was lowered at one ED but unchanged at the other ED....... The main noise sources at the ED in Study II were clinicians talking, phones ringing, and equipment being moved around. Conclusion: The noise level at both EDs is above levels previously found to decrease the quality of work, increase the strain on the staff, or both. The transition from dry...

  6. Level of stress in final year MBBS students at Rural Medical College: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Shelke Umesh S, Kunkulol Rahul R, Narwane Sandeep P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stress, defined as an imbalance between environmental conditions necessary for survival and the ability of individuals to adapt to those conditions, have a high prevalence in MBBS students. A variety of stressors play a significant role in developing stress. Objective:To study the level of stress and stressors responsible in Final MBBS students of Rural Medical College, Loni. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in 100 students (50 of either sex) willing ...

  7. Servant leadership and employee voice behavior: a cross-level investigation in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Aimin; Xiao, Yigui

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the influence and mechanisms of servant leadership on voice behavior, including the mediating role of psychological safety, and the moderating role of supervisor-subordinate Guanxi. Data were collected from 430 civil servants and their immediate supervisors in Changsha, China. Cross-Level investigation revealed that servant leadership had a significant influence on voice behavior, psychological safety mediated the relationship between servant leadership and voice behavior, w...

  8. Low-energy and very-low energy total cross sections for electron collisions with N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Kishino, Takaya; Okumura, Takuma; Kobayashi, Naomasa; Sayama, Atsushi; Mori, Yuma; Hosaka, Kouichi; Odagiri, Takeshi; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Absolute grand total cross sections for electron scattering from N2 are obtained in the energy range from 20 eV down to 5 meV with very narrow electron energy width of 9 meV using the threshold-photoelectron source. Total cross sections obtained in the present study are compared with the previous experimentally obtained results. At the very-low energy region below 50 meV, the present total cross sections are somewhat smaller than those reported by the Aarhus group [S.V. Hoffmann et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4157 (2002)], which has been the only experimental work that provided the total cross sections in the very-low energy region. The energy positions of the peaks in the total cross sections due to the 2Πg shape resonance are obtained with higher accuracy, due to the improved uncertainty of the energy position in the present measurement compared to the previous works. The resonance structure in the total cross sections due to the Feshbach resonances of N2 at around 11.5 eV are also observed. Analysis of the resonant structure was carried out in order to determine the values of resonance width of Feshbach resonances of N2. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  9. High level cross of the esophagus with the descending aorta in scoliosis: CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Koji; Kikuno, Motoyuki; Hyodoh, Hideki [Jichi Medical School Hospital, Minamikawachi-machi, Tochigi-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The esophagus occasionally crosses the descending aorta at an unusually high level (3-5 cm inferior to the carina) in right-sided scoliosis. The purpose of this study was to analyze the mechanism of this finding. We prospectively evaluated thoracic CT scans in 30 patients with right-sided scoliosis. We assessed the alterations in the positions of the esophagus and the descending aorta by the thoracic deformity. The descending aorta followed the scoliotic curve of the spine in 26 (87%) patients. The esophagus followed the scoliotic curve of the spine in 14 (47%) patients and did not in 16 (53%). The anteroposterior diameter of the thorax in the former group was significantly smaller than that in the latter (p < 0.01). High level cross of both structures was identified in 14 (47%) patients, and all of them belonged to the group in which the esophagus did not follow the scoliotic curve of the spine. The unusual high level cross of the esophagus with the descending aorta occasionally seen in scoliosis is due to a difference in the positional alterations of the two structures resulting from the scoliosis. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Prevalence of stress and stress tolerance levels among adolescent boys - a district level cross sectional study in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kallol; Kamath, Veena G; Kamath, Asha; Alex, Johnson; Hegde, Asha

    2015-11-10

    Adolescence is a tumultuous period of hormonal and psychological transitions ranging from 10 to 19 years (WHO). This growth phase is usually accompanied by stressors. Very few studies have reported the prevalence of stress levels among adolescent boys. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and determinants of stress and its tolerance levels among high school boys. A cross sectional study design was selected for this purpose. A standardized self reported questionnaire was administered to 1153 high school boys. A score of 130 and more was used to classify the participants as stressed. The prevalence of stress and its tolerance levels was found to be 55% and 33.7%, respectively. Also correlations suggest that parental education and occupational status play a significant role in adolescent stress. Together, these findings suggest necessitating an intervention to counter the same. The proportion of stressed adolescent boys (55.5%) reported to have poor stress tolerance (41%). Studies addressing stress among high school adolescents remain unexplored. The basic determinants of stress are not researched upon these age groups. Our study reports the prevalence of stress to be 55% among high school boys. This could be the fundamental basis of designing suitable stress management programs for adolescents that could reduce their stress levels.

  11. Reaction cross-section calculations using new experimental and theoretical level structure data for deformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, R.W.; Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    A technique for modeling level structures of odd-odd nuclei has been used to construct sets of discrete states with energies in the range 0 to 1.5 MeV for several nuclei in the rare-earth and actinide regions. The accuracy of the modeling technique was determined by comparison with experimental data. Examination was made of what effect the use of these new, more complete sets of discrete states has on the calculation of level densities, total reaction cross sections, and isomer ratios. 9 refs.

  12. Analytical expression for K- and L-shell cross sections of neutral atoms near ionization threshold by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, C S [Instituto de Geociencias, Centro de Pesquisa em Geologia e GeofIsica, Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), 40170-290 Salvador (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M A Z [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Trincavelli, J C [Facultad de Matematica, AstronomIa y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina); Segui, S [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, RIo Negro (Argentina)

    2007-10-14

    An analytical expression is proposed to describe the K- and L-shell ionization cross sections of neutral atoms by electron impact over a wide range of atomic numbers (4 {<=} Z {<=} 79) and over voltages U < 10. This study is based on the analysis of a calculated ionization cross section database using the distorted-wave first-order Born approximation (DWBA). The expression proposed for cross sections relative to their maximum height involves only two parameters for each atomic shell, with no dependence on the atomic number. On the other hand, it is verified that these parameters exhibit a monotonic behaviour with the atomic number for the absolute ionization cross sections, which allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the latter.

  13. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, a...

  14. Measurement of the Inclusive Electron Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section on Carbon with the T2K Near Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The T2K off-axis near detector ND280 is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ˜1 GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle, and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged νe charged current cross section on carbon is measured to be ⟨σ ⟩ϕ =1.11 ±0.10 (stat)±0.18 (syst)×1 0-38 cm2/nucleon . The differential and total cross-section measurements agree with the predictions of two leading neutrino interaction generators, NEUT and GENIE. The NEUT prediction is 1.23 ×1 0-38 cm2/nucleon and the GENIE prediction is 1.08 ×1 0-38 cm2/nucleon . The total νe charged current cross-section result is also in agreement with data from the Gargamelle experiment.

  15. Counter-crossing injection for stable high-quality electron beam generation via laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaki, H; Daito, I; Hayashi, Y; Ma, J; Chen, L-M; Kando, M; Esirkepov, T Z; Fukuda, Y; Homma, T; Pirozhkov, A; Koga, J K; Nakajima, K; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan)], E-mail: kotaki.hideyuki@jaea.go.jp

    2008-05-01

    Counter-crossing injection, which is a realistic setup for applications, by two sub-relativistic laser pulses colliding at an angle of 45 degrees is demonstrated. The collision of the two laser pulses generates a high-quality electron beam with high reproducibility. The generated monoenergetic electron beam has a peak energy of 14.4 MeV, an energy spread of 10.6%, a charge of 21.8 pC, a normalized emittance of 1.6 {pi} mm mrad, and a reproducibility of 50%. The electron beam generation is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations. The laser pulses in plasma are self-focused to higher intensity when the laser power is above the threshold for relativistic self-focusing. The collision of the self-focused laser pulses generates a high-quality electron beam with high reproducibility.

  16. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  17. Electron transport in mercury vapor: cross sections, pressure and temperature dependence of transport coefficients and NDC effects★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirić, Jasmina; Simonović, Ilija; Petrović, Zoran Lj.; White, Ronald D.; Dujko, Saša

    2017-11-01

    In this work we propose a complete and consistent set of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor. The set is validated through a series of comparisons between swarm data calculated using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulations, and the available experimental data. Other sets of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor were also used as input in our numerical codes with the aim of testing their completeness, consistency and accuracy. The calculated swarm parameters are compared with measurements in order to assess the quality of the cross sections in providing data for plasma modeling. In particular, we discuss the dependence of transport coefficients on the pressure and temperature of mercury vapor, and the occurrence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the limit of lower values of E/N. We have shown that the phenomenon of NDC is induced by the presence of mercury dimers and that can be controlled by varying either pressure or temperature of mercury vapor. The effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers is estimated for a range of pressures and temperatures. It is shown that the measured and calculated drift velocities agree very well only if the effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers and thermal motion of mercury atoms are carefully considered and implemented in numerical calculations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  18. Total projectile electron loss cross sections of U^{28+} ions in collisions with gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam lifetimes of stored U^{28+} ions with kinetic energies of 30 and 50  MeV/u, respectively, were measured in the experimental storage ring of the GSI accelerator facility. By using the internal gas target station of the experimental storage ring, it was possible to obtain total projectile electron loss cross sections for collisions with several gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton from the beam lifetime data. The resulting experimental cross sections are compared to predictions by two theoretical approaches, namely the CTMC method and a combination of the DEPOSIT code and the RICODE program.

  19. Baseline survey of level of quality control in medical radiology in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, S. O.; Egbe, N. O.; Inyang, I. S.; Oshi, D. O.

    2010-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in radiology is meant to ensure that accurate diagnoses are obtained with radiation doses kept as low as reasonably achievable. It is also a fundamental requirement by the Regulatory Authorities in issuing operational license to operators of radiology facilities. In Nigeria, QC issues in Radiation Medicine have recently been introduced and are being enforced by the Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA). The level of QC practice in the radiology facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria was evaluated to obtain baseline information that could be relied on in the future to determine the level of improvement. It was observed that radiology practitioners appreciate QC and its importance in their practice, the present low level of its implementation notwithstanding.

  20. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics: 2016 Performance Data Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Meydbray, Jenya [PV Evolution Labs (PVEL), Davis, CA (United States); Donovan, Matt [PV Evolution Labs (PVEL), Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The 2012 NREL report 'Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics' provides a standard methodology for estimating the performance benefit of distributed power electronics under partial shading conditions. Since the release of the report, experiments have been conducted for a number of products and for different system configurations. Drawing from these experiences, updates to the test and analysis methods are recommended. Proposed changes in data processing have the benefit of reducing the sensitivity to measurement errors and weather variability, as well as bringing the updated performance score in line with measured and simulated values of the shade recovery benefit of distributed PV power electronics. Also, due to the emergence of new technologies including sub-module embedded power electronics, the shading method has been extended to include power electronics that operate at a finer granularity than the module level. An update to the method is proposed to account for these emerging technologies that respond to shading differently than module-level devices. The partial shading test remains a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations as would be experienced by typical residential or commercial rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. Performance data for multiple products tested using this method are discussed, based on equipment from Enphase, Solar Edge, Maxim Integrated and SMA. In general, the annual recovery of shading losses from the module-level electronics evaluated is 25-35%, with the major difference between different trials being related to the number of parallel strings in the test installation rather than differences between the equipment tested. Appendix D data has been added in this update.

  1. Interaction-induced merging of Landau levels in an electron system of double quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Shashkin, A.A.; Dolgopolov, V.T.; Clark, J. W.; Shaginyan, V. R.; Zverev, M. V.; Khodel, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the disappearance of the chemical potential jumps over the range of perpendicular magnetic fields at fixed integer filling factor in a double quantum well with a tunnel barrier is caused by the interaction-induced level merging. The distribution function in the merging regime is special in that the probability to find an electron with energy equal to the chemical potential is different for the two merged levels.

  2. Confidence Level Based Approach to Total Dose Specification for Spacecraft Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Stauffer, C.; Phan, A.; McClure, S. S.; Ladbury, R. L.; Pellish, J. A.; Campola, M. J.; Label, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    A confidence level based approach to total dose radiation hardness assurance is presented for spacecraft electronics. It is applicable to both ionizing and displacement damage dose. Results are compared to the traditional approach that uses radiation design margin and advantages of the new approach are discussed.

  3. Cross section of W and Z inclusive production and the W/Z cross section ratio in association with one jet for the boson decaying into electron(s) with ATLAS 7 TeV data

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, Elina

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the inclusive production cross section of W and Z bosons as well as their ratio in association with one jet. The cross sections are estimated with 7 TeV LHC proton-proton collision data, collected by ATLAS during 2010, resulting in an integrated luminosity of approximately 40 pb−1 . This thesis focuses on the analysis performed in the electron channel, while comparisons with the results obtained in the muon channel also are included. This is the first time the W and Z production cross sections are measured at this center-of-mass energy and the results are important for various reasons, such as testing perturbative theoretical calculations and understanding these signatures as backgrounds to other physics processes. The final inclusive cross section values obtained in the electron channel are the following: σ(W → eν ) = 10.255 ± 0.031(stat) ± 0.190(syst) ± 0.349(lumi) ± 0.156(acc) nb σ(Z → ee) = 0.952 ± 0.010(stat) ± 0.026(syst) ± 0.032(lumi) ± 0.019(acc) nb The res...

  4. Servant leadership and employee voice behavior: a cross-level investigation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aimin; Xiao, Yigui

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the influence and mechanisms of servant leadership on voice behavior, including the mediating role of psychological safety, and the moderating role of supervisor-subordinate Guanxi. Data were collected from 430 civil servants and their immediate supervisors in Changsha, China. Cross-Level investigation revealed that servant leadership had a significant influence on voice behavior, psychological safety mediated the relationship between servant leadership and voice behavior, while supervisor-subordinate Guanxi negatively moderated the relationship between servant leadership and voice behavior.

  5. Fasting time and lipid levels in a community-based population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Davinder; Naugler, Christopher

    2012-12-10

    Although current guidelines recommend measuring lipid levels in a fasting state, recent studies suggest that nonfasting lipid profiles change minimally in response to food intake and may be superior to fasting levels in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between fasting times and lipid levels. Cross-sectional examination of laboratory data, including fasting duration (in hours) and lipid results, was performed over a 6-month period in 2011 in a large community-based cohort. Data were obtained from Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, the sole supplier of laboratory services for Calgary and surrounding areas (source population, 1.4 million persons). The main outcome measures were mean levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides for fasting intervals from 1 hour to more than 16 hours. After differences in individual ages were controlled for, linear regression models were used to estimate the mean levels of cholesterol subclasses at different fasting times. A total of 209,180 individuals (111,048 females and 98,132 males) were included in the study. The mean levels of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol differed little among individuals with various fasting times. The mean calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed slightly greater variations of up to 10% among groups of patients with different fasting intervals, and the mean triglyceride levels showed variations of up to 20%. Fasting times showed little association with lipid subclass levels in a community-based population, which suggests that fasting for routine lipid levels is largely unnecessary.

  6. Direct observation of children's preferences and activity levels during interactive and online electronic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cindy H P; Lam, Jessica W K; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2010-07-01

    Interactive electronic games have recently been popularized and are believed to help promote children's physical activity (PA). The purpose of the study was to examine preferences and PA levels during interactive and online electronic games among overweight and nonoverweight boys and girls. Using a modification of the SOFIT, we systematically observed 70 Hong Kong Chinese children (35 boys, 35 girls; 50 nonoverweight, 20 overweight), age 9 to 12 years, during 2 60-minute recreation sessions and recorded their game mode choices and PA levels. During Session One children could play either an interactive or an online electronic bowling game and during Session Two they could play an interactive or an online electronic running game. Children chose to play the games during 94% of session time and split this time between interactive (52%) and online (48%) versions. They engaged in significantly more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during interactive games than their online electronic versions (70% vs. 2% of game time). Boys and nonoverweight children expended relatively more energy during the interactive games than girls and overweight children, respectively. New-generation interactive games can facilitate physical activity in children, and given the opportunity children may select them over sedentary versions.

  7. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization in different ploidy levels cross-breeding of lily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid 'Freya' had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true.

  8. Is serum zinc level associated with prediabetes and diabetes?: a cross-sectional study from Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Rafiqul Islam

    Full Text Available AIMS: To determine serum zinc level and other relevant biological markers in normal, prediabetic and diabetic individuals and their association with Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA parameters. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted between March and December 2009. Any patient aged ≥ 30 years attending the medicine outpatient department of a medical university hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh and who had a blood glucose level ordered by a physician was eligible to participate. RESULTS: A total of 280 participants were analysed. On fasting blood sugar results, 51% were normal, 13% had prediabetes and 36% had diabetes. Mean serum zinc level was lowest in prediabetic compared to normal and diabetic participants (mean differences were approximately 65 ppb/L and 33 ppb/L, respectively. In multiple linear regression, serum zinc level was found to be significantly lower in prediabetes than in those with normoglycemia. Beta cell function was significantly lower in prediabetes than normal participants. Adjusted linear regression for HOMA parameters did not show a statistically significant association between serum zinc level, beta cell function (P = 0.07 and insulin resistance (P = 0.08. Low serum zinc accentuated the increase in insulin resistance seen with increasing BMI. CONCLUSION: Participants with prediabetes have lower zinc levels than controls and zinc is significantly associated with beta cell function and insulin resistance. Further longitudinal population based studies are warranted and controlled trials would be valuable for establishing whether zinc supplementation in prediabetes could be a useful strategy in preventing progression to Type 2 diabetes.

  9. Structure of junctions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with tetragonal cross section and flattened nanotubes revealed by electron-beam tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yuta; Kohno, Hideo

    2017-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes with tetragonal cross section frequently form junctions with flattened multi-walled carbon nanotubes, a kind of carbon nanoribbon. The three-dimensional structure of the junctions is revealed by transmission-electron-microscopy-based tomography. Two types of junction, parallel and diagonal, are found. The formation mechanism of these two types of junction is discussed in terms of the origami mechanism that was previously proposed to explain the formation of carbon nanoribbons and nanotetrahedra.

  10. Patterns of electronic cigarette use in current and ever users among college students in France: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Vasiliu, Anca; Romo, Lucia; Kotbagi, Gayatri; Kern, Laurence; Ladner, Joël

    2016-05-27

    There is sparse information on electronic cigarette use and health behaviours among college student populations. Our objectives were to identify the patterns of electronic cigarette use in current and ever users among college students in France. Cross-sectional study. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted on two major campuses in France. Students filled in an anonymous questionnaire on their use of electronic cigarettes and on targeted behaviours such as smoking, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, use of cannabis, practice of sport and eating disorders. Ever use of electronic cigarettes was defined as use but not during the previous 30 days, and current use of electronic cigarettes as any use in the previous 30 days. The opinions and motivations of electronic cigarette users were also sought and collected. 1134 college students between October 2014 and February 2015. The 1134 students included had a mean age of 20.8 years. The prevalence of ever use and current use of electronic cigarettes was 23.0% (95% CI (20.5% to 25.3%)) and 5.7% (95% CI (4.4% to 7.1%)), respectively. The prevalence of the combined use of conventional cigarettes and electronic cigarettes was 14.5%. Almost half (45.8%) of the ever users of electronic cigarettes had never smoked conventional cigarettes. Behaviours associated with ever use of electronic cigarettes were current cigarette smoking (adjusted OR (AOR)=3.97, 95% CI 2.71 to 5.83), former smoking (AOR=2.56, 95% CI 1.42 to 4.61), cannabis use (AOR=2.44, 95% CI 1.70 to 3.51) and occasional binge drinking (AOR=1.83, 95% CI 1.28 to 2.64). The only behaviour associated with current use of electronic cigarettes was conventional smoking, either previously (AOR=4.85, 95% CI 1.53 to 15.34) or currently (AOR=14.53, 95% CI 6.81 to 31.02). The ever users have an experimenter's profile with sensation-seeking while the current users are mostly smokers with intention to quit smoking. Our findings are crucial for the accurate

  11. Associations of attitudes towards electronic cigarettes with advertisement exposure and social determinants: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Benjamin; Fischbein, Rebecca; Bhamidipalli, Surya Sruthi; Bryant, Jennifer; Kenne, Deric R

    2017-01-01

    The exposure of young adults to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) advertisements has risen rapidly. E-cigarette ads have been shown to increase short term perceived acceptability of using e-cigarettes in places where traditional cigarettes are banned. We set out to investigate if advertising exposure was related to perceptions of harm, addictiveness, and acceptability of use of e-cigarettes in places where traditional cigarettes are banned. Using a cross-sectional design, 6037 students at a large Midwestern university between the ages of 18-24 were surveyed about e-cigarette use and smoking status. Bivariate analyses were performed associating perception of harm, addictiveness, and acceptability of e-cigarette use in places where smoking is banned with demographic and other background factors, and e-cigarette advertising exposure through different media channels. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the relationship of these factors on perceptions of harm, addictiveness and acceptability of e-cigarette use in places where smoking is banned. More than a quarter (27.4%) of respondents had used an e-cigarette, greater than half (53.2%) had seen an advertisement on TV and 42.0% had seen an advertisement on the Internet. Logistic regressions revealed that being white, male, an e-cigarette user, a smoker, having a mother who smoked, and Internet advertisement exposure were associated with lower perceived harm of e-cigarettes. The same factors, plus having seen advertisements on TV, were associated with increased likelihood of perceiving e-cigarette use in bars, stores, at work and in a dorm as acceptable. Perceiving use of e-cigarettes as acceptable in classrooms was also associated with the aforementioned factors and also included race. Only being male and an e-cigarette user were associated with lower perceived addictiveness of e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use is increasing in adolescents and young adults, as is exposure to e-cigarette advertising

  12. On the relationship between the population of the fine structure levels of the ground electronic state of atomic oxygen and the translational temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Zygelman, B.; von Esse, F.; Dalgarno, A.

    1994-08-01

    Using a recent calculation of the cross sections for fine structure changing collisions during an encounter between two oxygen atoms in the ground electronic state, we determine the population of the fine structure levels of oxygen as a function of altitude for four model atmospheres representing conditions at 0 deg longitude, 45 deg latitude, at midday and midnight, and high and low solar and geomagnetic activity. We include the effect of electron impacts. The fine structure levels are shown to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at the local neutral atom translational temperature for altitudes up to 350 km and 400 km for midnight and midday, respectively, at low activity, and up to at least 600 km at high activity. At higher altitudes spotaneous emission causes deviation from LTE and overpopulates the lowest (J = 2) level at the expense of the other two levels.

  13. Short energetic electron bunches from laser wakefield accelerator with orthogonally polarized perpendicularly crossed laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-05-01

    Electron acceleration with optical injection by a perpendicularly propagating and orthogonally polarized low intensity laser pulse into a nonlinear plasma wave driven by a short intense laser pulse was explored by particle- in-cell simulations. The scheme presented here provides an energetic electron bunch in the first ion cavity with a low energy spread. The electron bunch short and compact, with the mean energy about 400 MeV and a low energy spread about 10 MeV in time of 6 ps of acceleration. The injected charge is several tens of pC for the low intensity of the injection pulse. Initial positions of electrons forming the energetic bunch are shown and then these electrons are followed during the simulation in order to understand the injection process and determine electron bunch properties.

  14. Using the decision ladder to understand road user decision making at actively controlled rail level crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Christine M; Salmon, Paul M; Beanland, Vanessa; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-09-01

    Rail level crossings (RLXs) represent a key strategic risk for railways worldwide. Despite enforcement and engineering countermeasures, user behaviour at RLXs can often confound expectations and erode safety. Research in this area is limited by a relative absence of insights into actual decision making processes and a focus on only a subset of road user types. One-hundred and sixty-six road users (drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians) completed a diary entry for each of 457 naturalistic encounters with RLXs when a train was approaching. The final eligible sample comprised 94 participants and 248 encounters at actively controlled crossings where a violation of the active warnings was possible. The diary incorporated Critical Decision Method probe questions, which enabled user responses to be mapped onto Rasmussen's decision ladder. Twelve percent of crossing events were non-compliant. The underlying decision making was compared to compliant events and a reference decision model to reveal important differences in the structure and type of decision making within and between road user groups. The findings show that engineering countermeasures intended to improve decision making (e.g. flashing lights), may have the opposite effect for some users because the system permits a high level of flexibility for circumvention. Non-motorised users were more likely to access information outside of the warning signals because of their ability to achieve greater proximity to the train tracks and the train itself. The major conundrum in resolving these issues is whether to restrict the amount of time and information available to users so that it cannot be used for circumventing the system or provide more information to help users make safe decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Motivating and demotivating forces in teams: cross-level influences of empowering leadership and relationship conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gilad; Sharma, Payal Nangia; Edinger, Suzanne K; Shapiro, Debra L; Farh, Jiing-Lih

    2011-05-01

    Using cross-cultural laboratory and field studies with samples of leaders, employees, and students from the United States and the People's Republic of China, we examined how team-level stimuli, including empowering leadership and relationship conflict, combine to influence individual members' motivational states of psychological empowerment and affective commitment. As predicted, we found that these motivational states are individually and jointly influenced by teams' level of empowering leadership and relationship conflict and that these motivational states mediate the relationships between team stimuli and team members' innovative and teamwork behaviors and turnover intentions. In addition, results held despite controlling for team members' nationality and collectivism. We discuss contributions of our study to the team motivation, conflict, and stress literatures.

  16. Multicomponent Quantum Hall Ferromagnetism and Landau Level Crossing in Rhombohedral Trilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y; Tran, D; Myhro, K; Velasco, J; Gillgren, N; Poumirol, J M; Smirnov, D; Barlas, Y; Lau, C N

    2016-01-13

    Using transport measurements, we investigate multicomponent quantum Hall (QH) ferromagnetism in dual-gated rhombohedral trilayer graphene (r-TLG) in which the real spin, orbital pseudospin, and layer pseudospins of the lowest Landau level form spontaneous ordering. We observe intermediate QH plateaus, indicating a complete lifting of the degeneracy of the zeroth Landau level (LL) in the hole-doped regime. In charge neutral r-TLG, the orbital degeneracy is broken first, and the layer degeneracy is broken last and only in the presence of an interlayer potential U⊥. In the phase space of U⊥ and filling factor ν, we observe an intriguing "hexagon" pattern, which is accounted for by a model based on crossings between symmetry-broken LLs.

  17. The effects of educational level on breast cancer awareness: a cross-sectional study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdal, Sibel Özkan; Saraçoğlu, Gamze Varol; Oran, Ebru Şen; Yankol, Yücel; Soybir, Gürsel Remzi

    2012-01-01

    Breast self-examination (BSE) is important for early diagnosis of breast cancer (BC). However, the majority of Turkish women do not perform regular BSE. We aimed to evaluate the effects of education level on the attitudes and behaviors of women towards BSE. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 413 women (20-59 years), divided into university graduates (Group I, n = 224) and high school or lower graduates (Group II, n = 189). They completed a 22-item scale assessing the knowledge level, attitudes and behaviors regarding BSE, and the Turkish version of the Champion's Revised Health Belief Model. A significantly higher number of women in Group II did not believe in early diagnosis of BC. A significantly higher number of Group I had conducted BSE at least once, and their BSE frequency was also significantly high. Moreover, a significantly lower number of Group I women considered themselves to not be at risk for BC and the scores for "perceived susceptibility" and "perceived barriers" were significantly higher. Logistic regression analysis identified the university graduate group to have a higher likelihood of performing BSE, by 1.8 times. Higher educational levels were positively associated with BSE performance. Overall, the results suggest that Turkish women, regardless of their education level, need better education on BSE. Consideration of the education level in women will help clinicians develop more effective educational programs, resulting in more regular practice and better use of BSE.

  18. Polarizabilities of two-electron positive ions and Rydberg levels of lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order sums are computed for the two-electron positive ions Li(+), Be(2+), and B(3+) by representing the intermediate states as discrete pseudostates. The Hamiltonian for the system is given and translated to semi-Jacobi variables for its derivation in reduced Rydberg units. The interaction potential is developed in its multipole form and employed in second-order perturbation theory. The perturbation is always a multipole-potential term, and the initial and intermediate states are constructed from two-particle Hylleraas basis sets. The resulting pseudostates are shown to represent the continuum with good convergence, and the asymptotic-optical-potential method is applied to the two-body quantities to determine the energy levels of three-electron systems in high Rydberg states. The method is shown to give accurate values for the polarizabilities of the two-electron isoelectronic systems.

  19. Reproducibility of attachment level recordings using an electronic and a conventional probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, L; Baelum, V

    1996-12-01

    This study describes the variations in the reproducibility of attachment level recordings for different subjects at different examinations. Twenty patients with different degrees of periodontal disease were recruited and examined bi-monthly for their attachment levels using an electronic probe in two quadrants and a conventional probe in the other two quadrants. At each of the 7 examinations attachment level recordings were repeated with the appropriate probe after approximately 30 minutes. Results demonstrate that the reproducibility of attachment level recordings was slightly better for the conventional probe than for the electronic probe. Attachment level recording reproducibility varied considerably between subjects and between examinations for the same subject. Aggregation of attachment level recordings in the form of mean tooth values or mean individual values reduced the range of the differences, but considerable between-subject and between-examination variation was still seen. These results indicate that no single uniformly valid estimate of attachment level reproducibility exists which can be used to set diagnostic thresholds such that a minimum number of incorrect diagnoses are made.

  20. Recommendations for Enabling Manual Component Level Electronic Repair for Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Easton, John W.; Funk, Gregory P.; Latta, Gary S.; Ganster, Andrew W.; Estes, Brett E.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration missions to the Moon and Mars pose a number of challenges to mission designers, controllers, and the crews. Among these challenges are planning for corrective maintenance actions which often require a repair. Current repair strategies on the International Space Station (ISS) rely primarily on the use of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), where a faulty unit is replaced with a spare, and the faulty unit typically returns to Earth for analysis and possible repair. The strategy of replace to repair has posed challenges even for the ISS program. Repairing faulty hardware at lower levels such as the component level can help maintain system availability in situations where no spares exist and potentially reduce logistic resupply mass.This report provides recommendations to help enable manual replacement of electronics at the component-level for future manned space missions. The recommendations include hardware, tools, containment options, and crew training. The recommendations are based on the work of the Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task of the Exploration Technology Development Program from 2006 to 2009. The recommendations are derived based on the experience of two experiments conducted by the CLEAR team aboard the International Space Station as well as a group of experienced Miniature/Microminiature (2M) electronics repair technicians and instructors from the U.S. Navy 2M Project Office. The emphasis of the recommendations is the physical repair. Fault diagnostics and post-repair functional test are discussed in other CLEAR reports.

  1. Electronic selectivity tuning in titanium(III)-catalyzed acetylene cross-dimerization reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oshovsky, G.V.; Hessen, B.; Reek, J.N.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2011-01-01

    The reactivity of open-shell titanium(III) complexes in organometallic catalysis is associated with many open questions, in particular regarding the electronic structure of catalytic intermediates and transition states. The unpaired electron density in principle allows for radical-type reactivity,

  2. Electronic Selectivity Tuning in Titanium(III)-Catalyzed Acetylene Cross-Dimerization Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oshovsky, Gennady V.; Hessen, Bart; Reek, Joost N. H.; de Bruin, Bas

    2011-01-01

    The reactivity of open-shell titanium(III) complexes in organometallic catalysis is associated with many open questions, in particular regarding the electronic structure of catalytic intermediates and transition states. The unpaired electron density in principle allows for radical-type reactivity,

  3. Electronic structures of 1-ML C84/Ag(111): Energy level alignment and work function variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Jin-Juan; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Wei-Hui; Chen, Da; Sheng, Chun-Qi; Wang, Jia-Ou; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash; Li, Hong-Nian

    2017-12-01

    The electronic structures of fullerene/metal interface are critical to the performance of devices based on fullerene in molecular electronics and organic electronics. Herein, we investigate the electronic structures at the interface between C84 and Ag(111) by photoelectron spectroscopy and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. It is observed that C84 monolayer on Ag(111) surface (1-ML C84/Ag(111)) has metallic nature. A charge transfer from substrate to the unoccupied states of C84 is determined to be 1.3 electrons per molecule. However, the work function of 1-ML C84 (4.72 eV) is observed slightly larger than that of the clean Ag(111) substrate (4.50 eV). A bidirectional charge transfer model is introduced to understand the work function variation of the fullerene/metal system. In addition to the charge transfer from substrate to the adsorbate's unoccupied states, there exists non-negligible back charge transfer from fullerene occupied molecular orbital to the metal substrate through interfacial hybridization. The Fermi level will be pinned at ∼4.72 eV for C84 monolayer on coinage metal substrate.

  4. Positrons vs electrons channeling in silicon crystal: energy levels, wave functions and quantum chaos manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shul'ga, N. F.; Syshchenko, V. V.; Tarnovsky, A. I.; Solovyev, I. I.; Isupov, A. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The motion of fast electrons through the crystal during axial channeling could be regular and chaotic. The dynamical chaos in quantum systems manifests itself in both statistical properties of energy spectra and morphology of wave functions of the individual stationary states. In this report, we investigate the axial channeling of high and low energy electrons and positrons near [100] direction of a silicon crystal. This case is particularly interesting because of the fact that the chaotic motion domain occupies only a small part of the phase space for the channeling electrons whereas the motion of the channeling positrons is substantially chaotic for the almost all initial conditions. The energy levels of transverse motion, as well as the wave functions of the stationary states, have been computed numerically. The group theory methods had been used for classification of the computed eigenfunctions and identification of the non-degenerate and doubly degenerate energy levels. The channeling radiation spectrum for the low energy electrons has been also computed.

  5. Ab initio Potential-Energy Surfaces and Electron-Spin-Exchange Cross Sections for H-O2 Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    Accurate quartet- and doublet-state potential-energy surfaces for the interaction of a hydrogen atom and an oxygen molecule in their ground states have been determined from an ab initio calculation using large-basis sets and the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method. These potential surfaces have been used to calculate the H-O2 electron-spin-exchange cross section; the square root of the cross section (in a(sub 0)), not taking into account inelastic effects, can be obtained approximately from the expressions 2.390E(sup -1/6) and 5.266-0.708 log10(E) at low and high collision energies E (in E(sub h)), respectively. These functional forms, as well as the oscillatory structure of the cross section found at high energies, are expected from the nature of the interaction energy. The mean cross section (the cross section averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution) agrees reasonably well with the results of measurements.

  6. Electronic structure of triangular, hexagonal and round graphene flakes near the Fermi level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiskanen, H P; Manninen, M; Akola, J [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, PO Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)], E-mail: matti.manninen@jyu.fi

    2008-10-15

    The electronic shell structure of triangular, hexagonal and round graphene quantum dots (flakes) near the Fermi level has been studied using a tight-binding method. The results show that close to the Fermi level the shell structure of a triangular flake is that of free massless particles, and that triangles with an armchair edge show an additional sequence of levels ('ghost states'). These levels result from the graphene band structure and the plane wave solution of the wave equation, and they are absent for triangles with a zigzag edge. All zigzag triangles exhibit a prominent edge state at {epsilon}{sub F}, and few low-energy conduction electron states occur both in triangular and hexagonal flakes due to symmetry reasons. Armchair triangles can be used as building blocks for other types of flakes that support the ghost states. Edge roughness has only a small effect on the level structure of the triangular flakes, but the effect is considerably enhanced in the other types of flakes. In round flakes, the states near the Fermi level depend strongly on the flake radius, and they are always localized on the zigzag parts of the edge.

  7. Determinants of maternal and umbilical blood lead levels: a cross-sectional study, Mosul, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jomard Raghad A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The populations who are most sensitive to lead exposure from various sources are pregnant women and their newborns. Aiming to explore the presence of correlation between maternal and cord blood lead levels and to identify potential predictors that may influence both levels, the present study has been conducted. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted covering 350 full terms maternal-newborns pairs from Mosul maternity hospitals. Data were obtained directly from women just before delivery by the use of a detailed questionnaire form. Maternal and umbilical blood lead levels were estimated using LEADCARE® Blood Lead Testing System and Kits. Results A positive significant correlation was found between maternal and cord blood lead values (r = 0.856, p = 0.001. By backward stepwise logistic regression analysis the followings emerged as significant potential predictors of high maternal blood lead: low parity, smoking and Hb level Conclusion Study results have provided baseline data needed to be transformed to decision makers to implement measures to eliminate lead from the environment and protect future generation from its deleterious effects.

  8. Mechanical properties of the equine superficial digital flexor tendon relate to specific collagen cross-link levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, C T; Stark, R J F; Goodship, A E; Birch, H L

    2010-11-01

    Damage to the flexor tendons, particularly the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries sustained by horses competing in all disciplines. Our previous work has shown that SDFTs from different individuals show a wide variation in mechanical strengths; this is important clinically as it may relate to predisposition to injury. The high mechanical strength of tendon relies on the correct orientation of collagen molecules within fibrils and stabilisation by the formation of chemical cross-links between collagen molecules. It is not known whether the variation in SDFT mechanical properties between individuals relates to differences in collagen cross-link levels. Enzyme-derived, intermolecular cross-linking of tendon collagen correlates with mechanical properties of the SDFT. SDFTs were collected from 38 horses and mechanically tested to failure. Structural and material properties were calculated from the load/deformation plot and cross-sectional area for each tendon. Following mechanical testing, pyrrolic cross-link levels were measured using a spectrophotometric assay for Ehrlich's reactivity and pyridinoline levels were quantified by HPLC. Cross-link levels were correlated with mechanical properties and statistical significance tested using a Pearson's correlation test. Pyrrole cross-link levels showed a significant positive correlation with ultimate stress (P = 0.004), yield stress (P = 0.003) and elastic modulus (P = 0.018) of the tendons, despite being a minor cross-link in these tendons. There was no significant correlation of mechanical properties with either hydroxylysyl- or lysyl-pyridinoline levels. Given the low absolute levels of pyrrole, we suggest that the correlation with high mechanical strength is through an indirect mechanism. Understanding the nature of the relationships between pyrrole cross-links, other matrix characteristics and tendon material properties may allow development of strategies to

  9. Mapping of the Energy Levels of Metallophthalocyanines via Electronic Spectroscopy, Electrochemistry, and Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    various cxcited states, information of considerable value ill uiderstanding pliool-ctnical behavior. Al- though Ifw heavy transitioi metal ion...Photochemistry, Photocatalysis 20. ABSTRACT (Contfou., an rover** oldsi $necesar n’pwd isionvtr &j black mmsbeo) 4 The mapping of the energy levels In...thet nature of rhe electron transfer, that is, redox at metal or ligand. Well-defined correlations are shown to exist between the ease of oxidation or

  10. Differing Levels of Forestry Best Management Practices at Stream Crossing Structures Affect Sediment Delivery and Installation Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Morris

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forestry best management practices (BMPs are used to reduce sedimentation from forest stream crossings. Three BMP treatments (BMP−, BMP-std, and BMP+ were applied to three forest road stream crossings (bridge, culvert, and ford. BMP− did not meet existing BMP guidelines, BMP-std met standard recommendations, and BMP+ treatments exceeded recommendations. Following BMP applications, three simulated rainfall intensities (low, medium, and high were applied in order to evaluate sediment delivery from crossing type and BMP level. During rainfall simulation, sediment concentrations (mg/L were collected with automated samplers and discharge (L/s was estimated to calculate total sediment loading. Costs of stream crossings and BMP levels were also quantified. Mean sediment associated with the three stream crossings were 3.38, 1.87, and 0.64 Mg for the BMP−, BMP-std, and BMP+ levels, respectively. Ford, culvert, and bridge crossings produced 13.04, 12.95, and 0.17 Mg of sediment during construction, respectively. BMP enhancement was more critical for sediment control at the culvert and ford crossings than at the bridge. Respective costs for BMP−, BMP-std, and BMP+ levels were $5,368, $5,658, and $5,858 for the bridge; $3,568, $4,166 and $4,595 for the culvert; and $180, $420 and $1,903 for the ford. Costs and sediment values suggest that current standard BMP levels effectively reduce stream sediment while minimizing costs.

  11. Vitamin D levels and allergic diseases. An italian cross-sectional multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, C; Passalacqua, G

    2017-03-01

    Background. During the two last decades, the interest in the role of Vitamin D (VD) in allergic disease has increased. Apart from the well-known actions of VD in bone metabolism, recent studies suggested its possible role as an immune-modulator in allergy. Objective. This study, conducted over the Italian territory, evaluated the possible correlations between VD serum level and diagnosed allergic diseases (rhinitis / asthma, food allergy, atopic dermatitis). Thus, VD was assessed in patients with physician-diagnosed allergic diseases. Methods. The study was carried out in hospital- and private practice-based setting between October 2012 and March 2013, and 18 Centers participated. Only adult patients, with at least one positive skin prick test were included. The diagnostic procedures and the data collection were standardized among the centers. VD levels were assayed by the same laboratory test. Results. Three hundred and nine patients were enrolled (132 male, mean age 37.5 ± 17 years). Of them, 40% reported a positive family history for allergies (asthma / rhinitis). Rhinitis plus asthma was present in 47% of patients, atopic dermatitis in 15%, and a consistent clinical history of food allergy associated with positive skin tests was present in 25% of subjects. There was no significant association between VD level and age, sex, family history, rhinitis, or food allergy. VD levels were overall lower in patients with asthma and rhinitis, but without statistical significance. A significant difference in VD levels was detected between patient with or without atopic dermatitis. VD was not related to seasonal allergens, whereas a significant negative correlation was seen for house dust mite and dog dander. Conclusion. Our data, derived from a cross-sectional study involving only allergic patients, agree partially with the current literature. Nonetheless, the association between VD levels and allergies appeared weak. Studies involving larger samples would be required to

  12. Farmers' Market Manager's Level of Communication and Influence on Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) Adoption at Midwest Farmers' Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Afroza; Smith, Sylvia

    2018-01-01

    To understand market managers' level of communication and use of technology that might influence decision to adopt Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) at farmers' markets. Cross-sectional study using the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation. Electronic survey administered in midwest states of Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Farmers' market managers in Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Information on EBT adoption, market managers' communication, and technology use. Binary logistic regression analysis with EBT adoption as the dependent variable and frequency of technology use, partnership with organizations, farmers' market association (FMA) membership, Facebook page and Web site for the market, and primary source of information as independent variables. Chi-square tests and ANOVA were used to compare states and adopter categories. Logistic regression results showed that the odds of adopting EBT was 7.5 times higher for markets that had partnership with other organizations. Compared with non-adopters, a significantly greater number of early adopters had partnership, FMA membership, and a Facebook page and Web site for market, and reported to a board of directors. Markets that had partnership, FMA membership, a Facebook page and Web site, and mandatory reporting to a board of directors were important factors that influenced EBT adoption at midwest farmers' markets. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Level-resolved quantum statistical theory of electron capture into many-electron compound resonances in highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Berengut, J C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2015-01-01

    The strong mixing of many-electron basis states in excited atoms and ions with open $f$ shells results in very large numbers of complex, chaotic eigenstates that cannot be computed to any degree of accuracy. Describing the processes which involve such states requires the use of a statistical theory. Electron capture into these 'compound resonances' leads to electron-ion recombination rates that are orders of magnitude greater than those of direct, radiative recombination, and cannot be described by standard theories of dielectronic recombination. Previous statistical theories considered this as a two-electron capture process which populates a pair of single-particle orbitals, followed by 'spreading' of the two-electron states into chaotically mixed eigenstates. This method is similar to a configuration-average approach, as it neglects potentially important effects of spectator electrons and conservation of total angular momentum. In this work we develop a statistical theory which considers electron capture in...

  14. Charging and the cross-field discharge during electron accelerator operation on a rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Monson, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from experiments to study the neutralization processes around an electron beam emitting rocket. The rocket, SCEX II, was flown on January 31, 1987 from Alaska, with a payload consisting of two independent electron accelerators and two arms with conducting elements to act as Langmuir probes and to measure floating potentials. It was expected that electrons in the strong electric fields around the charged rocket would gain sufficient energy to ionize neutrals, producing ions which would be hurled outward at energies up to the rocket potential. Three hemispherical retarding potential analyzers were ejected from the main payload to measure these ions. The measurements show that fields sufficient to accelerate electrons to ionizing energies were present around the rocket.

  15. Selforganisation and dynamics peculiarities of intense electron beams in compact crossed fields systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonov, A V; Fedorov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The review of the results of computer simulations of electron flow self-organisation inside magnetically isolated coaxial diodes (magnetron gun) is given. Magnetron guns of usual and inverted polarities are considered.

  16. Country- and individual-level determinants of probable problematic gambling in adolescence: a multi-level cross-national comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Sabrina; Canale, Natale; Vieno, Alessio; Lenzi, Michela; Siciliano, Valeria; Gori, Mercedes; Santinello, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    To estimate the role of family and socio-economic indicators of welfare state in accounting for probable problem gambling during adolescence in a representative sample of students living in nine European countries. Data from the 2011 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD) Study were used for cross-sectional analyses of adolescent probable problem gambling. Representative surveys in nine European countries. A total of 31 236 16-year-old students. Respondents' probable problem gambling, socio-demographic characteristics and parenting (regulation, monitoring and caring) were measured individually. Indicators of wealth (gross domestic product per capita, GDP), expenditure on public health (% GDP) and benefit in kind for families/children (% GDP) were obtained from national public databases. Students who perceived more parental caring [odds ratio (OR) = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.85-0.98] and monitoring (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.53-0.62) reported less involvement in probable problem gambling. Moreover, students who perceived stronger parental regulation (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.23) were more likely to be possible problematic gamblers. At the country level, expenditure on public health was associated negatively with probable problem gambling (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78-0.97), whereas GDP per capita (OR = 1, 95% CI = 1.00-1.00) and the benefits in kind for families/children (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.89-1.51) showed no association with probable problem gambling. Family characteristics and expenditure on public health may play a key role in explaining probable problem gambling among adolescents in Europe. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Charge-exchange-induced two-electron satellite transitions from autoionizing levels in dense plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F B; Griem, H R; Elton, R C; Jacobs, V L; Cobble, J A; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Geissel, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Süss, W; Uskov, D B; Shevelko, V P; Mancini, R C

    2002-11-01

    Order-of-magnitude anomalously high intensities for two-electron (dielectronic) satellite transitions, originating from the He-like 2s(2) 1S0 and Li-like 1s2s(2) (2)S(1/2) autoionizing states of silicon, have been observed in dense laser-produced plasmas at different laboratories. Spatially resolved, high-resolution spectra and plasma images show that these effects are correlated with an intense emission of the He-like 1s3p 1P-1s(2) 1S lines, as well as the K(alpha) lines. A time-dependent, collisional-radiative model, allowing for non-Maxwellian electron-energy distributions, has been developed for the determination of the relevant nonequilibrium level populations of the silicon ions, and a detailed analysis of the experimental data has been carried out. Taking into account electron density and temperature variations, plasma optical-depth effects, and hot-electron distributions, the spectral simulations are found to be not in agreement with the observations. We propose that highly stripped target ions (e.g., bare nuclei or H-like 1s ground-state ions) are transported into the dense, cold plasma (predominantly consisting of L- and M-shell ions) near the target surface and undergo single- and double-electron charge-transfer processes. The spectral simulations indicate that, in dense and optically thick plasmas, these charge-transfer processes may lead to an enhancement of the intensities of the two-electron transitions by up to a factor of 10 relative to those of the other emission lines, in agreement with the spectral observations.

  18. Electron and Photon High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084857

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system. The first level is implemented on custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to contain the HLT rate within the available bandwidth while keeping thresholds low enough to cover the requirements of the physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the improvements that have been applied to the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. We present such changes in the definitions of HLT electrons and photons, focusing in particular on the deployment of a new clustering algorithm allowing pileup mitigation, a new Particle-Flow based isolation replacing th...

  19. Cross-sectional study of use of electronic media by secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    KIATRUNGRIT, Komsan; HONGSANGUANSRI, Sirichai

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing concern about the negative psychological effects of excessive use of various electronic media by adolescents but the monitoring of these behaviors in low- and middle-income countries has some methodological flaws. Aim Assess the use of all types of electronic media among secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods A stratified random sample of students from four schools in Bangkok completed a modified version of a questionnaire used in a major study ...

  20. 3D Objects Localization Using Fuzzy Approach and Hierarchical Belief Propagation: Application at Level Crossings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufaux A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological solutions for obstacle-detection systems have been proposed to prevent accidents in safety-transport applications. In order to avoid the limits of these proposed technologies, an obstacle-detection system utilizing stereo cameras is proposed to detect and localize multiple objects at level crossings. Background subtraction is first performed using the color independent component analysis technique, which has proved its performance against other well-known object-detection methods. The main contribution is the development of a robust stereo-matching algorithm which reliably localizes in 3D each segmented object. A standard stereo dataset and real-world images are used to test and evaluate the performances of the proposed algorithm to prove the efficiency and the robustness of the proposed video-surveillance system.

  1. Exploring Chemistry Student Teachers’ Diagnostic Competence—A Qualitative Cross-Level Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannik Tolsdorf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic competence is an important skill of professional teachers and is a part of Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK. Because increasing heterogeneity and diversity characterize our schools, diagnostic competence plays a prominent role in teacher pre- and in-service courses. At our university, two modules are focused on examining student teachers’ diagnostic competence in chemistry. The present paper describes a cross-level case study analyzing three groups of student teachers in different phases of their university teacher training program. The study is based on a qualitative research study with a total of 108 participants. The results show both positive and negative developments in teacher trainees’ diagnostic competence. They show that attitudes and beliefs about heterogeneity can be changed from a rather negative viewpoint to a more positive one. The results will be presented and discussed below. Suggestions for further development will be given.

  2. Industry growth, work role characteristics, and job satisfaction: a cross-level mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael T; Wooldridge, Jessica D

    2012-10-01

    The associations between industry revenue growth, individual work role characteristics, and job satisfaction were examined in this cross-level mediation analysis. Work roles were expected to be more autonomous, involve greater skill variety, and offer more opportunities for growth and development for workers in growing industries than for workers in declining industries. Supervisor support was also hypothesized to be stronger for workers in high-growth industries. Results from a nationally representative (U.S.) sample of service industry workers, using multilevel modeling, supported these propositions and suggest that job enrichment mediates relations between industry growth and job satisfaction. Associations between industry growth and autonomy were also stronger among workers in occupations that are less normatively autonomous, suggesting that industry growth fosters a weakening, and industry decline a strengthening, of traditional differences in autonomy across work roles. These results contribute to a multilevel perspective on organizational environments, individual work roles, and worker attitudes and well-being.

  3. Predicting local malaria exposure using a Lasso-based two-level cross validation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwaye, Bienvenue; Rossi, Fabrice; Fonton, Noël; Garcia, André; Dossou-Gbété, Simplice; Hounkonnou, Mahouton Norbert; Cottrell, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of local environmental factors to determine the fine-scale heterogeneity of malaria transmission and exposure to the vector. In this work, we compare a classical GLM model with backward selection with different versions of an automatic LASSO-based algorithm with 2-level cross-validation aiming to build a predictive model of the space and time dependent individual exposure to the malaria vector, using entomological and environmental data from a cohort study in Benin. Although the GLM can outperform the LASSO model with appropriate engineering, the best model in terms of predictive power was found to be the LASSO-based model. Our approach can be adapted to different topics and may therefore be helpful to address prediction issues in other health sciences domains.

  4. Correlation of peri-implant health and myeloperoxidase levels: a cross-sectional clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskmann, Stanislav; Zilmer, Mihkel; Vihalemm, Tiiu; Salum, Olev; Fischer, Krista

    2004-10-01

    At present, there are no diagnostic tools that permit early detection of peri-implantitis. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the correlation of myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels with traditional periodontal clinical parameters around dental implants including peri-implant pocket probing depth (PPD), gingival index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), since MPO has been associated with destruction of periodontal tissues. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers (9 men and 15 women) with 64 Ankylos Biofunctional implants (DentsplyFriadent, Mannheim, Germany) were recruited from Tallinn Dental Clinic. Biochemical and clinical parameters evaluated were the following ones: the level of MPO in the peri-implant sulcus fluid (PISF) (an analog for gingival crevicular fluid in natural teeth), PPD (mm), GI (0,1,2 or 3), and BOP (0 or 1). In comparison to the clinically healthy implants, total amounts of MPO were significantly higher in PISF collected around implants with inflammatory lesions. In addition, the levels of MPO were correlated with the clinical parameters. The results confirm the similarity of the inflammatory response of tissues surrounding implants and natural teeth, and suggest that MPO could be promising marker of inflammation around dental implants.

  5. Physiological and anthropometric characteristics of top-level youth cross-country cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasiero, Alessandro; Savoldelli, Aldo; Modena, Roberto; Boccia, Gennaro; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico

    2017-07-03

    In the literature there is a lack of data about the development of top level athletes in cross-country mountain biking (XCO). The purpose of this study was to analyze anthropometric and physiological characteristics of some of the best XCO bikers aged between 13 and 16. The study involved 45 bikers (26 males and 19 females) belonging to a youth national team. The evaluations, consisting of anthropometric measures, incremental cycling tests (VO2max, PPO, P@RCP), and 30 s Wingate Tests (PMax, PMean), were conducted over a lapse of 4 years. Our findings showed in bikers, already at young age, a specific athletic profile advantageous for XCO performance. At the age of 16, just before entering the junior category and competing at international level, male and female bikers showed physiological values normalized to the body mass comparable to those reported in literature for high level athletes (VO2max>70 and >60 ml/kg/min, PPO >6.5 and >5.5 W/kg, respectively in males and females). The production of high power-to-weight ratios and high peaks of anaerobic power attests the presence of highly developed aerobic and anaerobic systems in young XCO cyclists reflecting the high physiological demand of this sport.

  6. Measurements of Coulomb Cross Section for Production of Direct Electron-pairs by High Energy Ions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    QED predicts copious direct electron pair production by ultrarelativistic heavy nuclei in a high Z medium such as nuclear emulsion. First order QED calculations (combined screening and non-screening) for this process show that 1000@+32 electron pairs above 100~keV energy) should be emitted for a total |1|6O track length of 10.9~m in nuclear emulsion at 200~GeV/AMU. Emulsion exposures with oxygen (and other nuclei if available) at 60 and 200~GeV/AMU will be used to calibrate the energy dependent cross section @s~@j~(1n~E)|2|-|3, whose exponent depends on atomic screening. The oxygen tracks in the developed emulsions will be scanned with a microscope, and the number of direct electron pairs will be counted for individual tracks. The exposed stacks will contain sufficient emulsion (and CR39 plastic to check for possible interactions) that adequate path length will be available for exposures to @$>$~10|4~ions at each energy and ion species. \\\\ \\\\ If the absolute value of this cross section is confirmed as large a...

  7. Protein Oxidation Levels After Different Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkcu, Ummuhani Ozel; Yuksel, Nilay; Novruzlu, Sahin; Yalinbas, Duygu; Bilgihan, Ayse; Bilgihan, Kamil

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity, and total sulfhydryl (TSH) levels in rabbit corneas after different corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) methods. Eighteen eyes of 9 adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 6 eyes. The standard CXL group was continuously exposed to UV-A at a power setting of 3 mW/cm for 30 minutes. The accelerated CXL (A-CXL) group was continuously exposed to UV-A at a power setting of 30 mW/cm for 3 minutes. The pulse light-accelerated CXL (PLA-CXL) group received UV-A at a power setting of 30 mW/cm for 6 minutes of pulsed exposure (1 second on, 1 second off). Corneas were obtained after 1 hour of UV-A exposure, and 360-degree keratotomy was performed. SOD enzyme activity, AOPP, and TSH levels were measured in the corneal tissues. Compared with the standard CXL and A-CXL groups (133.2 ± 8.5 and 140.2 ± 6.2 μmol/mg, respectively), AOPP levels were found to be significantly increased in the PLA-CXL group (230.7 ± 30.2 μmol/mg) (P = 0.005 and 0.009, respectively). SOD enzyme activities and TSH levels did not differ between the groups (P = 0.167 and 0.187, respectively). CXL creates covalent bonds between collagen fibers because of reactive oxygen species. This means that more oxygen concentration during the CXL method will produce more reactive oxygen species and, thereby, AOPP. This means that in which CXL method occurs in more oxygen concentration that will produce more reactive oxygen species and thereby AOPP. This study demonstrated that PLA-CXL results in more AOPP formation than did standard CXL and A-CXL.

  8. Organic molecules on metal and oxide semiconductor substrates: Adsorption behavior and electronic energy level alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, Charles M.

    Modern devices such as organic light emitting diodes use organic/oxide and organic/metal interfaces for crucial processes such as charge injection and charge transfer. Understanding fundamental physical processes occurring at these interfaces is essential to improving device performance. The ultimate goal of studying such interfaces is to form a predictive model of interfacial interactions, which has not yet been established. To this end, this thesis focuses on obtaining a better understanding of fundamental physical interactions governing molecular self-assembly and electronic energy level alignment at organic/metal and organic/oxide interfaces. This is accomplished by investigating both the molecular adsorption geometry using scanning tunneling microscopy, as well as the electronic structure at the interface using direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopy, and analyzing the results in the context of first principles electronic structure calculations. First, we study the adsorption geometry of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) molecules on three noble metal surfaces: Au(111), Ag(111), and Ag(100). These surfaces were chosen to systematically compare the molecular self-assembly and adsorption behavior on two metals of the same surface symmetry and two surface symmetries of one metal. From this investigation, we improve the understanding of self-assembly at organic/metal interfaces and the relative strengths of competing intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions that influence molecular adsorption geometry. We then investigate the electronic structure of the ZnTPP/Au(111), Ag(111), and Ag(100) interfaces as examples of weakly-interacting systems. We compare these cases to ZnTPP on TiO2(110), a wide-bandgap oxide semiconductor, and explain the intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions that determine the electronic energy level alignment at the interface. Finally we study tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), a strong electron acceptor, on TiO2

  9. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  10. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible....

  11. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  12. Linking electronic health records with community-level data to understand childhood obesity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomayko, E J; Flood, T L; Tandias, A; Hanrahan, L P

    2015-12-01

    Environmental and socioeconomic factors should be considered along with individual characteristics when determining risk for childhood obesity. To assess relationships and interactions among the economic hardship index (EHI) and race/ethnicity, age and sex in regard to childhood obesity rates in Wisconsin children using an electronic health record dataset. Data were collected using the University of Wisconsin (UW) Public Health Information Exchange database, which links electronic health records with census-derived community-level data. Records from 53,775 children seen at UW clinics from 2007 to 2012 were included. Mixed-effects modelling was used to determine obesity rates and the interaction of EHI with covariates (race/ethnicity, age, sex). When significant interactions were determined, linear regression analyses were performed for each subgroup (e.g. by age groups). The overall obesity rate was 11.7% and significant racial/ethnic disparities were detected. Childhood obesity was significantly associated with EHI at the community level (r = 0.62, P obesity rates. Reducing economic disparities and improving environmental conditions may influence childhood obesity risk in some, but not all, races and ethnicities. Furthermore, the impact of EHI on obesity may be compounded over time. Our findings demonstrate the utility of linking electronic health information with census data to rapidly identify community-specific risk factors in a cost-effective manner. © 2014 World Obesity.

  13. Cross-sectoral cancer care: views from patients and health care professionals regarding a personal electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudendistel, I; Winkler, E C; Kamradt, M; Brophy, S; Längst, G; Eckrich, F; Heinze, O; Bergh, B; Szecsenyi, J; Ose, D

    2017-03-01

    Cross-sectoral cancer care is complex and involves collaboration from health care professionals (HCPs) across multiple sectors. However, when health information exchange (HIE) is not adequate, it results in impeded coordination and continuity of care. A web-based personal electronic health record (PEPA) under patients' control, providing access to personal health data across sectors, is being developed. Aim of this study was to explore perceived benefits and concerns. Using a qualitative approach, 10 focus groups were performed collecting views of three prospective user groups: patients with colorectal cancer (n = 12), physicians (n = 17) and other HCPs (n = 16). Representatives from different health sectors across the Rhine-Neckar region (Germany) participated. Data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Our study shows that patients and HCPs expected a PEPA to enhance cross-sectoral availability of information, cross-sectoral cooperation and facilitate data management. Quality of cancer care was expected to be improved. Concerns were expressed in terms of data protection and data security. Concepts like a PEPA offer the chance to support HIE and avoid gaps of information in cross-sectoral cancer care. This may lead to improvements in coordination and continuity of care. Issues concerning data security and protection have to be addressed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Averaged electron collision cross sections for thermal mixtures of β-alanine conformers in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Milton M.; de Lima, Erik V. R.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical study of elastic electron scattering by gas-phase amino acid molecule β-alanine (NH2-CH2-CH2-COOH) is presented. R-matrix calculations are performed for each of the ten lowest-lying, thermally-accessible conformers of β-alanine. Eigenphase sums, resonance features, differential and integral cross sections are computed for each conformer. The positions of the low-energy shape resonance associated with the unoccupied {π }* orbital of the -COOH group are found to vary from 2.5 to 3.3 eV and the resonance widths from 0.2 to 0.5 eV depending on the conformation. The temperature-dependent population ratios are derived, based on temperature-corrected Gibbs free energies. Averaged cross sections for thermal mixtures of the 10 conformers are presented. A comparison with previous results for the α-alanine isomer is also presented.

  15. Correlation between proteinuria level and renal morphology with special reference to electron microscopy in kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacar, Ahmet; Karabay, Gülten; Unlükal, Nejat; Yazici, Canan; Ozdemir, Handan

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between protein level in urine and renal morphology in kidney transplant donors, as well as to detect the role of electron microscopy. For this purpose, kidney biopsies of 10 donors with urine protein levels were evaluated. Seven patients were female and three were male. Two had physiologic proteinuria (150 mg/24h), four had non-significant proteinuria (150-300 mg/24h), and three had significant (> 300 mg/24h) proteinuria. Serum creatinine levels were in normal ranges in all patients except for one who had a slight increase (1.76 mg/dL). Seven cases were reported to have normal or nonspecific light microscopic findings. Two of those seven cases had physiologic proteinuria, three had non-significant proteinuria, and two had significant proteinuria. One case had IgA nephropathy with significant proteinuria. One donor had early stage focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with non-significant proteinuria, and one donor had focal interstitial fibrosis with normal urine protein level. There was no statistically significant difference between score means of ultrastructural morphology of the six patients with same patients' light microscopic results and score means of light microscopic results with urine protein levels of all patients. However, there was a significant difference between score means of ultrastructural morphology with urine protein levels of those six patients. In conclusion, urine protein levels and light microscopic findings did not always reflect the detailed morphology alone and together. Therefore, combining with electron microscopic examination could be more beneficial in relieving problems occurring in long-term prognoses.

  16. 75 FR 60377 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Cross-Border Electronic Transmittals of Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... units in Australia and Canada, both of which already collect cross border funds transfer information.\\22... experience of AUSTRAC and FINTRAC, FinCEN's counterpart financial intelligence units in Australia and Canada... Customs Enforcement (ICE) is establishing Trade Transparency Units (TTUs) with critical partner...

  17. Measuring Empathy Levels among Kurdish Medical Students in Erbil City, Iraq; Cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awring M. Raof

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Empathy is a crucial attribute within the physician-patient relationship. This study aimed to evaluate the empathy levels of students in the College of Medicine at Hawler Medical University (HMU in Erbil city, Iraq. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between January and May 2015 and included all medical undergraduates enrolled at HMU (n = 989. The validated self-administered English language version of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy-Student Version (JSPE-SV was used to measure empathy levels. Students reported their conformity to each statement of the 20-item questionnaire on a 7-point Likert scale. Levels of empathy were considered directly relative to their final score. Results: A total of 927 students completed the questionnaire (response rate: 93.7%. The male-to-female ratio was 0.72:1 and the mean age was 21.3 ± 1.4 years. The mean empathy score was 101.9 ± 19.2. Female students had significantly higher empathy (P = 0.023 and more frequently chose people-oriented specialties (P = 0.001 than males. First-year students reported the highest mean score (112.9 ± 20.1 while fourth-year students had the lowest (92.7 ± 16.0. There was a significant decline in mean scores between first- and second-year male students (P = 0.020 and first- and fourth-year male students (P = 0.050. Students who chose people-oriented specialties had significantly higher scores than those who chose technologyoriented specialties (P = 0.002. Conclusion: The studied cohort of HMU students demonstrated low empathy levels. As such, the inclusion of empathy instruction in medical school curricula is recommended to promote professionalism and patient welfare.

  18. Effect of gating and pressure on the electronic transport properties of crossed nanotube junctions: formation of a Schottky barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havu, P; Hashemi, M J; Kaukonen, M; Nieminen, R M [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, PO Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Seppaelae, E T [Nokia Research Center, Itaemerenkatu 11-13, FI-00180 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-03-23

    The electronic transport properties of crossed carbon nanotube junctions are investigated using ab initio methods. The optimal atomic structures and the intertube distances of the junctions are obtained using van der Waals corrected density functional theory. The effect of gating on the intertube conductance of the junctions is explored, showing the charge accumulation to the nanotube contact and the charge depletion region at the metal-semiconductor Schottky contact. Finally, it is shown how the conductance of the junctions under the gate voltage is affected by pressure applied to the nanotube film. (fast track communication)

  19. Determination of molecular, atomic, electronic cross-sections and effective atomic number of some boron compounds and TSW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icelli, Orhan [Department of physics Education, Faculty of Education Erzincan University, 24030 Erzincan (Turkey)], E-mail: orhanicelli@gmail.com; Erzeneoglu, Salih [Department of physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Boncukcuoglu, Recep [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-07-15

    The transmission of gamma-rays of some boron compounds (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) and the trommel sieve waste (TSW) have been measured by using an extremely narrow-collimated-beam transmission method in the energy range 15.74-40.93 keV. Molecular, atomic and electronic cross-sections and effective atomic numbers have been determinated on the basis of mixture rule and compared with the results obtained from theory.

  20. Measurement of beauty and charm cross sections in photoproduction using decays into electrons with ZEUS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juengst, Markus

    2010-02-15

    Photoproduction of heavy quarks in events with two jets and an electron associated with one of the jets has been studied with the ZEUS detector using the data recorded in the years 1996-2000 and 2006-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L=120 pb{sup -1} and L=190 pb{sup -1}, respectively. The fractions of events containing b quarks, and also of events containing c quarks, were extracted from a likelihood fit using variables sensitive to electron identification as well as to semileptonic decays. For the second data-set the list of variables sensitive to the flavour could be extended using the additional information from the microvertexdetector. Total and differential cross sections for beauty and charm production were measured for both data-sets and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  1. Institutions for sustainable forest governance: Robustness, equity, and cross-level interactions in Mawlyngbna, Meghalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Oberlack

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study adopts Ostrom’s Social-Ecological Systems (SES framework in empirical fieldwork to explain how local forestry institutions affect forest ecosystems and social equity in the community of Mawlyngbna in North-East India. Data was collected through 26 semi-structured interviews, participatory timeline development, policy documents, direct observation, periodicals, transect walks, and a concurrent forest-ecological study in the village. Results show that Mawlyngbna's forests provide important sources of livelihood benefits for the villagers. However, ecological disturbance and diversity varies among the different forest ownership types and forest-based livelihood benefits are inequitably distributed. Based on a bounded rationality approach, our analysis proposes a set of causal mechanisms that trace these observed social-ecological outcomes to the attributes of the resource system, resource units, actors and governance system. We analyse opportunities and constraints of interactions between the village, regional, and state levels. We discuss how Ostrom’s design principles for community-based resource governance inform the explanation of robustness but have a blind spot in explaining social equity. We report experiences made using the SES framework in empirical fieldwork. We conclude that mapping cross-level interactions in the SES framework needs conceptual refinement and that explaining social equity of forest governance needs theoretical advances.

  2. Overestimation of physical activity level is associated with lower BMI: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corder Kirsten

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor recognition of physical inactivity may be an important barrier to healthy behaviour change, but little is known about this phenomenon. We aimed to characterize a high-risk population according to the discrepancies between objective and self-rated physical activity (PA, defined as awareness. Methods An exploratory cross-sectional analysis of PA awareness using baseline data collected from 365 ProActive participants between 2001 and 2003 in East Anglia, England. Self-rated PA was defined as 'active' or 'inactive' (assessed via questionnaire. Objective PA was defined according to achievement of guideline activity levels (≥30 minutes or Results 63.3% of participants (N = 231 were inactive according to objective measurement. Of these, 45.9% rated themselves as active ('Overestimators'. In a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for age and smoking, males (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.12, 3.98, those with lower BMI (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84, 0.95, younger age at completion of full-time education (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.74, 0.93 and higher general health perception (OR = 1.02 CI = 1.00, 1.04 were more likely to overestimate their PA. Conclusions Overestimation of PA is associated with favourable indicators of relative slimness and general health. Feedback about PA levels could help reverse misperceptions.

  3. Cross-Scale and Cross-Level Dynamics: Governance and Capacity for Resilience in a Social-Ecological System in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Sheng Tai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience thinking has strongly influenced how people understand and pursue sustainability of linked social-ecological systems. Resilience thinking highlights the need to build capacity and manage general system properties in a complex, constantly changing world. I modified an analytical framework to address associations among cross-scale and cross-level dynamics, attributes of governance, and capacity to enhance resilience. The Danungdafu Forestation Area represents one of Taiwan’s most controvisal cases concerning land use, indigenous rights, and environmental issues. Analysis of this Taiwanese experience from a social-ecological perspective can show how current capacities for managing resilience are related to critical governance attributes. Analysis helped identify fundamental flaws in current governance and key issues needing to be addressed. The Danungdafu Forestation Area should transition towards a governance regime that is more participatory, deliberative, multi-layered, accountable, just, and networked. This can be done by developing an intermediate level institution that coordinates the cross-scale and cross-level interactions that better fit this social-ecological system.

  4. Soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) response to soybean plant defense: stress levels, tradeoffs, and cross-virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Laramy; Bickel, Ryan; Brisson, Jennifer; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Siegfried, Blair; Zera, Anthony; Miller, Nick

    2014-02-01

    A variety of management methods to control the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) have been investigated since its invasion into North America in 2000, among them plant resistance has emerged as a viable option for reducing aphid damage to soybeans and preventing outbreaks. Plant resistance methods often use natural soybean plant defenses that impose stress on aphids by reducing fitness and altering behavior. Research efforts have heavily focused on identification and development of aphid resistant soybean varieties, leaving much unknown about soybean aphid response to stressful host plant defenses. In this study, we aimed to 1) evaluate lifetime fitness consequences and phenotypic variation in response to host plant-induced stress and 2) investigate whether trade-offs involving fitness costs and/or cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties exists. We compared aphid survival and reproduction during and after a short period of exposure to soybeans with the Rag2 resistance gene and measured aphid clonal variation in response to Rag2 soybeans. In addition, we measured the performance of Rag2 virulent and avirulent aphids on five soybean varieties with various forms of antibiotic resistance. Our results indicate that plant defenses impose high levels of stress and have long-term fitness consequences, even after aphids are removed from resistant plants. We identified one aphid clone that was able to colonize Rag2 among the seven clones tested, suggesting that virulent genotypes may be prevalent in natural populations. Finally, although we did not find evidence of cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties, our results suggest independent mechanisms of aphid virulence to Rag1 and Rag2 that may involve fitness costs.

  5. Emission cross sections for spectral lines transiting from the In2+ lower laser 4d105pP states excited by electron impact on the In+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomonai, A. N.; Hutych, Yu. I.; Gomonai, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    Energy dependences of ionization-with-excitation cross sections of the λ174.9 nm and λ162.6 nm lines related to the 4d105pP → 4d105sS transitions in the In2+ ion were studied using a spectroscopic method in crossed electron and In+ ion beams. A well-defined structure related to the excitation of the 4d95s2nl autoionizing states of the In+ ion as well as 4d10nl,4d95s2 discrete states and 4d95p2,4d95s5d, and 4d9npn'l autoionizing states of the In2+ ion was observed in the excitation functions for both lines. The absolute cross section values for the lines under investigation were determined and found to be 0.7 × 10-17 cm2 and 1.4 × 10-17 cm2, respectively, at the 100 eV energy. The effective population of the In2+ ion lower 4d105pP laser levels under ionization-with-excitation is shown to result from the contribution of cascade processes as well as excitation-autoionization process related mainly to the correlation interaction between the outer s-shell and inner d-shell.

  6. Double differential cross sections for proton induced electron emission from molecular analogues of DNA constituents for energies in the Bragg peak region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; Bug, Marion U.; Wang, Mingjie; Baek, Woon Yong; Buhr, Ticia; Hilgers, Gerhard; Champion, Christophe; Rabus, Hans

    2016-09-01

    For track structure simulations in the Bragg peak region, measured electron emission cross sections of DNA constituents are required as input for developing parameterized model functions representing the scattering probabilities. In the present work, double differential cross sections were measured for the electron emission from vapor-phase pyrimidine, tetrahydrofuran, and trimethyl phosphate that are structural analogues to the base, the sugar, and the phosphate residue of the DNA, respectively. The range of proton energies was from 75 keV to 135 keV, the angles ranged from 15° to 135°, and the electron energies were measured from 10 eV to 200 eV. Single differential and total electron emission cross sections are derived by integration over angle and electron energy and compared to the semi-empirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht (HKS) model and a quantum mechanical calculation employing the first Born approximation with corrected boundary conditions (CB1). The CB1 provides the best prediction of double and single differential cross section, while total cross sections can be fitted with semi-empirical models. The cross sections of the three samples are proportional to their total number of valence electrons.

  7. Understanding the effects of electronic polarization and delocalization on charge-transport levels in oligoacene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2017-06-13

    Electronic polarization and charge delocalization are important aspects that affect the charge-transport levels in organic materials. Here, using a quantum mechanical/ embedded-charge (QM/EC) approach based on a combination of the long-range corrected omega B97X-D exchange-correlation functional (QM) and charge model 5 (CM5) point-charge model (EC), we evaluate the vertical detachment energies and polarization energies of various sizes of crystalline and amorphous anionic oligoacene clusters. Our results indicate that QM/EC calculations yield vertical detachment energies and polarization energies that compare well with the experimental values obtained from ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements. In order to understand the effect of charge delocalization on the transport levels, we considered crystalline naphthalene systems with QM regions including one or five-molecules. The results for these systems show that the delocalization and polarization effects are additive; therefore, allowing for electron delocalization by increasing the size of the QM region leads to the additional stabilization of the transport levels. Published by AIP Publishing.

  8. Performance of electron, photon and muon triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069734

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. Here we will present the design and performance of the main muon, electron and photon triggers, in view of the more challenging conditions for the LHC Run 2. For the muon case, we discuss the improvements in the isolation algorithm with the usage of Particle Flow techniques, which allow for better discrimination power between processes with prompt muons and the the effect of jets penetrating through the hadronic calorimeter into the muon chambers. For the ele...

  9. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  10. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Boisen, Anja; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  11. Electronic transport in graphene-based structures: An effective cross-section approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uppstu, Andreas; Saloriutta, Karri; Harju, Ari

    2012-01-01

    We show that transport in low-dimensional carbon structures with finite concentrations of scatterers can be modeled by utilizing scaling theory and effective cross sections. Our results are based on large-scale numerical simulations of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, using a tight...... with good accuracy from the transmission functions of single defects, greatly reducing the computational cost and paving the way toward using first-principles methods to evaluate the conductance of mesoscopic systems, consisting of millions of atoms....

  12. Extended Pulse-Powered Humidity-Freeze Cycling for Testing Module-Level Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rodriguez, Miguel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kempe, Michael D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Repins, Ingrid L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-28

    An EMI suppression capacitor (polypropylene film type) failed by 'popcorning' due to vapor outgassing in pulse powered humidity-freeze cycles. No shorts or shunts could be detected despite mildly corroded metallization visible in the failed capacitor. Humidity-freeze cycling is optimized to break into moisture barriers. However, further studies will be required on additional module level power electronic (MLPE) devices to optimize the stress testing for condensation to precipitate any weakness to short circuiting and other humidity/bias failure modes.

  13. Cross-sectional study of use of electronic media by secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatrungrit, Komsan; Hongsanguansri, Sirichai

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing concern about the negative psychological effects of excessive use of various electronic media by adolescents but the monitoring of these behaviors in low- and middle-income countries has some methodological flaws. Assess the use of all types of electronic media among secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. A stratified random sample of students from four schools in Bangkok completed a modified version of a questionnaire used in a major study in the United States. Among the 768 participants, 443 (57.7%) were female and 325 (42.3%) were male; their mean (sd) age was 15.4 (1.5) years. Almost all respondents had easy access to multiple types of electronic media; 94% had mobile phones, 77% had a television in their bedroom, and 47% had internet access in their bedroom. Over the prior day 39% had watched television shows or movies for more than 3 hours, 28% spent more than 3 hours on social networking sites, 25% listened to music for more than 3 hours, and 18% played computer games for more than 3 hours. Overall, 27% reported using electronic devices for more than 12 hours in the previous day. Only 19% reported parental rules about the use of electronic devices in the home that were regularly enforced. Time engaged in the various activities was not related to parental education or, with the exception of time playing computer games, to students' grade point average. Younger students and male students spent less time than older students and female students using these devices to engage in interactive social activities (e.g., talking on the phone or social networking), while male students spent much more time than female students playing games on the devices. Adolescents spend a substantial part of every single day using different types of electronic devices. Longitudinal studies with precise time logs of device usage and descriptions of the type of content accessed are needed to determine the extent to which these activities have negative (or

  14. Cross-sectional study of use of electronic media by secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIATRUNGRIT, Komsan; HONGSANGUANSRI, Sirichai

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing concern about the negative psychological effects of excessive use of various electronic media by adolescents but the monitoring of these behaviors in low- and middle-income countries has some methodological flaws. Aim Assess the use of all types of electronic media among secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods A stratified random sample of students from four schools in Bangkok completed a modified version of a questionnaire used in a major study in the United States. Results Among the 768 participants, 443 (57.7%) were female and 325 (42.3%) were male; their mean (sd) age was 15.4 (1.5) years. Almost all respondents had easy access to multiple types of electronic media; 94% had mobile phones, 77% had a television in their bedroom, and 47% had internet access in their bedroom. Over the prior day 39% had watched television shows or movies for more than 3 hours, 28% spent more than 3 hours on social networking sites, 25% listened to music for more than 3 hours, and 18% played computer games for more than 3 hours. Overall, 27% reported using electronic devices for more than 12 hours in the previous day. Only 19% reported parental rules about the use of electronic devices in the home that were regularly enforced. Time engaged in the various activities was not related to parental education or, with the exception of time playing computer games, to students’ grade point average. Younger students and male students spent less time than older students and female students using these devices to engage in interactive social activities (e.g., talking on the phone or social networking), while male students spent much more time than female students playing games on the devices. Conclusion Adolescents spend a substantial part of every single day using different types of electronic devices. Longitudinal studies with precise time logs of device usage and descriptions of the type of content accessed are needed to determine the extent to

  15. Sounding the warning bells: the need for a systems approach to understanding behaviour at rail level crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Gemma J M; Salmon, Paul M; Lenné, Michael G

    2013-09-01

    Collisions at rail level crossings are an international safety concern and have been the subject of considerable research effort. Modern human factors practice advocates a systems approach to investigating safety issues in complex systems. This paper describes the results of a structured review of the level crossing literature to determine the extent to which a systems approach has been applied. The measures used to determine if previous research was underpinned by a systems approach were: the type of analysis method utilised, the number of component relationships considered, the number of user groups considered, the number of system levels considered and the type of model described in the research. None of research reviewed was found to be consistent with a systems approach. It is recommended that further research utilise a systems approach to the study of the level crossing system to enable the identification of effective design improvements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines in Electronic Cigarettes: Comparison between Liquid and Aerosol Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although electronic cigarette (EC liquids contain low levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs, studies evaluating the levels emitted to the aerosol are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of TSNAs between liquids and generated aerosol. Methods: Three EC liquids were obtained from the market. An additional (spiked sample was prepared by adding known amounts of standard TSNAs solutions to one of the obtained liquids. N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN, N-nitrosoanatabine (NAT, N-nitrosoanabasine (NAB and 4-(methylnitrosamino1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK were measured. Three 100-puff sets from each liquid were trapped in filter pads and were subsequently analyzed for the presence of TSNAs. The expected levels of TSNAs (calculated based on the liquid consumption were compared with the measured levels in the aerosol. Results: Only NAB was found at trace levels in two commercial liquids (1.2 and 2.3 ng/g, while the third contained 1.5 ng/g NAB and 7.7 ng/g NNN. The 100-puff sets resulted in 336–515 mg liquid consumption, with no TSNAs being detected in the aerosol. The spiked sample contained 42.0–53.9 ng/g of each of the TSNAs. All TSNAs were detected in the aerosol with the measured levels being statistically similar to the expected amounts. A significant correlation between expected and measured levels of TSNAs in the aerosol was found (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that exposure of EC users to TSNAs can be accurately assessed based on the levels present in the liquid, without the need to analyze the aerosol.

  17. Crossing Over: Nanostructures that Move Electrons and Ions across Cellular Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M; Noy, Aleksandr

    2015-10-14

    Critical biological processes such as energy generation and signal transduction are driven by the flow of electrons and ions across the membranes of living cells. As a result, there is substantial interest in creating nanostructured materials that control transport of these charged species across biomembranes. Recent advances in the synthesis of de novo and protein nanostructures for transmembrane ion and electron transport and the mechanistic understanding underlying this transport are described. This body of work highlights the promise such nanostructures hold for directing transmembrane transport of charged species as well as challenges that must be overcome to realize that potential. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Cross-cultural differences in electronic word-of-mouth engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Hurter, Raphaela

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays consumers spread and seek opinions of peers through social networks like Facebook. Marketeers need to understand consumers’ online engagement and the factors that influence such electronic word-of-mouth behaviour (eWOM). Culture specifically plays a vital role, however, has been paid limited attention in previous research studies. This study undertook an online survey with 107 German and 48 Portuguese Facebook users, focusing on Millennials, to understand how engagemen...

  19. The DEPOSIT computer code: Calculations of electron-loss cross-sections for complex ions colliding with neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsarev, Mikhail S.

    2013-02-01

    A description of the DEPOSIT computer code is presented. The code is intended to calculate total and m-fold electron-loss cross-sections (m is the number of ionized electrons) and the energy T(b) deposited to the projectile (positive or negative ion) during a collision with a neutral atom at low and intermediate collision energies as a function of the impact parameter b. The deposited energy is calculated as a 3D integral over the projectile coordinate space in the classical energy-deposition model. Examples of the calculated deposited energies, ionization probabilities and electron-loss cross-sections are given as well as the description of the input and output data. Program summaryProgram title: DEPOSIT Catalogue identifier: AENP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8726 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer that can run C++ compiler. Operating system: Any operating system that can run C++. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: An MPI version is included in the distribution. Classification: 2.4, 2.6, 4.10, 4.11. Nature of problem: For a given impact parameter b to calculate the deposited energy T(b) as a 3D integral over a coordinate space, and ionization probabilities Pm(b). For a given energy to calculate the total and m-fold electron-loss cross-sections using T(b) values. Solution method: Direct calculation of the 3D integral T(b). The one-dimensional quadrature formula of the highest accuracy based upon the nodes of the Yacobi polynomials for the cosθ=x∈[-1,1] angular variable is applied. The Simpson rule for the φ∈[0,2π] angular variable is used. The Newton-Cotes pattern of the seventh order

  20. High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD™) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-μm object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (WODSTH00190024) on Town Highway 19, crossing North Bridgewater Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00190024 on Town Highway 19 crossing North Bridgewater Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D.

  2. Calculations of elastic, ionization and total cross sections for inert gases upon electron impact: threshold to 2 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Limbachiya, Chetan; Antony, Bobby; Joshipura, K. N.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we report comprehensive calculations of total elastic (Qel), total ionization (Qion) and total (complete) cross sections (QT) for the impact of electrons on inert gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) at energies from about threshold to 2000 eV. We have employed the spherical complex optical potential (SCOP) formalism to evaluate Qel and QT and used the complex spherical potential-ionization contribution (CSP-ic) method to derive Qion. The dependence of QT on polarizability and incident energy is presented for these targets through an analytical formula. Mutual comparison of various cross sections is provided to show their relative contribution to the total cross sections QT. Comparison of QT for all these targets is carried out to present a general theoretical picture of collision processes. The present calculations also provide information, hitherto sparse, on the excitation processes of these atomic targets. These results are compared with available experimental and other theoretical data and overall good agreement is observed.

  3. Photo-cross-linked perylene diimide derivative materials as efficient electron transporting layers in inverted polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Yong-Jin; Choi, Yu-Jin; Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Seok-Soon; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Na, Seok-In

    2017-11-23

    We present an efficient and stable interfacial material based on a water-soluble perylene diimide derivative functionalized with ionic and methacrylate groups (abbreviated as PDIM), which can be stabilized by the photo-polymerization of diacrylate groups at both ends of the side chain in the PDIM. The characteristics of the photo-cross-linked PDIM films were examined using absorption spectra, cyclic voltammetry, work function, and surface morphology. The feasibility of the photo-cross-linked PDIM films as a novel electron transporting layer (ETL) in polymer solar cells (PSCs) was also investigated. The PTB7-Th:PC71BM-based PSC using the PDIM as the ETL achieved the excellent power conversion efficiency of 9.44% similar to the conventional polyethylenimine ethoxylated (PEIE) and better than ZnO. Furthermore, the PSC with the PDIM films exhibited a similar lifetime to that of the PEIE-based device. This approach suggests that the photo-cross-linked PDIM film could be regarded as a promising interfacial material for fabricating highly efficient PSCs.

  4. Similarities and differences in dream content at the cross-cultural, gender, and individual levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Domhoff, G; Schneider, Adam

    2008-12-01

    The similarities and differences in dream content at the cross-cultural, gender, and individual levels provide one starting point for carrying out studies that attempt to discover correspondences between dream content and various types of waking cognition. Hobson and Kahn's (Hobson, J. A., & Kahn, D. (2007). Dream content: Individual and generic aspects. Consciousness and Cognition, 16, 850-858.) conclusion that dream content may be more generic than most researchers realize, and that individual differences are less salient than usually thought, provides the occasion for a review of findings based on the Hall and Van de Castle (Hall, C., & Van de Castle, R. (1966). The content analysis of dreams. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.) coding system for the study of dream content. Then new findings based on a computationally intensive randomization strategy are presented to show the minimum sample sizes needed to detect gender and individual differences in dream content. Generally speaking, sample sizes of 100-125 dream reports are needed because most dream elements appear in less than 50% of dream reports and the magnitude of the differences usually is not large.

  5. SATISFACTION LEVEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATORS WORKING IN TEACHING INSTITUTIONS : A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshna Chatterjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a resource-limited and high-burden disease setting, satisfied health professional is an asset in terms of maximized productivity, efficiency and quality health care. Job Satisfaction Index is a validated measure to identify the components that influence those issues. A multi-faceted structured questionnaire study was conducted upon a cross-section of medical educators (n=160 serving two tertiary care teaching institutions under different management set-up. Multiple demographic features were independent variables whereas three (3 critical areas of satisfaction index (SI were outcome variables. All participants were interviewed using 15 item Likert response-based, modified job satisfaction scale. It was observed that total SI scores among doctors representing the private group remained marginally higher (P<0.05 while compared to the other group. The comparative analysis of SI scores in critical areas like availability of academic supports and job security remained higher among the private doctors than that of the government ones though not significant. However the private doctors remained marginally satisfied in terms of working environment. The study outcome necessitates appropriate intervention measures at the organizational levels.

  6. Level of stress in final year MBBS students at Rural Medical College: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelke Umesh S, Kunkulol Rahul R, Narwane Sandeep P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress, defined as an imbalance between environmental conditions necessary for survival and the ability of individuals to adapt to those conditions, have a high prevalence in MBBS students. A variety of stressors play a significant role in developing stress. Objective:To study the level of stress and stressors responsible in Final MBBS students of Rural Medical College, Loni. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in 100 students (50 of either sex willing to participate in the study. They were subjected to fill the Medical Student Stressor Questionnaire, which consists of 40 questions for evaluating the stressors and severity of stress perceived by the subjects. Results: 71% subjects’ perceived moderate stress, while 13% and 16% perceived high and mild stress respectively. Academic stressor counted for moderate stress in 63% and high stress in 24 % of subjects, which was higher than other stressors. Conclusion: Academic stressors being the major stressor perceived, Strategies are required to decrease the burden of academic stress in the students.

  7. Tables and graphs of electron-interaction cross sections from 10 eV to 100 GeV derived from the LLNL Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), Z = 1--100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, S.T.; Cullen, D.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Seltzer, S.M. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Radiation Research)

    1991-11-12

    Energy-dependent evaluated electron interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Fm (Z = 1 to 100). Data are given over the energy range from 10 eV to 100 GeV. Cross sections and average energy deposits are presented in tabulated and graphic form. In addition, ionization cross sections and average energy deposits for each shell are presented in graphic form. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL) as of July, 1991.

  8. Total cross sections for electron scattering by CO{sub 2} molecules in the energy range 400{endash}5000 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G.; Manero, F. [Direccion de Tecnologia, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]|[Instituto de Investigacion Basica, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1996-01-01

    Total cross sections for electron scattering by CO{sub 2} molecules in the energy range 400{endash}5000 eV have been measured with experimental errors of {approximately}3{percent}. The present results have been compared with available experimental and theoretical data. The dependence of the total cross sections on electron energy shows an asymptotic behavior with increasing energies, in agreement with the Born-Bethe approximation. In addition, an analytical formula is provided to extrapolate total cross sections to higher energies. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Correlative light and electron microscopy enables viral replication studies at the ultrastructural level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Kirsi; Vihinen, Helena; Kallio, Katri; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2015-11-15

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a powerful tool to study structural changes within cells caused e.g. by ectopic protein expression, gene silencing or virus infection. Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has proven to be useful in cases when it is problematic to identify a particular cell among a majority of unaffected cells at the EM level. In this technique the cells of interest are first identified by fluorescence microscopy and then further processed for EM. CLEM has become crucial when studying positive-strand RNA virus replication, as it takes place in nanoscale replication sites on specific cellular membranes. Here we have employed CLEM for Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replication studies both by transfecting viral replication components to cells or by infecting different cell types. For the transfection-based system, we developed an RNA template that can be detected in the cells even in the absence of replication and thus allows exploration of lethal mutations in viral proteins. In infected mammalian and mosquito cells, we were able to find replication-positive cells by using a fluorescently labeled viral protein even in the cases of low infection efficiency. The fluorescent region within these cells was shown to correspond to an area rich in modified membranes. These results show that CLEM is a valuable technique for studying virus replication and membrane modifications at the ultrastructural level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross-Linkable and Dual Functional Hybrid Polymeric Electron Transporting Layer for High-Performance Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sheng; Hu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Kai; Yin, Qingwu; Jiang, Xiaofang; Huang, Fei; Cao, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A cross-linkable dual functional polymer hybrid electron transport layer (ETL) is developed by simply adding an amino-functionalized polymer dopant (PN4N) and a light crosslinker into a commercialized n-type semiconductor (N2200) matrix. It is found that the resulting hybrid ETL not only has a good solvent resistance, facilitating multilayers device fabrication but also exhibits much improved electron transporting/extraction properties due to the doping between PN4N and N2200. As a result, by using PTB7-Th:PC 71 BM blend as an active layer, the inverted device based on the hybrid ETL can yield a prominent power conversion efficiency of around 10.07%. More interestingly, photovoltaic property studies of bilayer devices suggest that the absorption of the hybrid ETL contributes to photocurrent and hence the hybrid ETL simultaneously acts as both cathode interlayer material and an electron acceptor. The resulting inverted polymer solar cells function like a novel device architectures with a combination of a bulk heterojunction device and miniature bilayer devices. This work provides new insights on function of ETLs and may be open up a new direction for the design of new ETL materials and novel device architectures to further improve device performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Differential cross sections for electron capture in p + H2 collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Akinori; Gulyás, Laszlo; Ohsaki, Akihiko

    2017-11-01

    Projectile angular distributions for electron capture in p + H2 collisions at 25 and 75 keV impact energies, measured by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 022706 (2012)], are calculated using the CDW-EIS and eikonal approximations. Angular distributions evaluated in the CDW-EIS approximation are in good agreement with the experimental data measured for coherent projectile beams. Incoherent projectile scatterings are also considered by folding the coherent angular distributions over the transverse momentum distribution of the projectile wave-packet. Reasonable agreements with the measurements are obtained only with coherence parameters very different from those reported in the experiments.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1'-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Szymon; Vdovin, Alexander; Rijs, Anouk; van Walree, Cornelis A; Zgierski, Marek Z; Buma, Wybren J

    2011-09-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We find that the excitation spectrum of S(1) displays extensive vibrational progressions that we identify to arise from large changes in the torsional angles of the phenyl rings upon electronic excitation. The extensive activity of the antisymmetric inter-ring torsional vibration provides conclusive evidence for a loss of symmetry upon excitation, leading to an inequivalence of the two phenyl rings. Nonresonant zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy from the ground state of the neutral molecule to the ground state of the radical cation, on the other hand, demonstrates that upon ionization symmetry is retained, and that the geometry changes are considerably smaller. Apart from elucidating how removal of an electron affects the structure of the molecule, these measurements provide an accurate value for the adiabatic ionization energy (65274 ± 1 cm(-1) (8.093 eV)). Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectra obtained after excitation of vibronic levels in S(1) confirm these conclusions and provide us with an extensive atlas of ionic vibronic energy levels. For higher excitation energies the excitation spectrum of S(1) becomes quite congested and shows unexpected large intensities. Ab initio calculations strongly suggest that this is caused by a conical intersection between S(1) and S(2). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. High-mass Drell-Yan cross-section and search for new phenomena in multi-electron/positron final states with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollstadt, Simon

    2015-02-12

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a very successful theory which describes nearly all known processes of particle physics very precisely. Nevertheless, there are several observations which cannot be explained within the existing theory. In this thesis, two analyses with high energy electrons and positrons using data of the ATLAS detector are presented. One, probing the Standard Model of particle physics and another searching for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The production of an electron-positron pair via the Drell-Yan process leads to a very clean signature in the detector with low background contributions. This allows for a very precise measurement of the cross-section and can be used as a precision test of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) where this process has been calculated at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The invariant mass spectrum mee is sensitive to parton distribution functions (PFDs), in particular to the poorly known distribution of antiquarks at large momentum fraction (Bjoerken x). The measurement of the high-mass Drell-Yan cross-section in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=7 TeV is performed on a dataset collected with the ATLAS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb{sup -1}. The differential cross-section of pp→Z{sup 0}/γ{sup *}+X→e{sup +}e{sup -}+X is measured as a function of the invariant mass in the range 116 GeVcross-section is corrected for detector effects and different levels of final state radiation corrections. A comparison is made to various event generators and to predictions of pQCD calculations at NNLO. A good agreement within the uncertainties between measured cross-sections and Standard Model predictions is observed. Examples of observed phenomena which can not be explained by the Standard Model are the amount of dark matter in the

  14. Single-top production t-channel cross section measurement in the electron+jets final state at ATLAS with 35 pb{sup -1}of data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoriauli, Gia

    2012-07-15

    The cross section of the Standard Model electroweak production of a single top quark in the t-channel has been measured using the LHC proton-proton collision data at {radical}(s)=7 TeV, 35 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, recorded by the ATLAS detector during the year 2010. The measurement has been based on a selection of the collision events with an electron and one b-tagged hadronic jet in the central region of the detector and one extra jet in the forward region of the detector. These requirements are dictated by the topology of the final state particles in the t-channel process. They helped to optimize an expected fraction of the t-channel process, according to a study based on Monte-Carlo simulation, in the selected events and suppress the contribution of the background processes. The main background processes such as production of hadronic jets via the strong interaction and production of a single W boson with associated hadronic jets are measured by means of data driven methods developed in this work. The measured cross section of single top quark production in the t-channel process is 59{sup +44}{sub -39}(stat.){sup +63}{sub -39}(syst.) pb. The measured upper limit on the cross section is 226 pb at the 95% confidence level. The results are in agreement with the latest theoretical prediction of the t-channel cross section of the Standard Model production of a single top quark calculated at NNLO, 64.6{sup +3.3}{sub -2.6} pb, considering m {sub t-quark}=172.5 GeV.

  15. Examining Students' Perceptions of Plagiarism: A Cross-Cultural Study at Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaoglu, M. Naci; Erbay, Sakire; Flitner, Cristina; Saltas, Dogan

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to dominate the academic world as one of its greatest challenges, and the existing literature suggests cross-cultural investigation of this critical issue may help all shareholders who detect, are confronted by and struggle with this issue to address it. Therefore, the present study, drawing upon a cross-cultural investigation…

  16. Piloting a Non-Invasive Genetic Sampling Method for Evaluating Population-Level Benefits of Wildlife Crossing Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony P. Clevenger

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intuitively, wildlife crossing structures should enhance the viability of wildlife populations. Previous research has demonstrated that a broad range of species will use crossing structures, however, questions remain as to whether these measures actually provide benefits to populations. To assess this, studies will need to determine the number of individuals using crossings, their sex, and their genetic relationships. Obtaining empirical data demonstrating population-level benefits for some species can be problematic and challenging at best. Molecular techniques now make it possible to identify species, individuals, their sex, and their genetic relatedness from hair samples collected through non-invasive genetic sampling (NGS. We describe efforts to pilot a method to assess potential population-level benefits of wildlife crossing structures. We tested the feasibility of a prototype NGS system designed to sample hair from black bears (Ursus americanus and grizzly bears (U. arctos at two wildlife underpasses. The piloted hair-sampling method did not deter animal use of the trial underpasses and was effective at sampling hair from more than 90% of the bear crossing events at the underpasses. Hair samples were also obtained from non-target carnivore species, including three out of five (60% cougar (Puma concolor crossing events. Individual identification analysis revealed that three female and two male grizzly bears used one wildlife underpass, whereas two female and three male black bears were identified as using the other underpass. Of the 36 hair samples from bears analyzed, five failed, resulting in an 87% extraction success rate, and six more were only identified to species. Overall, 70% of the hair samples from bears collected in the field had sufficient DNA for extraction purposes. Preliminary data from our NGS suggest the technique can be a reliable method to assess the population-level benefits of Banff wildlife crossings. Furthermore, NGS

  17. Multipolarity effects in ionization of the inner level of an atom by an electron impact in extended fine structures of K and L spectra of electron energy losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebennikov, V.I. [Institute of Metal Physics, UB RAS, 620066 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Guy, D.E. [Physical-Technical Institute, Kirov st. 132, UB RAS, 426000 Izhevsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: lasas@fti.udm.ru; Ruts, Y.V. [Physical-Technical Institute, Kirov st. 132, UB RAS, 426000 Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Surnin, D.V. [Physical-Technical Institute, Kirov st. 132, UB RAS, 426000 Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Zheltysheva, O.R. [Physical-Technical Institute, Kirov st. 132, UB RAS, 426000 Izhevsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01

    The problem of multipolarity of the atom core level ionization by electron impact in extended energy loss fine structure (EELFS) spectroscopy is studied. The intensities and amplitudes of electron transitions have been calculated in the OPW approximation. The experimental K EELFS spectra of Al, Si and L EELFS spectra of Fe, Co have been obtained. Corresponding calculations have been carried out in the monopole and dipole approximations. A comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra have been made. It is shown that a good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results points to the need for taking account of multipolarity of the electron transition processes in EELFS calculations.

  18. Computation of Electron Impact Ionization Cross sections of Iron Hydrogen Clusters - Relevance in Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Umang; Joshipura, K. N.

    2017-04-01

    Plasma-wall interaction (PWI) is one of the key issues in nuclear fusion research. In nuclear fusion devices, such as the JET tokamak or the ITER, first-wall materials will be directly exposed to plasma components. Erosion of first-wall materials is a consequence of the impact of hydrogen and its isotopes as main constituents of the hot plasma. Besides the formation of gas-phase atomic species in various charge states, di- and polyatomic molecular species are expected to be formed via PWI processes. These compounds may profoundly disturb the fusion plasma, may lead to unfavorable re-deposition of materials and composites in other areas of the vessel. Interaction between atoms, molecules as well transport of impurities are of interest for modelling of fusion plasma. Qion by electron impact are such process also important in low temperature plasma processing, astrophysics etc. We reported electron impact Qionfor iron hydrogen clusters, FeHn (n = 1 to 10) from ionization threshold to 2000 eV. A semi empirical approach called Complex Scattering Potential - Ionization Contribution (CSP-ic) has been employed for the reported calculation. In context of fusion relevant species Qion were reported for beryllium and its hydrides, tungsten and its oxides and cluster of beryllium-tungsten by Huber et al.. Iron hydrogen clusters are another such species whose Qion were calculated through DM and BEB formalisms, same has been compared with present calculations.

  19. Probing Energy Levels of Large Array Quantum Dot Superlattice by Electronic Transport Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisri, S. Z.; Degoli, E.; Spallanzani, N.; Krishnan, G.; Kooi, B.; Ghica, C.; Yarema, M.; Protesescu, L.; Heiss, W.; Kovalenko, M.; Pulci, O.; Ossicini, S.; Iwasa, Y.; Loi, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dot superlattice (CQDS) emerges as new type of hybrid solids allowing easy fabrication of devices that exploits the quantum confinement properties of individual QD. This materials displays peculiar characters, making investigation of their transport properties nontrivial. Besides the bandgap variations, 0D nature of QD lead to the formation of discrete energy subbands. These subbands are crucial for multiple exciton generation (for efficient solar cell), thermoelectric material and multistate transistor. Full understanding of the CQDS energy level structure is vital to use them in complex devices. Here we show a powerful method to determine the CQDS electronic energy levels from their intrinsic charge transport characteristics. Via the use of ambipolar transistors with CQDS as active materials and gated using highly capacitive ionic liquid gating, Fermi energy can be largely tuned. It can access energy levels beyond QD's HOMO & LUMO. Ability to probe not only the bandgap, but also the discrete energy level from large assembly of QD at room temperature suggests the formation of energy minibands in this system.

  20. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    , which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-resonance in the transmission. We then go on to study current induced heating and cooling, and nd that there is a basis for using quantum interference to design molecules that can be cooling by the tunnelling current. The basic idea is to align the incoming and the outgoing transmission channels such that absorption...... of a phonon is favoured over emission of a phonon. The incoming and outgoing channels are usually very alike, but by separating them using quantum interference it is possible to tune the system to observe a cooling eect. The basis is illus- trated in a simple tight-binding model, and the subsequent cooling...

  1. A novel technique for the measurement of the electron neutrino cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhin, A. [I.N.F.N., Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Ludovici, L. [I.N.F.N., Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Terranova, F. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Absolute neutrino cross section measurements are presently limited by uncertainties on ν fluxes. In this paper, we propose a technique that is based on the reconstruction of large angle positrons in the decay tunnel to identify three-body semileptonic K{sup +} → e{sup +}π{sup 0}ν{sub e} decays. This tagging facility operated in positron counting mode (gevent count mode h) can be employed to determine the absolute ν{sub e} flux at the neutrino detector with O(1%) precision. Facilities operated in gevent by event tag mode h i.e. tagged neutrino beams that exploit the time coincidence of the positron at source and the ν{sub e} interaction at the detector, are also discussed. (orig.)

  2. The energy-level crossing behavior and quantum Fisher information in a quantum well with spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z H; Zheng, Q; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yong

    2016-03-02

    We study the energy-level crossing behavior in a two-dimensional quantum well with the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings (SOCs). By mapping the SOC Hamiltonian onto an anisotropic Rabi model, we obtain the approximate ground state and its quantum Fisher information (QFI) via performing a unitary transformation. We find that the energy-level crossing can occur in the quantum well system within the available parameters rather than in cavity and circuit quantum eletrodynamics systems. Furthermore, the influence of two kinds of SOCs on the QFI is investigated and an intuitive explanation from the viewpoint of the stationary perturbation theory is given.

  3. Individual-level outcomes in poorly managed cross-border mergers and acquisitions: A holistic view of the relevant processes

    OpenAIRE

    Hajro, A; Mandal, A

    2011-01-01

    This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article (with the provisional title "Undesired individual-level outcomes in cross-border mergers and acquisitions: A process approach") published in Schmalenbach Business Review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version, "Individual-level outcomes in poorly managed cross-border mergers and acquisitions: A holistic view of the relevant processes" in Special Issue 3/11, 92 - 116, 2011 is available online at: http://www.sbr-online.de/s...

  4. Carboxyhaemoglobin levels, health and lifestyle perceptions in smokers converting from tobacco cigarettes to electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staden, Sandri Rachelle; Groenewald, Marcelle; Engelbrecht, Rifke; Becker, Piet Johannes; Hazelhurst, Lynton Tempest

    2013-09-30

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer are diseases associated with smoking tobacco cigarettes. Smokers find cessation difficult. To determine whether smoking the Twisp electronic cigarette (e-cigarette), containing nicotine in a vegetable-based glycerine substance, would reduce carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) levels in regular cigarette smokers by (i) comparing arterial and venous COHb levels before and after smoking the Twisp e-cigarette for 2 weeks; and (ii) evaluating changes in participants' perception of their health and lifestyle following the use of Twisp e-cigarettes. A single group within-subject design was used where tobacco cigarette smokers converted to Twisp e-cigarettes for 2 weeks. Prior to using the Twisp e-cigarette and after using this device for 2 weeks, arterial COHb, venous COHb and venous cotinine levels were determined. Additionally, the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire outlining their perceptions on health and lifestyle. Thirteen participants of median age 38 years (range 23 - 46) with a smoking median of 20 cigarettes/day (range 12 - 30) completed the study. COHb levels (%) were significantly reduced after smoking Twisp e-cigarettes for 2 weeks (mean ± standard deviation (SD) arterial COHb before 4.66±1.99 v. after 2.46±1.35; p=0.014 and mean ±SD venous COHb before 4.37±2.1 v. after 2.50±1.23; p=0.018). There was excellent agreement between arterial and venous COHb levels (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.916). A decrease in cotinine levels (p=0.001) and an increase in oxygen saturation (p=0.002) were also observed. The majority of participants perceived improvements in their health and lifestyle parameters. Smoking the Twisp e-cigarette may be a healthier and more acceptable alternative to smoking tobacco cigarettes.

  5. Coulomb Repulsion Effect in Two-electron Non-adiabatic Tunneling through a One-level redox Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medvedev, Igor M.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We investigated Coulomb repulsion effects in nonadiabatic (diabatic) two-electron tunneling through a redox molecule with a single electronic level in a symmetric electrochemical contact under ambient conditions, i.e., room temperature and condensed matter environment. The electrochemical contact...

  6. Measuring trade-offs that matter: assessing the impact of a new electronic cross-match policy on the turnaround time and the cross-match workload efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, David M; Goldfinger, Dennis; Lu, Qun; Wallace, Bridget; Kosaka-Nguyen, Dawn; Wood, Alisa; Porter, Bethany; Bumerts, Pamela; Jeffery, Rebecca; Fang, Amy; Stalcup, Irene; Penaflorida, Tracy; Ziman, Alyssa

    2014-12-01

    Our traditional cross-match (XM) policy generated a significant number of XM units that were never issued. To minimize the unnecessary XM workload, we proposed a new policy where orders eligible for the electronic XM (EXM) are pended until orders to issue red blood cells (RBCs) are received. To address concerns that this new policy might unduly delay blood availability, we conducted a study to assess whether the new policy was noninferior to the traditional policy with regard to the turnaround time (TAT). We monitored the TAT and XM workload efficiency (XM-to-issue [C : I] ratio) for a total of 8 weeks split between the two policies' periods. The primary outcome was the proportion of RBC issue requests that was turned around in less than 12 minutes. Fifty percent (1133 of 2265) of issue requests were turned around in 12 minutes or less under the traditional policy compared to 43.9% (975 of 2223) under the new policy (absolute difference of 6.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.2%-9.1%; p trade-off between delays in the TAT and efficiency gains in the XM workload remained acceptable for patient care. © 2014 AABB.

  7. Levels of selected carcinogens and toxicants in vapor from electronic cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasz, Goniewicz Maciej; Jakub, Knysak; Michal, Gawron; Leon, Kosmider; Andrzej, Sobczak; Jolanta, Kurek; Adam, Prokopowicz; Magdalena, Jablonska-Czapla; Czeslawa, Rosik-Dulewska; Christopher, Havel; Peyton, Jacob; Neal, Benowitz

    2014-01-01

    Significance Electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, are devices designed to imitate regular cigarettes and deliver nicotine via inhalation without combusting tobacco. They are purported to deliver nicotine without other toxicants and to be safer alternative to regular cigarettes. However, little toxicity testing has been performed to evaluate the chemical nature of vapor generated from e-cigarettes. The aim of this study was to screen e-cigarette vapors for content of four groups of potentially toxic and carcinogenic compounds: carbonyls, volatile organic compounds, nitrosamines, and heavy metals. Materials and methods Vapors were generated from 12 brands of e-cigarettes and the reference product, the medicinal nicotine inhaler, in controlled conditions using a modified smoking machine. The selected toxic compounds were extracted from vapors into a solid or liquid phase and analyzed with chromatographic and spectroscopy methods. Results We found that the e-cigarette vapors contained some toxic substances. The levels of the toxicants were 9 to 450 times lower than in cigarette smoke and were, in many cases, comparable to trace amounts found in the reference product. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the idea that substituting tobacco cigarettes with electronic cigarettes may substantially reduce exposure to selected tobacco-specific toxicants. E-cigarettes as a harm reduction strategy among smokers unwilling to quit warrants further study. PMID:23467656

  8. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, P. L.; Pizarro, J.; Guerrero, E.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; Scavello, G.; Yáñez, A.; Núñez-Moraleda, B. M.; Maestre, J. M.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples.

  9. Firearm legislation and firearm mortality in the USA: a cross-sectional, state-level study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalesan, Bindu; Mobily, Matthew E; Keiser, Olivia; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Galea, Sandro

    2016-04-30

    In an effort to reduce firearm mortality rates in the USA, US states have enacted a range of firearm laws to either strengthen or deregulate the existing main federal gun control law, the Brady Law. We set out to determine the independent association of different firearm laws with overall firearm mortality, homicide firearm mortality, and suicide firearm mortality across all US states. We also projected the potential reduction of firearm mortality if the three most strongly associated firearm laws were enacted at the federal level. We constructed a cross-sectional, state-level dataset from Nov 1, 2014, to May 15, 2015, using counts of firearm-related deaths in each US state for the years 2008-10 (stratified by intent [homicide and suicide]) from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, data about 25 firearm state laws implemented in 2009, and state-specific characteristics such as firearm ownership for 2013, firearm export rates, and non-firearm homicide rates for 2009, and unemployment rates for 2010. Our primary outcome measure was overall firearm-related mortality per 100,000 people in the USA in 2010. We used Poisson regression with robust variances to derive incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs. 31,672 firearm-related deaths occurred in 2010 in the USA (10·1 per 100,000 people; mean state-specific count 631·5 [SD 629·1]). Of 25 firearm laws, nine were associated with reduced firearm mortality, nine were associated with increased firearm mortality, and seven had an inconclusive association. After adjustment for relevant covariates, the three state laws most strongly associated with reduced overall firearm mortality were universal background checks for firearm purchase (multivariable IRR 0·39 [95% CI 0·23-0·67]; p=0·001), ammunition background checks (0·18 [0·09-0·36]; pfirearms (0·16 [0·09-0·29]; pfirearm purchase could reduce national firearm mortality from 10·35 to 4·46

  10. Level-1 trigger selection of electrons and photons with CMS for LHC Run-II.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088114

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The first, hardware-level trigger (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all subdetectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its center of mass energy to 13 or 14 TeV, and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme in this intense environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be upgraded. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture in particular has been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds even in presence of more demanding conditions (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of $\\tau$ leptons. This design benefits from recent $\\mu$TCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorit...

  11. Absence of Energy Level Crossing for the Ground State Energy of the Rabi Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hirokawa, Masao; Hiroshima, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    The Hamiltonian of the Rabi model is considered. It is shown that the ground state energy of the Rabi Hamiltonian is simple for all values of the coupling strength, which implies the ground state energy does not cross other energy

  12. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, R.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1994-12-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the SLAC Linear Collider with the SLD detector. The author describes this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {+-} 1.2%. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2290 {+-} 0.0010.

  13. Universal scaling behavior of molecular electronic stopping cross section for protons colliding with small molecules and nucleobases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo-López, L.N.; Martínez-Flores, C. [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. Postal 43-8, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62251 (Mexico); Cabrera-Trujillo, R., E-mail: trujillo@fis.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. Postal 43-8, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62251 (Mexico); Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Ap. Postal 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The electronic stopping cross section and mean excitation energy for molecules and 5 nucleobases have been calculated within the first Born approximation in terms of an orbital decomposition to take into account the molecular structure. The harmonic oscillator (HO) description of the stopping cross section together with a Floating Spherical Gaussian Orbital (FSGO) model is implemented to account for the chemical composition of the target. This approach allows us to use bonds, cores, and lone pairs as HO basis to describe the ground state molecular structure. In the HO model, the orbital angular frequency is the only parameter that connects naturally with the mean excitation energy. As a result, we obtain a simple expression for the equivalent mean excitation energy in terms of the orbital radius parameter, as well as an analytical expression of the stopping cross section. For gas phase molecular targets, we provide HO based orbital mean excitation energies to describe any molecule containing C, N, O, H, and P atoms. We present results for protons colliding with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}), methane (CH{sub 4}), ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and the nucleobases – guanine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}O), cytosine (C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}), thymine (C{sub 5}H{sub 6}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}), adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) and uracil (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The results for the stopping cross section are compared with available experimental and theoretical data showing good to excellent agreement in the region of validity of the model. The HO approach allows us to obtain a universal stopping cross section formula to describe a universal scaling behavior for the energy loss process. The universal scaled curve is confirmed by the experimental data.

  14. Combining cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cross-linking mass spectrometry (CX-MS) for structural elucidation of large protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carla; Urlaub, Henning

    2017-10-01

    Determining the structures of, and gaining insight into, the function of large protein complexes at the molecular or atomic level has become a key part of modern structural biology. Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) can solve structures of highly dynamic macromolecular complexes that are not feasible with other structural techniques like X-ray of crystallized proteins (protein complexes) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of proteins (protein complexes) in solution. To resolve the regions that are less well defined in cryo-EM images, cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (CX-MS) provides valuable information on the proximity between amino-acid residues as distance constraints for homology or de novo modelling. The CX-MS strategy involves covalent linkage, with chemical cross-linkers, of residues close to each other in three-dimensional space and identifying these connections by mass spectrometry. In this article, we summarise the advances of CX-MS and its integration with cryo-EM for structural reconstruction. We further evaluate a number of important examples of structure determination that followed this combinatorial strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Incorporating Cross-Cultural Videoconferencing to Enhance Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) at the Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranc-Paszylk, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide evidence of cross-cultural videoconferencing affordances with reference to a Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) context at the tertiary level. At the core of CLIL lie student-centered paradigms of teaching methodologies that invite task and project work and authentic and meaningful communication, while…

  16. Cross-Age Mentoring to Support A-Level Pupils' Transition into Higher Education and Undergraduate Students' Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Alana I.

    2014-01-01

    Two challenges identified for psychology higher education are supporting entry students' transition, and supporting graduates' transition into employment. The evaluation of the first phase of a cross-age mentoring action research project targeting these issues is presented; eight psychology undergraduates mentored 20 A-level psychology pupils in…

  17. Safe implementation of automatic microprocessor systems of level crossing on the example of the SPA-4 system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław KORNASZEWSKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fulfilling high requirements of safety and reliability is an importantquestion in devices of railway traffic control. Increased safety in computer systems is reached in the simplest way through redundancy of hardware and software, but also with other methods. A microprocessor system of automatic SPA-4 level crossing, manufactured by Bombardier Transportation Katowice (Poland, is a benchmark in the paper.

  18. Exploiting level anti-crossings for efficient and selective transfer of hyperpolarization in coupled nuclear spin systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pravdivtsev, A.N.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603; Miesel, K.; Vieth, H.-M.; Ivanov, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Spin hyperpolarization can be coherently transferred to other nuclei in field-cycling NMR experiments. At low magnetic fields spin polarization is redistributed in a strongly coupled network of spins. Polarization transfer is most efficient at fields where level anti-crossings (LACs) occur for the

  19. Reversal of the sex difference in serum leptin levels upon cross-sex hormone administration in transsexuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, J.M.; Asscheman, H.; Seidell, J C; Frölich, M.; Meinders, Arend E; Gooren, Louis J G

    1997-01-01

    Women have higher circulating leptin levels than men. This sex difference is not simply explained by differences in the amount of body fat and is possibly influenced by their different sex steroid milieus. This prompted us to study prospectively the effects of cross-sex steroid hormones on serum

  20. Non-A/non-B hepatitis in experimentally infected chimpanzees: cross-challenge and electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D W; Maynard, J E; Cook, E H; Ebert, J W; Gravelle, C R; Tsiquaye, K N; Kessler, H; Zuckerman, A J; Miller, M F; Ling, C; Overby, L R

    1980-01-01

    Inoculation of eight chimpanzees with factor VIII, factor IX, or "H" strain plasma resulted in enzymatic and histopathologic evidence of non-A/non-B hepatitis in all eight animals. Challenge of two chimpanzees convalescent from factor VIII-induced disease with either factor IX or "H" strain plasma resulted in non-A/non-B hepatitis only in the animal inoculated with factor IX materials. Reciprocal cross-challenge of a chimpanzee convalescent from factor IX-induced disease with factor VIII also produced unequivocal enzymatic and histopathologic evidence of non-A/non-B hepatitis. Cross-challenge of a chimpanzee convalescent from "H" strain-induced non-A/non-B hepatitis with factor VII did not cause a second bout of non-A/non-B hepatitis. These findings suggest the factor VIII materials and "H" strain plasma used in these studies share a common etiologic agent (or agents), but that factor VIII and factor IX may contain two distinct agents. Electron microscopic (EM) examination of thin-sectioned, acute-phase liver biopsies from all but one of the chimpanzees receiving the primary inocula revealed the presence of abnormal hepatocyte cytoplasmic structures previously shown to be associated with non-A/non-B hepatitis. Crystalline structure containing 25 to 30 nm particles were visualized by EM in the cytoplasm of endothelial or Kupffer cells in acute-phase liver biopsies obtained from three chimpanzees inoculated with either factor VIII materials or "H" strain plasma.

  1. Cross sections for electron scattering by methylfluoride (CH{sub 3}F) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz, J.R.; Santos, A.S. dos [Departamento de Física, UFSCar, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Souza, G.L.C. de; Lee, M.-T. [Departamento de Química, UFSCar, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Brescansin, L.M. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Lucchese, R.R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 7784-3255 (United States); Machado, L.E., E-mail: dlem@df.ufscar.br [Departamento de Física, UFSCar, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Theoretical investigation on e{sup −}–CH{sub 3}F collisions. • Complex optical potential is used to evaluate elastic, total, and total absorption cross sections. • Single-center expansion, combined with the Padé approximant technique, is used to solve the scattering equations. • Calculated results are in good agreement with existing theoretical and experimental data. - Abstract: We report a theoretical study on electron scattering by methylfluoride (CH{sub 3}F) in the intermediate-energy range. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer, as well as grand-total (elastic + inelastic) and total absorption cross sections are reported for impact energies ranging from 15 to 500 eV. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron–molecule interaction dynamics. A theoretical method based on the single-center-expansion close-coupling framework and corrected by the Padé approximant technique is used to solve the scattering equations. The comparison of our calculated results with experimental and other available theoretical data is encouraging.

  2. Final results of nu-e-bar electron scattering cross-section measurements and constraints on new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Deniz, Muhammed; Wong, Henry T

    2012-01-01

    The nu-e-bar electron elastic scattering cross-section was measured with a CsI(Tl) scintillating crystal detector array with a total mass of 187 kg at the Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Station. The detectors were exposed to a reactor nu-e-bar flux of 6.4 X 10^{12} cm^{-2}s^{-1} originated from a core with 2.9 GW thermal power. Using 29882/7369 kg-days of Reactor ON/OFF data, the Standard Model (SM) of electroweak interaction was probed at the 4-momentum transfer range of Q^2 ~ 3 X 10^{-6} GeV^2. A cross-section ratio of R_{expt} = [1.08 +- 0.21(stat) +- 0.16(sys)] X R_{SM} was measured. Constraints on the electroweak parameters (g_V,g_A) were placed, corresponding to a weak mixing angle measurement of $\\s2tw$ = [0.251 +- 0.031(stat) +- 0.024(sys)]. Destructive interference in the SM nu-e-bar+e processes was verified. Bounds on neutrino anomalous electromagnetic properties (neutrino magnetic moment and neutrino charge radius), non-standard neutrino interactions, upparticle physics and non-commutative physics were pl...

  3. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, C. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sarkar, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rajagopalan, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rentenberger, C., E-mail: christian.rentenberger@univie.ac.at [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti{sub 0.45}Al{sub 0.55} thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson’s ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10{sup −4} and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. - Highlights: • A TEM method to measure elastic strain in metallic glass films is proposed. • Method is based on tracking geometric changes in TEM diffraction patterns. • An automatic procedure is developed for extracting the local strain tensor. • Atomic-level strain in amorphous TiAl film was analysed during in-situ deformation. • Capability of the method to obtain micrometer scale strain profiles/maps is shown.

  4. Electronic cigarette use among adolescents: a cross-sectional study in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about electronic cigarette (e-cigarette use among Chinese adolescents. We examined the prevalence of current (past 30-day e-cigarette use and its associated factors in a large sample of adolescents in Hong Kong. Methods We analyzed data of the School-based Survey on Smoking among Students 2012/13 from a representative sample of 45,857 secondary school students (mean age: 14.8 ± 1.9. We conducted chi-square tests and t-test to compare current e-cigarette use by covariates. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between current e-cigarette use and demographic variables, parental smoking, peer smoking, knowledge about the harm of cigarette smoking, attitudes toward cigarette smoking, cigarette smoking status, use of other tobacco products, and alcohol consumption. Results Overall, 1.1 % of students reported current e-cigarette use. Of e-cigarette users, 11.7 % were never-cigarette smokers, 15.8 % were experimental cigarette smokers, 39.3 % were former cigarette smokers, and 33.2 % were current cigarette smokers. Current e-cigarette use was associated with male sex, poor knowledge about the harm of smoking, cigarette smoking, use of other tobacco products, and alcohol consumption. Conclusions Surveillance and intervention efforts should address a wide range of tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. Tobacco cessation programs should also address alcohol use collectively. Policies prohibiting e-cigarette sales to minors may help prevent e-cigarette uptake among adolescents.

  5. Urinary trichloroacetic acid levels and semen quality: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Wuhan, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Shao-Hua [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China); The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Yu-Feng [Reproductive Medicine Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Tan, Yin-Feng [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China); The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Zheng, Dan [The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ai-Lin; Xie, Hong [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China); The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); and others

    2011-02-15

    Toxicological studies indicate an association between exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and impaired male reproductive health in animals. However, epidemiological evidence in humans is still limited. We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study to investigate the effect of exposure to DBPs on semen quality in humans. Between May 2008 and July 2008, we recruited 418 male partners in sub-fertile couples seeking infertility medical instruction or assisted reproduction services from the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Major semen parameters analyzed included sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Exposure to DBPs was estimated by their urinary creatinine-adjusted trichloroacetic (TCAA) concentrations that were measured with the gas chromatography/electron capture detection method. We used linear regression to assess the relationship between exposure to DBPs and semen quality. According to the World Health Organization criteria (<20 million/mL for sperm concentration and <50% motile for sperm motility) and threshold value recommended by Guzick (<9% for sperm morphology), there were 265 men with all parameters at or above the reference values, 33 men below the reference sperm concentration, 151 men below the reference sperm motility, and 6 men below the reference sperm morphology. The mean (median) urinary creatinine-adjusted TCAA concentration was 9.2 (5.1) {mu}g/g creatinine. Linear regression analyses indicated no significant association of sperm concentration, sperm count, and sperm morphology with urinary TCAA levels. Compared with those in the lowest quartile of creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations, subjects in the second and third quartiles had a decrease of 5.1% (95% CI: 0.6%, 9.7%) and 4.7% (95% CI: 0.2%, 9.2%) in percent motility, respectively. However, these associations were not significant after adjustment for age, abstinence time, and smoking status. The present study provides suggestive but inconclusive evidence of the

  6. Total cross sections of electron scattering by several sulfur-containing molecules OCS, SO2, SF4, SF6, SF5CF3, SO2Cl2 and SO2ClF at 30-5000 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, D. H.; Sun, J. F.; Liu, Y. F.; Zhu, Z. L.; Ma, H.

    2009-07-01

    Total cross sections of electron scattering by several sulfur-containing molecules OCS, SO{2}, SF{4}, SF{6}, SF{5}CF{3}, SO{2}Cl{2} and SO{2}ClF are calculated at the Hartree-Fork level employing the modified additivity rule approach. The modified additivity rule approach, which was proposed by Shi et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 45, 253 (2007); Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 254, 205 (2007)], takes into consideration that the contributions of the geometric shielding effect vary as the energy of incident electrons, the target's molecular dimension and the atomic and electronic numbers in the molecule. The present investigations cover the impact energies ranging from 30 to 5000 eV. The quantitative total cross sections are compared with those obtained by experiments and other theories. Good agreement is observed even at energies of several tens of eV. It shows that the modified additivity rule approach is applicable to carry out the total cross section calculations of electron scattering by these sulfur-containing molecules at intermediate and high energies, especially over the energy range above 100 eV or so. In the present calculations, the atoms are still represented by the spherical complex optical potential, which is composed of static, exchange, polarization and absorption terms.

  7. Pilot study on the internal exposure to heavy metals of informal-level electronic waste workers in Agbogbloshie, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Feldt, Torsten; Till, Holger; Burchard, Gerd; Wilhelm, Michael; Fobil, Julius N

    2017-01-01

    Informal-level electronic waste (e-waste)-processing activities are performed at hotspots in developing countries such as India, China, and Ghana. These activities increase the ambient burden of heavy metals and contribute to the toxic exposure of the general population. However, few data exist on the internal exposure of populations involved in these informal activities and in close contact with fumes from the direct combustion of electronic waste products in these countries. Therefore, in a cross-sectional study design, we analyzed blood, urine, and hair samples from 75 e-waste workers residing in and/or working on a large e-waste recycling site in Agbogbloshie, Accra, Ghana, and compared the results against those of 40 individuals living in a suburb of Accra without direct exposure to e-waste recycling activities. A comparative analysis using the Mann-Whitney U test showed significantly higher median concentrations of blood lead (88.5 vs. 41.0 μg/l, p e-waste workers than those of controls. There was no difference in blood cadmium concentrations between the groups (0.51 vs. 0.57 μg/l, p = 0.215) or in urine mercury levels (0.18 vs. 0.18 μg/g crea , p = 0.820). Hair mercury levels were higher in the controls than in the e-waste workers (0.43 vs. 0.72, p compared our data with those from European populations, specifically using the German reference values, and found that the internal concentrations of the participants exceeded the German reference values in 59.3 vs. 3.1% (e-waste workers vs. controls) for blood lead, 56.9 vs. 52.5% for urine nickel, 22.2 vs. 20.0% for urine chromium, and 17.8 vs. 62.2% for hair mercury. In particular, the high blood lead levels of up to several hundred micrograms per liter are a cause for concern because many of the workers in Agbogbloshie are children or adolescents who are in developmental stages and are at a particular risk for negative health effects. We conclude that exposure to some of the heavy metals tended to

  8. Using electronic odor sensors to discriminate among oak barrel toasting levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatonnet, P; Dubourdieu, D

    1999-10-01

    Toasting changes both the quantity and the quality of the extractable substances in oak wood of barrels used for the aging of fine wines and spirits. Mastery and repeatability of toasting are vital in the production of quality barrels to be used for aging wines and spirits. Toasted wood components, which can be extracted by the wines or spirits during the aging process, are normally analyzed by maceration in standard alcohol solutions at concentrations adapted to the various products and can be used to control the intensity of the wood toasting. These kinds of analyses are accurate but time-consuming and need specialized laboratories. In this work, the feasibility of monitoring barrel toasting levels using an electronic nose with a metal oxide odor sensor array (MOS) was studied. The results of oak toasting level differentiation obtained via the MOS network were identical to those obtained by analyzing extractable compounds in liquid or gas phase as described in a previous paper. The results presented in this work at the laboratory scale could be used to implement a nondestructive monitoring system based on the analysis of headspace of barrels under industrial conditions.

  9. The CMS Level-1 electron and photon trigger: for Run II of LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, N.; Jessop, C.; Meng, F.; Marinelli, N.; Taroni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Davignon, O.; Romanteau, T.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Sauvan, J. B.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Taylor, J.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Shtipliyski, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Xia, F.

    2017-02-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) employs a sophisticated two-level online triggering system that has a rejection factor of up to 105. Since the beginning of Run II of LHC, the conditions that CMS operates in have become increasingly challenging. The centre-of-mass energy is now 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity currently peaks at 1.5 ×1034 cm-2s-1. In order to keep low physics thresholds and to trigger efficiently in such conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. A new trigger architecture, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT) has been introduced which allows the full granularity of the calorimeters to be exploited at the first level of the online trigger. The new trigger has also benefited immensely from technological improvements in hardware. Sophisticated algorithms, developed to fully exploit the advantages provided by the new hardware architecture, have been implemented. The new trigger system started taking physics data in 2016 following a commissioning period in 2015, and since then has performed extremely well. The hardware and firmware developments, electron and photon algorithms together with their performance in challenging 2016 conditions is presented.

  10. Municipal-level differences in depressive symptoms among adolescents in Norway: Results from the cross-national Ungdata study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Dawit Shawel; Frøyland, Lars Roar; Bakken, Anders; von Soest, Tilmann

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate municipal-level variations and individual- and municipal-level predictors of high levels of depressive symptoms among Norwegian adolescents. We used data from the Norwegian cross-national Ungdata study. We included 77,424 adolescents from 171 municipalities attending junior high school (Grades 8-10; age 13-16 years) from 2011 to 2013. Multilevel (two-level) logistic regression models were applied for the data analyses. The study revealed that 11% of adolescents reported high levels of depressive symptoms. The median odds ratio without adjusting for any individual- or municipal-level predictors was 1.24, indicating a small between-municipalities variability for high levels of depressive symptoms. All individual-level factors, such as gender, school grade, family income, substance use behaviours, bullying and dissatisfaction with different aspects of life, were significantly associated with high levels of depressive symptoms (p level factors, a low annual budgets for municipal health services was the sole significant predictor of high levels of depressive symptoms between municipalities. Municipal-level factors and variables related to survey characteristics explained a moderate proportion of the variation in high levels of depressive symptoms between municipalities. The cluster heterogeneity in high levels of depressive symptoms was small between municipalities in Norway. Further research should examine the geographic clustering of mental health problems at the school and neighbourhood level. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  11. An Application of Fuzzy Theory to Technical Competency Analysis for the Entry-Level Electronic Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liang-Te; And Others

    A study was conducted to develop the electronic technical competencies of duty and task analysis by using a revised DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) method, a questionnaire survey, and a fuzzy synthesis operation. The revised DACUM process relied on inviting electronics trade professionals to analyze electronic technology for entry-level…

  12. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in the tenth grade, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for sixteen units of instruction: (1) orientation, (2) introduction to electricity/electronics, (3) electricity/electronics safety, (4) fundamental skills, (5) direct current circuits, (6) graphical illustrations, (7) circuit…

  13. Calculations of total electron-impact ionization cross sections for Fluoroketone C5F10O and Fluoronitrile C4F7N using modified Deutsch-Märk formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jiayu; Li, Xingwen; Wu, Jian; Guo, Xiaoxue; Zhao, Hu

    2017-11-01

    Both fluoroketone C5F10O and fluoronitrile C4F7N are promising substitute gases for SF6. The electron-impact ionization cross sections for these two gases are calculated using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) formula and its modified method. The necessary molecular geometry optimization and electron population were determined by ab initio calculation, which was performed with quantum chemistry code. The level of calculation, including the theoretical method and basis-set, are carefully determined. To eliminate the drawbacks of the DM formula, a modified DM formula is set in this paper. The modified DM formula, of which the weighting factors are changed, has a better agreement with the experimental data on both the peak and shape of the cross-section curves. The results calculated by DM formula and modified DM formula are given as references to fill in gaps in further research into C5F10O and C4F7N.

  14. Absolute L-shell ionization and X-ray production cross sections of Lead and Thorium by 16-45 keV electron impact

    CERN Document Server

    Rahangdale, H V; De, S; Santos, J P; Mitra, D; Guerra, M; Saha, S

    2015-01-01

    The absolute L subshell specific electron impact ionization cross sections near the ionization threshold (16 < E < 45 keV) of Lead and Thorium are obtained from the measured L X-ray production cross sections. Monte Carlo simulation is done to account for the effect of the backscattered electrons and the final experimental results are compared with calculations performed using distorted wave Born approximation and the modified relativistic binary encounter Bethe model.The sensitivity of the results on the atomic parameters is explored. Observed agreements and discrepancies between the experimental results and theoretical estimates, and their dependence on the specific atomic parameters are reported.

  15. Total electron scattering cross sections of molecules containing H, C, N, O and F in the energy range 0.2–6.0 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurung, Meera Devi; Ariyasinghe, W.M., E-mail: wickram_ariyasinghe@baylor.edu

    2017-03-15

    Based on the effective atomic total electron scattering cross sections (EATCS) of atoms in a molecular environment, a simple model is proposed to predict the total electron scattering cross sections (TCS) of H, C, N, O, and F containing molecules. The EATCS for these five atoms are reported for 0.2–6.0 keV energies. The predicted TCS by this model are compared with experimental TCS in the literature. The experimental TCS of CHF{sub 3}, C{sub 2}F{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 4}F{sub 6}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} have been obtained for 0.2–4.5 keV electrons by measuring the attenuation of the electron beam through a gas cell.

  16. Bethe binary-encounter peaks in the double-differential cross sections for high-energy electron-impact ionization of H2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-11-01

    We study the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region in the ejected-electron double-differential emission spectrum of H2 and He targets in collisions with 8-keV electrons. We compare the absolute cross sections for these isoelectronic systems at high emission energies. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of a state-of-the-art theoretical model based on a two-effective-center approximation. In the case of the H2 molecule the binary peak in the double-differential cross sections (DDCS) is enhanced due to the two-center Young-type interference. The observed undulation in the DDCS ratio is explained in terms of the combined contributions of the Compton profile mismatch and the interference effect. The influence of the interference effect is thus observed for higher-energy electrons compared to most of the earlier studies which focused on low-energy electrons produced in soft collisions.

  17. Scaling of cross sections for K-electron capture by high-energy protons and alpha-particles from the multielectron atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, K.

    1979-01-01

    Electron capture by protons from H, He, and the K shell of Ar, and electron capture by alpha particles from He are considered. Using the experimental data, a function of the capture cross section is formed. It is shown that when this function is plotted versus the inverse of the collision energies, at high energies a straight line is obtained. At lower energies the line is concave up or down, depending on the charge of the projectile and/or the effective charge and the ionization potential of the electron that is being captured. The plot can be used to predict cross sections where experimental data are not available, and as a guide in future experiments. High-energy scaling formulas for K-electron capture by low-charge projectiles are given.

  18. Determining partial differential cross sections for low-energy electron photodetachment involving conical intersections using the solution of a Lippmann-Schwinger equation constructed with standard electronic structure techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seungsuk; Yarkony, David R

    2011-05-07

    A method for obtaining partial differential cross sections for low energy electron photodetachment in which the electronic states of the residual molecule are strongly coupled by conical intersections is reported. The method is based on the iterative solution to a Lippmann-Schwinger equation, using a zeroth order Hamiltonian consisting of the bound nonadiabatically coupled residual molecule and a free electron. The solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation involves only standard electronic structure techniques and a standard three-dimensional free particle Green's function quadrature for which fast techniques exist. The transition dipole moment for electron photodetachment, is a sum of matrix elements each involving one nonorthogonal orbital obtained from the solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. An expression for the electron photodetachment transition dipole matrix element in terms of Dyson orbitals, which does not make the usual orthogonality assumptions, is derived.

  19. Crossing the FE/HE Divide: The Transition Experiences of Direct Entrants at Level 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Angela; Harrison, John

    2011-01-01

    For students who have experienced higher education (HE) in the further education (FE) sector, the transfer to an HE institution (HEI) to complete an honours degree can bring many challenges. The transition for some can be difficult, as students cope with crossing both institutional and programme boundaries, whilst also negotiating a new academic…

  20. Zero-Crossing Disturbance Elimination and Spectrum Analysis of Single-Carrier Seven-Level SPWM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Fengjiang; Feng, Fan; Duan, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    the same comparison logics of the MWs and carrier during positive and negative half cycles of the MWs. Thus, it is implemented with only one digital signal processor chip without any other attached logical circuit or controller. The reason for generating the zero-crossing voltage pulse disturbance (ZCVPD...

  1. The Interplay of Cross-Situational Word Learning and Sentence-Level Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Judith; Crocker, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of mechanisms contribute to word learning. Learners can track co-occurring words and referents across situations in a bottom-up manner (cross-situational word learning, CSWL). Equally, they can exploit sentential contexts, relying on top-down information such as verb-argument relations and world knowledge, offering immediate constraints…

  2. Dependence levels in users of electronic cigarettes, nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETTER, Jean-François; EISSENBERG, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess dependence levels in users of e-cigarettes, and compare them with dependence levels in users of nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes. Design Self-reports from cross-sectional Internet and mail surveys. Comparisons of: a) 766 daily users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes with 30 daily users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes; b) 911 former smokers who used the e-cigarette daily with 451 former smokers who used the nicotine gum daily (but no e-cigarette); c) 125 daily e-cigarette users who smoked daily (dual users) with two samples of daily smokers who did not use e-cigarettes (2206 enrolled on the Internet and 292 enrolled by mail from the general population of Geneva). We used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale, the Cigarette Dependence Scale and versions of these scales adapted for e-cigarettes and nicotine gums. Results Dependence ratings were slightly higher in users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes than in users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes. In former smokers, long-term (>3 months) users of e-cigarettes were less dependent on e-cigarettes than long-term users of the nicotine gum were dependent on the gum. There were few differences in dependence ratings between short-term (e-cigarettes. Dependence on e-cigarettes was generally lower in dual users than dependence on tobacco cigarettes in the two other samples of daily smokers. Conclusions Some e-cigarette users were dependent on nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, but these products were less addictive than tobacco cigarettes. E-cigarettes may be as or less addictive than nicotine gums, which themselves are not very addictive. PMID:25561385

  3. Dependence levels in users of electronic cigarettes, nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    To assess dependence levels in users of e-cigarettes, and compare them with dependence levels in users of nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes. Self-reports from cross-sectional Internet and mail surveys. Comparisons of: (a) 766 daily users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes with 30 daily users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes; (b) 911 former smokers who used the e-cigarette daily with 451 former smokers who used the nicotine gum daily (but no e-cigarette); (c) 125 daily e-cigarette users who smoked daily (dual users) with two samples of daily smokers who did not use e-cigarettes (2206 enrolled on the Internet and 292 enrolled by mail from the general population of Geneva). We used the Fagerström test for nicotine dependence, the nicotine dependence syndrome scale, the cigarette dependence scale and versions of these scales adapted for e-cigarettes and nicotine gums. Dependence ratings were slightly higher in users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes than in users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes. In former smokers, long-term (>3 months) users of e-cigarettes were less dependent on e-cigarettes than long-term users of the nicotine gum were dependent on the gum. There were few differences in dependence ratings between short-term (≤3 months) users of gums or e-cigarettes. Dependence on e-cigarettes was generally lower in dual users than dependence on tobacco cigarettes in the two other samples of daily smokers. Some e-cigarette users were dependent on nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, but these products were less addictive than tobacco cigarettes. E-cigarettes may be as or less addictive than nicotine gums, which themselves are not very addictive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electronic Cigarette Use among Irish Youth: A Cross Sectional Study of Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Babineau

    Full Text Available To examine prevalence of, and factors associated with, e-cigarette use among young people aged 16-17 in Ireland.In 2014, a representative sample of 821 young people aged 16-17 recruited from secondary schools completed a pen and paper survey on e-cigarette use, tobacco use, and socio-demographic items.A total of 23.8% of respondents had used e-cigarettes at least once. Dual trial of tobacco and e-cigarettes was common with 69.5% of regular smokers and 30.4% of 'ever' smokers having tried e-cigarettes and 10.6% of current smokers using e-cigarettes regularly. 4.2% of never smokers have tried e-cigarettes. Overall, current e-cigarette use (once a month or more was low (3.2%. Binary logistic regression conducted through generalized estimating equations (GEE determined that controlling for other variables, current tobacco use and 'ever' tobacco use predicted ever e-cigarette use. Gender and school-level socioeconomic status were also independent predictors of ever e-cigarette use. Gender stood as the only predictor of on-going e-cigarette use, with males being more likely to regularly use e-cigarettes at least once a month.E-cigarette use among 16-17 year olds in Ireland is of note, with nearly a quarter of students having tried them. Concurrent or experimental use of e-cigarettes and tobacco is more common than sole use, while a small number have tried e-cigarettes without having tried tobacco.

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (WODSTH00990049) on Town Highway 99, crossing Gulf Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00990049 on Town Highway 99 crossing the Gulf Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (CABOTH00410037) on Town Highway 41, crossing the Winooski River, Cabot, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CABOTH00410037 on Town Highway 41 crossing the Winooski River (also referred to as Coit’s Pond Brook), Cabot, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  7. Measurements of electron-proton elastic cross sections for $0.4 < Q^2 < 5.5 (GeV/c)^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Christy, M E; Armstrong, C S; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Beck, D H; Blok, H P; Bochna, C W; Böglin, W; Bosted, P; Bouwhuis, M; Breuer, H; Brown, D S; Brüll, A; Carlini, R D; Chant, N S; Cochran, A; Cole, L; Danagulyan, S; Day, D B; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Fox, B; Gan, L; Gao, H; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Geesaman, D F; Gueye, P L J; Harvey, M; Holt, R J; Jiang, X; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E; Liang, Y; Lorenzon, W; Lung, A; Markowitz, P; Martin, J W; McIlhany, K; McKee, D; Meekins, D G; Miller, M A; Milner, R G; Mitchell, J H; Mkrtchyan, H G; Müller, B A; Nathan, A; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; O'Neill, T G; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Piercey, R B; Potterveld, D; Ransome, R D; Reinhold, J; Rollinde, E; Roos, P; Sarty, A J; Sawafta, R; Schulte, E C; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Tieulent, R; Uzzle, A; Vulcan, W F; Wood, S A; Xiong, F; Yuan, L; Zeier, M; Zihlmann, B; Ziskin, V

    2004-01-01

    We report on precision measurements of the elastic cross section for electron-proton scattering performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The measurements were made at 28 unique kinematic settings covering a range in momentum transfer of 0.4 $<$ $Q^2$ $<$ 5.5 $(\\rm GeV/c)^2$. These measurements represent a significant contribution to the world's cross section data set in the $Q^2$ range where a large discrepancy currently exists between the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors extracted from previous cross section measurements and that recently measured via polarization transfer in Hall A at Jefferson Lab.

  8. Low-energy cross-section calculations of single molecules by electron impact: a classical Monte Carlo transport approach with quantum mechanical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J. R.; Akabani, G.

    2014-05-01

    The present state of modeling radio-induced effects at the cellular level does not account for the microscopic inhomogeneity of the nucleus from the non-aqueous contents (i.e. proteins, DNA) by approximating the entire cellular nucleus as a homogenous medium of water. Charged particle track-structure calculations utilizing this approximation are therefore neglecting to account for approximately 30% of the molecular variation within the nucleus. To truly understand what happens when biological matter is irradiated, charged particle track-structure calculations need detailed knowledge of the secondary electron cascade, resulting from interactions with not only the primary biological component—water--but also the non-aqueous contents, down to very low energies. This paper presents our work on a generic approach for calculating low-energy interaction cross-sections between incident charged particles and individual molecules. The purpose of our work is to develop a self-consistent computational method for predicting molecule-specific interaction cross-sections, such as the component molecules of DNA and proteins (i.e. nucleotides and amino acids), in the very low-energy regime. These results would then be applied in a track-structure code and thereby reduce the homogenous water approximation. The present methodology—inspired by seeking a combination of the accuracy of quantum mechanics and the scalability, robustness, and flexibility of Monte Carlo methods—begins with the calculation of a solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation and proceeds to use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the perturbations in the internal electron field to determine the interaction processes, such as ionization and excitation. As a test of our model, the approach is applied to a water molecule in the same method as it would be applied to a nucleotide or amino acid and compared with the low-energy cross-sections from the GEANT4-DNA physics package of the Geant4 simulation toolkit

  9. Lessons learned from positron-electron project low level rf and longitudinal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fox

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Positron-Electron Project II (PEP-II B Factory collider ended the final phase of operation at nearly twice the design current and 4X the design luminosity. In the ultimate operation state, eight 1.2 MW radio-frequency (rf klystrons and 12 accelerating cavities were added beyond the original implementation, and the two storage rings were operating with longitudinal instability growth rates roughly 5X in excess of the original design estimates. From initial commissioning there has been continual adaptation of the low level rf (LLRF control strategies, configuration tools, and some new hardware in response to unanticipated technical challenges. This paper offers a perspective on the original LLRF and longitudinal instability control design, and highlights via two examples the system evolution from the original design estimates through to the final machine with 1.2×10^{34} luminosity. The impact of unanticipated signals in the coupled-bunch longitudinal feedback and the significance of nonlinear processing elements in the LLRF systems are presented. We present valuable “lessons learned” which are of interest to designers of next generation feedback and impedance controlled LLRF systems.

  10. Levels of selected carcinogens and toxicants in vapour from electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, Maciej Lukasz; Knysak, Jakub; Gawron, Michal; Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Kurek, Jolanta; Prokopowicz, Adam; Jablonska-Czapla, Magdalena; Rosik-Dulewska, Czeslawa; Havel, Christopher; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal

    2014-03-01

    Electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, are devices designed to imitate regular cigarettes and deliver nicotine via inhalation without combusting tobacco. They are purported to deliver nicotine without other toxicants and to be a safer alternative to regular cigarettes. However, little toxicity testing has been performed to evaluate the chemical nature of vapour generated from e-cigarettes. The aim of this study was to screen e-cigarette vapours for content of four groups of potentially toxic and carcinogenic compounds: carbonyls, volatile organic compounds, nitrosamines and heavy metals. Vapours were generated from 12 brands of e-cigarettes and the reference product, the medicinal nicotine inhaler, in controlled conditions using a modified smoking machine. The selected toxic compounds were extracted from vapours into a solid or liquid phase and analysed with chromatographic and spectroscopy methods. We found that the e-cigarette vapours contained some toxic substances. The levels of the toxicants were 9-450 times lower than in cigarette smoke and were, in many cases, comparable with trace amounts found in the reference product. Our findings are consistent with the idea that substituting tobacco cigarettes with e-cigarettes may substantially reduce exposure to selected tobacco-specific toxicants. E-cigarettes as a harm reduction strategy among smokers unwilling to quit, warrants further study. (To view this abstract in Polish and German, please see the supplementary files online.).

  11. SATISFACTION LEVEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATORS WORKING IN TEACHING INSTITUTIONS : A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sudeshna Chatterjee; Krishnangshu Ray; Anup Kumar Das; Arcojit Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    In a resource-limited and high-burden disease setting, satisfied health professional is an asset in terms of maximized productivity, efficiency and quality health care. Job Satisfaction Index is a validated measure to identify the components that influence those issues. A multi-faceted structured questionnaire study was conducted upon a cross-section of medical educators (n=160) serving two tertiary care teaching institutions under different management set-up. Multiple demographic...

  12. Studies of combustion reactions at the state-resolved differential cross section level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, P.L.; Suits, A.G.; Bontuyan, L.S.; Whitaker, B.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved differential reaction cross sections provide perhaps the most detailed information about the mechanism of a chemical reaction, but heretofore they have been extremely difficult to measure. This program explores a new technique for obtaining differential cross sections with product state resolution. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of state-selected reaction products is determined by ionizing the appropriate product, waiting for a delay while it recoils along the trajectory imparted by the reaction, and finally projecting the spatial distribution of ions onto a two dimensional screen using a pulsed electric field. Knowledge of the arrival time allows the ion position to be converted to a velocity, and the density of velocity projections can be inverted mathematically to provide the three-dimensional velocity distribution for the selected product. The main apparatus has been constructed and tested using photodissociations. The authors report here the first test results using crossed beams to investigate collisions between Ar and NO. Future research will both develop further the new technique and employ it to investigate methyl radical, formyl radical, and hydrogen atom reactions which are important in combustion processes. The authors intend specifically to characterize the reactions of CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO; of HCO with O{sub 2}; and of H with CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}.

  13. Heterogeneous Electronics – Wafer Level Integration, Packaging, and Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility integrates active electronics with microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices at the miniature system scale. It obviates current size-, weight-, and power...

  14. Patient and public attitudes towards informed consent models and levels of awareness of Electronic Health Records in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Fiona; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E.; Marston, Cicely; Bell, Derek; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) forms an integral part of the information strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, with the aim of facilitating health information exchange for patient care and secondary use, including research and healthcare planning. Implementing EHR systems requires an understanding of patient expectations for consent mechanisms and consideration of public awareness towards information sharing as might be made possible through integrated EHRs across primary and secondary health providers. Objectives To explore levels of public awareness about EHRs and to examine attitudes towards different consent models with respect to sharing identifiable and de-identified records for healthcare provision, research and planning. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to adult patients and members of the public in primary and secondary care clinics in West London, UK in 2011. In total, 5331 individuals participated in the survey, and 3157 were included in the final analysis. Results The majority (91%) of respondents expected to be explicitly asked for consent for their identifiable records to be accessed for health provision, research or planning. Half the respondents (49%) did not expect to be asked for consent before their de-identified records were accessed. Compared with White British respondents, those from all other ethnic groups were more likely to anticipate their permission would be obtained before their de-identified records were used. Of the study population, 59% reported already being aware of EHRs before the survey. Older respondents and individuals with complex patterns of interaction with healthcare services were more likely to report prior awareness of EHRs. Individuals self-identifying as belonging to ethnic groups other than White British, and those with lower educational qualifications were less likely to report being aware of EHRs than White British respondents and

  15. Patient and public attitudes towards informed consent models and levels of awareness of Electronic Health Records in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Fiona; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E; Marston, Cicely; Bell, Derek; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-04-01

    The development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) forms an integral part of the information strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, with the aim of facilitating health information exchange for patient care and secondary use, including research and healthcare planning. Implementing EHR systems requires an understanding of patient expectations for consent mechanisms and consideration of public awareness towards information sharing as might be made possible through integrated EHRs across primary and secondary health providers. To explore levels of public awareness about EHRs and to examine attitudes towards different consent models with respect to sharing identifiable and de-identified records for healthcare provision, research and planning. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to adult patients and members of the public in primary and secondary care clinics in West London, UK in 2011. In total, 5331 individuals participated in the survey, and 3157 were included in the final analysis. The majority (91%) of respondents expected to be explicitly asked for consent for their identifiable records to be accessed for health provision, research or planning. Half the respondents (49%) did not expect to be asked for consent before their de-identified records were accessed. Compared with White British respondents, those from all other ethnic groups were more likely to anticipate their permission would be obtained before their de-identified records were used. Of the study population, 59% reported already being aware of EHRs before the survey. Older respondents and individuals with complex patterns of interaction with healthcare services were more likely to report prior awareness of EHRs. Individuals self-identifying as belonging to ethnic groups other than White British, and those with lower educational qualifications were less likely to report being aware of EHRs than White British respondents and respondents with degree-level education

  16. Structure and Dissipation Characteristics of an Electron Diffusion Region Observed by MMS During a Rapid, Normal-Incidence Magnetopause Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Argall, M. R.; Alm, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Giles, B. L.; Rager, A.; Dorelli, J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Wilder, F. D.; Ahmadi, N.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2017-12-01

    On 22 October 2016, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft encountered the electron diffusion region (EDR) when the magnetosheath field was southward, and there were signatures of fast reconnection, including flow jets, Hall fields, and large power dissipation. One rapid, normal-incidence crossing, during which the EDR structure was almost stationary in the boundary frame, provided an opportunity to observe the spatial structure for the zero guide field case of magnetic reconnection. The reconnection electric field was determined unambiguously to be 2-3 mV/m. There were clear signals of fluctuating parallel electric fields, up to 6 mV/m on the magnetosphere side of the diffusion region, associated with a Hall-like parallel current feature on the electron scale. The width of the main EDR structure was determined to be 2 km (1.8 de). Although the MMS spacecraft were in their closest tetrahedral separation of 8 km, the divergences and curls for these thin current structures could therefore not be computed in the usual manner. A method is developed to determine these quantities on a much smaller scale and applied to compute the normal component of terms in the generalized Ohm's law for the positions of each individual spacecraft (not a barocentric average). Although the gradient pressure term has a qualitative dependence that follows the observed variation of E + Ve × B, the quantitative magnitude of these terms differs by more than a factor of 2, which is shown to be greater than the respective errors. Thus, future research is required to find the manner in which Ohm's law is balanced.

  17. Amplified cross-linking efficiency of self-assembled monolayers through targeted dissociative electron attachment for the production of carbon nanomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Koch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the negative ion yield of 2′-chloro-1,1′-biphenyl (2-Cl-BP, 2′-bromo-1,1′-biphenyl (2-Br-BP and 2′-iodo-1,1′-biphenyl (2-I-BP upon dissociative electron attachment (DEA at an electron energy of 0 eV revealed cross section values that were more than ten times higher for iodide loss from 2-I-BP than for the other halogenides from the respective biphenyls (BPs. Comparison with dissociative ionization mass spectra shows that the ratio of the efficiency of electron impact ionization induced fragmentation of 2-I-BP, 2-Br-BP, and 2-Cl-BP amounts to approximately 1:0.7:0.6. Inspired by these results, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of the respective biphenyl-4-thiols, 2-Cl-BPT, 2-Br-BPT, 2-I-BPT as well as BPT, were grown on a Au(111 substrate and exposed to 50 eV electrons. The effect of electron irradiation was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, to determine whether the high relative DEA cross section for iodide loss from 2-I-BPT as compared to 2-Br-BP and 2-Cl-BP is reflected in the cross-linking efficiency of SAMs made from these materials. Such sensitization could reduce the electron dose needed for the cross-linking process and may thus lead to a significantly faster conversion of the respective SAMs into carbon nanomembranes (CNMs without the need for an increased current density. XPS data support the notation that DEA sensitization may be used to achieve more efficient electron-induced cross-linking of SAMs, revealing more than ten times faster cross-linking of 2-I-BPT SAMs compared to those made from the other halogenated biphenyls or from native BPT at the same current density. Furthermore, the transfer of a freestanding membrane onto a TEM grid and the subsequent investigation by helium ion microscopy (HIM verified the existence of a mechanically stable CNM created from 2-I-BPT after exposure to an electron dose as low as 1.8 mC/cm2. In contrast, SAMs made from BPT, 2-Cl-BPT and 2-Br

  18. Labeled experimental choice design for estimating attribute and availability cross effects with N attributes and specific brand attribute levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thong Tien

    2011-01-01

    , orthogonal design is not available for every situation. Instead, efficient design based on computerized design algorithm is always available. This paper presents the method of efficient design for estimating brand models having attribute and availability cross effects. The paper gives a framework...... for implementing designs that is efficient enough to estimate model with N brands, each brand have K attributes, and brand attribute has specific levels. The paper also illustrates an example in food consumption study....

  19. High speed bending of 2nd level interconnects on printed circuit boards for automotive electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouters, M.H.M.; Ubachs, R.; Wiel, H.J. van de; Waal, A. van der; Veer, J. van der

    2011-01-01

    Standard drop tests for portable electronics are not representative for the qualification of automotive electronics. High-frequency vibrations are more dominant than abrupt shocks during normal operation. In this work a high speed board bending (HSB) method is developed to mimic the constant cyclic

  20. Electronic and vibronic cluster models for the T24(G) level of d5 ions in tetrahedral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, R.; Boulanger, D.

    2006-08-01

    Electronic and vibronic cluster models are proposed to elaborate a general model for the T24(G) orbital triplet levels of d5 ions in tetrahedral symmetry. These models involve perturbation schemes and the diagonalization of the molecular electronic structure and vibronic Hamiltonian. First, the electronic fine structure is determined from the first- and second-order molecular spin-orbit (MSO) interaction. Then, Ham’s perturbation model for vibronic interactions is used in conjunction with the molecular model to analyze the vibronic interactions corresponding to a strong coupling to ɛ -vibrational modes. Then, a more general model is considered to account for the energy-level schemes and the strong intensity transfer observed, for example, on the fine structure lines of the T24(G) level of Mn2+ in ZnS and ZnSe. This model involves the diagonalization of the vibronic Hamiltonian for the T24(G) level and a perturbation model to account for vibronic interactions with all other multiplets of the d5 configuration. It is shown that the energy-level schemes as well as the strong intensity transfer of the fine structure lines of the T24(G) level of Mn2+ in ZnS and ZnSe are very well accounted for from the electronic molecular model involving the first- and second-order MSO interaction and from the proposed diagonalization and perturbation models for the coupling to ɛ -vibrational modes.

  1. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  2. Electronic gaming machines and gambling disorder: a cross-cultural comparison between Brazil and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Gustavo Costa; Leppink, Eric W.; Yaemi, Ana; Mariani, Mirella; Tavares, Hermano; Grant, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The objective of this paper is to perform a cross-cultural comparison of gambling disorder (GD) due to electronic gaming machines (EGM), a form of gambling that may have a high addictive potential. Our goal is to investigate two treatment-seeking samples of adults collected in Brazil and the United States, countries with different socio-cultural backgrounds. This comparison may lead to a better understanding of cultural influences on GD. Methods The total studied sample involved 733 treatment-seeking subjects: 353 men and 380 women (average age = 45.80, standard deviation ±10.9). The Brazilian sample had 517 individuals and the American sample 216. Subjects were recruited by analogous strategies. Results We found that the Brazilian sample was younger, predominantly male, less likely to be Caucasian, more likely to be partnered, had a faster progression from recreational gambling to GD, and were more likely to endorse chasing losses. Conclusion This study demonstrated that there are significant differences between treatment-seeking samples of adults presenting GD due to EGM in Brazil and in the United States. These findings suggest that cultural aspects may have a relevant role in GD due to EGM. PMID:26474662

  3. Surface and internal microstructure damage of He-ion-irradiated CLAM steel studied by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P.P. [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhan, Q., E-mail: qzhan@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Fu, Z.Y.; Wei, Y.P. [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Y.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Wang, F.M. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ohnuki, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Wan, F.R. [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Good understanding of blistering and embrittlement mechanism depends on good investigation of surface and internal microstructure damage of gas-ion-irradiated materials. Internal and surface microstructure of He{sup +} ion irradiated CLAM steel were examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy combining focused ion beam. Variation of helium bubble density and size distribution versus depth in CLAM steel after high dose helium irradiation at room temperature was investigated. The average size of helium bubble increased within 100–400 nm but decreased near the non-irradiated matrix with the increase of depth, while the density followed a reverse trend. The formation and growth mechanism of helium bubble is different at different irradiation depth. The formation of a zone of large bubbles under the surface is the main reason of surface blistering and flaking. Helium induced irradiation swelling and surface blistering at low temperature were also discussed. - Highlights: • Microstructure of helium irradiated CLAM steel was investigated by FIB and TEM. • The nucleation of helium bubble was controlled by both different mechanisms. • The substructure of surface blisters has been analyzed in detail by XTEM. • Helium induced surface blistering and irradiation swelling have been discussed.

  4. Board Level Proton Testing Book of Knowledge for NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    This book of knowledge (BoK) provides a critical review of the benefits and difficulties associated with using proton irradiation as a means of exploring the radiation hardness of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) systems. This work was developed for the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Board Level Testing for the COTS task. The fundamental findings of this BoK are the following. The board-level test method can reduce the worst case estimate for a board's single-event effect (SEE) sensitivity compared to the case of no test data, but only by a factor of ten. The estimated worst case rate of failure for untested boards is about 0.1 SEE/board-day. By employing the use of protons with energies near or above 200 MeV, this rate can be safely reduced to 0.01 SEE/board-day, with only those SEEs with deep charge collection mechanisms rising this high. For general SEEs, such as static random-access memory (SRAM) upsets, single-event transients (SETs), single-event gate ruptures (SEGRs), and similar cases where the relevant charge collection depth is less than 10 µm, the worst case rate for SEE is below 0.001 SEE/board-day. Note that these bounds assume that no SEEs are observed during testing. When SEEs are observed during testing, the board-level test method can establish a reliable event rate in some orbits, though all established rates will be at or above 0.001 SEE/board-day. The board-level test approach we explore has picked up support as a radiation hardness assurance technique over the last twenty years. The approach originally was used to provide a very limited verification of the suitability of low cost assemblies to be used in the very benign environment of the International Space Station (ISS), in limited reliability applications. Recently the method has been gaining popularity as a way to establish a minimum level of SEE performance of systems that require somewhat higher reliability performance than previous applications. This sort of application of

  5. PyNCS: a microkernel for high-level definition and configuration of neuromorphic electronic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eStefanini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromorphic hardware offers an electronic substrate for the realization of asynchronousevent-based sensory-motor systems and large-scale spiking neural network architectures. Inorder to characterize these systems, configure them, and carry out modeling experiments, it isoften necessary to interface them to workstations. The software used for this purpose typicallyconsists of a large monolithic block of code highly specific to the hardware setup used. While thisapproach can lead to highly integrated hardware/software systems, it hampers the developmentof modular and neuromorphic infrastructures. To alleviate this problem, we propose PyNCS,an open-source front-end for the definition of neural network models that is interfaced to thehardware through a set of Python Application Programming Interfaces (APIs. The designof PyNCS promotes modularity, portability and expandability and separates implementationfrom hardware description. The high-level front-end that comes with PyNCS includes tools todefine neural network models as well as to create, monitor and analyze spiking data. Here wereport the design philosophy behind the PyNCS framework and describe its implementation.We demonstrate its functionality with two representative case studies, one using an event-based neuromorphic vision sensor, and one using a set of multi-neuron devices for carryingout a cognitive decision-making task involving state-dependent computation. PyNCS, alreadyapplicable to a wide range of existing spike-based neuromorphic setups, will accelerate thedevelopment of hybrid software/hardware neuromorphic systems, thanks to its code flexibility.The code developed is open-source and available online at https://github.com/inincs/pyNCS.

  6. PyNCS: a microkernel for high-level definition and configuration of neuromorphic electronic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanini, Fabio; Neftci, Emre O; Sheik, Sadique; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Neuromorphic hardware offers an electronic substrate for the realization of asynchronous event-based sensory-motor systems and large-scale spiking neural network architectures. In order to characterize these systems, configure them, and carry out modeling experiments, it is often necessary to interface them to workstations. The software used for this purpose typically consists of a large monolithic block of code which is highly specific to the hardware setup used. While this approach can lead to highly integrated hardware/software systems, it hampers the development of modular and reconfigurable infrastructures thus preventing a rapid evolution of such systems. To alleviate this problem, we propose PyNCS, an open-source front-end for the definition of neural network models that is interfaced to the hardware through a set of Python Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). The design of PyNCS promotes modularity, portability and expandability and separates implementation from hardware description. The high-level front-end that comes with PyNCS includes tools to define neural network models as well as to create, monitor and analyze spiking data. Here we report the design philosophy behind the PyNCS framework and describe its implementation. We demonstrate its functionality with two representative case studies, one using an event-based neuromorphic vision sensor, and one using a set of multi-neuron devices for carrying out a cognitive decision-making task involving state-dependent computation. PyNCS, already applicable to a wide range of existing spike-based neuromorphic setups, will accelerate the development of hybrid software/hardware neuromorphic systems, thanks to its code flexibility. The code is open-source and available online at https://github.com/inincs/pyNCS.

  7. Multi-level analysis of electronic health record adoption by health care professionals: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrecque Michel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The electronic health record (EHR is an important application of information and communication technologies to the healthcare sector. EHR implementation is expected to produce benefits for patients, professionals, organisations, and the population as a whole. These benefits cannot be achieved without the adoption of EHR by healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, the influence of individual and organisational factors in determining EHR adoption is still unclear. This study aims to assess the unique contribution of individual and organisational factors on EHR adoption in healthcare settings, as well as possible interrelations between these factors. Methods A prospective study will be conducted. A stratified random sampling method will be used to select 50 healthcare organisations in the Quebec City Health Region (Canada. At the individual level, a sample of 15 to 30 health professionals will be chosen within each organisation depending on its size. A semi-structured questionnaire will be administered to two key informants in each organisation to collect organisational data. A composite adoption score of EHR adoption will be developed based on a Delphi process and will be used as the outcome variable. Twelve to eighteen months after the first contact, depending on the pace of EHR implementation, key informants and clinicians will be contacted once again to monitor the evolution of EHR adoption. A multilevel regression model will be applied to identify the organisational and individual determinants of EHR adoption in clinical settings. Alternative analytical models would be applied if necessary. Results The study will assess the contribution of organisational and individual factors, as well as their interactions, to the implementation of EHR in clinical settings. Conclusions These results will be very relevant for decision makers and managers who are facing the challenge of implementing EHR in the healthcare system. In addition

  8. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Romarly F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, Márcio H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Varella, Márcio T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Jones, Darryl B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Brunger, Michael J. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Blanco, Francisco [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 2840 Madrid (Spain); Colmenares, Rafael [Hospital Ramón y Cajal, 28034 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the N{sub open}-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  9. New calculations and measurements of the Coulomb cross-section for the production of direct electron pairs by high energy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Dake, S.; Dong, B. L.; Eby, P. B.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Iyono, A.; King, D. T.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, new calculations were made of the direct Coulomb pair cross section that rely less in arbitrary parameters. More accurate calculations of the cross section down to low pair energies were made. New measurements of the total direct electron pair yield, and the energy and angular distribution of the electron pairs in emulsion were made for O-16 at 60 and 200 GeV/amu at S-32 at 200 GeV/amu which give satisfactory agreement with the new calculations. These calculations and measurements are presented along with previous accelerator measurements made of this effect during the last 40 years. The microscope scanning criteria used to identify the direct electron pairs is described. Prospects for application of the pair method to cosmic ray energy measurements in the region 10 (exp 13) to 10 (exp 15) eV/amu are discussed.

  10. Cross-Cultural Competency Adaptability of Dental Hygiene Educators in Entry Level Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeswick, Lynnette Marie

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to discover the extent dental hygiene educators in 25 entry-level dental hygiene programs from the Upper Midwest demonstrate Emotional Resilience, Flexibility and Openness, Perceptual Acuity, and Personal Autonomy as they relate to their level of education and multicultural experiences. An additional purpose was to examine…

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00440045 on town highway 44 crossing the First Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Chelsea. The 32.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have low to moderate woody vegetation coverage except for the upstream right bank, which is grass covered. The immediate vicinity of the site is suburban and the overbank areas are occupied by houses, driveways, and lawn areas. The upstream right bank area is a dirt parking lot for a small auto repair garage. In the study area, the First Branch White River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel (D50 is 43.1 mm or 0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 17, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 44 crossing of the First Branch White Riveris a 31-ft-long, two-lane

  12. Is organizational justice climate at the workplace associated with individual-level quality of care and organizational affective commitment? A multi-level, cross-sectional study on dentistry in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Hanne; Conway, Paul Maurice; Clausen, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether organizational justice climate at the workplace level is associated with individual staff members' perceptions of care quality and affective commitment to the workplace. The study adopts a cross-sectional multi-level design. Data were collected using an electronic survey and a response rate of 75% was obtained. Organizational justice climate and affective commitment to the workplace were measured by items from Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire and quality of care by three self-developed items. Non-managerial staff working at dental clinics with at least five respondents (n = 900 from 68 units) was included in analyses. A set of Level-2 random intercept models were built to predict individual-level organizational affective commitment and perceived quality of care from unit-level organizational justice climate, controlling for potential confounding by group size, gender, age, and occupation. The results of the empty model showed substantial between-unit variation for both affective commitment (ICC-1 = 0.17) and quality of care (ICC-1 = 0.12). The overall results showed that the shared perception of organizational justice climate at the clinical unit level was significantly associated with perceived quality of care and affective commitment to the organization (p Organizational justice climate at work unit level explained all variation in affective commitment among dental clinics and was associated with both the individual staff members' affective commitment and perceived quality of care. These findings suggest a potential for that addressing organizational justice climate may be a way to promote quality of care and enhancing affective commitment. However, longitudinal studies are needed to support causality in the examined relationships. Intervention research is also recommended to probe the effectiveness of actions increasing unit-level organizational justice climate and test their impact on quality of care

  13. The DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure as a Screening Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaens, Leo; Galus, James

    2017-05-19

    The DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure was developed to aid clinicians with a dimensional assessment of psychopathology; however, this measure resembles a screening tool for several symptomatic domains. The objective of the current study was to examine the basic parameters of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive power of the measure as a screening tool. One hundred and fifty patients in a correctional community center filled out the measure prior to a psychiatric evaluation, including the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview screen. The above parameters were calculated for the domains of depression, mania, anxiety, and psychosis. The results showed that the sensitivity and positive predictive power of the studied domains was poor because of a high rate of false positive answers on the measure. However, when the lowest threshold on the Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure was used, the sensitivity of the anxiety and psychosis domains and the negative predictive values for mania, anxiety and psychosis were good. In conclusion, while it is foreseeable that some clinicians may use the DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure as a screening tool, it should not be relied on to identify positive findings. It functioned well in the negative prediction of mania, anxiety and psychosis symptoms.

  14. Association between serum organochlorines and global methylation level of leukocyte DNA among Japanese women: a cross-sectional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hiroaki [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8421 Japan (Japan); Iwasaki, Motoki, E-mail: moiwasak@ncc.go.jp [Epidemiology Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104–0045 Japan (Japan); Kasuga, Yoshio [Department of Surgery, Nagano Matsushiro General Hospital, 183 Matsushiro, Matsushiro-cho, Nagano City, Nagano Prefecture 381–1231 Japan (Japan); Yokoyama, Shiro; Onuma, Hiroshi [Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Nagano Red Cross Hospital, 5-22-1 Wakasato, Nagano City, Nagano Prefecture 380–8582 Japan (Japan); Nishimura, Hideki [Department of Respiratory Surgery and Breast Surgery, Nagano Municipal Hospital, 1333–1 Tomitake, Nagano City, Nagano Prefecture 381–8551 Japan (Japan); Kusama, Ritsu [Department of Surgery, Hokushin General Hospital, 1-5-63 Nishi, Nakano City, Nagano Prefecture 383–8505 Japan (Japan); Yoshida, Teruhiko [Division of Genetics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104–0045 Japan (Japan); Yokoyama, Kazuhito [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8421 Japan (Japan); Tsugane, Shoichiro [Dierctor Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104–0045 Japan (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    While the global methylation level of leukocyte DNA may be a suitable biomarker for cancer risk, the level may be influenced by multiple factors, both environmental and host-related, one of which is exposure to environmental pollutants. To date, three epidemiologic studies have examined associations between serum organochlorine levels and global DNA methylation level, but their findings are not fully consistent, and the associations thus require confirmation in other well-characterized populations. We tested the association between organochlorine exposure and the global DNA methylation level of leukocytes in Japanese women. We conducted a cross-sectional study using the control group of a breast cancer case–control study in Japan. Subjects were 403 Japanese women who provided blood samples. Serum polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and nine pesticide-related organochlorines were measured by gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry. Further, global methylation level of peripheral leukocyte DNA among 399 women was measured by luminometric methylation assay. Linear trends in the association between methylation and quartile levels of organochlorines were evaluated by regression coefficients in a multivariable linear regression model. We found significant inverse associations between the global methylation level in leukocyte DNA and many of the organochlorine levels measured. Global methylation level was significantly decreased by 0.33–0.83% per quartile category for serum o,p′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (o,p′-DDT), p,p′-DDT, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, hexachlorobenzene, β-hexachlorocyclohexane, PCB17, PCB52/69, PCB74, PCB114, and PCB183. Serum organochlorine levels were inversely associated with the global methylation level of leukocyte DNA in a relatively large sample of Japanese women. - Highlights: • Many serum organochlorine pesticides were inversely associated with the global

  15. EVALUATION OF PERCEIVED STRESS LEVELS AND ITS SOURCE AMONG DENTAL STUDENTS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen K.; Christofer; Purna Singh; Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT Recent reports show high amount of academic stress among the students and chronic stress is shown to have a negative effect on cognitive functioning and learning of students. AIMS The purpose of study was to determine the prevalence of self-perceived stress among dental students and to observe any possible association between the levels of stress and (a) academic year, (b) motivation to study dental science, (c) medium of study at 10+2 level, (d) mother tongue, (e...

  16. A longitudinal cross-level model of leader and salesperson influences on sales force technology use and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, John; Ahearne, Michael; Taylor, Scott R

    2007-03-01

    The authors examined the influence of the introduction of a new suite of technology tools on the performance of 592 salespersons. They hypothesized that the salespersons' work experience would have a negative effect on their technology self-efficacy, which in turn would relate positively to their use of technology. Sales performance was hypothesized to be positively related to both past performance and the use of new technology tools. Further, the authors hypothesized that leaders' commitment to sales technology would enhance salespersons' technology self-efficacy and usage, and leaders' empowering behaviors would influence salespersons' technology self-efficacy and moderate the individual-level relationships. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses confirmed all of the hypothesized individual-level relationships and most of the cross-level relationships stemming from average leader behaviors. In particular, empowering leadership exhibited multiple cross-level interactions, as anticipated. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of social-psychological factors related to the success of sales force technology interventions. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Deep levels in as-grown and electron-irradiated n-type GaN studied by deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, Tran Thien [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); School of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Kordina, Olof; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-03-07

    Development of high performance GaN-based devices is strongly dependent on the possibility to control and understand defects in material. Important information about deep level defects is obtained by deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy on as-grown and electron irradiated n-type bulk GaN with low threading dislocation density produced by halide vapor phase epitaxy. One hole trap labelled H1 (E{sub V} + 0.34 eV) has been detected on as-grown GaN sample. After 2 MeV electron irradiation, the concentration of H1 increases and at fluences higher than 5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, a second hole trap labelled H2 is observed. Simultaneously, the concentration of two electron traps, labelled T1 (E{sub C} – 0.12 eV) and T2 (E{sub C} – 0.23 eV), increases. By studying the increase of the defect concentration versus electron irradiation fluence, the introduction rate of T1 and T2 using 2 MeV- electrons was determined to be 7 × 10{sup −3 }cm{sup −1} and 0.9 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Due to the low introduction rate of T1, it is suggested that the defect is associated with a complex. The high introduction rate of trap H1 and T2 suggests that the defects are associated with primary intrinsic defects or complexes. Some deep levels previously observed in irradiated GaN layers with higher threading dislocation densities are not detected in present investigation. It is therefore suggested that the absent traps may be related to primary defects segregated around dislocations.

  18. Multi-level, cross-sectional study of workplace social capital and smoking among Japanese employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuji; Fujiwara, Takeo; Takao, Soshi; Subramanian, S V; Yamamoto, Eiji; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2010-08-17

    Social capital is hypothesized to be relevant to health promotion, and the association between community social capital and cigarette smoking has been examined. Individual-level social capital has been found to be associated with smoking cessation, but evidence remains sparse on the contextual effect of social capital and smoking. Further, evidence remains sparse on the association between smoking and social capital in the workplace, where people are spending an increasing portion of their daily lives. We examined the association between workplace social capital and smoking status among Japanese private sector employees. We employed a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure. Of the total of 1,800 subjects in 60 companies, 1,171 (men/women; 834/337) employees (65.1%) were identified from 46 companies in Okayama in 2007. Workplace social capital was assessed in two dimensions; trust and reciprocity. Company-level social capital was based on inquiring about employee perceptions of trust and reciprocity among co-workers, and then aggregating their responses in order to calculate the proportion of workers reporting mistrust and lack of reciprocity. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to explore whether individual- and company-level social capital was associated with smoking. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% credible intervals (CIs) for current smoking were obtained. Overall, 33.3% of the subjects smoked currently. There was no relationship between individual-level mistrust of others and smoking status. By contrast, one-standard deviation change in company-level mistrust was associated with higher odds of smoking (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.06-1.46) even after controlling for individual-level mistrust, sex, age, occupation, educational attainment, alcohol use, physical activity, body mass index, and chronic diseases. No clear associations were found between lack of reciprocity and smoking both at the individual- and

  19. Assessing alpha-tocopherol levels in patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargavi Krishna Ayinampudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: A keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT is a benign uni- or multicystic, intraosseous tumour of odontogenic origin, with a characteristic lining of parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and potential for aggressive, infiltrative behaviour. Various studies in hamsters showed that, alpha-Tocopherol, which is an active biological form of Vitamin E, is a potent antioxidant known to inhibit tumour formation and also regression of established tumours. So, the aim of the present pilot study was to assess the levels of Alpha-Tocopherol(Vitamin E in Patients with KCOT and compare them with Vitamin E levels in normal healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A sample of 20 individuals were taken and Alpha Tocopherol levels in serum were assessed. Independent sample t test was used to analyse the data. Serum Vitamin-E levels were found to be decreased in KCOT cases. Results: Mean Vitamin-E level was found to be decreased (mean + S.D. = 10,549.34 +/- 2494.21 ng/mL as compared to healthy controls (mean + S.D. = 13,982.42 +/- 2178.02 ng/mL. The reduction in serum vitamin E level was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The reduction in Vitamin E levels in KCOT patients might be suggestive of the possible interrelation between Vitamin E and KCOT invivo. Also, increase in intake of Vitamin E might help in reducing the risk of recurrence in KCOT by reducing the dysregulation of Cyclin D1 and Down-Regulation of mutant p53.

  20. Charge deep-level transient spectroscopy study of high-energy-electron-beam-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.; Nádaždy, V.; Zeman, M.; Swaaiij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of changes in the defect density of states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) due to high-energy electron irradiation using charged deep-level transient spectroscopy. It was found that defect states near the conduction band were removed, while in other band gap regions the

  1. Oxidative stress and decreased thiol level in patients with migraine: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Yasemin; Dirik, Ebru; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan

    2015-12-01

    Although migraine is a neurological disorder known since long, its physiopathology remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that migraine is associated with oxidative stress; however, they report divergent results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and serum thiol level in migraine patients with or without aura. The study group consisted of 141 migraine patients. The control group included 70 healthy subjects. TAS, TOS, OSI were evaluated using a method developed by Erel. Serum thiol level was measured using the Hu method. No difference was found in TAS, TOS, OSI between the patients and controls. The level of thiol was significantly lower in patients than in controls. Negative correlations were detected between thiol level and Migraine Disability Assessment score in patients. Although TAS, TOS, and OSI were similar to those of the control group, serum thiol level, an important marker of antioxidant capacity, was significantly lower in migraines compared with controls, and caused more serious disability. Novel treatment approaches may be developed based on these data, and compounds containing thiol, such as alpha lipoic acid and N-acetyl cysteine, may be used in prophylaxis.

  2. Association of urinary metal levels with human semen quality: A cross-sectional study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xin; Sun, Yang; Feng, Wei; Wang, Peng; Yang, Pan; Li, Jin; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Ying-Jun; Liu, Chong; Sun, Li; Yue, Jing; Gu, Long-Jie; Zeng, Qiang; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to metals, including essential and nonessential elements, has been linked to male reproductive health in animals. However, findings from human studies are inconsistent. To examine the associations between metal exposure at environmental levels and semen quality in a Chinese population by performing repeated measurements of urinary metals to estimate individual-level exposure. From March to June 2013, 1052 men seeking semen evaluation were recruited from the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Each man provided one semen sample and two urine sample. Semen quality parameters and urinary levels of 18 metals were determined. Associations between the urinary metal levels and semen quality parameters were assessed using confounder adjusted linear and logistic regressions. Restricted cubic spline analysis was performed to assess dose-response relationships between continuous metal measurements and outcomes. Urinary levels of cadmium were significantly inversely associated with progressive sperm motility and total motility (both Psemen quality parameters observed in the logistic models (both Pmetals, and curves of restricted cubic spline showed clear dose-response relationships. Our findings suggest that environmental exposure to cadmium, molybdenum and lead may contribute to a decline in human semen quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electronics for CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger System Phase-1 and HL LHC upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorsky, A.

    2017-07-01

    To accommodate high-luminosity LHC operation at a 13 TeV collision energy, the CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger system had to be significantly modified. To provide robust track reconstruction, the trigger system must now import all available trigger primitives generated by the Cathode Strip Chambers and by certain other subsystems, such as Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). In addition to massive input bandwidth, this also required significant increase in logic and memory resources. To satisfy these requirements, a new Sector Processor unit has been designed. It consists of three modules. The Core Logic module houses the large FPGA that contains the track-finding logic and multi-gigabit serial links for data exchange. The Optical module contains optical receivers and transmitters; it communicates with the Core Logic module via a custom backplane section. The Pt Lookup table (PTLUT) module contains 1 GB of low-latency memory that is used to assign the final Pt to reconstructed muon tracks. The μ TCA architecture (adopted by CMS) was used for this design. The talk presents the details of the hardware and firmware design of the production system based on Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA family. The next round of LHC and CMS upgrades starts in 2019, followed by a major High-Luminosity (HL) LHC upgrade starting in 2024. In the course of these upgrades, new Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors and more RPC chambers will be added to the Endcap Muon system. In order to keep up with all these changes, a new Advanced Processor unit is being designed. This device will be based on Xilinx UltraScale+ FPGAs. It will be able to accommodate up to 100 serial links with bit rates of up to 25 Gb/s, and provide up to 2.5 times more logic resources than the device used currently. The amount of PTLUT memory will be significantly increased to provide more flexibility for the Pt assignment algorithm. The talk presents preliminary details of the hardware design program.

  4. Application-Level and User-Level QoS Assessment of Audio-Video IP Transmission over Cross-Layer Designed Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunome, Toshiro; Tasaka, Shuji; Nakaoka, Ken

    This paper performs application-level QoS and user-level QoS assessment of audio-video streaming in cross-layer designed wireless ad hoc networks. In order to achieve high QoS at the user-level, we employ link quality-based routing in the network layer and media synchronization control in the application layer. We adopt three link quality-based routing protocols: OLSR-SS (Signal Strength), AODV-SS, and LQHR (Link Quality-Based Hybrid Routing). OLSR-SS is a proactive routing protocol, while AODV-SS is a reactive one. LQHR is a hybrid protocol, which is a combination of proactive and reactive routing protocols. For applicationlevel QoS assessment, we performed computer simulation with ns-2 where an IEEE 802.11b mesh topology network with 24 nodes was assumed. We also assessed user-level QoS by a subjective experiment with 30 assessors. From the assessment results, we find AODV-SS the best for networks with long inter-node distances, while LQHR outperforms AODV-SS for short inter-node distances. In addition, we also examine characteristics of the three schemes with respect to the application-level QoS in random topology networks.

  5. Measurements of the electron and muon inclusive cross-sections in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Akesson, Torsten Paul; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amoros, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Asman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Galtieri, Angela Barbaro; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jurg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Boser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, Andre; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Buscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, Francois; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urban, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Garrido, Maria Del Mar Capeans; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Montoya, German D.Carrillo; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, Joao; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G.; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H.; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muino, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, Maria Jose; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Cote, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristobal; Donszelmann, Tulay Cuhadar; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; De Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; de la Taille, Christophe; de la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; de Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; del Papa, Carlo; del Peso, Jose; del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Yagci, Kamile Dindar; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, Andre; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jurgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jorg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duhrssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Duren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipcic, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fohlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Garcia, Carmen; Garcia Navarro, Jose Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Dani\\|{e}l Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Helene; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Borge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Gopfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gossling, Claus; Gottfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Goncalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorisek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanere, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafstrom, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frederic; Hensel, Carsten; Henss, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernandez Jimenez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higon-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Goran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jez, Pavel; Jezequel, Stephane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Koneke, Karsten; Konig, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Kopke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamaki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramon; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Celine; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Leveque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Sterzo, Francesco Lo; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dorthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Bjorn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macek, Bostjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mattig, Peter; Mattig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amelia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandic, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, Jose; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin Dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Kee, Shawn Patrick Mc; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W.Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijovic, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuz, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjornmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Monig, Klaus; Moser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Mock, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Muller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Hong, Van Nguyen Thi; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozicka, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, Antonio; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pasztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Cavalcanti, Tiago Perez; Perez Codina, Estel; Perez Garcia-Estan, Maria Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, Joao Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommes, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Bueso, Xavier Portell; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Rohne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Ruhr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, Jose; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Bjorn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, Joao; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schafer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schoning, Andre; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, Jose; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sibidanov, Alexei; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, Jose; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjolin, Jorgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spano, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Strohmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sanchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothee; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tom\\'{a}\\v{s}; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Viegas, Florbela De Jes Tique Aires; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jurgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torro Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocme, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Ferrer, Juan Antonio Valls; Van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; Van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Anh, Tuan Vu; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C.; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Zenis, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zivkovic, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-07-16

    This letter presents measurements of the differential cross-sections for inclusive electron and muon production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, using data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The muon cross-section is measured as a function of pT in the range 4 < pT < 100 GeV and within pseudorapidity |eta| < 2.5. In addition the electron and muon cross-sections are measured in the range 7 < pT < 26 GeV and within |eta| <2.0, excluding 1.37<|eta|<1.52. Integrated luminosities of 1.3 pb-1 and 1.4 pb-1 are used for the electron and muon measurements, respectively. After subtraction of the W/Z/gamma* contribution, the differential cross-sections are found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions for heavy-flavour production obtained from Fixed Order NLO calculations with NLL high-pT resummation, and to be sensitive to the effects of NLL resummation.

  6. A cross-cultural investigation of multiple intelligences in university-level nutrition students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Joy E.

    Effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body in undergraduate nutrition and dietetics programs are needed in order for graduates to effectively meet the health and nutrition needs of a diverse clientele. One way to promote diversity and improve teaching methods in dietetics education is through a framework based on Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). The theory suggests that individuals possess varying degrees of eight different intelligences which are shaped by genetics and cultural context. Relatively little research has been conducted to investigate MI approaches in the areas of higher education, cross-cultural education, or dietetics education. Therefore, this study investigated the MI profiles of students within undergraduate nutrition programs at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, Mexico and Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Data were collected through the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS). The findings provide a profile of the intellectual dispositions for the study population and suggest that dietetics students in this cross-cultural study population score highest for the MIDAS scale measuring interpersonal intelligence, with significant differences occurring between scores for the eight intelligences measured by the MIDAS. Not only were there significant differences between scale scores when analyzing the population as a whole, there were also significant differences in scale scores when comparing American and Mexican students. This phenomenon was also true when scores were grouped into five ordinal categories. In addition, the findings suggest that differences exist among the particular skills associated with the intelligences for the students at each university. Results indicate that skills related to social sensitivity and persuasion are significantly higher than many other skills for dietetics students. Further, when comparing the

  7. A cross-cultural comparison of the stress experienced by high-level career women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette S. van den Berg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines differences in the experience of work-related stress and of exposure to work-related stressors among South African career women of different ethnic groups. A sample of 732 women working in administrative, semi-professional, professional and managerial positions was involved. Analyses of covariance found signifcant differences in the level of stress reported by the different groups, with black women reporting the highest level of stress. Stressors pertaining to a lack of infrastructure and resources in the environment signifcantly contributed to the stress experienced by black women. All four groups reported discontent with their remuneration and fringe benefts.

  8. Importance of nuclear triaxiality for electromagnetic strength, level density and neutron capture cross sections in heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Eckart; Massarczyk, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections for neutron capture in the range of unresolved resonances are predicted simultaneously to level distances at the neutron threshold for more than 100 spin-0 target nuclei with A >70. Assuming triaxiality in nearly all these nuclei a combined parameterization for both, level density and photon strength is presented. The strength functions used are based on a global fit to IVGDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians adding up to the TRK sum rule and theory-based predictions for the A-dependence of pole energies and spreading widths. For the small spins reached by capture level densities are well described by only one free global parameter; a significant collective enhancement due to the deviation from axial symmetry is observed. Reliable predictions for compound nuclear reactions also outside the valley of stability as expected from the derived global parameterization are important for nuclear astrophysics and for the transmutation of nuclear waste.

  9. The Level Crossing Problem in Semi-Classical Analysis I. The symmetric case

    CERN Document Server

    Colin de Verdière, Y

    2002-01-01

    Our goal is to recover and extend the difficult results of George Hagedorn (1994) on the propagation of coherent states in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in the case of generic crossings of eigenvalues of the (matrix valued) classical Hamiltonian. This problem, going back to Landau and Zener in the thirties, is often called the ``Mode Conversion Problem'' by physicists and occurs in many domains of physics. We want to obtain a geometrical description of the propagation of states in the framework of semi-classical analysis and WKB-Lagrangian states. It turns out that, in a very beautiful (but not well known!) paper published in 1993, Peter Braam and Hans Duistermaat found that there is a formal normal form for this problem. A formal normal form for the dispersion relation were already founded by Arnold. In our paper, we show, using Nelson's wave operators method, that, in the hyperbolic case, their normal form can be extended to a local normal form in the phase space. Then, we extend this classical local n...

  10. Do autistic children have higher levels of caries? A cross-sectional study in Turkish children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namal Necmi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess whether the dental caries experience is higher in children with an autistic disorder (AD than in normal children. Three schools for autistic children and three standard elementary schools in Istanbul, Turkey, were included in a cross-sectional study. Subjects were orally examined. Socio-demographic information and data about their oral care habits were obtained from their parents from records. Sixty-two children with AD and 301 children without AD were examined. Their ages varied between 6 and 12 years. Children with AD compared to those without AD had lower experience of caries. Logistic regression analysis of DMFT showed that the dental status was positively affected in younger children (OR = 15.57; 95% CI 7.62, 31.80, children from families with high income (OR = 5.42; 95% CI 2.31, 12.75, children brushing teeth regularly (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.10, 3.68, children consuming less sugar (OR = 5.01; 95% CI 2.57, 9.76 and in those with AD (OR=3.99; 95% CI 1.56, 10.19. Children with AD had better caries status than children without AD at younger ages.

  11. Beyond moulage sign and TTG levels: the role of cross-sectional imaging in celiac sprue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheedy, Shannon P; Barlow, John M; Fletcher, Joel G; Smyrk, Thomas C; Scholz, Francis J; Codipilly, Don C; Al Bawardy, Badr F; Fidler, Jeff L

    2017-02-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and destruction in the small intestine of genetically susceptible individuals following ingestion of gluten. Awareness of the disease has increased; however, it remains a challenge to diagnose. This review summarizes the intestinal and extraintestinal cross-sectional imaging findings of celiac disease. Small intestine fold abnormalities are the most specific imaging findings for celiac disease, whereas most other imaging findings reflect a more generalized pattern seen with malabsorptive processes. Familiarity with the imaging pattern may allow the radiologist to suggest the diagnosis in patients with atypical presentations in whom it is not clinically suspected. Earlier detection allows earlier treatment initiation and may prevent significant morbidity and mortality that can occur with delayed diagnosis. Refractory celiac disease carries the greatest risk of mortality due to associated complications, including cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome, ulcerative jejunoileitis, enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma, all of which are described and illustrated. Radiologic and endoscopic investigations are complimentary modalities in the setting of complicated celiac disease.

  12. Is there an association between Vitamin D level and inflammatory markers in hemodialysis patients? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Atif Mohiuddin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is very prevalent among the patients with end-stage renal disease. The etiology of this is multifactorial, including nutritional deficiency, insufficient expo- sure to sunlight, race, obesity and not the least, impaired Vitamin D synthesis and metabolism in chronic kidney disease patients. We hypothesized that lower Vitamin D level will be associated with higher inflammatory burden and low immunological response to hepatitis B vaccination in hemodialysis (HD population. The study was carried out in March 2013 among 100 HD patients who were identified to be eligible for the study. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing the relationship between Vitamin D level and inflammatory markers in HD patients. A relationship between Vitamin D level and markers of mineral bone disorder was also analyzed. We also analyzed the relationship between Vitamin D level and hemoglobin and erythropoietin dosage. Hemoglobin, transferrin saturation, and erythropoietin dose were used to study the relationship between Vitamin D and markers of anemia. Antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen were measured to study the response between Vitamin D level and immune response to hepatitis B vaccine. Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in females compared to males (P = 0.009 and diabetics compared to non-diabetics (P = 0.02. No significant association was observed between Vitamin D levels with immune response to hepatitis B vaccine (P = 0.89, C-reactive protein (P = 0.19, serum albumin (P = 0.17, hemoglobin level (P = 0.18, and erythropoietin requirement (P = 0.87, parathyroid hormone (PTH levels (P = 0.57, calcium levels (P = 0.79 and phosphate level (P = 0.1.

  13. A multilevel investigation on nursing turnover intention: the cross-level role of leader-member exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portoghese, Igor; Galletta, Maura; Battistelli, Adalgisa; Leiter, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    To analyse nursing turnover intention from the unit by using multilevel approach, examining at the individual level, the relationships between job characteristics, job satisfaction and turnover intention, and at the group level the role of leader-member exchange. Research on nursing turnover has given little attention to the effects of multilevel factors. Aggregated data of 935 nurses nested within 74 teams of four Italian hospitals were collected in 2009 via a self-administered questionnaire. Hierarchical linear modelling showed that job satisfaction mediated the relationship between job characteristics and intention to leave at the individual level. At the unit level, leader-member exchange was directly linked to intention to leave. Furthermore, cross-level interaction revealed that leader-member exchange moderated the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction. This study supported previous research in single-level turnover studies concerning the key role of job satisfaction, providing evidence that job characteristics are important in creating motivating and satisfying jobs. At the unit-level, leader-member exchange offers an approach to understand the role of unit-specific conditions created by leaders on nurses' workplace wellbeing. This study showed that it is important for nursing managers to recognise the relevance of implementing management practices that foster healthy workplaces centred on high-quality nurse-supervisor relationships. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A cross-sectional study to estimate associations between education level and osteoporosis in a Chinese postmenopausal women sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hui-Hong; He, Jiajia; Zhang, Keqin; Tang, Zihui

    2015-01-01

    Our research aims to investigate the associations between education level and osteoporosis (OP) in Chinese postmenopausal women. A large-scale, community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the associations between education level and OP. A self-reported questionnaire was used to access the demographical information and medical history of the participants. A total of 1905 postmenopausal women were available for data analysis in this study. Multiple regression models controlling for confounding factors to include education level were performed to investigate the relationship with OP. The prevalence of OP was 28.29% in our study sample. Multivariate linear regression analyses adjusted for relevant potential confounding factors detected significant associations between education level and T-score (β = 0.025, P-value = 0.095, 95% CI: -0.004-0.055 for model 1; and β = 0.092, P-value = 0.032, 95% CI: 0.008-0.175 for model 2). Multivariate logistic regression analyses detected significant associations between education level and OP in model 1 (P-value = 0.070 for model 1, Table 5), while no significant associations was reported in model 2 (P value = 0.131). In participants with high education levels, the OR for OP was 0.914 (95% CI: 0.830-1.007). The findings indicated that education level was independently and significantly associated with OP. The prevalence of OP was more frequent in Chinese postmenopausal women with low educational status.

  15. Maternal serum cholesterol levels are elevated from the 1st trimester of pregnancy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Ä; Egan, N; Broadhurst, D I; Khashan, A S; Joyce, C; Stapleton, M; O'Mullane, J; O'Donoghue, K

    2012-11-01

    Cholesterol is monitored in the non-pregnant adult population, where normal values are established. Although reported to be elevated in pregnancy, cholesterol is neither routinely measured nor treated. We aimed to investigate cholesterol levels throughout pregnancy and to establish reference values for cholesterol in healthy pregnant women. This was a cross-sectional analysis of serum cholesterol in healthy women with an uncomplicated singleton pregnancy. Pregnant women attending for antenatal care were recruited and cholesterol levels assayed at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks' gestation and on day 1-3 postpartum. A total of 222 women were recruited. The majority (95%) were white Irish, with a median age of 31 years (range 16-46). Median BMI was 25.9 kg/m2 (range 18-40) and 16% were smokers. Cholesterol levels were elevated in all trimesters of pregnancy, with median values from 1st trimester raised outside the non-pregnant adult range. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels ranged from 0.9 to 3.7 mmol/l and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels ranged from 1.3 to 6.1 mmol/l. Fasting, smoking and obesity did not have any significant effects on results. Total and LDL-cholesterol levels were raised throughout pregnancy. Levels were above non-pregnant adult ranges as early as the 1st trimester. The implications of this on fetus and mother are undetermined and deserve further investigation.

  16. Differences in atherosclerosis according to area level socioeconomic deprivation: cross sectional, population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deans, Kevin A.; Bezlyak, Vladimir; Ford, Ian; Batty, G. David; Burns, Harry; Cavanagh, Jonathan; de Groot, Eric; McGinty, Agnes; Millar, Keith; Shiels, Paul G.; Tannahill, Carol; Velupillai, Yoga N.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the relation between area level social deprivation and ultrasound markers of atherosclerosis (common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque score), and to determine whether any differences can be explained by "classic" (currently recognised) or "emerging" (novel) cardiovascular risk

  17. A cross-sectional study of plasma and urinary aluminum levels in term and preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougle, D; Bureau, F; Voirin, J; Neuville, D; Duhamel, J F

    1992-01-01

    High aluminum levels have been reported in sick and intravenously fed premature infants; however, aluminum is a ubiquitous pollutant of food. This study compares the usual aluminum levels of healthy newborns from birth to the third month of life with those of enterally fed premature infants free of renal failure. Plasma and urine concentrations were determined 66 times in full-term newborns (n = 58), 56 times in a group of preterm infants whose gestational age at birth was 28 to 32 weeks (n = 36) and 54 times in another group of preterm infants whose gestational age at birth was 33 to 36 weeks (n = 50). Daily aluminum intakes (+/- SE) of the full-term infants and the two groups of preterm infants were 0.42 +/- 0.05, 0.64 +/- 0.03, and 0.52 +/- 0.03 mumol/kg per day, respectively (p = .05). Plasma aluminum levels were 0.29 +/- 0.05, 0.49 +/- 0.06, and 0.39 +/- 0.05 mumol/L (p = .007); urine excretion levels were 0.80 +/- 0.12, 0.77 +/- 0.21, and 0.78 +/- 0.2 mumol of aluminum/mmol of creatinine (p value not significant). Although the metabolic consequences of the high aluminum intakes and blood levels we have observed in very low birth weight infants remain to be assessed, these results suggest that more attention should be paid to the aluminum status and intake of healthy premature babies.

  18. MeV-level electron and gamma ray sensitivites of modern far ultraviolet sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Cooke, Chathan M.; Blase, Ryan C.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2016-07-01

    The Jovian system is the focus of multiple current and future NASA and ESA missions, but dangerously high radiation levels surrounding the planet make operations of instruments sensitive to high energy electrons or gamma rays problematic. Microchannel plate (MCP) detectors have been the detectors of choice in planetary ultraviolet spectrographs for decades. However, the same properties that give these detectors high response to vacuum ultraviolet photons also make them sensitive to high energy electrons and gamma rays. The success of ultraviolet investigations in the Jovian system depends on effectively shielding these MCP detectors to protect them as much as possible from this withering radiation. The design of such shielding hinges on our understanding of the response of MCP detectors to the high energy electrons and gamma rays found there. To this end, Southwest Research Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology collaborated in 2012-13 to measure the response of a flight-spare microchannel plate detector to a beam of high energy electrons. The detector response was measured at multiple beam energies ranging from 0.5-2.5 MeV and multiple currents. This response was then checked with MCNP6, a radiation transport simulation tool, to determine the secondary gamma rays produced by the primary electrons striking the detector window. We report on the measurement approach and the inferred electron and gamma sensitivities.

  19. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today’s ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources.

  20. Variations in label information and nicotine levels in electronic cigarette refill liquids in South Korea: regulation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungroul; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Yu, Sol; Kim, Bokyeong; Gupta, Ribhav

    2015-05-05

    In South Korea, the consumption of liquid nicotine used in electronic cigarettes has dramatically increased from 4310 L in 2012 to 7220 L in 2013. This study aimed to examine the level of heterogeneity of contents of the labels and discrepancy of the nicotine content between that indicated on the label and the actual values for electronic cigarette liquid refill products in South Korea. We purchased 32 electronic cigarette liquid refill products (17 Korean domestic, 15 imported ones) and one pure nicotine product at six different electronic cigarette retail stores in Seoul between May and June 2014. The actual nicotine concentrations of each product were measured by a blinded analyst at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. Three out of 15 imported liquid refill products provided manufacturing dates, while expiration dates were available on eight products. The range of nicotine concentration was from "not detected" to 17.5 mg/mL. Labeling discrepancies of the concentrations ranged from -32.2% to 3.3% among electronic cigarette liquid refill products. The highest concentration (150.3 ± 7.9 mg/mL) was found in a sample labeled as "pure nicotine". There is no standardization of labelling among electronic cigarette liquids sampled from retail stores and the labels did not accurately reflect the content. One product labeled "pure nicotine" raises concerns, since it may be poisonous to consumers, especially to children. This study revealed the urgent need for the development of product regulations in South Korea.

  1. Absolute cross sections for electron-impact ionization of N2O, H2S, and CS2 from threshold to 1000 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, B. G.; Rejoub, R.; Stebbings, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    Absolute partial and total cross sections for electron-impact ionization of N2O, H2S, and CS2 are reported for electron energies from threshold to 1000 eV. The product ions are mass analyzed using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected with a position-sensitive detector whose output demonstrates that all product ion species are collected with equal efficiency irrespective of their initial kinetic energies. Data are presented for production of N2O+, N2+, NO+, N+, and O+ from N2O; for production of (H2S++HS++S+) and H+ from H2S; and for production of CS2+, S2+, CS+, S+, C+, and CS22+ from CS2. The total cross sections are obtained as the sum of these partial cross sections. The overall uncertainty in the absolute cross sections for most of the singly-charged ions is ±6-8%. For all three targets the cross sections for production of lighter fragment ions are found to be greater than previously reported which is consistent with the presumption of incomplete collection of energetic ions in the earlier studies. Agreement with recent theoretical calculations is satisfactory for N2O but not for H2S or CS2.

  2. Data analysis at the CMS level-1 trigger: migrating complex selection algorithms from offline analysis and high-level trigger to the trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wulz, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    With ever increasing luminosity at the LHC, optimum online data selection is becoming more and more important. While in the case of some experiments (LHCb and ALICE) this task is being completely transferred to computer farms, the others -- ATLAS and CMS -- will not be able to do this in the medium-term future for technological, detector-related reasons. Therefore, these experiments pursue the complementary approach of migrating more and more of the offline and high-level trigger intelligence into the trigger electronics. The presentation illustrates how the level-1 trigger of the CMS experiment and in particular its concluding stage, the so-called ``Global Trigger", take up this challenge.

  3. Hierarchical Bayesian random intercept model-based cross-level interaction decomposition for truck driver injury severity investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Guohui; Tian, Zong; Bogus, Susan M; Yang, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Traffic crashes occurring on rural roadways induce more severe injuries and fatalities than those in urban areas, especially when there are trucks involved. Truck drivers are found to suffer higher potential of crash injuries compared with other occupational labors. Besides, unobserved heterogeneity in crash data analysis is a critical issue that needs to be carefully addressed. In this study, a hierarchical Bayesian random intercept model decomposing cross-level interaction effects as unobserved heterogeneity is developed to examine the posterior probabilities of truck driver injuries in rural truck-involved crashes. The interaction effects contributing to truck driver injury outcomes are investigated based on two-year rural truck-involved crashes in New Mexico from 2010 to 2011. The analysis results indicate that the cross-level interaction effects play an important role in predicting truck driver injury severities, and the proposed model produces comparable performance with the traditional random intercept model and the mixed logit model even after penalization by high model complexity. It is revealed that factors including road grade, number of vehicles involved in a crash, maximum vehicle damage in a crash, vehicle actions, driver age, seatbelt use, and driver under alcohol or drug influence, as well as a portion of their cross-level interaction effects with other variables are significantly associated with truck driver incapacitating injuries and fatalities. These findings are helpful to understand the respective or joint impacts of these attributes on truck driver injury patterns in rural truck-involved crashes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring athletic identity in elite-level English youth football: a cross-sectional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tom O; Nesti, Mark; Richardson, David; Midgley, Adrian W; Eubank, Martin; Littlewood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first empirical investigation that has explored levels of athletic identity in elite-level English professional football. The importance of understanding athletes' psychological well-being within professional sport has been well documented. This is especially important within the professional football industry, given the high attrition rate (Anderson, G., & Miller, R. M. (2011). The academy system in English professional football: Business value or following the herd? University of Liverpool, Management School Research Paper Series. Retrieved from http://www.liv.ac.uk/managementschool/research/working%20papers/wp201143.pdf ) and distinct occupational practices (Roderick, M. (2006). The work of professional football. A labour of love? London: Routledge). A total of 168 elite youth footballers from the English professional football leagues completed the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS). Multilevel modelling was used to examine the effect of playing level, living arrangements and year of apprentice on the total AIMS score and its subscales (i.e., social identity, exclusivity and negative affectivity). Football club explained 30% of the variance in exclusivity among players (P = .022). Mean social identity was significantly higher for those players in the first year of their apprenticeship compared to the second year (P = .025). All other effects were not statistically significant (P > .05). The novel and unique findings have practical implications in the design and implementation of career support strategies with respect to social identity. This may facilitate the maintenance of motivation over a 2-year apprenticeship and positively impact on performance levels within the professional football environment.

  5. Increased Levels of Dissolved Titanium Are Associated With Peri-Implantitis - A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioti, Luciana M; Kotsakis, Georgios A; Pozhitkov, Alex E; Chung, Whasun O; Daubert, Diane M

    2017-05-01

    Peri-implantitis represents a disruption of the biocompatible interface between the titanium dioxide layer of the implant surface and the peri-implant tissues. Increasing preclinical data suggest that peri-implantitis microbiota not only triggers an inflammatory immune response but also causes electrochemical alterations of the titanium surfaces, i.e., corrosion, that aggravate this inflammatory response. Thus, it was hypothesized that there is an association between dissolution of titanium from dental implants, which suggests corrosion, and peri-implantitis in humans. The objective of this study is to compare levels of dissolved titanium in submucosal plaque collected from healthy implants and implants with peri-implantitis. Submucosal plaque from 20 implants with peri-implantitis and 20 healthy implants was collected with sterile curets from 30 participants. Levels of titanium were quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and normalized for mass of bacterial DNA per sample to exclude confounding by varying amounts of plaque per site. Statistical analysis was performed using generalized estimated equations to adjust for clustering of implants per participant. Implants with peri-implantitis harbored significantly higher mean levels of titanium (0.85 ± 2.47) versus healthy implants (0.07 ± 0.19) after adjusting for amount of plaque collected per site (P = 0.033). Greater levels of dissolved titanium were detected in submucosal plaque around implants with peri-implantitis compared with healthy implants, indicating an association between titanium dissolution and peri-implantitis. Factors triggering titanium dissolution, as well as the role of titanium corrosion in the peri-implant inflammatory process, warrant further investigation.

  6. Cross-Level Cultural Congruence: Implications For Managing Diversity In Multinational Corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Palthe

    2014-01-01

    Few models view culture as a multi-level construct and limited diversity management theories capture the significance of the configuration of individual, organizational, and national culture differences on employee and organizational outcomes. This paper seeks to bridge this gap by presenting a conceptual model that suggests that the interplay between this triad of cultural entities (individual, organizational, and national) influences the degree of cultural congruence that ultimately affects...

  7. Kerr-effect analysis in a three-level negative index material under magneto cross-coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutabba, N.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the feasibility of the Kerr effect in negative refractive index materials under magneto cross-coupling and reservoir interaction. The considered medium is a typical three-level atomic system where we derive both the refractive and the gain spectrum. The profiles are analyzed for a weak probe field, and for varying strengths of the strong control field. The considered scheme shows an enhancement of the Kerr nonlinearity which we attribute to the contribution of the electromagnetic components of the fields. For more realistic experimental conditions, we discuss the dependence of the Kerr effect on different thermal bath coupling constants.

  8. Servant leadership, procedural justice climate, service climate, employee attitudes, and organizational citizenship behavior: a cross-level investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walumbwa, Fred O; Hartnell, Chad A; Oke, Adegoke

    2010-05-01

    This study tests the influence of servant leadership on 2 group climates, employee attitudes, and organizational citizenship behavior. Results from a sample of 815 employees and 123 immediate supervisors revealed that commitment to the supervisor, self-efficacy, procedural justice climate, and service climate partially mediated the relationship between servant leadership and organizational citizenship behavior. Cross-level interaction results revealed that procedural justice climate and positive service climate amplified the influence of commitment to the supervisor on organizational citizenship behavior. Implications of these results for theory and practice and directions for future research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Testing the Electronic Personal Health Record Acceptance Model by Nurses for Managing Their Own Health: A Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, K; Trinkoff, A M; Storr, C L; Wilson, M L; Gurses, A P

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, no evidence is available on health care professionals' use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) for their health management. We therefore focused on nurses' personal use of ePHRs using a modified technology acceptance model. To examine (1) the psychometric properties of the ePHR acceptance model, (2) the associations of perceived usefulness, ease of use, data privacy and security protection, and perception of self as health-promoting role models to nurses' own ePHR use, and (3) the moderating influences of age, chronic illness and medication use, and providers' use of electronic health record (EHRs) on the associations between the ePHR acceptance constructs and ePHR use. A convenience sample of registered nurses, those working in one of 12 hospitals in the Maryland and Washington, DC areas and members of the nursing informatics community (AMIA and HIMSS), were invited to respond to an anonymous online survey; 847 responded. Multiple logistic regression identified associations between the model constructs and ePHR use, and the moderating effect. Overall, ePHRs were used by 47%. Sufficient reliability for all scales was found. Three constructs were significantly related to nurses' own ePHR use after adjusting for covariates: usefulness, data privacy and security protection, and health-promoting role model. Nurses with providers that used EHRs who perceived a higher level of data privacy and security protection had greater odds of ePHR use than those whose providers did not use EHRs. Older nurses with a higher self-perception as health-promoting role models had greater odds of ePHR use than younger nurses. Nurses who use ePHRs for their personal health might promote adoption by the general public by serving as health-promoting role models. They can contribute to improvements in patient education and ePHR design, and serve as crucial resources when working with their individual patients.

  10. The relationship between shift work and mental health among electronics workers in South Korea: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Kang, Chung-Won; Kim, Hyunjoo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the relationship between shift work and mental health, particularly insomnia, depression, and suicidal ideation, among electronics production workers. A survey was conducted with 14,226 workers from an electronics manufacturer in South Korea. After excluding 112 individuals with incomplete responses, 14,114 respondents were analyzed. As part of a larger project, we collected data on respondents' general characteristics, work-related characteristics, and health status; however, in this study, we focused on the data related to shift work and mental health. Insomnia, depression, and suicidal ideation were set as dependent variables and working schedule as set as the independent variable. We performed multiple logistic regression analysis with daytime workers as the reference group. The model was adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, workplace, educational level, and marital status with or without children under 6 years of age. Relative to daytime workers, shift workers had 2.35, 1.23, and 1.17 greater odds of insomnia, depression, and suicidal ideation, respectively. Within the shift worker group, we found that the odds of depression and suicidal ideation increased dramatically when respondents had insomnia. The ORs for depression and suicidal ideation were 4.899 and 7.934, respectively. Our findings suggest that shift work is related to an increased risk of mental health problems in production workers, and the sleep disturbance related with shift work is a central mechanism for this relationship. Since these results suggest that proactive management of sleep problems might attenuate their detrimental effects on shift worker's mental health.

  11. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba...

  12. Semiconductor laser utilizing transitions between size-quantization levels with separate electron and optical confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanyan, A.G.; Aleksanyan, A.G.; Mirzabekyan, G.E.; Popov, Y.M.

    1984-09-01

    An analytic expression is obtained for the threshold of a semiconductor laser in the form of a five-layer structure with separate electron and optical confinement. An analysis is made of the dependence of the lasing threshold on the thickness of the active and waveguide layers, and also on the permittivities of these layers.

  13. Electron transfer and redox metalloenzyme catalysis at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    Voltammetry based on single-crystal, atomically-planar metal electrodes is novel in bioelectrochemistry. Together with in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) directly in aqueous buffer, single-crystal voltammetry has disclosed new detail in molecular adsorption and interfacial electron trans...

  14. Electronics from the Bottom up: Strategies for Teaching Nanoelectronics at the Undergraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoelectronics is an emerging area of electrical and computer engineering that deals with the current-voltage behavior of atomic-scale electronic devices. As the trend toward ever smaller devices continues, there is a need to update traditional undergraduate curricula to introduce electrical engineers to the fundamentals of the field. These…

  15. Electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine : An experimental and theoretical study of occupied and unoccupied levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangelista, Fabrizio; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Stefani, Giovanni; Jansik, Branislav; Alagia, Michele; Stranges, Stefano; Ruocco, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule is presented. We performed x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and photoabsorption [x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES)] gas phase experiments and we compared the results with

  16. An X-Ray of the Level of Electronic Purse Usage in Nigeria | Ogbuji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the invasion of e-purse as electronic banking channels that has the potential of disempowering the cash systems of exchange and granting firms competitive edge, it is ... It is believed that if these inconsistencies are taken care of, the rate of e-purse acceptance will outweigh its present status in the near future.

  17. A Structural Approach to Establishing a Platform Chemistry for the Tunable, Bulk Electron Beam Cross-Linking of Shape Memory Polymer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearon, Keith; Besset, Celine J; Lonnecker, Alexander T; Ware, Taylor; Voit, Walter E; Wilson, Thomas S; Wooley, Karen L; Maitland, Duncan J

    2013-11-26

    The synthetic design and thermomechanical characterization of shape memory polymers (SMPs) built from a new polyurethane chemistry that enables facile, bulk and tunable cross-linking of low-molecular weight thermoplastics by electron beam irradiation is reported in this study. SMPs exhibit stimuli-induced geometry changes and are being proposed for applications in numerous fields. We have previously reported a polyurethane SMP system that exhibits the complex processing capabilities of thermoplastic polymers and the mechanical robustness and tunability of thermomechanical properties that are often characteristic of thermoset materials. These previously reported polyurethanes suffer practically because the thermoplastic molecular weights needed to achieve target cross-link densities severely limit high-throughput thermoplastic processing and because thermally unstable radiation-sensitizing additives must be used to achieve high enough cross-link densities to enable desired tunable shape memory behavior. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate cross-link density in low-molecular weight aliphatic thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs (Mw as low as ~1.5 kDa) without radiation-sensitizing additives by incorporating specific structural motifs into the thermoplastic polymer side chains that we hypothesized would significantly enhance susceptibility to e-beam cross-linking. A custom diol monomer was first synthesized and then implemented in the synthesis of neat thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs that were irradiated at doses ranging from 1 to 500 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) demonstrated rubbery moduli to be tailorable between 0.1 and 55 MPa, and both DMA and sol/gel analysis results provided fundamental insight into our hypothesized mechanism of electron beam cross-linking, which enables controllable bulk cross-linking to be achieved in highly processable, low-molecular weight thermoplastic shape memory polymers without sensitizing additives.

  18. To stop or not to stop: Contrasting compliant and non-compliant driver behaviour at rural rail level crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beanland, Vanessa; Salmon, Paul M; Filtness, Ashleigh J; Lenné, Michael G; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-11-01

    Many rail level crossings (RLXs) have only passive protection, such as static signs instructing road users to stop, yield, or look for trains. Stop signs have been suggested as a low-cost option to improve safety at passive RLXs, as requiring drivers to stop should encourage safe behaviour. However, field observations have noted high rates of non-compliance at stop-controlled RLXs. To explore this further, we conducted an on-road study to identify factors that influence compliance at stop-controlled RLXs. Twenty-two drivers drove a 30.5km route in rural Australia, encompassing three stop-controlled RLXs. In over half of all cases (59%) drivers stopped completely at the RLX; on 27% of crossings drivers executed a rolling stop, and on 14% of crossings drivers violated the stop controls. Rolling stops were defined as a continuous deceleration to 10km/h. Behavioural patterns, including visual checks and decision-making, were similar when comparing drivers who made complete versus rolling stops. Non-compliant drivers did not differ from compliant drivers in approach speeds, but spent less time visually checking for trains. Post-drive interviews revealed some drivers wilfully disregarded the stop sign, whereas others did not notice the stop sign. Those who intentionally violated noted trains were infrequent and suggested sight distance was good enough (even though all crossings had been formally assessed as having inadequate sight distance). Overall the results suggest most drivers exhibit safe behaviour at passive RLXs, but a notable minority disregard or fail to notice signs. Potential avenues for redesigning passive RLXs to improve safety are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Empathy levels among health professional students: a cross-sectional study at two universities in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm J; Palermo, Claire; Nestel, Debra; Brightwell, Richard; McCall, Louise; Russo, Verity

    2014-01-01

    Background Empathy is paramount in the health care setting, optimizing communication and rapport with patients. Recent empirical evidence suggests that empathy is associated with improved clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the importance of empathy in the health care setting, gaining a better understanding of students’ attitudes and self-reported empathy is important. The objective of this study was to examine self-reported empathy levels of students enrolled in different health disciplines from two large Australian universities. Materials and methods A total of 1,111 students from two different universities enrolled in eight different health professions were administered the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy – Health Profession Students version, a 20-item 7-point Likert scale questionnaire to evaluate self-reported empathy levels. Results A total of 1,111 students participated in this study. The majority of participants were from Monash University (n=771), with 340 students from Edith Cowan University. No statistically significant differences were found between universities: Monash University (mean 110.1, standard deviation [SD] 11.8); Edith Cowan University (mean 109.2, SD 13.3, P=0.306). The mean female empathy score (mean 110.8, SD 11.7) was significantly higher than the mean male score (mean 105.3, SD 13.5; Pempathy scores (mean 106.3, SD 12.73) than all other participants except nursing students (Pempathy and its incline/decline as students progress through a program. Further study is warranted to explore why there are variations in empathy levels in students of different health disciplines. PMID:24833947

  20. Anxiety Levels among Five-Year-Old Children Undergoing ART Restoration- A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishan; Shivlingesh, K K; Agarwal, Vartika; Gupta, Bhuvan Deep; Anand, Richa; Sharma, Abhinav; Kushwaha, Sumedha; Khan, Khateeb

    2017-04-01

    Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) involves manually excavating the carious part of the tooth and restoring the prepared cavity with chemically adhesive restorative material [Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC)] and it may induce and/or impact the dental anxiety in children. It is well established that ART procedure is less anxiety producing when compared with other restorative procedures using dental drill. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiety levels among five-year-old children undergoing ART restoration in I.T.S. Dental College, Greater Noida, India. A sample of 50, five-year-old children visiting the Outpatient Department (OPD) of ITS Dental College, Greater Noida was selected for ART treatment using Fuji IX GIC. Modified Venham Anxiety Scale based on their behaviour and heart rate of the children were measured and recorded before, during and after the ART procedure. Heart rate was measured using Radial Pulse examination method. Chi-square test was used and tests were conducted using IBM SPSS software (ver.20.0; IBM, Chicago, IL, USA). Before the ART treatment, heart rates and Modified Venham Anxiety Scores of majority of children were higher than that after the treatment. A p-value was statistically significant (0.028 and 0.048 respectively) for association of gender with heart rate and Modified Venham's score before the ART treatment. No statistically significant relation was found between the variables during and after the ART treatment. The level of anxiety for ART treatment in children was higher before the treatment than that during and after the treatment. There is a correlation between the gender of children and their level of anxiety for ART treatment.

  1. Associations of Electronic Cigarette Nicotine Concentration With Subsequent Cigarette Smoking and Vaping Levels in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenson, Nicholas I; Leventhal, Adam M; Stone, Matthew D; McConnell, Rob S; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L

    2017-12-01

    Research indicates that electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use (vaping) among adolescents is associated with the initiation and progression of combustible cigarette smoking. The reasons for this association are unknown. To evaluate whether use of e-cigarettes with higher nicotine concentrations is associated with subsequent increases in the frequency and intensity of combustible cigarette smoking and vaping. In this prospective cohort study involving students from 10 high schools in the Los Angeles, California, metropolitan area, surveys were administered during 10th grade in the spring (baseline) and 11th grade in the fall (6-month follow-up) of 2015 to students who reported using e-cigarettes within the past 30 days and the nicotine concentration level they used at baseline. Self-report of baseline e-cigarette nicotine concentration of none (0 mg/mL), low (1-5 mg/mL), medium (6-17 mg/mL), or high (≥18 mg/mL) typically used during the past 30 days. Frequency of combustible cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use within the past 30 days (0 days [none], 1-2 days [infrequent], or ≥3 days [frequent]) and daily intensity of smoking and vaping (number of cigarettes smoked per day, number of vaping episodes per day, and number of puffs per vaping episode) at the 6-month follow-up. The analytic sample included 181 students (96 boys [53.0%] and 85 girls [47.0%]; mean [SD] age, 16.1 [0.4] years). Each successive increase in nicotine concentration (none to low, low to medium, and medium to high) vaped was associated with a 2.26 (95% CI, 1.28-3.98) increase in the odds of frequent (vs no) smoking and a 1.65 (95% CI, 1.09-2.51) increase in the odds of frequent (vs no) vaping at follow-up after adjustment for baseline frequency of smoking and vaping and other relevant covariates. Use of e-cigarettes with high (vs no) nicotine concentration was associated with a greater number of cigarettes smoked per day at follow-up (adjusted rate ratio [RR], 7.03; 95% CI, 6.11-7.95). An

  2. Differential electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections extracted from ion-atom collisions of 0.53 MeV/u Cu{sup 5+} on H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). J.R. MacDonald Lab.]|[Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Grabbe, S.R. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). J.R. MacDonald Lab.

    1997-12-31

    A method of extracting electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from ion-atom collisions has been developed. By analyzing the binary encounter electron (BEe) production in energetic ion-atom collisions, which is due to loosely bound target electrons ionized through direct, hard collisions with the projectile ions, differential cross sections of electrons elastic scattered from highly charged ions are derived for a broad range of scattering angles. The cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections, and immediately yielded an electron diffraction in angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons. Experimental data are compared with a partial-wave treatment using the Hartree-Fock model. (orig.). 19 refs.

  3. Literacy skills gaps: A cross-level analysis on international and intergenerational variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suehye

    2018-01-01

    The global agenda for sustainable development has centred lifelong learning on UNESCO's Education 2030 Framework for Action. The study described in this article aimed to examine international and intergenerational variations in literacy skills gaps within the context of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For this purpose, the author examined the trend of literacy gaps in different countries using multilevel and multisource data from the OECD's Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) and UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning survey data from the third edition of the Global Report on Adult Learning and Education (GRALE III). In this article, particular attention is paid to exploring the specific effects of education systems on literacy skills gaps among different age groups. Key findings of this study indicate substantial intergenerational literacy gaps within countries as well as different patterns of literacy gaps across countries. Young generations generally outscore older adults in literacy skills, but feature bigger gaps when examined by gender and social origin. In addition, this study finds an interesting tendency for young generations to benefit from a system of Recognition, Validation and Accreditation (RVA) in closing literacy gaps by formal schooling at country level. This implies the potential of an RVA system for tackling educational inequality in initial schooling. The article concludes with suggestions for integrating literacy skills as a foundation of lifelong learning into national RVA frameworks and mechanisms at system level.

  4. Crossing levels in systems ergonomics: a framework to support 'mesoergonomic' inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Waterson, Patrick; Holden, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we elaborate and articulate the need for what has been termed 'mesoergonomics'. In particular, we argue that the concept has the potential to bridge the gap between, and integrate, established work within the domains of micro- and macroergonomics. Mesoergonomics is defined as an open systems approach to human factors and ergonomics (HFE) theory and research whereby the relationship between variables in at least two different system levels or echelons is studied, and where the dependent variables are human factors and ergonomic constructs. We present a framework which can be used to structure a set of questions for future work and prompt further empirical and conceptual inquiry. The framework consists of four steps: (1) establishing the purpose of the mesoergonomic investigation; (2) selecting human factors and ergonomics variables; (3) selecting a specific type of mesoergonomic investigation; and (4) establishing relationships between system levels. In addition, we describe two case studies which illustrate the workings of the framework and the value of adopting a mesoergonomic perspective within HFE. The paper concludes with a set of issues which could form part of a future agenda for research within systems ergonomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Patterns of routine primary care for osteoarthritis in the UK: a cross-sectional electronic health records study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Holly; Barnett, Lauren A; Jordan, Kelvin P; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Cottrell, Elizabeth; Finney, Andrew G; Paskins, Zoe; Edwards, John J

    2017-12-29

    To determine common patterns of recorded primary care for osteoarthritis (OA), and patient and provider characteristics associated with the quality of recorded care. An observational study nested within a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Eight UK general practices who were part of the Management of Osteoarthritis in Consultations study. Patients recorded as consulting within the eight general practices for clinical OA. Achievement of seven quality indicators of care (pain/function assessment, information provision, exercise/weight advice, analgesics, physiotherapy), recorded through an electronic template or routinely recorded in the electronic healthcare records, was identified for patients aged ≥45 years consulting over a 6-month period with clinical OA. Latent class analysis was used to cluster patients based on care received. Clusters were compared on patient and clinician-level characteristics. 1724 patients (median by practice 183) consulted with clinical OA. Common patterns of recorded quality care were: cluster 1 (38%, High ) received most quality indicators of care; cluster 2 (11%, Moderate ) had pain and function assessment, and received or were considered for other indicators; cluster 3 (17%, Low ) had pain and function assessment, and received or were considered for paracetamol or topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; cluster 4 (35%, None ) had no recorded quality indicators. Patients with higher levels of recorded care consulted a clinician who saw more patients with OA, consulted multiple times and had less morbidity. Those in the High cluster were more likely to have recorded diagnosed OA and have knee/hip OA. Patterns of recorded care for OA fell into four natural clusters. Appropriate delivery of core interventions and relatively safe pharmacological options for OA are still not consistently recorded as provided in primary care. Further research to understand clinical recording behaviours and determine potential barriers to quality

  6. Empathy levels among health professional students: a cross-sectional study at two universities in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Ted Brown,2 Lisa McKenna,3 Malcolm J Boyle,1 Claire Palermo,4 Debra Nestel,5 Richard Brightwell,6 Louise McCall,7 Verity Russo11Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, 2Department of Occupational Therapy, 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, 4Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, 5School of Rural Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 6School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, 7Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaBackground: Empathy is paramount in the health care setting, optimizing communication and rapport with patients. Recent empirical evidence suggests that empathy is associated with improved clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the importance of empathy in the health care setting, gaining a better understanding of students' attitudes and self-reported empathy is important. The objective of this study was to examine self-reported empathy levels of students enrolled in different health disciplines from two large Australian universities.Materials and methods: A total of 1,111 students from two different universities enrolled in eight different health professions were administered the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy – Health Profession Students version, a 20-item 7-point Likert scale questionnaire to evaluate self-reported empathy levels.Results: A total of 1,111 students participated in this study. The majority of participants were from Monash University (n=771, with 340 students from Edith Cowan University. No statistically significant differences were found between universities: Monash University (mean 110.1, standard deviation [SD] 11.8; Edith Cowan University (mean 109.2, SD 13.3, P=0.306. The mean female empathy score (mean 110.8, SD 11.7 was significantly higher than the mean male score (mean 105.3, SD 13.5; P<0.0001; d=0.44. Paramedic students had significantly lower empathy scores (mean 106.3, SD 12

  7. Direct and indirect relationships between physical activity and happiness levels among older adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine if physical activity (PA) is associated to happiness and to investigate if social functioning and health status mediate this association. Participants of this cross-sectional study were 323 men and women, age 60 or over, who were covered by the medical insurance of the French National Education System, France. They received by mail a self-report questionnaire that asked for information about general health, PA, and happiness. In multinomial logistic regressions, the total volume of PA was associated to higher levels of happiness, but this association disappeared in the presence of social functioning. A structural equation modelling (SEM) showed an indirect association between PA and happiness, which was mediated by participants' health status and social functioning; in this SEM model, social functioning was the only variable directly associated to happiness. Complex associations among PA, health status, and social functioning appear to determine happiness levels in older adults.

  8. Creative self-efficacy and individual creativity in team contexts: cross-level interactions with team informational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andreas W; Hirst, Giles; van Knippenberg, Daan; Baer, Markus

    2012-11-01

    We propose a cross-level perspective on the relation between creative self-efficacy and individual creativity in which team informational resources, comprising both shared "knowledge of who knows what" (KWKW) and functional background diversity, benefit the creativity of individuals more with higher creative self-efficacy. To test our hypotheses, we conducted a multi-level study with 176 employees working in 34 research and development teams of a multinational company in 4 countries. In support of our hypotheses, the link between creative self-efficacy and individual creativity was more positive with greater shared KWKW, and this interactive effect was pronounced for teams of high rather than low functional background diversity. We discuss implications for the study of creative self-efficacy in team contexts. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Model potentials for electron scattering - Converged close coupling calculations for the differential cross section for e/-/N2 at 30-50 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, K.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    A calculation has been made of the elastic scattering and rotational excitation cross sections for e(-)-N2 scattering at 30 and 50 eV using quantum chemical techniques specially designed to be applicable to elastic and inelastic electron scattering by general polyatomic molecules. The angle dependence of the sum of the elastic and rotational excitation differential cross sections is in good agreement with experiment at all scattering angles at both energies, but at 50 eV the difference from experiment exceeds the experimental uncertainty at small scattering angles and near the minimum of the differential cross section. At large scattering angles the rotational excitation cross sections are predicted to exceed the elastic scattering cross sections. The absolute cross sections agree with experiment at some angles but at other angles are as much as 51% (30 eV) or 90% (50 eV) higher; this may be due at least in part to the difficulty of putting the experimental results on an absolute scale.

  10. Developmental Climate: A Cross-level Analysis of Voluntary Turnover and Job Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spell, Hannah B; Eby, Lillian T; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    This research investigates the influence of shared perceptions of developmental climate on individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment, engagement, and perceived competence, and whether these attitudes mediate the relationship between developmental climate and both individual voluntary turnover and supervisor-rated job performance. Survey data were collected from 361 intact employee-supervisory mentoring dyads and matched with employee turnover data collected one year later to test the proposed framework using multilevel modeling techniques. As expected, shared perceptions of developmental climate were significantly and positively related to all three individual work attitudes. In addition, both organizational commitment and perceived competence were significant mediators of the positive relationship between shared perceptions of developmental climate and voluntary turnover, as well as shared perceptions of developmental climate and supervisor-rated job performance. By contrast, no significant mediating effects were found for engagement. Theoretical implications, limitations, and future research are discussed.

  11. Developmental Climate: A Cross-level Analysis of Voluntary Turnover and Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spell, Hannah B.; Eby, Lillian T.; Vandenberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the influence of shared perceptions of developmental climate on individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment, engagement, and perceived competence, and whether these attitudes mediate the relationship between developmental climate and both individual voluntary turnover and supervisor-rated job performance. Survey data were collected from 361 intact employee-supervisory mentoring dyads and matched with employee turnover data collected one year later to test the proposed framework using multilevel modeling techniques. As expected, shared perceptions of developmental climate were significantly and positively related to all three individual work attitudes. In addition, both organizational commitment and perceived competence were significant mediators of the positive relationship between shared perceptions of developmental climate and voluntary turnover, as well as shared perceptions of developmental climate and supervisor-rated job performance. By contrast, no significant mediating effects were found for engagement. Theoretical implications, limitations, and future research are discussed. PMID:24748681

  12. A first measurement of the charged current DIS cross sections with longitudinally polarised electrons in the H1 experiment at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunovic, B.

    2007-07-01

    The analysis presented in this thesis is based on data from electron-proton collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=319 GeV. The data were taken with the H1 detector at the HERA collider in the year 2005 corresponding to two polarisation states: a left-handed electron polarisation of -27% and a right-handed electron polarisation of +37%, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 68.6 pb{sup -1} and 29.6 pb{sup -1}, respectively. The inclusive total deep inelastic charged current cross section and the differential cross sections are measured for both helicities in the kinematic domain Q{sup 2}>400 GeV{sup 2} and y<0.9. The entire analysis chain necessary for the determination of the cross sections is described with emphasis on the understanding of the performance of the Liquid Argon trigger system. The experimental results obtained are consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model. In particular, the measurement of the total polarised charged current cross section confirms the Standard Model expectation that there are no weak charged current interactions mediated by a hypothetical right-handed W boson. In addition, a measurement of the charged current structure function F{sup cc}{sub 2} has been performed at the H1 experiment for the first time. The measurements are well described by the theoretical expectations based on parton distributions derived from inclusive neutral current measurements in H1, and are in agreement with published data from the ZEUS (e{sup {+-}}p) and CCFR (anti {nu}{sub {mu}}Fe) experiments. (orig.)

  13. Morning and nocturnal serum melatonin rhythm levels in patients with major depressive disorder: an analytical cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Khaleghipour

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The pineal gland is an adaptive organ that precisely regulates the biological rhythms of melatonin brain hemostasis. Variation in the regulation of melatonin rhythms is a likely cause of depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to measure serum melatonin levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and normal control subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the industrial medical unit of the Iron Smelting Company of Isfahan, Iran. METHODS: The morning and nocturnal serum melatonin levels of patients and controls were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. All data were assessed using variance analysis. RESULTS: The morning and nocturnal serum melatonin levels of depressed and healthy subjects differed (P < 0.05. The nocturnal serum melatonin levels of depressed women were lower than those of depressed men (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that the nocturnal serum melatonin levels in the depressed patients were lower than in the controls. Thus, the peak melatonin phase in the depressed patients was reached with delay. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01357083

  14. Copeptin Levels Do Not Correlate With Cross-Clamping Time in Patients Undergoing Carotid Endarterectomy Under General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unic-Stojanovic, Dragana; Isenovic, Esma R; Jovic, Miomir; Maravic-Stojkovic, Vera; Miljkovic, Milica; Gojkovic, Tamara; Milicic, Biljana; Bogdanovic, Nikola; Radak, Djordje

    2016-11-01

    Copeptin is a sensitive and more stable surrogate marker for arginine vasopressin. In this study, we evaluated copeptin levels in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) patients, perioperatively, to determine whether copeptin levels can be related to carotid artery cross clamping (CC) time and to postoperative neurological outcomes. Copeptin, interleukin 6, C-reactive protein, cortisol, and brain natriuretic peptide were measured preoperatively (T1) and 3 hours postoperatively (T3) as well as intraoperatively (T2). We recruited 77 patients. Values of copeptin rose gradually over the observed times: T1 = 7.9 (6.4-9.6), T2 = 12.6 (9.3-16.8), and T3 = 72.3 (49.1-111.2) pmol/L. There was a significant difference for repeated measurement ( P = .000, P = .000, and P = .000). Duration of carotid artery CC during CEA does not affect postoperative copeptin level (CC ≤ 13 minutes: 106.8 ± 93.6 pmol/L, CC > 13 minutes: 96.7 ± 89.1 pmol/L; P = .634). Preoperative copeptin level was significantly higher in patients with ulcerated plaque morphology. Activation of the stress axis in patients undergoing CEA results in copeptin elevation. Duration of CC during CEA does not affect postoperative copeptin levels.

  15. A cross-sectional study of the association between circulating TSH level and lipid profile in a large Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Palacios, Silvia; Brugos-Larumbe, Antonio; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Galofré, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    Some evidence suggests that high serum TSH levels are associated with an adverse lipid profile, but this association is not clear when plasma TSH is within the reference range. Nevertheless, these studies have never been conducted in Spain, a country with a strong adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The study aim was to analyse the association between blood TSH levels and circulating lipids in a large Spanish population and set up a TSH reference range in different age, gender and Body Mass Index (BMI) subpopulations from our cohort. Cross-sectional study on 20 783 subjects. We analysed circulating levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) and triglycerides (TG) and compared them with TSH serum levels. Discriminant function analysis was used to determine the TSH cut-off level from where hyperlipidaemia developed. In individuals free of thyroid dysfunction, the mean and the 95% TSH (mU/l) reference limits were 2·20 and 0·72-4·43, respectively. We observed a sex-related difference in TSH concentration (men, 2·07 and 0·72-4·29; women, 2·29 and 0·72-4·49; P profile became less favourable, even within the normal range. Additionally, TSH reference ranges varied according to gender, age and BMI. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Purposeful collective action in ambiguous and contested situations: exploring ‘enabling capacities’ and cross-level interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Patterson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purposeful collective action is important for sustainably managing many kinds of natural resource issues in social-ecological systems. However, cultivating purposeful collective action is challenging in ambiguous and contested situations involving multiple issues, actors, levels, and drivers, and weak or missing feedback. A particular example is the problem of managing waterway health in large and diverse landscapes. This paper analyses the emergence of purposeful collective action for managing waterway health, focusing on a case study of a large and diverse region in Australia. It applies a heuristic developed to guide inquiry into 'enabling capacities' underpinning purposeful collective action, to analyse three local cases embedded within a broader regional landscape. A diverse range of enabling capacities at both local and regional levels, and cross-level interplay between these levels, are shown to be important. Findings imply that efforts to generate purposeful collective action require building enabling capacities across multiple levels of organisation, from which contextually-appropriate and adaptive action can emerge. Moreover, findings indicate the need for a practice-focused ‘knowledge-action perspective’ that recognises the importance of intersubjectivity and agency. The paper demonstrates a promising approach for investigating purposeful collective action in ambiguous and contested water and environmental governance situations.

  17. Integrating phenotypic data from electronic patient records with molecular level systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracti...... Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently are mapped to systems biology frameworks....

  18. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins...... electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards...

  19. Time-dependent formulation of the two-dimensional model of resonant electron collisions with diatomic molecules and interpretation of the vibrational excitation cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    VáÅa, Martin; Houfek, Karel

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional model of the resonant electron-molecule collision processes with one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom introduced by K. Houfek, T. N. Rescigno, and C. W. McCurdy [Phys. Rev. A 73, 032721 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.032721] is reformulated within the time-dependent framework and solved numerically using the finite-element method with the discrete variable representation basis, the exterior complex scaling method, and the generalized Crank-Nicolson method. On this model we illustrate how the time-dependent calculations can provide deep insight into the origin of oscillatory structures in the vibrational excitation cross sections if one evaluates the cross sections not only at sufficiently large time to obtain the final cross sections, but also at several characteristic times which are given by the evolution of the system. It is shown that all details of these structures, especially asymmetrical peaks, can be understood as quantum interference of several experimentally indistinguishable processes separated in time due to a resonant capture of the electron and the subsequent vibrational motion of the negative molecular ion. Numerical results are presented for the N2-like, NO-like, and F2-like models and compared with ones obtained within the time-independent approach and within the local complex potential approximation.

  20. Measurement of the ttbar Production Cross Section in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV using Soft Electron b-Tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel, consisting of e{nu}+jets and {mu}{nu}+jets final states. The dominant background is the production of W bosons in association with multiple jets. To suppress this background, we identify electrons from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor jets ('soft electron tags'). From a sample of 2196 candidate events, we obtain 120 tagged events with a background expectation of 51 {+-} 3 events, corresponding to a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.8 {+-} 2.4 (stat) {+-} 1.6 (syst) {+-} 0.5 (lumi) pb. We assume a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of the t{bar t} cross section with soft electron tags in Run II of the Tevatron.

  1. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Levels and Patterns of Objectively Measured Sedentary Time in Adolescent Females

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrington, Deirdre M.

    2011-10-28

    Abstract Background Adolescent females have been highlighted as a particularly sedentary population and the possible negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle are being uncovered. However, much of the past sedentary research is based on self-report or uses indirect methods to quantity sedentary time. Total time spent sedentary and the possible intricate sedentary patterns of adolescent females have not been described using objective and direct measure of body inclination. The objectives of this article are to examine the sedentary levels and patterns of a group of adolescent females using the ActivPAL™ and to highlight possible differences in sedentary levels and patterns across the week and within the school day. A full methodological description of how the data was analyzed is also presented. Methods One hundred and eleven adolescent females, age 15-18 yrs, were recruited from urban and rural areas in the Republic of Ireland. Participants wore an ActivPAL physical activity monitor for a 7.5 day period. The ActivPAL directly reports total time spent sitting\\/lying every 15 seconds and accumulation (frequency and duration) of sedentary activity was examined using a customized MATLAB ® computer software programme. Results While no significant difference was found in the total time spent sitting\\/lying over the full 24 hour day between weekday and weekend day (18.8 vs. 18.9 hours; p = .911), significantly more sedentary bouts of 1 to 5 minutes and 21 to 40 minutes in duration were accumulated on weekdays compared to weekend days (p < .001). The mean length of each sedentary bout was also longer (9.8 vs. 8.8 minutes; p < .001). When school hours (9 am-3 pm) and after school hours (4 pm-10 pm) were compared, there was no difference in total time spent sedentary (3.9 hours; p = .796) but the pattern of accumulation of the sedentary time differed. There were a greater number of bouts of > 20 minutes duration during school hours than after school hours (4.7 vs. 3

  2. Spatiotemporal Variation of Ambient Noise Levels and Cross-Correlations observed in Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, W. T.; Singh, A.; Chen, K. X.; Zhao, L.

    2016-12-01

    To understand the correlation between the environmental turbulence imposed by the monsoon activity and the seismic microseisms, we have analyzed the seismic ambient noise levels at 39 broadband seismic stations in Gujarat, India. The results suggest a strong temporal variation of the power of secondary microseism (2-10 s), which may be an indication of the intensities of monsoons at least in Gujarat. The ambient noise CCF also presents a similar pattern, in which the energy in the period band of secondary microseism is much stronger during the monsoon season. A precursory signal of the CCFs around the zero lag-time is observed, but it disappears during the monsoon season. Possible mechanisms responsible for this observation remain unclear. In addition, 589 CCFs among these 39 stations have been retrieved as the empirical green's functions. We applied a multi-scale inversion scheme to derive 2-D tomographic images for both group and phase velocities at various periods. The result may reflect the heterogeneity of the geological regions in Gujarat, India.

  3. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections of H, He, N, O, Ar, Xe, Au, Pb Atoms and Their Ions in the Electron Energy Range from the Threshold up to 200 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Povyshev, V M; Shevelko, V P; Shirkov, G D; Vasina, E G; Vatulin, V V

    2001-01-01

    Single electron-impact ionization cross sections of H, He, N, O, Ar, Xe, Au, Pb atoms and their positive ions (i.e. all ionization stages) are presented in the electron energy range from the threshold up to 200 keV. The data-set for the cross sections has been created on the basis of available experimental data and calculations performed by the computer code ATOM. Consistent data for the ionization cross sections have been fitted by seven parameters using the LSM method. The accuracy of the calculated data presented is within a factor of 2 that in many cases is sufficient to solve the plasma kinetics problems. Contributions from excitation-autoionization and resonant-ionization processes as well as ionization of atoms and ions are not considered here. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the well-known Lotz formulae for ionization of neutral atoms and positive ions. The material is illustrated by figures and includes tables of ionization cross sections, binding energies and fitting para...

  4. Ionization cross sections of the Au L subshells by electron impact from the L3 threshold to 100 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Suelen F.; Vanin, Vito R.; Maidana, Nora L.; Martins, Marcos N.; García-Alvarez, Juan A.; Santos, Osvaldo C. B.; Rodrigues, Cleber L.; Koskinas, Marina F.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2018-01-01

    We measured the cross sections for Au Lα, Lβ, Lγ, Lℓ and Lη x-ray production by the impact of electrons with energies from the L3 threshold to 100 keV using a thin Au film whose mass thickness was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. The x-ray spectra were acquired with a Si drift detector, which allowed to separate the components of the Lγ multiplet lines. The measured Lα, Lβ, {{L}}{γ }1, L{γ }{2,3,6}, {{L}}{γ }{4,4\\prime }, {{L}}{γ }5, {{L}}{\\ell } and Lη x-ray production cross sections were then employed to derive Au L1, L2 and L3 subshell ionization cross sections with relative uncertainties of 8%, 7% and 7%, respectively; these figures include the uncertainties in the atomic relaxation parameters. The correction for the increase in electron path length inside the Au film was estimated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental ionization cross sections are about 10% above the state-of-the-art distorted-wave calculations.

  5. Energy calibration procedure for γ-radiation and conversion electron spectra using level scheme a priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabina, L. P.; Kondurov, I. A.; Sushkov, P. A.

    1996-02-01

    A procedure for energy calibration of gamma- and electron-line spectra using a priori information about the relationships between gamma-ray and conversion electron energies and their corresponding peak positions in the spectrum has been developed in the GTLM computer program. The transition energy estimations and the excited states' energies of the nucleus under investigation are calculated using all the experimental data available from different experiments and the relationships deduced from the level scheme. The minimised function consists of five terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curves (polynomials) and the level energies of the nucleus under investigation. The procedure was tested with two γ-spectra, in the energy range 1.5-8 MeV, measured with the pair spectrometer at the High Flux Reactor of the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), Grenoble and allowed us to estimate transition energies with uncertainties of 10 eV.

  6. Electronic levels in silicon MaWCE nanowires: evidence of a limited diffusion of Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir; Cavallini, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) was performed on lowly n-doped silicon nanowires grown by metal-assisted wet chemical etching (MaWCE) with silver as the catalyst in order to investigate the energetic scheme inside the bandgap. To observe the possible diffusion of atoms into the bulk, DLTS investigation was also performed on the samples after removing the nanowires. Two of the four energy levels observed in the nanowires were also detected inside the substrate. Based on these results and on literature data about deep levels in bulk silicon, some hypotheses are advanced regarding the identification of the defects responsible for the energy levels revealed.

  7. Probing the dynamics of polyatomic multichannel elementary reactions by crossed molecular beam experiments with soft electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Petrucci, Raffaele; Capozza, Giovanni; Segoloni, Enrico

    2009-01-07

    In this Perspective we highlight developments in the field of chemical reaction dynamics. Focus is on the advances recently made in the investigation of the dynamics of elementary multichannel radical-molecule and radical-radical reactions, as they have become possible using an improved crossed molecular beam scattering apparatus with universal electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis. These improvements consist in the implementation of (a) soft ionization detection by tunable low-energy electrons which has permitted us to reduce interfering signals originating from dissociative ionization processes, usually representing a major complication, (b) different beam crossing-angle set-ups which have permitted us to extend the range of collision energies over which a reaction can be studied, from very low (a few kJ mol(-1), as of interest in astrochemistry or planetary atmospheric chemistry) to quite high energies (several tens of kJ mol(-1), as of interest in high temperature combustion systems), and (c) continuous supersonic sources for producing a wide variety of atomic and molecular radical reactant beams. Exploiting these new features it has become possible to tackle the dynamics of a variety of polyatomic multichannel reactions, such as those occurring in many environments ranging from combustion and plasmas to terrestrial/planetary atmospheres and interstellar clouds. By measuring product angular and velocity distributions, after having suppressed or mitigated, when needed, the problem of dissociative ionization of interfering species (reactants, products, background gases) by soft ionization detection, essentially all primary reaction products can be identified, the dynamics of each reaction channel characterized, and the branching ratios determined as a function of collision energy. In general this information, besides being of fundamental relevance, is required for a predictive description of the chemistry of these

  8. A Novel Electronically Controllable of Current-mode Level Shifted Multicarrier PWM Based on MO-CFTA

    OpenAIRE

    W. Kongnun; A. Aurasopon

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of an electronically controlled current-mode for a level shifted multicarrier PWM generator. The proposed circuit consists of two multiple-output current follower transconductance amplifiers (MO-CFTAs) for the multiple-output triangular generator and four current follower transconductance amplifiers (CFTAs) for the signal comparator. The characteristics of the circuit are as follows: the current output can be controlled by bias current, the maximum amplitud...

  9. Determining the maturity level of business organizations for ict implementation in the case of electronic content management

    OpenAIRE

    MILENKOVIC DEJAN S.

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the fact that the use of electronic content is an imperative of our time, and from a general opinion that the application of modern information technologies can establish a solution for a reliable and simple organization and systematization of documentation, it can be stated that the organization's success depends directly on the achieved level of information management. Timely, accurate, verifiable, readily available and consistent data are more than necessary for business acti...

  10. A cross-sectional study to estimate associations between education level and osteoporosis in a Chinese postmenopausal women sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hui-Hong; He, Jiajia; Zhang, Keqin; Tang, Zihui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our research aims to investigate the associations between education level and osteoporosis (OP) in Chinese postmenopausal women. Methods: A large-scale, community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the associations between education level and OP. A self-reported questionnaire was used to access the demographical information and medical history of the participants. A total of 1905 postmenopausal women were available for data analysis in this study. Multiple regression models controlling for confounding factors to include education level were performed to investigate the relationship with OP. Results: The prevalence of OP was 28.29% in our study sample. Multivariate linear regression analyses adjusted for relevant potential confounding factors detected significant associations between education level and T-score (β = 0.025, P-value = 0.095, 95% CI: -0.004-0.055 for model 1; and β = 0.092, P-value = 0.032, 95% CI: 0.008-0.175 for model 2). Multivariate logistic regression analyses detected significant associations between education level and OP in model 1 (P-value = 0.070 for model 1, Table 5), while no significant associations was reported in model 2 (P value = 0.131). In participants with high education levels, the OR for OP was 0.914 (95% CI: 0.830-1.007). Conclusion: The findings indicated that education level was independently and significantly associated with OP. The prevalence of OP was more frequent in Chinese postmenopausal women with low educational status. PMID:26885032

  11. Reducing medical claims cost to Ghana's National Health Insurance scheme: a cross-sectional comparative assessment of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsiah-Boateng, Eric; Asenso-Boadi, Francis; Dsane-Selby, Lydia; Andoh-Adjei, Francis-Xavier; Otoo, Nathaniel; Akweongo, Patricia; Aikins, Moses

    2017-02-06

    A robust medical claims review system is crucial for addressing fraud and abuse and ensuring financial viability of health insurance organisations. This paper assesses claims adjustment rate of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana. The study was a cross-sectional comparative assessment of paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the NHIS. Medical claims of subscribers for the year, 2014 were requested from the claims directorate and analysed. Proportions of claims adjusted by the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews were determined for each type of healthcare facility. Bivariate analyses were also conducted to test for differences in claims adjustments between healthcare facility types, and between the two claims reviews. The electronic-based review made overall adjustment of 17.0% from GHS10.09 million (USD2.64 m) claims cost whilst the paper-based review adjusted 4.9% from a total of GHS57.50 million (USD15.09 m) claims cost received, and the difference was significant (p paper-based reviews (p = 0.6484). The electronic-based review adjusted significantly higher claims cost than the paper-based claims review. Scaling up the electronic-based review to cover claims from all accredited care providers could reduce spurious claims cost to the scheme and ensure long term financial sustainability.

  12. Relationship between Urinary Level of Phytate and Valvular Calcification in an Elderly Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Palomeque, Carlos; Grau, Andres; Perelló, Joan; Sanchis, Pilar; Isern, Bernat; Prieto, Rafel M.; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Caldés, Onofre J.; Bonnin, Oriol; Garcia-Raja, Ana; Bethencourt, Armando; Grases, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Pathological calcification generally consists of the formation of solid deposits of hydroxyapatite (calcium phosphate) in soft tissues. Supersaturation is the thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, so it is believed that higher blood levels of calcium and phosphate increase the risk of cardiovascular calcification. However several factors can promote or inhibit the natural process of pathological calcification. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between physiological levels of urinary phytate and heart valve calcification in a population of elderly out subjects. A population of 188 elderly subjects (mean age: 68 years) was studied. Valve calcification was measured by echocardiography. Phytate determination was performed from a urine sample and data on blood chemistry, end-systolic volume, concomitant diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, medication usage and food were obtained. The study population was classified in three tertiles according to level of urinary phytate: low (1.21 μM). Subjects with higher levels of urinary phytate had less mitral annulus calcification and were less likely to have diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. In the multivariate analysis, age, serum phosphorous, leukocytes total count and urinary phytate excretion appeared as independent factors predictive of presence of mitral annulus calcification. There was an inverse correlation between urinary phytate content and mitral annulus calcification in our population of elderly out subjects. These results suggest that consumption of phytate-rich foods may help to prevent cardiovascular calcification evolution. PMID:26322979

  13. Relationship between Urinary Level of Phytate and Valvular Calcification in an Elderly Population: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernández-Palomeque

    Full Text Available Pathological calcification generally consists of the formation of solid deposits of hydroxyapatite (calcium phosphate in soft tissues. Supersaturation is the thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, so it is believed that higher blood levels of calcium and phosphate increase the risk of cardiovascular calcification. However several factors can promote or inhibit the natural process of pathological calcification. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between physiological levels of urinary phytate and heart valve calcification in a population of elderly out subjects. A population of 188 elderly subjects (mean age: 68 years was studied. Valve calcification was measured by echocardiography. Phytate determination was performed from a urine sample and data on blood chemistry, end-systolic volume, concomitant diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, medication usage and food were obtained. The study population was classified in three tertiles according to level of urinary phytate: low (1.21 μM. Subjects with higher levels of urinary phytate had less mitral annulus calcification and were less likely to have diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. In the multivariate analysis, age, serum phosphorous, leukocytes total count and urinary phytate excretion appeared as independent factors predictive of presence of mitral annulus calcification. There was an inverse correlation between urinary phytate content and mitral annulus calcification in our population of elderly out subjects. These results suggest that consumption of phytate-rich foods may help to prevent cardiovascular calcification evolution.

  14. Renormalized molecular levels in a Sc3N@C-80 molecular electronic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larade, Brian; Taylor, Jeremy Philip; Zheng, Q. R.

    2001-01-01

    We address several general questions about quantum transport through molecular systems by an ab initio analysis of a scandium-nitrogen doped C-80 metallofullerene device. Charge transfer from the Sc3N is found to drastically change the current-voltage characteristics: the current through the Sc3N...... @ C-80 device is double that through a bare C-80 device. We provide strong evidence that transport in such molecular devices is mediated by molecular electronic states which have been renormalized by the device environment, such as the electrodes and external bias V-b. The renormalized molecular...

  15. Interfacial electrochemical electron transfer in biology – Towards the level of the single molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2012-01-01

    with unprecedented resolution, opening a new area of single-molecule bioelectrochemistry. We consider first in situ STM of small redox molecules, followed by in situ STM of thiol-based SAMs as molecular views of bioelectrochemical environments. We then address electron transfer metalloproteins, and multi......Physical electrochemistry has undergone a remarkable evolution over the last few decades, integrating advanced techniques and theory from solid state and surface physics. Single-crystal electrode surfaces have been a core notion, opening for scanning tunnelling microscopy directly in aqueous......-centre metalloenzymes including applied single-biomolecular perspectives based on metalloprotein/metallic nanoparticle hybrids....

  16. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, Ole; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximately 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative information......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...

  17. Neurobehavioral function and low-level exposure to brominated flame retardants in adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiciński Michał

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and in vitro studies demonstrated a neurotoxic potential of brominated flame retardants, a group of chemicals used in many household and commercial products to prevent fire. Although the first reports of detrimental neurobehavioral effects in rodents appeared more than ten years ago, human data are sparse. Methods As a part of a biomonitoring program for environmental health surveillance in Flanders, Belgium, we assessed the neurobehavioral function with the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES-3, and collected blood samples in a group of high school students. Cross-sectional data on 515 adolescents (13.6-17 years of age was available for the analysis. Multiple regression models accounting for potential confounders were used to investigate the associations between biomarkers of internal exposure to brominated flame retardants [serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE congeners 47, 99, 100, 153, 209, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD, and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA] and cognitive performance. In addition, we investigated the association between brominated flame retardants and serum levels of FT3, FT4, and TSH. Results A two-fold increase of the sum of serum PBDE’s was associated with a decrease of the number of taps with the preferred-hand in the Finger Tapping test by 5.31 (95% CI: 0.56 to 10.05, p = 0.029. The effects of the individual PBDE congeners on the motor speed were consistent. Serum levels above the level of quantification were associated with an average decrease of FT3 level by 0.18 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.34, p = 0.020 for PBDE-99 and by 0.15 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.004 to 0.29, p = 0.045 for PBDE-100, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. PBDE-47 level above the level of quantification was associated with an average increase of TSH levels by 10.1% (95% CI: 0.8% to 20.2%, p = 0.033, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. We did not

  18. Electronic Reverse Auctions: Integrating an E-Sourcing Tool into a Sales and Purchasing Cross-Course Negotiation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline A.; Dobie, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Electronic reverse auctions are increasingly being used by firms to improve firm financial and operational performance. The described teaching innovation serves as a model for introducing electronic reverse auctions as a central element in a comprehensive negotiation exercise involving sales management and purchasing management students. Results…

  19. Variations in Label Information and Nicotine Levels in Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids in South Korea: Regulation Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungroul Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In South Korea, the consumption of liquid nicotine used in electronic cigarettes has dramatically increased from 4310 L in 2012 to 7220 L in 2013. This study aimed to examine the level of heterogeneity of contents of the labels and discrepancy of the nicotine content between that indicated on the label and the actual values for electronic cigarette liquid refill products in South Korea. Methods: We purchased 32 electronic cigarette liquid refill products (17 Korean domestic, 15 imported ones and one pure nicotine product at six different electronic cigarette retail stores in Seoul between May and June 2014. The actual nicotine concentrations of each product were measured by a blinded analyst at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. Results: Three out of 15 imported liquid refill products provided manufacturing dates, while expiration dates were available on eight products. The range of nicotine concentration was from “not detected” to 17.5 mg/mL. Labeling discrepancies of the concentrations ranged from −32.2% to 3.3% among electronic cigarette liquid refill products. The highest concentration (150.3 ± 7.9 mg/mL was found in a sample labeled as “pure nicotine”. Conclusions: There is no standardization of labelling among electronic cigarette liquids sampled from retail stores and the labels did not accurately reflect the content. One product labeled “pure nicotine” raises concerns, since it may be poisonous to consumers, especially to children. This study revealed the urgent need for the development of product regulations in South Korea.

  20. Accuracy of periapical radiography in assessing bone level in implants affected by peri-implantitis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Marta; Mir-Mari, Javier; Benic, Goran I; Figueiredo, Rui; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of periapical radiography in measuring peri-implant bone levels. Twenty-five subjects with 46 implants in need of surgical treatment for peri-implantitis were included in this cross-sectional study. Prior to surgery, periapical radiographs were taken, a prediction of type of defect was made and radiographic peri-implant bone levels (RxBL) were determined at the mesial and distal aspects. Intra-operatively, the peri-implant bone level (SurgBL) was assessed mesially, distally, buccally and orally and the type of defect was recorded. A paired t-test was applied to detect differences between inter-proximal RxBL and SurgBL. ANOVA was used to compare SurgBL at different circumferential positions. The mean inter-proximal RxBL was 4.0 ± 2.2 mm and the mean inter-proximal SurgBL was 5.3 ± 2.3 mm. The difference between RxBL and SurgBL was statistically significant (p = 0.014). There were no significant differences in SurgBL at the mesial, distal, buccal and oral aspects (p > 0.05). The intra-operatively measured peri-implant bone levels were more apical than the radiographic bone levels. The intra-operatively assessed peri-implant bone levels (SurgBL) were similar at all the circumferential positions around the implant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.