WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron laser based

  1. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loulergue, A; Labat, M; Evain, C; Benabderrahmane, C; Malka, Victor; Couprie, M E

    2015-01-01

    .... After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA...

  2. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  3. Laser-Based Electron Acceleration Experiment in KERI/APRI-GIST

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Guang-Hoon; Hafz, Nasr; Ko Do Kyeong; Lee Jong Min; Suk, Hyyong; Yu, T J

    2005-01-01

    Laser-based acceleration of charged particles has been of interest since laser wakefield produces very strong longitudinal electrical field to accelerate electrons upto relativistic energy. Recently, 20TW Ti:sapphire laser system, with pulse width of 30 fs and energy pf 600 mJ, was installed in APRI-GIST. The laser pulse is focused onto a gas jet to produce plasma and accelerate electrons in the scheme of self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration. Details of laser system and diagnostic results of electron beam will be discussed

  4. Generation of electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator at Shanghai Jiao Tong University

    CERN Document Server

    Elsied, Ahmed M M; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University, we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams having a reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared.

  5. Free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Schmüser, P

    2006-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons in undulator magnets and the low-gain Free-Electron Laser (FEL) are discussed in some detail. The highgain FEL based on the principle of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission is treated on a qualitative level.

  6. Lasers in Electronic Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The use of lasers for Electronic Warfare applications will be discussed and reviewed. Specific examples of deployed EW systems which include lasers will be presented along with a discussion of their most salient features.

  7. Proposed method for internal electron therapy based on high-intensity laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Michal; Barkai, Uri; Gannot, Israel

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods to treat cancer. However, due to the propagation pattern of high-energy photons in tissue and their inability to discriminate between healthy and malignant tissues, healthy tissues may also be damaged, causing undesired side effects. A possible method for internal electron therapy, based on laser acceleration of electrons inside the patient's body, is suggested. In this method, an optical waveguide, optimized for high intensities, is used to transmit the laser radiation and accelerate electrons toward the tumor. The radiation profile can be manipulated in order to create a patient-specific radiation treatment profile by changing the laser characteristics. The propagation pattern of electrons in tissues minimizes the side effects caused to healthy tissues. A simulation was developed to demonstrate the use of this method, calculating the trajectories of the accelerated electron as a function of laser properties. The simulation was validated by comparison to theory, showing a good fit for laser intensities of up to 2×1020 (W/cm2), and was then used to calculate suggested treatment profiles for two tumor test cases (with and without penetration to the tumor). The results show that treatment profiles can be designed to cover tumor area with minimal damage to adjacent tissues.

  8. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-07

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  9. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE. However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10^{-4}, with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3  μm for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  10. Higher-order mode-based cavity misalignment measurements at the free-electron laser FLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellert, Thorsten; Baboi, Nicoleta; Shi, Liangliang

    2017-12-01

    At the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser, superconducting TeV-energy superconducting linear accelerator (TESLA)-type cavities are used for the acceleration of electron bunches, generating intense free-electron laser (FEL) beams. A long rf pulse structure allows one to accelerate long bunch trains, which considerably increases the efficiency of the machine. However, intrabunch-train variations of rf parameters and misalignments of rf structures induce significant trajectory variations that may decrease the FEL performance. The accelerating cavities are housed inside cryomodules, which restricts the ability for direct alignment measurements. In order to determine the transverse cavity position, we use a method based on beam-excited dipole modes in the cavities. We have developed an efficient measurement and signal processing routine and present its application to multiple accelerating modules at FLASH. The measured rms cavity offset agrees with the specification of the TESLA modules. For the first time, the tilt of a TESLA cavity inside a cryomodule is measured. The preliminary result agrees well with the ratio between the offset and angle dependence of the dipole mode which we calculated with eigenmode simulations.

  11. Frequency mixing in accelerator based sources and application to tunable seeded free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Evain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we address the problem of tunability of seeded free-electron lasers (FELs, working typically in the domain of the vacuum ultraviolet. The seeding of FELs with an external laser permits us to obtain FEL pulses with both good longitudinal coherence and good stability properties (contrary to an amplification starting from noise. However, with a fixed external laser wavelength, only amplification at harmonics of this wavelength is possible. If full tunability is wanted, it is necessary to have a tunable external source; but this type of source has much less power, hence it is much harder to reach high harmonics numbers. Here we propose the so-called frequency mixing scheme (from its analogy with the similar process in nonlinear optics, based on two laser/electron interactions. Numerical and analytic studies show that it permits to increase significantly the tunability at short wavelengths using a low-energy tunable source. Numerical simulations are made with the parameters of FERMI-FEL 1, the first seeded FEL for user operation.

  12. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; Rutishauser, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V. A.; Bunk, O.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-08-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×1017 W/cm2 was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  13. Free standing diamond-like carbon thin films by PLD for laser based electrons/protons acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thema, F.T.; Beukes, P.; Ngom, B.D. [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: mani@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital (SBMCH), Chrompet, Bharath University, Chennai, 600044 (India); Maaza, M., E-mail: maaza@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-05

    This study we reports for the first time on the synthesis and optical characteristics of free standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto graphene buffer layers for ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. The fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations indicate that the suitability of such free standing DLC thin-films within the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range and hence their appropriateness for the targeted applications. - Highlights: • We report for the first time synthesis of free standing diamond-like carbon. • Pulsed laser deposition onto graphene buffer layers. • Fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations. • Ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. • This material's suitable for the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range.

  14. Low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector for a compact free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Takao; Ego, Hiroyasu; Hanaki, Hirohumi; Hara, Toru; Hasegawa, Taichi; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Inagaki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Kondo, Chikara; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Matsubara, Shinichi; Matsui, Sakuo; Ohshima, Takashi; Otake, Yuji; Sakurai, Tatsuyuki; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Tajiri, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Togawa, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2017-08-01

    A low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector was developed for the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility known as the SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA). The thermionic-gun-based system has the advantages of maintainability, reliability, and stability over a photocathode radio-frequency (rf) gun because of its robust thermionic cathode. The basic performance of the injector prototype was confirmed at the SPring-8 compact self-amplified spontaneous emission source (SCSS) test accelerator, where stable FEL generation in an extreme ultraviolet wavelength range was demonstrated. The essential XFEL innovation is the achievement of a constant beam peak current of 3-4 kA, which is 10 times higher than that generated by the SCSS test accelerator, while maintaining a normalized-slice emittance below 1 mm mrad. Thus, the following five modifications were applied to the SACLA injector: (i) a nonlinear energy chirp correction; (ii) the optimization of the rf acceleration frequency; (iii) rf system stabilization; (iv) nondestructive beam monitoring; and (v) a geomagnetic field correction. The SACLA injector successfully achieved the target beam performance, which shows that a thermionic-gun-based injector is applicable to an XFEL accelerator system. This paper gives an overview of the SACLA injector and describes the physical and technical details, together with the electron beam performance obtained in the beam commissioning.

  15. Low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector for a compact free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Asaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector was developed for the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility known as the SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA. The thermionic-gun-based system has the advantages of maintainability, reliability, and stability over a photocathode radio-frequency (rf gun because of its robust thermionic cathode. The basic performance of the injector prototype was confirmed at the SPring-8 compact self-amplified spontaneous emission source (SCSS test accelerator, where stable FEL generation in an extreme ultraviolet wavelength range was demonstrated. The essential XFEL innovation is the achievement of a constant beam peak current of 3–4 kA, which is 10 times higher than that generated by the SCSS test accelerator, while maintaining a normalized-slice emittance below 1 mm mrad. Thus, the following five modifications were applied to the SACLA injector: (i a nonlinear energy chirp correction; (ii the optimization of the rf acceleration frequency; (iii rf system stabilization; (iv nondestructive beam monitoring; and (v a geomagnetic field correction. The SACLA injector successfully achieved the target beam performance, which shows that a thermionic-gun-based injector is applicable to an XFEL accelerator system. This paper gives an overview of the SACLA injector and describes the physical and technical details, together with the electron beam performance obtained in the beam commissioning.

  16. Welding of Mo-Based Alloy Using Electron Beam and Laser-GTAW Hybrid Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Kumar, Santosh; Tewari, Raghvendra; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, welding of TZM (molybdenum-based alloy) plates in square-butt configuration was carried out using electron beam and laser-GTAW hybrid power sources. Microstructures of weld joint containing three zones—parent metal, heat-affected zone, and fusion zone—were clearly identified when examined through optical and scanning electron microscopy. The weld joints were found to be sound with very wide fusion and heat-affected zones. The microstructure of the fusion zone was coarse-grained. as-solidified microstructure, while the microstructure of heat-affected zone was the recrystallized microstructure with reduction in grain size as distance from the fusion line increased. Microhardness profile using Vickers hardness tester was obtained across the weld region, and the tensile properties of the weld joints were evaluated by performing room temperature tensile test and fracture was examined using scanning electron microscope. Joint coefficient of the weld joints were ~40 to 45 pct of that of the parent metals with nonmeasurable tensile ductility with predominantly transgranular mode of fracture indicating weakness along the grain boundary. Detailed orientation imaging and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to understand the most dominating factor in introducing weld joint brittleness.

  17. IRIDE: Interdisciplinary research infrastructure based on dual electron linacs and lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrario, M., E-mail: Massimo.Ferrario@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF (Italy); Alesini, D. [INFN-LNF (Italy); Alessandroni, M. [RMP Srl (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN-LNF (Italy); Andreas, S. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Angelone, M. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy); Arcovito, A. [Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore - Roma (Italy); Arnesano, F. [Univ. di Bari (Italy); Artioli, M. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy); Avaldi, L. [CNR, Area Ric. di Roma 1 (Italy); Babusci, D. [INFN-LNF (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN and Univ. di Milano (Italy); Balerna, A.; Bartalucci, S.; Bedogni, R.; Bellaveglia, M. [INFN-LNF (Italy); Bencivenga, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste (Italy); Benfatto, M. [INFN-LNF (Italy); Biedron, S. [Colorado Univ. (United States); Bocci, V. [INFN and Univ. di Roma, La Sapienza (Italy); and others

    2014-03-11

    This paper describes the scientific aims and potentials as well as the preliminary technical design of IRIDE, an innovative tool for multi-disciplinary investigations in a wide field of scientific, technological and industrial applications. IRIDE will be a high intensity “particles factory”, based on a combination of high duty cycle radio-frequency superconducting electron linacs and of high energy lasers. Conceived to provide unique research possibilities for particle physics, for condensed matter physics, chemistry and material science, for structural biology and industrial applications, IRIDE will open completely new research possibilities and advance our knowledge in many branches of science and technology. IRIDE is also supposed to be realized in subsequent stages of development depending on the assigned priorities.

  18. Transverse effects in the production of x rays with a free-electron laser based on an optical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bacci

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between high-brilliance electron beams and counterpropagating laser pulses produces x rays via Thomson backscattering. If the laser source is long and intense enough, the electrons of the beam can bunch on the scale of the emitted x-ray wavelength and a regime of collective effects can establish. In this case of dominating collective effects, the FEL instability can develop and the system behaves like a free-electron laser based on an optical undulator. Coherent x rays can be irradiated, with a bandwidth very much thinner than that of the corresponding incoherent emission. The emittance of the electron beam and the distribution nonuniformity of the laser energy are the principal quantities that limit the growth of the x-ray signal. In this work we analyze with a 3D code the transverse effects in the emission produced by a relativistic electron beam when it is under the action of an optical laser pulse and the x-ray spectra obtained. The scalings typical of the optical wiggler, characterized by very short gain lengths and overall time durations of the process, make possible considerable emission also in violation of the Pellegrini criterion for static wigglers. A generalized form of this criterion is validated on the basis of the numerical evidence.

  19. Extremely intense laser-based electron acceleration in a plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2018-03-01

    Laser pulses of extreme intensities (I> {10}22 {{W}} {{cm}}-2) are about to become available in the laboratory. The prepulse of such a laser can induce a plasma expansion that generates a low-density channel in near-critical gas jets. We present a study of channel formation and subsequent direct laser acceleration of electrons within the pre-formed channel. Radiation reaction affects the acceleration in several ways. It first interferes with the motion of the return current on the channel walls. In addition, it reduces the radial expelling efficiency of the transverse ponderomotive force, leading to the radiative trapping of particles near the channel axis. These particles then interact with the peak laser intensity and can attain multi-GeV energies.

  20. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-03

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  1. En Route: next-generation laser-plasma-based electron accelerators; En Route: Elektronenbeschleuniger der naechsten Generation auf Laser-Plasma-Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, Bernhard

    2008-05-15

    Accelerating electrons to relativistic energies is of fundamental interest, especially in particle physics. Today's accelerator technology, however, is limited by the maximum electric fields which can be created. This thesis presents results on various mechanisms aiming at exploiting the fields in focussed laser pulses and plasma waves for electron acceleration, which can be orders of magnitude higher than with conventional accelerators. With relativistic, underdense laser-plasma-interaction, quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with energies up to {approx}50 MeV and normalized emittances of the order of 5mmmrad have been generated. This was achieved by focussing the {approx}80 fs, 1 J pulses of the JETI-laser at the FSU Jena to intensities of several 10{sup 19}W=cm{sup 2} into gas jets. The experimental observations could be explained via 'bubble acceleration', which is based on self-injection and acceleration of electrons in a highly nonlinear breaking plasma wave. For the rst time, this bubble acceleration was achieved explicitly in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA). This quasimonoenergetic SMLWFA-regime stands out by relaxing dramatically the requirements on the driving laser pulse necessary to trigger bubble acceleration. This is due to self-modulation of the laser pulse in high-density gas jets, leading to ultrashort laser pulse fragments capable of initiating bubble acceleration. Electron bunches with durations laser pulse fragment can be powerful enough to drive a bubble. Distinct double peaks have been observed in the electron spectra, indicating that two quasimonoenergetic electron bunches separated by only few tens of fs have formed. This is backed up by PIC-Simulations (Particle-in-Cell). These results underline the feasibility of the construction of small table

  2. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  3. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A.; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Driutti, A.; Escalante, O.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Gioiosa, A.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Liedl, A.; Lusiani, A.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Piacentino, G. M.; Raha, N.; Rossi, E.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  4. Interaction of relativistic electrons with an intense laser pulse: High-order harmonic generation based on Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hack, Szabolcs [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU Non-Profit Ltd., Dugonics tér 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Szeged, Tisza L. krt. 84-86, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Varró, Sándor [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU Non-Profit Ltd., Dugonics tér 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Wigner Research Center for Physics, SZFI, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Czirják, Attila [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU Non-Profit Ltd., Dugonics tér 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Szeged, Tisza L. krt. 84-86, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate nonlinear Thomson scattering as a source of high-order harmonic radiation with the potential to enable attosecond light pulse generation. We present a new analytic solution of the electron’s relativistic equations of motion in the case of a short laser pulse with a sine-squared envelope. Based on the single electron emission, we compute and analyze the radiated amplitude and phase spectrum for a realistic electron bunch, with special attention to the correct initial values. These results show that the radiation spectrum of an electron bunch in head-on collision with a sufficiently strong laser pulse of sine-squared envelope has a smooth frequency dependence to allow for the synthesis of attosecond light pulses.

  5. Femtosecond laser high-efficiency drilling of high-aspect-ratio microholes based on free-electron-density adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lan; Fang, Juqiang; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Kaihu; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yanwu; Huang, Qiang; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-11-01

    We studied the micromachining of high-aspect-ratio holes in poly(methylmethacrylate) using a visible double-pulse femtosecond laser based on free-electron-density adjustments. Hole depth and aspect ratio increased simultaneously upon decreasing the wavelength in the visible-light zone. When the pulse energy reached a high level, the free-electron density was adjusted by using a double-pulse laser, which induced fewer free electrons, a lower reflectivity plasma plume, and more pulse energy deposition in the solid bottom. Thus, the aspect ratio of the hole was improved considerably. At a moderate pulse energy level, a 1.3-1.4 times enhancement of both the ablation depth and the aspect ratio was observed when the double-pulse delay was set between 100 and 300 fs, probably due to an enhanced photon-electron coupling effect through adjusting the free-electron density. At a lower pulse energy level, this effect also induced the generation of a submicrometer string. In addition, the ablation rate was improved significantly by using visible double pulses.

  6. Toward all-carbon electronics: fabrication of graphene-based flexible electronic circuits and memory cards using maskless laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiajie; Chen, Yongsheng; Xu, Yanfei; Liu, Zhibo; Zhang, Long; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Tian, Jianguo; Huang, Yi; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei

    2010-11-01

    Owing to its extraordinary electronic property, chemical stability, and unique two-dimensional nanostructure, graphene is being considered as an ideal material for the highly expected all-carbon-based micro/nanoscale electronics. Herein, we present a simple yet versatile approach to constructing all-carbon micro/nanoelectronics using solution-processing graphene films directly. From these graphene films, various graphene-based microcosmic patterns and structures have been fabricated using maskless computer-controlled laser cutting. Furthermore, a complete system involving a prototype of a flexible write-once-read-many-times memory card and a fast data-reading system has been demonstrated, with infinite data retention time and high reliability. These results indicate that graphene could be the ideal material for fabricating the highly demanded all-carbon and flexible devices and electronics using the simple and efficient roll-to-roll printing process when combined with maskless direct data writing.

  7. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Moody

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200  MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100  fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  8. Development of a Silicon Based Electron Beam Transmission Window for Use in a KrF Excimer Laser System

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, C A; Hartfield, J W; Hawryluk, R J; Hegeler, F; Heitzenroeder, P J; Jun, C H; Ku, L P; Lamarche, P H; Myers, M C; Parker, J J; Parsells, R F; Payen, M; Raftopoulos, S; Sethian, J D

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is currently investigating various novel materials (single crystal silicon, , and ) for use as electron-beam transmission windows in a KrF excimer laser system. The primary function of the window is to isolate the active medium (excimer gas) from the excitation mechanism (field-emission diodes). Chosen window geometry must accommodate electron energy transfer greater than 80% (750 keV), while maintaining structural integrity during mechanical load (1.3 to 2.0 atm base pressure differential, approximate 0.5 atm cyclic pressure amplitude, 5 Hz repetition rate) and thermal load across the entire hibachi area (approximate 0.9 W centre dot cm superscript ''-2''). In addition, the window must be chemically resistant to attack by fluorine free-radicals (hydrofluoric acid, secondary). In accordance with these structural, functional, and operational parameters, a 22.4 mm square silicon prototype window, coated w...

  9. Single-shot method for measuring femtosecond bunch length in linac-based free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Huang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the generation and characterization of femtosecond and subfemtosecond pulses from linac-based free-electron lasers (FELs. In this report, following the method of Ricci and Smith [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 032801 (2000PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.3.032801], we investigate the measurement of the longitudinal bunch profile of an ultrashort electron bunch produced by these FELs. We show that this method can be applied in a straightforward manner at x-ray FEL facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source by slightly adjusting the second bunch compressor followed by running the bunch on an rf zero-crossing phase of the final linac. We find that the linac wakefield strongly perturbs the measurement, and through analysis show that it can be compensated in a simple way. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and wakefield compensation through numerical simulations, including effects of coherent synchrotron radiation and longitudinal space charge. When used in conjunction with a high-resolution electron spectrometer, this method potentially reveals the temporal profile of the electron beam down to the femtosecond and subfemotsecond scale.

  10. Sub-picosecond timing fluctuation suppression in laser-based atmospheric transfer of microwave signal using electronic phase compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shijun; Sun, Fuyu; Bai, Qingsong; Chen, Dawei; Chen, Qiang; Hou, Dong

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrated a timing fluctuation suppression in outdoor laser-based atmospheric radio-frequency transfer over a 110 m one-way free-space link using an electronic phase compensation technique. Timing fluctuations and Allan Deviation are both measured to characterize the instability of transferred frequency incurred during the transfer process. With transferring a 1 GHz microwave signal over a timing fluctuation suppressed transmission link, the total root-mean-square (rms) timing fluctuation was measured to be 920 femtoseconds in 5000 s, with fractional frequency instability on the order of 1 × 10-12 at 1 s, and order of 2 × 10-16 at 1000 s. This atmospheric frequency transfer scheme with the timing fluctuation suppression technique can be used to fast build an atomic clock-based frequency free-space transmission link since its stability is superior to a commercial Cs and Rb clock.

  11. Free Electron Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Peter; Höche, Daniel

    Functional and smart surfaces and coatings play an increasingly decisive role in the applicability and performance of modern materials. From an industrial point of view, there is a great interest with respect to friction, wear, corrosion, and further properties. Many methods have been developed for the improvement of the respective surface and material properties. Traditionally, these treatments range from simple PVD and CVD processes to complicated plasma and hybrid methods. Recently, it has been established that short laser pulses of high energy can induce a direct laser synthesis of functional coatings if the material's surface is irradiated in a reactive atmosphere. The process is based on a complicated combination of laser plasma - gas - material surface interactions. Tests for steel, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and silicon in nitrogen, methane, and hydrogen atmospheres have been carried out successfully; with these materials, interesting coatings can be produced by direct laser synthesis, for example, AlN and SiC. Various laser types can be used for this purpose: Excimer, Nd:YAG, CO2 Laser, and even the free electron laser (FEL).

  12. Matching-based fresh-slice method for generating two-color x-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilun Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-color high intensity x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs provide powerful tools for probing ultrafast dynamic systems. A novel concept of realizing fresh-slice two-color lasing through slice-dependent transverse mismatch has been proposed by one of the authors [Y. Chao, SLAC Report No. SLAC-PUB-16935, 2016]. In this paper we present a feasible example following this concept based on the Linac Coherent Light Source parameters. Time-dependent mismatch along the bunch is generated by a passive dechirper module and controlled by downstream matching sections, enabling FEL lasing at different wavelength with a split undulator configuration. Simulations for soft x-ray FELs show that tens of gigawatts pulses with femtosecond duration can be generated.

  13. Matching-based fresh-slice method for generating two-color x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weilun; Ding, Yuantao; Lutman, Alberto A.; Chao, Yu-Chiu

    2017-09-01

    Two-color high intensity x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) provide powerful tools for probing ultrafast dynamic systems. A novel concept of realizing fresh-slice two-color lasing through slice-dependent transverse mismatch has been proposed by one of the authors [Y. Chao, SLAC Report No. SLAC-PUB-16935, 2016]. In this paper we present a feasible example following this concept based on the Linac Coherent Light Source parameters. Time-dependent mismatch along the bunch is generated by a passive dechirper module and controlled by downstream matching sections, enabling FEL lasing at different wavelength with a split undulator configuration. Simulations for soft x-ray FELs show that tens of gigawatts pulses with femtosecond duration can be generated.

  14. Goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography with X-ray free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; González, Ana; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Brehmer, Winnie; Brewster, Aaron S; Brunger, Axel T; Calero, Guillermo; Chang, Joseph F; Chollet, Matthieu; Ehrensberger, Paul; Eriksson, Thomas L; Feng, Yiping; Hattne, Johan; Hedman, Britt; Hollenbeck, Michael; Holton, James M; Keable, Stephen; Kobilka, Brian K; Kovaleva, Elena G; Kruse, Andrew C; Lemke, Henrik T; Lin, Guowu; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Manglik, Aashish; Mathews, Irimpan I; McPhillips, Scott E; Nelson, Silke; Peters, John W; Sauter, Nicholas K; Smith, Clyde A; Song, Jinhu; Stevenson, Hilary P; Tsai, Yingssu; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Vinetsky, Vladimir; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Weis, William I; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Zeldin, Oliver B; Zhu, Diling; Hodgson, Keith O

    2014-12-02

    The emerging method of femtosecond crystallography (FX) may extend the diffraction resolution accessible from small radiation-sensitive crystals and provides a means to determine catalytically accurate structures of acutely radiation-sensitive metalloenzymes. Automated goniometer-based instrumentation developed for use at the Linac Coherent Light Source enabled efficient and flexible FX experiments to be performed on a variety of sample types. In the case of rod-shaped Cpl hydrogenase crystals, only five crystals and about 30 min of beam time were used to obtain the 125 still diffraction patterns used to produce a 1.6-Å resolution electron density map. For smaller crystals, high-density grids were used to increase sample throughput; 930 myoglobin crystals mounted at random orientation inside 32 grids were exposed, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Screening results from cryocooled crystals of β2-adrenoreceptor and an RNA polymerase II complex indicate the potential to extend the diffraction resolution obtainable from very radiation-sensitive samples beyond that possible with undulator-based synchrotron sources.

  15. A monolithic relativistic electron beam source based on a dielectric laser accelerator structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeur, Josh; Carranza, Nestor; Travish, Gil; Yin Hairong; Yoder, Rodney [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); College of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610054 (China); Manhattanville College, Physics Dept., 2900 Purchase St., Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Work towards a monolithic device capable of producing relativistic particle beams within a cubic-centimeter is detailed. We will discuss the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), an optical laser powered dielectric accelerator as the main building block of this chip-scale source along with a field enhanced emitter and a region for sub-relativistic acceleration.

  16. A bremsstrahlung gamma-ray source based on stable ionization injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döpp, A., E-mail: andreas.doepp@polytechnique.edu [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Centro de Laseres Pulsados, Parque Cientfico, 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Sylla, F. [SourceLAB SAS, 86 rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Goddet, J-P.; Tafzi, A.; Iaquanello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Rousseau, P. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Conejero, E.; Ruiz, C. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de laMerced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2016-09-11

    Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance with GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations, we measure a γ-ray source size of less than 100 μm for a 0.5 mm tantalum converter placed at 2 mm from the accelerator exit. Furthermore we present radiographs of image quality indicators.

  17. Widely tunable opto-electronic oscillator based on a dual frequency laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxin, J.; Saleh, K.; Pillet, G.; Morvan, L.; Llopis, O.; Dolfi, D.

    2013-03-01

    We present the stabilization of the beatnote of an Er,Yb:glass Dual Frequency Laser at 1.53 μm with optical fiber delay lines. Instead of standard optoelectronics oscillators, this architecture does not need RF filter and offers a wide tunability from 2.5 to 5.5 GHz. Thank to a fine analysis of the laser RIN to phase noise conversion in the photodiodes, the expected RF-amplifiers noise limit is reached with a phase noise power spectral density of -25 dBc/Hz at 10 Hz (respectively -110 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz) from the carrier over the whole tuning range. Implementation of a double fiber coil architecture improves the oscillator spectral purity: the phase noise reaches a level of -35 dBc/Hz at 10 Hz (respectively -112 dBc/Hz respectively 10 kHz) from the carrier.

  18. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza, E-mail: r-massudi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983969411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  19. Optimization and control of electron beams from laser wakefield accelerations using asymmetric laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, K.; Gupta, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Optimization and control of electron beam quality in laser wakefield acceleration are explored by using a temporally asymmetric laser pulse of the sharp rising front portion. The temporally asymmetric laser pulse imparts stronger ponderomotive force on the ambient plasma electrons. The stronger ponderomotive force associated with the asymmetric pulse significantly affects the injection of electrons into the wakefield and consequently the quality of the injected bunch in terms of injected charge, mean energy, and emittance. Based on particle-in-cell simulations, we report to generate a monoenergetic electron beam with reduced emittance and enhanced charge in laser wakefield acceleration using an asymmetric pulse of duration 30 fs.

  20. Vanderbilt free electron laser project in biomedical and materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Richard F.; Tolk, N. H.

    1988-06-01

    The Medical Free Electron Laser Program was awarded to develop, construct and operate a free-electron laser facility dedicated to biomedical and materials studies, with particular emphases on: fundamental studies of absorption and localization of electromagnetic energy on and near material surfaces, especially through electronic and other selective, non-statistical processes; non-thermal photon-materials interactions (e.g., electronic bond-breaking or vibrational energy transfer) in physical and biological materials as well as in long-wavelength biopolymer dynamics; development of FEL-based methods to study drug action and to characterize biomolecular properties and metabolic processes in biomembranes; clinical applications in otolaryngology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology and radiology stressing the use of the laser for selective laser-tissue, laser-cellular and laser-molecule interactions in both therapeutic and diagnostic modalities.

  1. Development of a far infrared free electron laser based on compact microtron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    1998-11-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between KAERI and BINP, a FIR FEL having tunable range of output wavelength from 30 {mu}m to 50 {mu}m. The peak power is 10kW at maximum. The micropulse width is 10 ps and the macropulse width is 5 {mu}s. The repetition rate of micropulses is 2.8 GHz and that of macropulses is 1 - 10 Hz. In addition to the FIR FEL system, many key technologies of high power FELs have been developed. Among them are there electron accelerator technology, design and optimization of electron beamline, design of undulator, measurement of magnetic field of undulators, high-voltage technology, optical cavity, etc.. (author). 10 refs., 11 tabs., 48figs.

  2. Power Beaming, Orbital Debris Removal, and Other Space Applications of a Ground Based Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    considerable biological damage, but the collisions involved can generate neutrons and even gamma radiation in some cases. Therefore, the beam dump...at energies low enough so that neutrons are not produced. 20 B. FEL RESONANCE CONDITION For optimum energy exchange between the electrons and...surfaces to mitigate the risk of damage from collisions with them [48]. 97 Figure 40, Figure 41, and Figure 42 display an instantaneous “ snap -shot” of

  3. A high brightness electron beam for Free Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oerle, Bartholomeus Mathias; van Oerle, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    In a free electron laser, coherent radiation is generated by letting an electron beam propagate through an alternating magnetic field. The magnetic field is created by a linear array of magnets, which is called an undulator or a wiggler. The wavelength of the laser radiation depends on the amplitude

  4. Laser electron collider within a micro-channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2017-10-01

    We propose a laser-electron collider based on a laser-driven micro-channel-plate target. In this unique geometry, electrons accelerated within the channel can collide head-on with the laser reflected from a foil attached onto the rear target surface. The simple scheme allows for efficient generation of gamma-photons and most importantly, the observing of radiation-reaction effect for the first time. It resolves the aligning and time synchronization challenges for laser-electron colliding scenarios involving two light/electron beams. We predict that a single 5PW laser is sufficient to make radiation-reaction effect measurable. A principle-of-proof experiment was conducted at a currently available 200TW laser system. The superior acceleration of electrons with the novel micro-channel structure was confirmed, showing enhanced electron cut-off energies and slope temperatures compared to ordinary flat interfaces. The results set forth the basis for radiation-reaction measurement from laser-electron colliding in upcoming multi-petawatt laser systems.

  5. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%)

  6. [Comparison of adaptation and microstructure of titanium upper complete denture base fabricated by selecting laser melting and electron beam melting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y; Xiong, Y Y; Zhu, J R; Sun, J

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To fabricate Ti alloy frameworks for a maxillary complete denture with three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique, such as selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM), and to evaluate the microstructure of these frameworks and their adaptation to the die stone models. Methods: Thirty pairs of edentulous casts were divided into 3 groups randomly and equally. In each group, one of the three techniques (SLM, EBM, conventional technique) was used to fabricate Ti alloy frameworks. The base-cast sets were transversally sectioned into 3 sections at the distal of canines, mesial of first molars, and the posterior palatal zone. The gap between the metal base and cast was measured in the 3 sections. Stereoscopic microscope was used to measure the gap. Three pieces of specimens of 5 mm diameter were fabricated with Ti alloy by SLM, EBM and the traditional casting technology (as mentioned above). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the differences of microstructure among these specimens. Results: The gaps between the metal base and cast were (99.4±17.0), (98.2±26.1), and (99.6± 16.1) μm in conventional method; (99.4 ± 22.8), (83.1 ± 19.3), and (103.3 ± 13.8) μm in SLM technique; (248.3±70.3), (279.1±71.9), and (189.1±31.6) μm in EBM technique. There was no statistical difference in the value of gaps between SLM Ti alloy and conventional method Ti alloy group (P>0.05). There was statistical difference among EBM Ti alloy, conventional method Ti alloy and SLM Ti alloy group (P<0.05). The SLM Ti alloy showed more uniform and compact microstructure than the cast Ti alloy and EBM Ti alloy did. Conclusions: SLM technique showed initial feasibility to manufacture the dental base of complete denture. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the denture frameworks prepared by SLM indicate that these dentures are appropriate for clinical use. EBM technique is inadequate to make a complete denture now.

  7. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  8. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  9. Theoretical study of free electron laser physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Gwon; Cho, Sung Oh; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Sun Kook; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Jong Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    A theoretical study of free electron laser physics is presented in this report. In particular, an analysis is given of the free electron laser with a linearly polarized magnetic wiggler. We describe the basic electron dynamics and gain mechanism in a free electron laser by solving the one-body classical Lorentz force equations in the presence of a periodic magnetic field and a plane electromagnetic wave. Phase space paths for electrons analogously related to those of a simple pendulum are used to describe the laser gain and saturation, and the evolution of the electron beam energy and position distributions. We present an analysis of the single-mode problem and a self-consistent nonlinear treatment of the finite transverse dimensional effects associated with the free electron laser in a steady state. Results computed by applying an external D.C. electric field to the system are discussed for investigating efficiency enhancement of the free electron lasers. Finally optical guiding effect in small signal regime is described to investigate the possibility of amplifying radiation fields in very long wigglers for large gain and high extraction efficiency. 14 refs., 45 figs. (Author)

  10. Proceedings of the Laser Issues for Electron RF Photoinjectors Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, P

    2003-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) proposed for SLAC is a SASE FEL designed to generate high brightness, coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulses. The injector of choice is the RF photoinjector, which is capable of producing suitably low emittance electron beams. It is well established that the performance of the SASE FEL depends critically on properties of the electron beam generated by the injector and therefore on the injector laser beam parameters. This workshop was established specifically to provide a forum for discussion of photoinjector laser systems. Laser design requirements and technical challenges common to RF photoinjectors were highlighted and some solutions were explored. This included not only details of laser systems but also those of laser-based diagnostics envisioned for monitoring ultrashort electron microbunches on a single shot basis. Sixty-one registrants representing twenty-three institutions from Italy, Germany, Japan and the United States attended. The program listing shows that the twe...

  11. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hirose, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Physics Dept.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  12. Resonant Laser Incisions: Molecular Targets Using the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Lou; Bryant, Grady; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Laser ablation of tissue for medical incisions is normally concerned with the energy absorption and the subsequent vaporization of intracellular water. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have identified specific non-water resonances within tissues. Then, using the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (wavelength tunable from 2 to 10 microns) and our Computer Assisted Surgical Techniques program (to standardize the laser delivery), we have targeted specific molecular resonances for laser incisions and tissue removal. Using both acute and chronic studies, we can map out the resonant action spectrum to improve surgical outcomes. We have modeled these ablation mechanisms and working to establish the link between these ablation mechanisms and wound healing. This work has been supported, in part, by a grant from the Department of Defense, Medical Free Electron Laser Program, ONR Grant #N000149411023.

  13. Rationalizing the photophysical properties of BODIPY laser dyes via aromaticity and electron-donor-based structural perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, Paul G.; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Teng; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-05-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of six boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) laser dyes with simple non-aromatic substituents are rationalized by relating them to observable structural perturbations within the molecules of the dyes. An empirical relationship involving the structure and the optical properties is derived using a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, quantum chemical calculations and electronic constants: i.e. the tendency of the pyrrole bond lengths towards aromaticity and the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence wavelengths correlating with the electron-donor properties of the substituents. The effect of molecular conformation on the solid-state optical properties of the dyes is also discussed. The findings in this study also demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of using crystal structure data to develop structure-property relationships in this class of optical materials, contributing to the growing effort to design optoelectronic materials with tunable properties via molecular engineering.

  14. Single-pulse femtosecond laser Bessel beams drilling of high-aspect-ratio microholes based on electron dynamics control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Yan, Xueliang; Han, Weina; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    Microholes drilling has attracted extensive research efforts for its broad applications in photonics, microfluidics, optical fibers and many other fields. A femtosecond (fs) laser is a promising tool for high-precision materials processing with reduced recast/microcracks and minimized heat affected zones. But there remain many challenges in hole drilling using conventional fs laser with Gaussian beams, such as low aspect ratio and taper effects. We report small-diameter and high-aspect-ratio microholes with taper free drilling in PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) using single-pulse fs laser Bessel beams. Axicon is used to transform Gaussian beams into Bessel beams, which then irradiate in the sample by a telescope consisting of plano-convex lens and microscope objective. Using this technique, we enhance the aspect ratio of microholes by 55 times as compared with Gaussian beams. We attribute this high aspect ratio and high quality microholes formation to the unique spatial intensity distribution and propagation stability of Bessel beams, which can effectively adjust the transient localized electron density distribution leading to a long and uniform localized-interacted zone. By using the optimized pulse energy and focal depth position, the microholes diameter ranges between 1.4-2.1 μm and the aspect ratio can exceed 460. This efficient technique is of great potentials for fabrication of microphotonics devices and microfluidics.

  15. Status of and Future Plans for the CERN Linac4 Emittance Meter based on Laser Electron-detachment and a Diamond Strip-detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F; Zocca, F; Gibson, S; Kruchinin, KO; Bosco, A; Boorman, G; Griesmayer, E

    2014-01-01

    LINAC4 has started its staged commissioning at CERN. After completion it will accelerate high brightness H- beams to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse profile and emittance of the beam, a non-destructive method based on electron photo detachment is proposed, using a pulsed, fibre-coupled laser to strip electrons from the H- ions. The laser can be focused and scanned through the H- beam, acting like a conventional slit. A downstream dipole separates the neutral H0 beamlet, created by the laser interaction, from the main H- beam, so that it can be measured by a diamond stripdetector. Combining the H0 beamlet profiles with the laser position allows the transverse emittance to be reconstructed. A prototype of this instrument was tested while commissioning the LINAC4 at 3 and 12 MeV. In this paper we shall describe the experimental setup, challenges and results of the measurements, and also address the characteristics and performance of the diamond strip-detector subsystem. In addition, the proposal for a permane...

  16. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbajo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London 431, 535 (2004; T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006; S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: “Making the molecular movie,”, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010; F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010; Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006; C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006; A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and

  17. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  18. Experimental and theoretical studies of picosecond laser interactions with electronic materials-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Samuel S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Lasers having picosecond and shorter pulse duration are receiving much attention due to their capabilities for direct-write micromachining on many materials with minimal substrate damage. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of laser ablation processes, particularly the creation of plasmas that often shield the target and reduce the material processing efficiency at nanosecond time scales. However, a considerable challenge that still remains is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms during picosecond laser interactions with electronic solids. In this work we first study picosecond laser-induced electron emission from semiconductor surfaces. A theoretical model was set up based on carrier transport inside the semiconductor material during picosecond laser-semiconductor interactions. We demonstrate that nonequilibrium carrier dynamics plays a significant role for picosecond, as well as short nanosecond, laser induced electron emission from semiconductors. Photoelectric effect is found to be responsible for electron emission at low incident laser fluences, whereas thermionic emission is dominant at higher fluences. We have also performed experimental and theoretical studies on the formation and subsequent evolution of plasmas during laser-metal interactions at the picosecond time scale. Using picosecond time-resolved shadowgrams ahd interferograms, a novel type of plasma is observed, which has an electron density on the order of 1020cm-3.The origin of this picosecond plasma is attributed to gas breakdown, which is caused by laser-induced electron emission fi-om the target surface. After the laser pulse is completed, the longitudinal expansion of the plasma is suppressed. This suppression is found to result from an electric field above the target that prevents, after laser irradiation, fbrther movement of the electrons inside the plasma. Measurements of lateral plasma expansion indicate that the picosecond plasma may absorb

  19. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  20. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  1. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  2. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  3. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  4. Short wavelength free electron lasers in 1998

    OpenAIRE

    Colson, W.B.

    1999-01-01

    A table is presented that describes the characteristics of 58 short wavelength free electron lasers, operating and proposed, around the world. The author is grateful for support of this work by the Naval Postgraduate School and the Directed Energy Weapons Group, SPAWAR, U.S. Navy.

  5. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  6. Plasma wave undulator for laser-accelerated electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; 10.1063/1.3569827

    2011-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have become compact sources of ultrashort electron bunches at energies up to the gigaelectronvolt range thanks to the remarkable progress made over the past decade. A direct application of these electron bunches is the production of short pulse x-ray radiation sources. In this letter, we study a fully optically driven x-ray source based on the combination of a laser-plasma accelerator and a plasma wave undulator. The longitudinal electric field of a laser-generated plasma wave is used to wiggle electrons transversally. The period of this plasma undulator being equal to the plasma wavelength, tunable photon energies in the 10 keV range can be achieved with electron energies in the 100-200 MeV range. Considering a 10s TW class femtosecond laser system, undulators with a strength parameter K~0.5 and with about ten periods can be combined with a laser-plasma accelerator, resulting in several 10^-2 emitted x-ray photons per electron.

  7. Performance of the thermionic RF gun injector for the linac-based IR free electron laser at the FEL-SUT

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, F; Kawai, M; Koike, H; Sobajima, M

    2001-01-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) has developed a linac-based compact IR free electron laser device and has installed it in the FEL-SUT (IR FEL Research Center of Science University of Tokyo). The FEL device adopts a combination of a multi-cell RF gun with a thermionic cathode and an alpha-magnet as an injector. The fundamental design of this RF gun is the pi/2 mode standing wave structure. It has two accelerating cells and a coupling cell located on the beam axis, a so-called 'on axis coupled structure' (OCS). Characteristics of momentum distribution and micropulse bunch length of the electron beam are compared with beam dynamics simulation results in this paper. We succeeded in obtaining sufficient peak current for FEL lasing with this injector, and the first lasing was achieved on 6 July 2000.

  8. A Submillimeter Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-30

    radiation fields sinale- etage M design and b) the uv-visible- generated by a single electron have an angar ir region using a two- etage M device...the UCSB M -dill be tested as a two- etage device. The range of wavelength that will be covered with this mode of operation is from the vacuum

  9. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  10. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  11. Electron Impact of Laser Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-14

    60 10 first Porn approximation. E trx tiqy oFVI 0.4" 0. \\\\ ... * 94 D. E. Golden and N. C Stepb together with the calculations of Baluja and McDowell...monochromator and are detected by a RCA C31034A-02 ported coincidence measurements between energy aria- photomultiplier tube (PMT) cooled to -20 ’C. The pho...The recent R-matrix calculation of Fon Conventional tube lenses focus the electron beam et al.14 is in fair agreement with the small-angle onto the

  12. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  13. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  14. Electronic beam control for advanced laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschner, Terry A.; Lambert, Larry Q.; Smith, Irl W.; Harris, Clarke E.

    1999-05-01

    The recent development of optical phased arrays (OPAs) enables practical, electronically programmable, control of laser beams for laser radar and other advanced optical sensors. OPAs are the direct analog of microwave phased array antennas; they are electronically programmable optical elements that control the phase distribution on an optical aperture in order to control beam direction and shape. Operating principles and construction of OPAs are briefly described and current and potential performance capabilities are summarized. An OPA supports spatial-domain beam control such as agile or continuous scanning patterns, adaptive electronic focus control, and far-field beam shape control, as well as the generation of multiple beams from a single input beam (pattern generation, or fanout). OPAs also support time-domain beam control, including precision time delay or positioning of short pulses, pulse compression and expansion, and the generation of dense pulse bursts from a single pulse. All of these functions are software controllable, which enables mission-flexible and mission-adaptive optical systems, including so-called 'smart' optical systems with autonomous alignment and calibration capabilities. These and other electronically programmable capabilities are discussed. As a concrete example of an advanced sensor enabled by the OPA, the potential for an adaptable-format, high-resolution, multi-beam laser radar with no moving parts is discussed.

  15. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  16. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  17. Chaos in free electron laser oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, C. [Univ Paris 11, LAL, UMR 8607, F-91898 Orsay, (France); Bachelard, R.; Couprie, M.E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Garzella, D. [CEA DSM DRECAM SPAM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Orlandi, G.L. [CR Frascati FIM FISACC, ENEA, I-00044 Frascati, (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The chaotic nature of a storage-ring free electron laser (FEL) is investigated. The derivation of a low embedding dimension for the dynamics allows the low-dimensionality of this complex system to be observed, whereas its unpredictability is demonstrated, in some ranges of parameters, by a positive Lyapounov exponent. The route to chaos is then explored by tuning a single control parameter, and a period-doubling cascade is evidenced, as well as intermittence. (authors)

  18. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  19. Radiation-Reaction Trapping of Electrons in Extreme Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, L L; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-01-01

    proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  20. SIMCON 3.0 eight channel FPGA-based cavity simulator and controller for VUV free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-10-01

    The work describes integrated system of hardware controller and simulator of superconductive cavity. The controller was realized on FPGA chip Xilinx-VirtexII-V4000. The solution uses DSP EMBEDDED BOARD positioned on a LLRF Modular Control Platform. The algorithm was realized in VHDL using hardware multiplication components existing in VirtexII series of chips. There was obtained implementation of a device working in real-time according to the control condition demands of LLRF system for TESLA superconductive cavities. The system is predicted as a developmental stage for FLASH accelerator and FEL laser and next for XFEL. The paper describes in detail functional layer, parameter programming, control basics for particular blocks, monitoring of real-time processes. There are presented results of system usage for control of the module ACC1 of FLASH laser.

  1. Intensity dependence of electron gas kinetics in a laser corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In various experimental situations relevant to the laser fusion, such as plasma near the light entrance holes of hohlraum in the indirect drive experiments or more recently in the shock ignition direct drive a relatively long underdense plasma of corona type is encountered, which is subject to an intense nanosecond laser beam. The plasma is only weakly collisional and thus in the electron phase space a complicated kinetic evolution is going on, which is taking the electron gas fairly far from the thermal equilibrium and contributes to its unstable behaviour. These phenomena impede the absorption and thermalization of the incoming laser energy, create groups of fast electrons and also may lead to a non-linear reflection of the heating laser beam. One of the key processes leading to the electron acceleration is the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS in its non-linear phase. The SRS in the presence of electron-ion collisions requires a certain threshold intensity above which the mentioned non-dissipative phenomena can occur and develop to the stage, where they may become unpleasant for the fusion experiments. To assess this intensity limit a computational model has been developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell kinetics describing such a plasma in 1D geometry. At a relatively high intensity of 1016 W/cm2 a number of non-linear phenomena are predicted by the code such as a saturation of Landau damping, which is then translated in an unfavourable time dependence of the reflected light intensity and formation of accelerated electron groups due to the electron trapping. The purpose of the present contribution is to map the intensity dependence of this non-linear development with the aim of assessing its weight in fusion relevant situations.

  2. Laser-based additive manufacturing of metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For making metallic products through Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes, laser-based systems play very significant roles. Laser-based processes such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) are dominating processes...

  3. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  4. Externally Controlled Injection of Electrons by a Laser Pulse in a Laser Wakefield Electron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Szu Yuan; Chen Wei Ting; Chien, Ting-Yei; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2005-01-01

    Spatially and temporally localized injection of electrons is a key element for development of plasma-wave electron accelerator. Here we report the demonstration of two different schemes for electron injection in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) by using a laser pulse. In the first scheme, by implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. We found that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the pump pulse. In the second scheme, by using a transient density ramp we achieve self-injection of electrons in a SM-LWFA with spatial localization. The transient density ramp is produced by a prepulse propagating transversely to drill a density depression channel via ionization and expansion. The same mechanism of injection with comparable efficiency is also demonstrated wi...

  5. Manipulation and electron-oscillation-measurement of laser accelerated electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaki, H; Hayashi, Y; Kawase, K; Mori, M; Kando, M; Homma, T; Koga, J K; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V, E-mail: kotaki.hideyuki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Monoenergetic electron beams have been generated in the self-injection scheme of laser acceleration. In applications of these laser accelerated electron beams, stable and controllable electron beams are necessary. A stable electron beam is generated in the self-injection scheme by using a nitrogen gas jet target. We found the profile of the electron beam was manipulated by rotating the laser polarization. The electron beam is in the first bucket of the wake wave. In the energy space, transverse oscillation is observed when the laser pulse has S-polarization. The direction of the electron beam is controlled by the gas jet position.

  6. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  7. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  9. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  10. Fast-electron-relaxation measurement for laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Kemp, A; Hansen, S B; Wilks, S C; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Fournier, K B; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-11-01

    We present measurements of the fast-electron-relaxation time in short-pulse (0.5 ps) laser-solid interactions for laser intensities of 10(17), 10(18), and 10(19) Wcm2, using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. We find that the laser coupling to hot electrons increases as the laser intensity becomes relativistic, and that the thermalization of fast electrons occurs over time scales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. The experimental data are analyzed using a combination of models that include Kalpha generation, collisional coupling, and plasma expansion.

  11. The influence of quaternary electron blocking layer on the performance characteristics of intracavity-contacted oxide-confined InGaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharrizi, A. Zandi; Alahyarizadeh, Gh.; Hassan, Z.; Hassan, H. Abu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of electron blocking layer (EBL) on the performance characteristics of InGaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) was numerically investigated using an integrated system engineering technical computer aided design (ISE TCAD) simulation program. Simulation results indicated that the performance characteristics of InGaN quantum well VCSEL were improved by the ternary Al0.17Ga0.83N EBL. Better performance was also obtained when Al0.17Ga0.83N EBL was replaced by a polarization-matched Al0.275In0.115Ga0.61N EBL having the same energy bandgap. The quaternary EBL enhances the output power and differential quantum efficiency (DQE) as well as reduces the threshold current compared with the ternary EBL. Enhancement in the value of the optical intensity was also observed in the VCSEL structure with quaternary EBL. Furthermore, the effect of Al composition of AlInGaN EBL on the performance of InGaN-based VCSEL structure that uses the quaternary AlInGaN EBL was studied. In mole fraction was 0.115, Al mole fraction changed from 0.260 to 0.290 by step 0.005, and optimum performance was achieved in 0.275 Al mole fraction of AlInGaN EBL.

  12. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  13. Quantum regime of free electron lasers starting from noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonifacio, R; Piovella, N; Robb, G. R. M; Schiavi, A

    2006-01-01

    .... In the first part, we neglect the radiation propagation and we formulate a quantum linear theory of the N-particle free-electron laser Hamiltonian model, quantizing both the radiation field and the electron motion...

  14. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  15. Electron bunch timing with femtosecond precision in a superconducting free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F; Arsov, V; Felber, M; Hacker, K; Jalmuzna, W; Lorbeer, B; Ludwig, F; Matthiesen, K-H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmüser, P; Schulz, S; Szewinski, J; Winter, A; Zemella, J

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  16. CERN's web application updates for electron and laser beam technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sigas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the modifications at CERN's web application for electron and laser beam technologies. There are updates at both the front and the back end of the application. New electron and laser machines were added and also old machines were updated. There is also a new feature for printing needed information.

  17. Role of Direct Laser Acceleration of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator with Ionization Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J L; Lemos, N; Amorim, L D; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Marsh, K A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2017-02-10

    We show the first experimental demonstration that electrons being accelerated in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the forced or blowout regimes gain significant energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) and the laser wakefield acceleration mechanisms. Supporting full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations elucidate the role of the DLA of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. An explanation is given for how electrons can maintain the DLA resonance condition in a laser wakefield accelerator despite the evolving properties of both the drive laser and the electrons. The produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism.

  18. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Yu, Yahong; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-02-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration in low-density plasma is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. An intense CO2 laser pulse of long wavelength excites a wake bubble that has a large elongated volume for accelerating a large number of electrons before reaching the charge saturation limit. A transversely injected laser pulse is used to induce and control the electron injection. It is found that an electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and absolute energy spread less than 16 MeV can be obtained. As a result, the charge per energy interval of the bunch reaches up to 0.6 nC/MeV. Intense CO2-laser based electron acceleration can provide a new direction for generating highly charged electron bunches with low energy spread, which is of much current interest, especially for table-top X-ray generation.

  19. All-optical time-resolved measurement of laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an all-optical method to measure laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam. In this scheme the time-dependent energy modulation generated from the electron-laser interaction in an undulator is converted into time-dependent density modulation with a chicane, which is measured to infer the laser energy modulation. The method, in principle, is capable of simultaneously providing information on femtosecond time scale and 10^{-5} energy scale not accessible with conventional methods. We anticipate that this method may have wide applications in many laser-based advanced beam manipulation techniques.

  20. Electronic properties of asymmetrical quantum dots dressed by laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibis, O.V. [Department of Applied and Theoretical Physics, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marx Avenue 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Slepyan, G.Ya.; Maksimenko, S.A. [Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruyskaya St. 11, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Hoffmann, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    In the present paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the strong non-resonant interaction between asymmetrical quantum dots (QDs) and a laser field results in harmonic oscillations of their band gap. It is shown that such oscillations change the spectrum of elementary electron excitations in QDs: in the absence of the laser pumping there is only one resonant electron frequency, but QDs dressed by the laser field have a set of electron resonant frequencies. One expects that this modification of elementary electron excitations in QDs can be observable in optical experiments. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Scaling the Yield of Laser-Driven Electron-Positron Jets to Laboratory Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Fiuza, F.; Link, A.; Hazi, A.; Hill, M.; Hoarty, D.; James, S.; Kerr, S.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Sentoku, Y.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-05-01

    We report new experimental results obtained on three different laser facilities that show directed laser-driven relativistic electron-positron jets with up to 30 times larger yields than previously obtained and a quadratic (˜EL2 ) dependence of the positron yield on the laser energy. This favorable scaling stems from a combination of higher energy electrons due to increased laser intensity and the recirculation of MeV electrons in the mm-thick target. Based on this scaling, first principles simulations predict the possibility of using such electron-positron jets, produced at upcoming high-energy laser facilities, to probe the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks in the laboratory.

  2. Two-pulse laser control of nuclear and electronic motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We discuss an explicitly time-dependent two-pulse laser scheme for controlling where nuclei and electrons are going in unimolecular reactions. We focus on electronic motion and show, with HD+ as an example, that one can find non-stationary states where the electron (with some probability) oscilla......We discuss an explicitly time-dependent two-pulse laser scheme for controlling where nuclei and electrons are going in unimolecular reactions. We focus on electronic motion and show, with HD+ as an example, that one can find non-stationary states where the electron (with some probability...

  3. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10{sup -5} was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6{pi} mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  4. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB{sub 6}-based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author).

  5. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  6. Identification of Nodal Kink in Electron-Doped (Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 Superconductor from Laser-Based Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou X. J.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on the electron-doped (Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 high temperature superconductor. We have revealed a clear kink at ~60 meV in the dispersion along the (0,0–(π,π nodal direction, accompanied by a peak-dip-hump feature in the photoemission spectra. This indicates that the nodal electrons are coupled to collective excitations (bosons in electron-doped superconductors, with the phonons as the most likely candidate of the boson. This finding has established a universality of nodal electron coupling in both hole- and electron-doped high temperature cuprate superconductors.

  7. Pulse Duration of Seeded Free-Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Paola; Höppner, Hauke; Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Capotondi, Flavio; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Coreno, Marcello; Cucini, Riccardo; Danailov, Miltcho B.; Demidovich, Alexander; De Ninno, Giovanni; Di Fraia, Michele; Feifel, Raimund; Ferrari, Eugenio; Fröhlich, Lars; Gauthier, David; Golz, Torsten; Grazioli, Cesare; Kai, Yun; Kurdi, Gabor; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Medvedev, Nikita; Nikolov, Ivaylo P.; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Penco, Giuseppe; Plekan, Oksana; Prandolini, Mark J.; Prince, Kevin C.; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Rebernik, Primoz; Riedel, Robert; Roussel, Eleonore; Sigalotti, Paolo; Squibb, Richard; Stojanovic, Nikola; Stranges, Stefano; Svetina, Cristian; Tanikawa, Takanori; Teubner, Ulrich; Tkachenko, Victor; Toleikis, Sven; Zangrando, Marco; Ziaja, Beata; Tavella, Franz; Giannessi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The pulse duration, and, more generally, the temporal intensity profile of free-electron laser (FEL) pulses, is of utmost importance for exploring the new perspectives offered by FELs; it is a nontrivial experimental parameter that needs to be characterized. We measured the pulse shape of an extreme ultraviolet externally seeded FEL operating in high-gain harmonic generation mode. Two different methods based on the cross-correlation of the FEL pulses with an external optical laser were used. The two methods, one capable of single-shot performance, may both be implemented as online diagnostics in FEL facilities. The measurements were carried out at the seeded FEL facility FERMI. The FEL temporal pulse characteristics were measured and studied in a range of FEL wavelengths and machine settings, and they were compared to the predictions of a theoretical model. The measurements allowed a direct observation of the pulse lengthening and splitting at saturation, in agreement with the proposed theory.

  8. Laser-modified electron scattering from a slowly ionising atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiordilino, E.; Mittleman, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    When an electron scatters from an atom in the presence of a laser field which is resonant with an atomic transition, off-shell effects enter into the cross section. These only become significant at higher laser intensities where the atom may also be ionised by the laser. Cross-sections are obtained for electron-atom scattering in which these off-shell effects appear and in which the slow ionisation of the atom by the laser is included. Experiments are suggested in which simplifications can occur and which still retain these 'exotic' effects.

  9. Laser-pumped coherent x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sprangle

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In a laser-pumped x-ray free-electron laser (FEL an intense laser field replaces the magnetic wiggler field of a conventional FEL. Depending on the intensity and quality of both the electron beam and pump laser, the Thomson backscattered radiation can be coherently amplified. In a conventional FEL the generation of x rays requires electron beam energies in the multi-GeV range. In a laser-pumped x-ray FEL, electron beam energies in the multi-MeV range would be sufficient. To generate coherent x rays with this mechanism a number of physics and technology issues must be addressed. Foremost among these are the stringent requirements placed on the electron beam quality and brightness as well as on the pump laser. The seed radiation for the laser-pumped FEL is the laser-induced spontaneous radiation. The evolution of incoherent radiation into coherent radiation as well as the power gain lengths associated with the coherent x rays are analyzed and discussed. There is excellent agreement between our analytical results and GENESIS simulations for the radiated power, gain length, conversion efficiency, linewidth, and saturation length. These issues, as well as others, necessary to achieve coherent amplified x rays in a laser-pumped FEL are discussed. While a coherent x-ray source would have a number of attractive features, the requirements placed on both the electron beam and pump laser are extremely challenging.

  10. Application of CO2 laser for electronic components soldering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascorro-Pantoja, J.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Nieto-Pérez, M.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2011-10-01

    Laser provides a high controllable and localized spot for soldering joint formation and this is a valuable tool in Sn/Pb Soldering process on electronic industry, in recent years, laser beam welding has become an emerging welding technique, the use of laser in welding area is a high efficiency method. A 60 Watts CO2 continuous laser was used on this study, during welding experimental results indicated the laser could significantly improve speed and weld quality. In this work, the welding interactions of CO2 laser with Sn/Pb wire have been investigated in details through varying the energy ratios of laser. And at the same time, the effect of distance from laser spot to material.

  11. Electron acceleration via high contrast laser interacting with submicron clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lu; Chen Liming; Wang Weiming; Yan Wenchao; Yuan Dawei; Mao Jingyi; Wang Zhaohua; Liu Cheng; Shen Zhongwei; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Lu Xin; Ma Jinglong; Wei Zhiyi [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana [Joint Institute for High Temperature of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beams Science Directorate, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan); Li Dazhang [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng Zhengming [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-01-02

    We experimentally investigated electron acceleration from submicron size argon clusters-gas target irradiated by a 100 fs, 10 TW laser pulses having a high-contrast. Electron beams are observed in the longitudinal and transverse directions to the laser propagation. The measured energy of the longitudinal electron reaches 600 MeV and the charge of the electron beam in the transverse direction is more than 3 nC. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of the interaction has been performed and it shows an enhancement of electron charge by using the cluster-gas target.

  12. Laser-assisted electron diffraction for femtosecond molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    We report the observation of laser-assisted electron diffraction (LAED) through the collision of 1 keV electrons with gas-phase CCl{sub 4} molecules in a femtosecond near-infrared laser field. In the angular distribution of the scattered electrons with the energy shifts of ±ℏω, we observed clear diffraction patterns which reflect the geometrical structure of the molecules at the moment of laser irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast nuclear dynamics of molecules can be probed by LAED with the high temporal (<10 fs) and spatial (∼0.01 Å) resolutions.

  13. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59  μm. Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  14. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  15. Large-Scale Production of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our interdisciplinary program to use the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J-Lab) for high-volume pulsed laser vaporization synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Based in part on the funding of from this project, a novel nanotube production system was designed, tested, and patented. Using this new system nanotube production rates over 100 times faster than conventional laser systems were achieved. Analysis of the material produced shows that it is of as high a quality as the standard laser-based materials.

  16. Generating ultrarelativistic attosecond electron bunches with laser wakefield accelerators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond electron bunches with ultrarelativistic energies were recently generated by laser wakefield accelerators. Here we predict that laser wakefield acceleration can generate even attosecond bunches, due to a strong chirp of the betatron frequency. We show how the bunch duration scales with

  17. Anti-Ship Missile Defense and the Free Electron Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herbert, Paul

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve ship self-defense against sea-skimming missiles, several concepts, such as the free electron laser, high-power microwaves, and the Phalanx gun system are reviewed and evaluated in this thesis...

  18. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  19. Introduction to free electron lasers (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  20. Introduction to free electron lasers (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  1. Introduction to free electron lasers (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  2. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkal, Yashvir, E-mail: yashvirkalkal@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Kumar, Vinit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  3. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L G; Xu, J C; Ji, L L; Zhang, X M; Wang, W P; Zhao, X Y; Yi, L Q; Yu, Y H; Shi, Y; Xu, T J; Xu, Z Z

    2014-01-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulation in low-density plasma. An intense CO2 laser pulse with long wavelength excites wakefield. The bubble behind it has a broad space to sustain a large amount of electrons before reaching its charge saturation limit. A transversely propagating inject pulse is used to induce and control the ambient electron injection. The accelerated electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and the average charge per energy interval of more than 0.6 nC/MeV are obtained. Plasma-based electron acceleration driven by intense CO2 laser provides a new potential way to generate high-charge electron bunch with low energy spread, which has broad applications, especially for X-ray generation by table-top FEL and bremsstrahlung.

  4. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  5. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  6. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; van Tilborg, J.; Michel, P.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultra-short electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching towards a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offers a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: Coherent terahertz emission and x-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering.

  7. Controlled injection and acceleration of electrons in plasma wakefields by colliding laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, J; Rechatin, C; Norlin, A; Lifschitz, A; Glinec, Y; Malka, V

    2006-12-07

    In laser-plasma-based accelerators, an intense laser pulse drives a large electric field (the wakefield) which accelerates particles to high energies in distances much shorter than in conventional accelerators. These high acceleration gradients, of a few hundreds of gigavolts per metre, hold the promise of compact high-energy particle accelerators. Recently, several experiments have shown that laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, with quasi-monoenergetic energy distributions at the 100 MeV level. However, these beams do not have the stability and reproducibility that are required for applications. This is because the mechanism responsible for injecting electrons into the wakefield is based on highly nonlinear phenomena, and is therefore hard to control. Here we demonstrate that the injection and subsequent acceleration of electrons can be controlled by using a second laser pulse. The collision of the two laser pulses provides a pre-acceleration stage which provokes the injection of electrons into the wakefield. The experimental results show that the electron beams obtained in this manner are collimated (5 mrad divergence), monoenergetic (with energy spread electron bunch durations shorter than 10 fs. We anticipate that this stable and compact electron source will have a strong impact on applications requiring short bunches, such as the femtolysis of water, or high stability, such as radiotherapy with high-energy electrons or radiography for materials science.

  8. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  9. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated approximately 125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography as a viable manufacturing technology. However, beyond the 7 nm technology node existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multi-patterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes. Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should free-electron lasers become the preferred next generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE), (2) regenerative amplification (RAFEL), or (3) self-seeding (SS-FEL). Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provide a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUV lithography applications.

  10. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  11. Biomolecular imaging and electronic damage using X-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Quiney, Harry M

    2010-01-01

    Proposals to determine biomolecular structures from diffraction experiments using femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses involve a conflict between the incident brightness required to achieve diffraction-limited atomic resolution and the electronic and structural damage induced by the illumination. Here we show that previous estimates of the conditions under which biomolecular structures may be obtained in this manner are unduly restrictive, because they are based on a coherent diffraction model that is not appropriate to the proposed interaction conditions. A more detailed imaging model derived from optical coherence theory and quantum electrodynamics is shown to be far more tolerant of electronic damage. The nuclear density is employed as the principal descriptor of molecular structure. The foundations of the approach may also be used to characterize electrodynamical processes by performing scattering experiments on complex molecules of known structure.

  12. Staged concept of laser-plasma acceleration toward multi-GeV electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Malka

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of the laser-plasma based accelerator and injector are discussed here. The recent tests done at LOA as well as design studies of high-quality GeV electron beam production with low energy spread (1% are presented. These laser-produced particle beams have a number of interesting properties and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine (radiotherapy, chemistry (radiolysis, and accelerator physics. They could be used as a source for the production of γ ray beams for nondestructive material inspection by radiography, or for future compact X-free electron laser machines.

  13. Laser-driven dielectric electron accelerator for radiobiology researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Matsumura, Yosuke; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Natsui, Takuya; Aimierding, Aimidula

    2013-05-01

    In order to estimate the health risk associated with a low dose radiation, the fundamental process of the radiation effects in a living cell must be understood. It is desired that an electron bunch or photon pulse precisely knock a cell nucleus and DNA. The required electron energy and electronic charge of the bunch are several tens keV to 1 MeV and 0.1 fC to 1 fC, respectively. The smaller beam size than micron is better for the precise observation. Since the laser-driven dielectric electron accelerator seems to suite for the compact micro-beam source, a phase-modulation-masked-type laser-driven dielectric accelerator was studied. Although the preliminary analysis made a conclusion that a grating period and an electron speed must satisfy the matching condition of LG/λ = v/c, a deformation of a wavefront in a pillar of the grating relaxed the matching condition and enabled the slow electron to be accelerated. The simulation results by using the free FDTD code, Meep, showed that the low energy electron of 20 keV felt the acceleration field strength of 20 MV/m and gradually felt higher field as the speed was increased. Finally the ultra relativistic electron felt the field strength of 600 MV/m. The Meep code also showed that a length of the accelerator to get energy of 1 MeV was 3.8 mm, the required laser power and energy were 11 GW and 350 mJ, respectively. Restrictions on the laser was eased by adopting sequential laser pulses. If the accelerator is illuminated by sequential N pulses, the pulse power, pulse width and the pulse energy are reduced to 1/N, 1/N and 1/N2, respectively. The required laser power per pulse is estimated to be 2.2 GW when ten pairs of sequential laser pulse is irradiated.

  14. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Agostini, P.A. [SPAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France). Centre d`Etudes de Saclay; Kulander, K.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  15. Paper based electronics platform

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna Mohammad

    2017-07-20

    A flexible and non-functionalized low cost paper-based electronic system platform fabricated from common paper, such as paper based sensors, and methods of producing paper based sensors, and methods of sensing using the paper based sensors are provided. A method of producing a paper based sensor can include the steps of: a) providing a conventional paper product to serve as a substrate for the sensor or as an active material for the sensor or both, the paper product not further treated or functionalized; and b) applying a sensing element to the paper substrate, the sensing element selected from the group consisting of a conductive material, the conductive material providing contacts and interconnects, sensitive material film that exhibits sensitivity to pH levels, a compressible and/or porous material disposed between a pair of opposed conductive elements, or a combination of two of more said sensing elements. The method of sensing can further include measuring, using the sensing element, a change in resistance, a change in voltage, a change in current, a change in capacitance, or a combination of any two or more thereof.

  16. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  17. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  18. A microtron accelerator for a free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, J.I.M.; Delhez, J.L.; Webers, G.A.; Hagedoorn, H.L.; Kleeven, W.J.G.M.; Timmermans, J.C.M.; Ernst, G.J.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Witteman, W.J.; Haselhoff, E.H.; Haselhoff, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    A racetrack microtron as a source for a free electron laser is being constructed. It will accelerate electrons up to 25 MeV to provide 10 ¿m radiation in a hybrid undulator with a periodicity distance of 25 mm. The aim is to accelerate 100 A bunches of 30 ps pulse length at 81.25 MHz. This frequency

  19. Electron bunch injection at an angle into a laser wakefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Mora, P.

    2009-01-01

    External injection of electron bunches longer than the plasma wavelength in a laser wakefield accelerator can lead to the generation of femtosecond ultra relativistic bunches with a couple of percent energy spread. Extensive study has been done on external electron bunch (e.g., one generated by a

  20. Enhanced electron yield from a laser-plasma accelerator using high-Z gas jet targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Li, Song; Sokollik, Thomas; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the multi-hundred MeV electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, neon and argon gas jet plasmas in a laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment was carried out. The charge measurement has been made via imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a 14-bit charge coupled device (CCD) which was cross-calibrated with nondestructive electronics-based method. Within given laser and plasma parameters, we found that laser-driven low Z- gas jet targets generate high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with reasonable yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which were observed from high-Z gas jets at higher densities reached much higher yield. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in high-Z gases, especially in the argon gas jet target where we received the highest yield of ~ 3 nC

  1. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  2. Enhanced Laser-to-Electron Energy Conversion Efficiency using Micro-Plasma Waveguide (MPW) Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Derek; Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liang; George, Kevin; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Zingale, Anthony; Daskalova, Rebecca; Schumacher, Doug; van Woerkom, Linn

    2017-10-01

    We present experiments from the Scarlet laser facility and 3D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations detailing the improved hot electron spectrum of MPW targets over flat targets. We observe an increase in the electron cutoff energy by a factor of 3 and a 10x enhancement of the total signal of electrons above 5MeV. From PIC simulations, we see strong transverse electric fields extract electron bunches from the MPW walls with the laser period, which are then accelerated by the usual vxB force. In addition, quasi-static longitudinal electric fields arise and are observed to increase the acceleration length of electrons along the tube walls. In this way, the micro-engineered structures provide a geometry more conducive to efficient direct laser acceleration and offer a new dimension in target design. We present evidence that by varying the structure's geometry we can alter the laser plasma interactions with applications in high field science, laser based proton therapy and relativistic nonlinear optics. In particular, the relationship between the MPW tube and laser-electron dephasing length is examined. AFOSR #FA9550-14-1-0085; NNSA #DE-NA0003107; DOE #DE-SC0012333.

  3. Electron heating by intense short-pulse lasers propagating through near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debayle, A.; Mollica, F.; Vauzour, B.; Wan, Y.; Flacco, A.; Malka, V.; Davoine, X.; Gremillet, L.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the electron heating induced by a relativistic-intensity laser pulse propagating through a near-critical plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that a specific interaction regime sets in when, due to the energy depletion caused by the plasma wakefield, the laser front profile has steepened to the point of having a length scale close to the laser wavelength. Wave breaking and phase mixing have then occurred, giving rise to a relativistically hot electron population following the laser pulse. This hot electron flow is dense enough to neutralize the cold bulk electrons during their backward acceleration by the wakefield. This neutralization mechanism delays, but does not prevent the breaking of the wakefield: the resulting phase mixing converts the large kinetic energy of the backward-flowing electrons into thermal energy greatly exceeding the conventional ponderomotive scaling at laser intensities > {10}21 {{{W}}{cm}}-2 and gas densities around 10% of the critical density. We develop a semi-numerical model, based on the Akhiezer–Polovin equations, which correctly reproduces the particle-in-cell-predicted electron thermal energies over a broad parameter range. Given this good agreement, we propose a criterion for full laser absorption that includes field-induced ionization. Finally, we show that our predictions still hold in a two-dimensional geometry using a realistic gas profile.

  4. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Eduardo Alcides; Endler, Antônio; Rizzato, Felipe Barbedo

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compre...

  5. Longitudinal Coherence Preservation and Chirp Evolution in a High Gain Laser Seeded Free Electron Laser Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.; /BNL, NSLS; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; Watanabe, T.; /BNL, NSLS

    2006-06-07

    In this letter we examine the start-up of a high gain free electron laser in which a frequency-chirped coherent seed laser pulse interacts with a relativistic electron beam. A Green function formalism is used to evaluate the initial value problem. We have fully characterized the startup and evolution through the exponential growth regime. We obtain explicit expressions for the pulse duration, bandwidth and chirp of the amplified light and show that the FEL light remains fully longitudinally coherent.

  6. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  7. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Andrew [Yorktown, VA

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  8. Functional Laser Trimming of Automotive Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Davison; Junji Mitobe

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of laser trim systems for the trimming of automotive hybrids. Being high volume parts these devices are best trimmed in two stages; first, a passive trim of the resistor substrate and secondly, a functional trim. The requirements for such a functional trim are such as to demand a fully integrated system.

  9. High-flux electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators driven by petawatt lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-07-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are considered to be one of the most competitive next-generation accelerator candidates. In this paper, we will study the potential high-flux electron beam production of an LWFA driven by petawatt-level laser pulses. In our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, an optimal set of parameters gives ˜ 40 {nC} of charge with 2 {PW} laser power, thus ˜ 400 {kA} of instantaneous current if we assume the electron beam duration is 100 fs. This high flux and its secondary radiation are widely applicable in nuclear and QED physics, industrial imaging, medical and biological studies.

  10. Spatial Control of Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimchuk, A.; Behm, K.; Zhao, T.; Joglekar, A. S.; Hussein, A.; Nees, J.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Elle, J.; Lucero, A.; Samarin, G. M.; Sarry, G.; Warwick, J.

    2017-10-01

    The laser wakefield experiments to study and control spatial properties of electron beams were performed using HERCULES laser at the University of Michigan at power of 100 TW. In the first experiment multi-electron beam generation was demonstrated using co-propagating, parallel laser beams with a π-phase shift mirror and showing that interaction between the wakefields can cause injection to occur for plasma and laser parameters in which a single wakefield displays no significant injection. In the second experiment a magnetic triplet quadrupole system was used to refocus and stabilize electron beams at the distance of 60 cm from the interaction region. This produced a 10-fold increase in remote gamma-ray activation of 63Cu using a lead converter. In the third experiment measurements of un-trapped electrons with high transverse momentum produce a 500 mrad (FWHM) ring. This ring is formed by electrons that receive a forward momentum boost by traversing behind the bubble and its size is inversely proportional to the plasma density. The characterization of divergence and charge of this electron ring may reveal information about the wakefield structure and trapping potential. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  11. Dimuon production by laser-wakefield accelerated electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Titov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze μ^{+}μ^{-} pair production generated by high-energy electrons emerging from a laser-wakefield accelerator. The μ^{+}μ^{-} pairs are created in a solid thick high-Z target, following the electron accelerating plasma region. Numerical estimates are presented for 1 to 10 GeV electron beams which are expected to be reliable in the nearest future. Reactions induced by the secondary bremsstrahlung photons dominate the dimuon production. According to our estimates, a 20 pC electron bunch with energy of 1 (10 GeV may create about 100 (5000 muon pairs. The produced μ^{±} can be used in studying various aspects of muon-related physics in tabletop installations. This may be considered as an important step towards the investigation of more complicated elementary processes induced by laser-driven electrons.

  12. Verification of a characterization method of the laser-induced selective activation based on industrial lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, laser-induced selective activation (LISA) for subsequent autocatalytic copper plating is performed by several types of industrial scale lasers, including a Nd:YAG laser, a UV laser, a fiber laser, a green laser, and a short pulsed laser. Based on analysis of all the laser-machine...

  13. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    Liaw L-H. and &,rns NMW%, Retinal References effects of the frequencý -doubled 15 3- m AG laser Histo- pathological comnparison with argon laser...much mare speaficaiIy locaiznd. (A-fl) X 630- Vol. S.90 No. 5. May 4. 1988 - 4D~~i .i ’’.A. ’A G. ii KieS R6,. -ft ’i 1’a’e- M-.r~.r ~c ji’N ot ýanccr...CHE-4o M-L Biological and biophysical properties of -,hc pntrialocyaninc-s. V. Photodynamic therapy of E.Mt-h mammary tu- tumor localizing component

  14. Laser-initiated explosive electron emission from flat germanium crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porshyn, V., E-mail: porshyn@uni-wuppertal.de; Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G. [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Physics Department, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany)

    2016-07-28

    Flat Sb-doped germanium (100) crystals were investigated in the triode configuration under pulsed tunable laser illumination (pulse duration t{sub laser} = 3.5 ns and photon energy hν = 0.54–5.90 eV) and under DC voltages <10{sup 4} V. Large bunch charges up to ∼1 μC were extracted from the cathodes for laser pulses >1 MW/cm{sup 2} corresponding to a high quantum efficiency up to 3.3% and cathode currents up to 417 A. This laser-induced explosive electron emission (EEE) from Ge was characterized by its voltage-, laser power- and hν-sensitivity. The analysis of the macroscopic surface damage caused by the EEE is included as well. Moreover, we have carried out first direct measurements of electron energy distributions produced during the EEE from the Ge samples. The measured electron spectra hint for electron excitations to the vacuum level of the bulk and emission from the plasma plume with an average kinetic energy of ∼0.8 eV.

  15. Storage Ring Technology for Free Electron Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    and 1,,) call be obtained quickly from F(.)) by dividing out the detector response P(W). If 1,(/) is modeled the inverse bunch length can be estimated...If a single harmonic of the comb spectrum of l(.’) is examined the change in the amplitude will be inversely proportional to the bunch-length change...obtained while operating the SRFEL as an amplier to an externa ’ laser [8,)]. All of the measurements presented here were obtained with svnchronous

  16. Electron acceleration using laser produced plasmas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Low density plasmas have long been of interest as a potential medium for particle acceleration since relativistic plasma waves are capable of supporting electric fields greater than 100 GeV/m. The physics of particle acceleration using plasmas will be reviewed, and new results will be discussed which have demonstrated that relatively narrow energy spread (<3%) beams having energies greater than 100 MeV can be produced from femtosecond laser plasma interactions. Future experiments and potential applications will also be discussed.

  17. Short Rayleigh Range Free Electron Laser Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, L H; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Wang, X J; Watanabe, T

    2005-01-01

    An important requirement for a high average power laser system is a manageable power density on the first optical element. One possibility to achieve this is a single pass amplifier which generates a short Rayleigh range (SRL) light beam. We present design parameters and calculated performances for several SRL configurations. These include a simulation of the optically guided (pinched) MW class FEL [1], the scalloped beam FEL amplifier [2] and high gain TOK amplifiers we propose to explore at our SDL facility.

  18. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  19. Laser and electron beam processing of silicon and gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-10-01

    Laser (photon) and electron beams provide a controlled source of heat by which surface layers of silicon and gallium arsenide can be rapidly melted and cooled with rates exceeding 10/sup 80/C/sec. The melting process has been used to remove displacement damage in ion implanted Si and GaAs, to remove dislocations, loops and precipitates in silicon and to study impurity segregation and solubility limits. The mechanisms associated with various phenomena will be examined. The possible impact of laser and electron beam processing on device technology, particularly with respect to solar cells is discussed.

  20. Search for electron EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the elementary particle has the sensitivity to the CP violation in the theories beyond the standard model (SM). The search for the EDM constitutes the stringent test to discriminate between the SM and beyond it. We plan to perform the electron EDM search by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom which has the largest enhancement factor of the electron EDM in the alkali atoms. In this paper, the present status of the laser cooled Fr factory that is being constructed at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University are reported.

  1. Control Chaotic Diffusion in a Single Pass Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniazzi, A

    2005-01-01

    We apply an innovative strategy to control chaotic diffusion in conservative systems to the case of a single pass Free Electron Laser. The core of our approach is a small apt modification of the system which channels chaos by building barriers to diffusion. By confining the electrons in phase space and limiting the oscillations of the dense core, we aim at stabilizing the laser intensity. Calculations are perfomed within the framework of a simplified Hamiltonian picture. Further extensions and future experimental applications are also discussed.

  2. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  3. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-07-23

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 {mu}m to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The

  4. Short electron bunches generated by perpendicularly crossing laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    Optical injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator by a low intensity orthogonally colliding laser pulse is investigated using 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The collision of the main laser pulse driving the plasma wave in the cavitated regime and the low intensity injection pulse affects the trajectories of electrons in the crossing region. As a consequence, some electrons are ejected into the front part of the bubble, and these electrons are subsequently trapped in the rear part of the bubble. The injected and accelerated electron bunch reaches a peak energy of 630 MeV after 8 ps of acceleration being as short as 7.0 fs and is quasimonoenergetic with a low energy spread of 20 MeV (3.8%), having a charge of several dozens of pC and a relatively large emittance of 2.27 π . mm . mrad. Two main injection mechanisms—crossing beatwave injection and injection by laser field preacceleration—were identified.

  5. Plasma Channel Diagnostic Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-09-09

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. The centroid position of low-intensity (<10{sup 14}Wcm{sup -2}) laser pulses focused at the input of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide was scanned and the exit positions recorded to determine the channel shape and depth with an accuracy of a few %. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel can be provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  6. Laser manufacturing for transparent, flexible and stretchable electronics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shutong; Yu, Yongchao; Feng, Guoying; Hu, Anming

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the interaction between femotsecond laser and polyimide with a high repetition femtosecond fiber laser and a precisely motorized 3D stage. We have found that high repetition femtosecond laser pulse train can effectively fabricate double-layer electrical conductive tracks inside a polyimide (PI) sheets by a single-time irradiation. This interaction comprised multi-photon absorption, dissociation of polymer molecules and the thermal accumulation. The experiment unveiled that dual-layer carbonization was a consequence of an inside micro-lens formed instantly as laser was just focused into the inside of polyimide. This micro-lens further focused the subsequent laser pulse to carbonize the polymer through multi-photon excitation, bond breaking and graphite layer reformation and eventually form the second electronic conductive layer. The second conductive layer was generated below the focal point. With the laser irradiating is kept at the same height, the top layer at the focused plane continued to absorb laser energy then carbonized into the conductive layer. We called the process as a kind of self-focusing phenomenon. We study the focus effect of inside microlenses under different laser powers and irradiation times. The gap of double electronic tracks embedded in the polyimide matrix can be adjusted with the laser processing parameters. When the gap is more than 30 micrometer, two conductive layers are electrically insulating. While the gap is smaller than 10 micrometer, two conductive layers are electrically connected. Various applications, such as, supercapacitors, capacitive sensors and the field effect transistors were investigated in the flexible PI sheets using this 3D double-layer electrical conductive architecture.

  7. Electron Acceleration By The Use Of Segmented Cylindrical Electrodes In An Inverse Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikrah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- In this paper we expend a theory of high gradient laser excited electron accelerator by the use of an inverse free-electron laser IFEL but with using new structure and design. The wiggler used in our scheme that is to say Paul wiggler is obtainedby segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltagesVosc tover 90-degrees segments. The inverse free-electron laser interaction can be demonstrated by the equations that govern the electron motion in the composed fields of both laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical research of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the electron gains the maximum energy at a short distance for high wiggler amplitude intensities a0w. In addition it is discovered that the electron energy gains various peaks for different initial axial velocities. It is seen that aappropriate small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces remarkably high energy gain. According to the transverse limitation of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this devise.

  8. Simulation of relativistically colliding laser-generated electron flows

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Sarri, Gianluca; Borghesi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The plasma dynamics resulting from the simultaneous impact, of two equal, ultra-intense laser pulses, in two spatially separated spots, onto a dense target is studied via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The simulations show that electrons accelerated to relativistic speeds, cross the target and exit at its rear surface. Most energetic electrons are bound to the rear surface by the ambipolar electric field and expand along it. Their current is closed by a return current in the target, and this current configuration generates strong surface magnetic fields. The two electron sheaths collide at the midplane between the laser impact points. The magnetic repulsion between the counter-streaming electron beams separates them along the surface normal direction, before they can thermalize through other beam instabilities. This magnetic repulsion is also the driving mechanism for the beam-Weibel (filamentation) instability, which is thought to be responsible for magnetic field growth close to the internal shocks of ...

  9. Nonlinear electron emission in ultrashort laser pulses and rescattering suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhin, E. A.; Preobrazhenskii, M. A.; Golovinski, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    The process of nonlinear electron emission from a metal surface under the action of femtosecond laser pulse with moderate intensity ~1011 W/cm2 is considered. One-dimensional model is formulated, taking into account the advantage of the p-polarized light in the nonlinear emission. The time dependent Schrödinger equation with fixed equilibrium boundary conditions is solved in the half-space using the Laplace transform technique. The energy spectrum of emitted electrons is presented, including analysis of dependence on the laser pulse parameters. In the framework of classical mechanics, the impact of additional dc electric field on the rescattering of emitted electron on the metal surface is investigated. The model reproduces the fiches of electron energy distribution and can be used at arbitrary Keldysh parameters.

  10. Electron bow-wave injection of electrons in laser-driven bubble acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y Y; Kawata, S; Yu, T P; Gu, Y Q; Sheng, Z M; Yu, M Y; Zhuo, H B; Liu, H J; Yin, Y; Takahashi, K; Xie, X Y; Liu, J X; Tian, C L; Shao, F Q

    2012-04-01

    An electron injection regime in laser wake-field acceleration, namely electron bow-wave injection, is investigated by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical model. In this regime electrons in the intense electron bow wave behind the first bubble catch up with the bubble tail and are trapped by the bubble finally, resulting in considerable enhancement of the total trapped electron number. For example, with the increase of the laser intensity from 2 × 10(19) to 1 × 10(20) W/cm(2), the electron trapping changes from normal self-injection to bow-wave injection and the trapped electron number is enhanced by two orders of magnitude. An analytical model is proposed to explain the numerical observation.

  11. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  12. Short energetic electron bunches from laser wakefield accelerator with orthogonally polarized perpendicularly crossed laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-05-01

    Electron acceleration with optical injection by a perpendicularly propagating and orthogonally polarized low intensity laser pulse into a nonlinear plasma wave driven by a short intense laser pulse was explored by particle- in-cell simulations. The scheme presented here provides an energetic electron bunch in the first ion cavity with a low energy spread. The electron bunch short and compact, with the mean energy about 400 MeV and a low energy spread about 10 MeV in time of 6 ps of acceleration. The injected charge is several tens of pC for the low intensity of the injection pulse. Initial positions of electrons forming the energetic bunch are shown and then these electrons are followed during the simulation in order to understand the injection process and determine electron bunch properties.

  13. Quantum/classical mode evolution in free electron laser oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, P.; Colson, W. B.; Freedman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of oscillator evolution and mode competition in free electron lasers is studied. Relativistic quantum field theory is used to calculate electron wave functions, the angular distribution of spontaneous emission, and the transition rates for stimulated emission and absorption in each mode. The photon rate equation for the weakfield regime is presented. This rate equation is applied to oscillator evolution with a conventional undulator, a two-stage optical klystron, and a tapered undulator. The effects of noise are briefly discussed.

  14. Laser-based coatings removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A. [F2 Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  15. Microlens Array Laser Transverse Shaping Technique for Photoemission Electron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ha, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (POSTECH) (Korea, Republic of); Qiang, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Gai, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wisniewski, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Edstrom, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Santucci, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-09-06

    A common issue encountered in photoemission electron sources used in electron accelerators is distortion of the laser spot due to non ideal conditions at all stages of the amplification. Such a laser spot at the cathode may produce asymmetric charged beams that will result in degradation of the beam quality due to space charge at early stages of acceleration and fail to optimally utilize the cathode surface. In this note we study the possibility of using microlens arrays to dramatically improve the transverse uniformity of the drive laser pulse on UV photocathodes at both Fermilab Accelerator Science \\& Technology (FAST) facility and Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). In particular, we discuss the experimental characterization of the homogeneity and periodic patterned formation at the photocathode. Finally, we compare the experimental results with the paraxial analysis, ray tracing and wavefront propagation software.

  16. Nonlinear Optics with a Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliel, E. R.; van der Ham, E. W. M.; Vrehen, Q. H. F.; Barmentlo, M.; Thooft, G. W.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    We report on an experiment on spectroscopic infrared-visible Sum-Frequency Generation (SFG) with a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) as the IR-source. The SFG spectrum of gallium phosphide has been investigated in detail in an experiment covering the unsurpassed spectral range from 20 to 32 mum. This

  17. Mechanisms for the production of harmonics in free electron lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgin, J.N.; Penman, C.

    1991-01-01

    Harmonics in the radiation of a free electron laser are useful for extending the range of tuning, may originate in spontaneous or parametric processes, and can take part in stimulated emission or amplification. These mechanisms exhibit interesting analogies with those of nonlinear optics. Apart from

  18. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  19. Accuracy of laser measurements improved by pulse autocorrelator electronic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, S. J.

    1967-01-01

    Pulse autocorrelator electronic system discriminates between the dispersion effect of a disturbed laser signal and background noise by detecting multipath arrivals of Gaussian-shaped signal pulses. The autocorrelation function is time-dependent and can be determined by integrating the product of a received pulse and its delayed replicas.

  20. Laguerre-Gaussian Modes in the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    www.fel.duke.edu, 20 March 2007. [6] W.B. Colson, C. Pellegrini and A. Renieri, Free Electron Laser Handbook, Volume 6, Chapter 5, North-Holland...California 6. Professor Peter Crooker Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 7. Chairman, Physics Department Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 8. Air Attache Embassy of Greece Washington, DC

  1. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion ...

  2. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Irman, A.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds) relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent) energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift

  3. Electron yield enhancement in a laser wakefield accelerator driven by asymmetric laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Trines, R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; van Tilborg, J.; Faure, J.

    2002-08-01

    The effect of asymmetric laser pulses on electron yield from a laser wakefield accelerator has been experimentally studied using > 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} plasmas and a 10 TW, > 45 fs, Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser. Laser pulse shape was controlled through non-linear chirp with a grating pair compressor. Pulses (76 fs FWHM) with a steep rise and positive chirp were found to significantly enhance the electron yield compared to pulses with a gentle rise and negative chirp. Theory and simulation show that fast rising pulses can generate larger amplitude wakes that seed the growth of the self-modulation instability and that frequency chirp is of minimal importance for the experimental parameters.

  4. Strongly directed electron emission in non-sequential double ionization of Ne by intense laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshammer, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Feuerstein, B [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Fischer, D [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Dorn, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Schroeter, C D [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Hoehr, C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-67119 Heidelberg (Germany); Rottke, H [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Trump, C [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Wittmann, M [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Korn, G [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, K [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Sandner, W [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2003-03-28

    Double ionization of Ne by 25 fs, 1.0 PW cm{sup -2} laser pulses has been explored in a kinematically complete experiment using a 'reaction microscope'. Electrons are found to be emitted into a narrow cone along the laser polarization ({epsilon}), much more confined than for single ionization, with a broad maximum in their energy distribution along {epsilon}. Correlated momentum spectra show both electrons being ejected into the same hemisphere, in sharp contrast to predictions based on field-free (e, 2e) recollision dynamics, but in overall agreement with recent semiclassical calculations for He. (letter to the editor)

  5. Free Electron Laser Research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-03

    given the time Transactions in Nuclear Science). required to lower the undulator after stable operation has been <ummary achieved, the actual current...C.N.E.N. engaged in nuclear physics. The Centre di Frascati FEL experimental project underC.P. 65 the leadership of Renieri was C.P. 5 Rfunded by the...injection); modification to injection from Instituto Nazionale di Fisica within the cavity (Kapitza Nuclere injection) has increased the electron beam

  6. Laser-induced electron diffraction for dynamic imaging of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chii-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Electron diffraction is the well-established tool for probing the structure of gas-phase molecules near the equilibrium geometry. To study chemical dynamics ultrashort electron pulses below a few tens of femtoseconds are needed. Laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) is a method where molecules can be probed with femtosecond temporal resolution and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. In LIED, molecules are exposed to an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The electrons that have been previously removed by the laser field can be driven back later to rescatter with the parent molecular ion. Using diffraction images from large-angle backscattered events, sub-angstrom spatial resolution can be achieved with tens to hundreds eV electrons. Recent LIED experimental results showing bond breaking in molecules will be illustrated. Practical issues related to the retrieval of diffraction images from LIED on aligned molecules and possibilities of real-time imaging of dissociating molecules using LIED will be presented. US Department of Energy. This work is performed in collaboration with Anh Thu Le (Kansas State University) and the experimental group of Jens Biegert (ICFO, Barcelona).

  7. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  8. A Compact Beam Source for Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingchang; Xu, Zhizhan; Yu, Jinhui; Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jongmin

    2000-10-01

    A compact beam source produced by pseudospark discharge for free electron lasers is developed. An impedance match between a Marx generator and a pseudospark discharge chamber is analyzed, the impedance characteristic curve for the pseudospark discharge chamber is measured for the first time. The configuration of the new device is described, it has a length of one meter; the original pulse line accelerator has total length of 6 meters. A voltage of 300 kV, a current of 4 kA for the compact device is measured. The electron beam has a diameter of 1.5 mm and has self-pinch effect. The beam has a brightness of 10^12 A/(m rad)^2, as same as a brightness from photo-cathode. The compact beam source can be used for free electron lasers and high power switch.

  9. Relativistic electron acceleration by mJ-class kHz lasers normally incident on liquid targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feister, Scott; Austin, Drake R; Morrison, John T; Frische, Kyle D; Orban, Chris; Ngirmang, Gregory; Handler, Abraham; Smith, Joseph R H; Schillaci, Mark; LaVerne, Jay A; Chowdhury, Enam A; Freeman, R R; Roquemore, W M

    2017-08-07

    We report observation of kHz-pulsed-laser-accelerated electron energies up to 3 MeV in the -klaser (backward) direction from a 3 mJ laser interacting at normal incidence with a solid density, flowing-liquid target. The electrons/MeV/s.r. >1 MeV recorded here using a mJ-class laser exceeds or equals that of prior super-ponderomotive electron studies employing lasers at lower repetition-rates and oblique incidence. Focal intensity of the 40-fs-duration laser is 1.5 · 1018 W cm-2, corresponding to only ∼80 keV electron ponderomotive energy. Varying laser intensity confirms electron energies in the laser-reflection direction well above what might be expected from ponderomotive scaling in normal-incidence laser-target geometry. This direct, normal-incidence energy spectrum measurement is made possible by modifying the final focusing off-axis-paraboloid (OAP) mirror with a central hole that allows electrons to pass, and restoring laser intensity through adaptive optics. A Lanex-based, optics-free high-acquisition rate (>100 Hz) magnetic electron-spectrometer was developed for this study to enable shot-to-shot statistical analysis and real-time feedback, which was leveraged in finding optimal pre-plasma conditions. 3D Particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction show qualitative super-ponderomotive spectral agreement with experiment. The demonstration of a high-repetition-rate, high-flux source containing >MeV electrons from a few-mJ, 40 fs laser and a simple liquid target encourages development of future ≥kHz-repetition, fs-duration electron-beam applications.

  10. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  11. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, John

    2013-08-29

    This thesis reports on the observation of dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons via the inverse Smith-Purcell effect in the optical regime. Evanescent modes in the vicinity of a periodic grating structure can travel at the same velocity as the electrons along the grating surface. A longitudinal electric field component is used to continuously impart momentum onto the electrons. This is only possible in the near-field of a suitable photonic structure, which means that the electron beam has to pass the structure within about one wavelength. In our experiment we exploit the third spatial harmonic of a single fused silica grating excited by laser pulses derived from a Titanium:sapphire oscillator and accelerate non-relativistic 28 keV electrons. We measure a maximum energy gain of 280 eV, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 25 MeV/m, already comparable with state-of-the-art radio-frequency linear accelerators. To experience this acceleration gradient the electrons approach the grating closer than 100 nm. We present the theory behind grating-based particle acceleration and discuss simulation results of dielectric laser acceleration in the near-field of photonic grating structures, which is excited by near-infrared laser light. Our measurements show excellent agreement with our simulation results and therefore confirm the direct acceleration with the light field. We further discuss the acceleration inside double grating structures, dephasing effects of non-relativistic electrons as well as the space charge effect, which can limit the attainable peak currents of these novel accelerator structures. The photonic structures described in this work can be readily concatenated and therefore represent a scalable realization of dielectric laser acceleration. Furthermore, our structures are directly compatible with the microstructures used for the acceleration of relativistic electrons demonstrated in parallel to this work by our collaborators in

  12. Measurements of electron-induced neutrons as a tool for determination of electron temperature of fast electrons in the task of optimization laser-produced plasma ions acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, H; Nishiuchi, M; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Fukami, T; Matsukawa, K; Kanasaki, M; Fukuda, Y; Yogo, A; Esirkepov, T; Kiriyama, H; Shimomura, T; Nakai, Y; Tanoue, M; Torimoto, K; Okamoto, M; Sato, T; Niita, K; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    High intensity laser-plasma interaction has attracted considerable interest for a number of years. The laser-plasma interaction is accompanied by generation of various charged particle beams, such as high-energy proton and ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M; same as multi-charged ions). Results of simultaneous novel measurements of electron-induced photonuclear neutrons (photoneutron), which are a diagnostic of the laser-plasma interaction, are proposed to use for optimization of the laser-plasma ion generation. The proposed method is demonstrated by the laser irradiation with the intensity of 1 × 10(21) W/cm(2) on the metal foil target. The photoneutrons are measured by using NE213 liquid scintillation detectors. Heavy-ion signal is registered with the CR-39 track detector simultaneously. The measured signals of the electron-induced photoneutrons are well reproduced by using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System. The results obtained provide useful approach for analyzing the various laser based ion beams.

  13. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  14. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today’s ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources.

  15. submitter Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Scisciò, M; Migliorati, M; Mostacci, A; Palumbo, L; Papaphilippou, Y; Antici, P

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupo...

  16. Transverse Laser Beam Shaping in High Brightness Electron Gun at ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, S

    2005-01-01

    The brightness of electron beams from a photo injector is influenced by the transverse and longitudinal distribution of the laser beam illuminating the cathode. Previous studies at Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility have shown that formation of an ideal e-beam with lowest transverse emittance requires uniform circular distribution of the emitted electrons. The use of the uniformly distributed power of the laser beam may not lead to that of the emitted electrons because of the non-uniform quantum efficiency. A proper shaping of the laser beam can compensate for this non-uniformity. In this paper we describe the use of digital light processing (DLP) technique based on digital mirror device (DMD) for spatial modulation of the laser beam, for measurements of the quantum efficiency map, and for creating the desirable e-beam density profiles. A DMD is aμelectronic mechanical system (MEMS) comprising of millions of highly reflectiveμmirrors controlled by underlying electronics. We present exper...

  17. Dynamics of electron injection in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Buck, A.; Chou, S.-W.; Schmid, K.; Shen, B.; Tajima, T.; Kaluza, M. C.; Veisz, L.

    2017-08-01

    The detailed temporal evolution of the laser-wakefield acceleration process with controlled injection, producing reproducible high-quality electron bunches, has been investigated. The localized injection of electrons into the wakefield has been realized in a simple way—called shock-front injection—utilizing a sharp drop in plasma density. Both experimental and numerical results reveal the electron injection and acceleration process as well as the electron bunch's temporal properties. The possibility to visualize the plasma wave gives invaluable spatially resolved information about the local background electron density, which in turn allows for an efficient suppression of electron self-injection before the controlled process of injection at the sharp density jump. Upper limits for the electron bunch duration of 6.6 fs FWHM, or 2.8 fs (r.m.s.) were found. These results indicate that shock-front injection not only provides stable and tunable, but also few-femtosecond short electron pulses for applications such as ultrashort radiation sources, time-resolved electron diffraction or for the seeding of further acceleration stages.

  18. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  19. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  20. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  1. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Martin; Ekerfelt, Henrik; Persson, Anna; Lundh, Olle

    2016-01-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second p...

  2. Electron beam, laser beam and plasma arc welding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    This program was undertaken as an initial step in establishing an evaluation framework which would permit a priori selection of advanced welding processes for specific applications. To this end, a direct comparison of laser beam, electron beam and arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was undertaken. Ti-6Al-4V was selected for use in view of its established welding characteristics and its importance in aerospace applications.

  3. Super-Radiant Free Electron Laser Measurement and Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Pyrometers Pyrometers measure the energy from electromagnetic radiation by the change in temperature due to the absorption of light in the detector. The...dependence of the resistivity of a certain material to measure the absorption of electromagnetic radiation . Like pyrometers , they are used for...relativistic electron bunches and a periodic magnetic field to generate coherent radiation . These types of lasers are of interest to the Navy because

  4. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  5. Free Electron Lasers with Slowly Varying Beam and Undulator Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Zhirong

    2005-01-01

    The performance of a free electron lasers (FEL) is affected when the electron beam energy varies alone the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime until FEL saturation. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theory of FELs with slowly-varying beam and undulator parameters. A general method is developed to apply the WKB approximation to the beam-radiation system by employing the adjoint eigenvector that is orthogonal to the eigenfunctions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations. This method may be useful for other slowly varying processes in beam dynamics.

  6. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  7. Electron Rephasing in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Ta Phuoc, K; Lifschitz, A; Grittani, G; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Chou, S W; Veisz, L; Malka, V

    2015-10-09

    An important limit for energy gain in laser-plasma wakefield accelerators is the dephasing length, after which the electron beam reaches the decelerating region of the wakefield and starts to decelerate. Here, we propose to manipulate the phase of the electron beam in the wakefield, in order to bring the beam back into the accelerating region, hence increasing the final beam energy. This rephasing is operated by placing an upward density step in the beam path. In a first experiment, we demonstrate the principle of this technique using a large energy spread electron beam. Then, we show that it can be used to increase the energy of monoenergetic electron beams by more than 50%.

  8. Mobility of Electron in DNA Crystals by Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    The mobility of electrons in laser radiated DNA is closed to the energy transfer and energy migration of a biological molecule. Arrhenius has studied the conductivity of the electrons in a biological molecule. But his result is far from the experimental result and meanwhile the relation between some parameters in his theory and the micro-quantities in DNA is not very clear. In this paper, we propose a new phonon model of electron mobility in DNA and use Lippman-Schwinger equation and S-matrix theory to study the mobility of electrons in DNA crystal. The result is relatively close to the experiment result and some parameters in Arrhenius theory are explained in our work.

  9. Patterning and electronic tuning of laser scribed graphene for flexible all-carbon devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Veronica; Dubin, Sergey; El-Kady, Maher F; Lech, Andrew; Wang, Yue; Weiller, Bruce H; Kaner, Richard B

    2012-02-28

    Engineering a low-cost graphene-based electronic device has proven difficult to accomplish via a single-step fabrication process. Here we introduce a facile, inexpensive, solid-state method for generating, patterning, and electronic tuning of graphene-based materials. Laser scribed graphene (LSG) is shown to be successfully produced and selectively patterned from the direct laser irradiation of graphite oxide films under ambient conditions. Circuits and complex designs are directly patterned onto various flexible substrates without masks, templates, post-processing, transferring techniques, or metal catalysts. In addition, by varying the laser intensity and laser irradiation treatments, the electrical properties of LSG can be precisely tuned over 5 orders of magnitude of conductivity, a feature that has proven difficult with other methods. This inexpensive method for generating LSG on thin flexible substrates provides a mode for fabricating a low-cost graphene-based NO(2) gas sensor and enables its use as a heterogeneous scaffold for the selective growth of Pt nanoparticles. The LSG also shows exceptional electrochemical activity that surpasses other carbon-based electrodes in electron charge transfer rate as demonstrated using a ferro-/ferricyanide redox couple.

  10. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  11. Laser-ion acceleration via anomalous electron heating

    CERN Document Server

    Yogo, A; Iwata, N; Tosaki, S; Morace, A; Arikawa, Y; Fujioka, S; Nishimura, H; Sagisaka, A; Johzaki, T; Matsuo, K; Kamitsukasa, N; Kojima, S; Nagatomo, H; Nakai, M; Shiraga, H; Murakami, M; Tokita, S; Kawanaka, J; Miyanaga, N; Yamanoi, K; Norimatsu, T; Sakagami, H; Bulanov, S V; Kondo, K; Azechi, H

    2016-01-01

    Using a kilojoule class laser, we demonstrate for the first time that high-contrast picosecond pulses are advantageous for ion acceleration. We show that a laser pulse with optimum duration and a large focal spot accelerates electrons beyond the ponderomotive energy. This anomalous electron heating enables efficient ion acceleration reaching 52 MeV at an intensity of 1.2X10^19 Wcm^-2. The proton energy observed agrees quantitatively with a one-dimensional plasma expansion model newly developed by taking the anomalous heating effect into account. The heating process is confirmed by both measurements with an electron spectrometer and a one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. By extending the pulse duration to 6 ps, 5% energy conversion efficiency to protons (50 J out of 1 kJ laser energy) is achieved with an intensity of 10^18-Wcm^-2. The present results are quite encouraging for realizing ion-driven fast ignition and novel ion beamlines.

  12. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  13. A robust fibre laser system for electro-optic electron bunch profile measurements at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissmann, Laurens-Georg

    2012-08-15

    For the electro-optic measurement of electron bunch profiles at FLASH a robust ytterbium doped fibre laser (YDFL) system has been developed consisting of a laser oscillator and a two-staged amplifier. The oscillator is designed to meet the specifications of high reliability and low noise operation. The amplifier makes use of tailored nonlinearity to enhance the spectral bandwidth of the output laser pulses. Active repetition rate control enables sub-picosecond synchronisation of the laser to the accelerator reference RF. Using a two-stage gating scheme the output pulse train repetition rate is adopted to the accelerator repetition rate. An experimental site used for electro-optic electron bunch diagnostics has been redesigned to support single-shot bunch profile measurements based on spectral decoding. An existing bunch profile monitor with a similar laser system was upgraded and electro-optic bunch profile measurements were conducted, allowing for a comparison with measurements done with other longitudinal electron bunch diagnostics and with former measurements.

  14. Exact and variational calculations of eigenmodes for three-dimensional free electron laser interaction with a warm electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    I present an exact calculation of free-electron-laser (FEL) eigenmodes (fundamental as well as higher order modes) in the exponential-gain regime. These eigenmodes specify transverse profiles and exponential growth rates of the laser field, and they are self-consistent solutions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the FEL interaction taking into account the effects due to energy spread, emittance and betatron oscillations of the electron beam, and diffraction and guiding of the laser field. The unperturbed electron distribution is assumed to be of Gaussian shape in four dimensional transverse phase space and in the energy variable, but uniform in longitudinal coordinate. The focusing of the electron beam is assumed to be matched to the natural wiggler focusing in both transverse planes. With these assumptions the eigenvalue problem can be reduced to a numerically manageable integral equation and solved exactly with a kernel iteration method. An approximate, but more efficient solution of the integral equation is also obtained for the fundamental mode by a variational technique, which is shown to agree well with the exact results. Furthermore, I present a handy formula, obtained from interpolating the numerical results, for a quick calculation of FEL exponential growth rate. Comparisons with simulation code TDA will also be presented. Application of these solutions to the design and multi-dimensional parameter space optimization for an X-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC linac will be demonstrated. In addition, a rigorous analysis of transverse mode degeneracy and hence the transverse coherence of the X-ray FEL will be presented based on the exact solutions of the higher order guided modes.

  15. Electron beam optics and trajectory control in the Fermi free electron laser delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Mitri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam optics (particle betatron motion and trajectory (centroid secular motion in the FERMI@Elettra free electron laser (FEL are modeled and experimentally controlled by means of the elegant particle tracking code. This powerful tool, well known to the accelerator community, is here for the first time fully integrated into the Tango-server based high level software of an FEL facility, thus ensuring optimal charge transport efficiency and superposition of the beam Twiss parameters to the design optics. The software environment, the experimental results collected during the commissioning of FERMI@Elettra, and the comparison with the model are described. As a result, a matching of the beam optics to the design values is accomplished and quantified in terms of the betatron mismatch parameter with relative accuracy down to the 10^{-3} level. The beam optics control allows accurate energy spread measurements with sub-keV accuracy in dedicated dispersive lines. Trajectory correction and feedback is achieved to a 5  μm level with the implementation of theoretical response matrices. In place of the empirical ones, they speed up the process of trajectory control when the machine optics is changed, avoid particle losses that may occur during the on-line computation of experimental matrices, and confirm a good agreement of the experimental magnetic lattice with the model.

  16. Sub-picosecond snapshots of fast electrons from high intensity laser-matter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, R; Anania, M P; Bisesto, F; Botton, M; Castellano, M; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Curcio, A; Ferrario, M; Galletti, M; Henis, Z; Petrarca, M; Schleifer, E; Zigler, A

    2016-12-26

    The interaction of a high-intensity short-pulse laser with thin solid targets produces electron jets that escape the target and positively charge it, leading to the formation of the electrostatic potential that in turn governs the ion acceleration. The typical timescale of such phenomena is on the sub-picosecond level. Here we show, for the first time, temporally-resolved measurements of the first released electrons that escaped from the target, so-called fast electrons. Their total charge, energy and temporal profile are provided by means of a diagnostics based on Electro-Optical Sampling with temporal resolution below 100 fs.

  17. Continuous point-like high-temperature laser discharge produced by terahertz free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kubarev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A continuous point-like laser discharge of record high temperature has been produced in argon at atmospheric pressure with focusing of the radiation of the Novosibirsk terahertz free electron laser (NovoFEL. According to spectral measurements, the temperature in the center of the millimeter-sized plasma sphere was 28000 K at a plasma density of 1.5×1017 cm-3 and an average NovoFEL power of 200 W at a wavelength of 130 μm (2.3 THz.

  18. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project`s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies.

  19. Quantum regime of free electron lasers starting from noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bonifacio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the quantum regime of a high-gain free-electron laser starting from noise. In the first part, we neglect the radiation propagation and we formulate a quantum linear theory of the N-particle free-electron laser Hamiltonian model, quantizing both the radiation field and the electron motion. Quantum effects such as frequency shift, line narrowing, quantum limitation for bunching and energy spread, and minimum uncertainty states are described. Using a second-quantization formalism, we demonstrate quantum entanglement between the recoiling electrons and the radiation field. In the second part, we describe the field classically but we include propagation effects (i.e. slippage and we demonstrate the novel regime of quantum SASE with high temporal coherence and discrete spectrum. Furthermore, we describe “quantum purification” of SASE: the classical chaotic spiking behavior disappears and the spectrum becomes a series of discrete very narrow lines which correspond to transitions between discrete momentum eigenstates (which originate high temporal coherence.

  20. Comparative study of electron and laser beam surface alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkov, Stefan Ts.; Petrov, Peter, Iv.; Lazarova, Rumiana L.

    2016-01-01

    High intensity energy fluxes, such as electron beams and laser beams are widely used for surface alloying of metals and alloys. These technologies are able to cause the formation of the so called melt pool where the alloying elements interact each other. It is known that the homogenization of the surface alloy can be explained by intense Marangoni convection, caused by the high temperature gradient in the melt pool. The convection is inversely to the speed of the specimen motion during the alloying process and therefore, the choice of low alloying velocity will reflect on more homogeneous structure of the obtained alloy. In this study, a comparison of the structure and properties of electron and laser beam surface alloying of aluminium with niobium was conducted. The phase composition of the alloyed layers was determined by XRD (X-ray diffraction) with CuKα radiation. The microstructure was studied by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Chemical analysis was carried out using an EDX electron probe microanalyser. The microhardness of the obtained samples is also measured and compared with respect to the technology of the formation of each surface alloy.

  1. High average current electron guns for high-power free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Sprangle

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High average power free-electron lasers (FELs require high average current electron injectors capable of generating high quality, short duration electron bunches with a repetition rate equal to the frequency of the rf linac. In this paper we propose, analyze, and simulate an rf-gated, gridded thermionic electron gun for use in high average power FELs. Thermionic cathodes can provide the necessary high current, have long lifetimes, and require modest vacuums. In the proposed configuration the rf-gated grid is modulated at the fundamental and 3rd harmonic of the linac frequency. The addition of the 3rd harmonic on the grid results in shorter electron bunches. In this configuration, every rf bucket of the linac accelerating field contains an electron bunch. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that this approach can provide the necessary charge per bunch, bunch duration, longitudinal and transverse emittance, and repetition rate for high average power FELs operating in the IR regime.

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of electron beam deposited dielectrics for 1-m class optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervy, Adrien; Gallais, Laurent; Chériaux, Gilles; Mouricaud, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In order to transport multi-petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser beams with large spectral bandwidth, specific mirrors have to be designed and manufactured. We report on an experimental study of the laser-damage resistance and other optical properties of coating materials deposited in a 1-m class coating chamber. The study is conducted on single-layer coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation at 500 fs. Based on the experience of large optics for nanosecond applications, hafnia and silica are particularly investigated. However, in the case of sub-15 fs, the spectral specifications for PW beam transport mirrors cannot be reached by classical high laser-resistant quarter-wave SiO2/HfO2 stacks. Therefore, we investigate the laser resistance of different dielectrics of interest deposited with electron-beam processes: Al2O3, Y2O3, Sc2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5, TiO2. The influence of multiple pulse irradiations and environmental conditions, such as vacuum and temperature, is studied. With the investigation of multilayer stacks, we also show that there is no difference in behavior when a film is studied as a single layer or embedded in a stack. Based on these results, we were able to optimize high reflective (>99.5%), broadband (300 nm) and high laser-induced damage threshold (2.5 J/cm2) mirrors for PW applications.

  3. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Reitsma, A.J.W.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001); Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002)]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser

  4. Infrared free electron laser enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, Kunio; Uchizono, Takeyuki; Suzuki, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Kazushi

    2005-08-01

    It is necessary to control enhancement of transdermal drug delivery with non-invasive. The present study was investigated to assess the effectivity of enhancing the drug delivery by irradiating 6-μm region mid infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL). The enhancement of transdermal drug (lidocaine) delivery of the samples (hairless mouse skin) irradiated with lasers was examined for flux (μg/cm2/h) and total penetration amount (μg/cm2) of lidocaine by High performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The flux and total amount penatration date was enhanced 200-300 fold faster than the control date by the laser irradiation. FEL irradiating had the stratum corneum, and had the less thermal damage in epidermis. The effect of 6-μm region MIR-FEL has the enhancement of transdermal drug delivery without removing the stratum corneum because it has the less thermal damage. It leads to enhancement drug delivery system with non-invasive laser treatment.

  5. Electron optical injection with head-on and countercrossing colliding laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, H; Daito, I; Kando, M; Hayashi, Y; Kawase, K; Kameshima, T; Fukuda, Y; Homma, T; Ma, J; Chen, L-M; Esirkepov, T Zh; Pirozhkov, A S; Koga, J K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Kiriyama, H; Okada, H; Shimomura, T; Nakai, Y; Tanoue, M; Sasao, H; Wakai, D; Matsuura, H; Kondo, S; Kanazawa, S; Sugiyama, A; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-06

    A high stability electron bunch is generated by laser wakefield acceleration with the help of a colliding laser pulse. The wakefield is generated by a laser pulse; the second laser pulse collides with the first pulse at 180 degrees and at 135 degrees realizing optical injection of an electron bunch. The electron bunch has high stability and high reproducibility compared with single pulse electron generation. In the case of 180 degrees collision, special measures have been taken to prevent damage. In the case of 135 degrees collision, since the second pulse is countercrossing, it cannot damage the laser system.

  6. Electron acceleration by laser fields in a gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, J.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the project is an investigation of topics related to the high-energy acceleration of electrons by means of suitably shaped laser beams in an inert gaseous medium. By slowing down the phase velocity of the fields by its index of refraction, the gas allows a cumulative interaction with the electrons resulting in net acceleration and also focusing. The objectives of the work reported here were twofold: (1) to participate as a consultant in the design and analysis of demonstration experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory by STI Optronics, a Belleview, WA company, under a separate DOE funded contract; (2) to perform further analytic and design work on the laser acceleration scheme originally proposed and explore a possible extension of the method to acceleration in vacuum using the same field configuration and analogous interaction process as with a gas. This report thus comprises an account of both activities. Section 2 is an overview of the various laser acceleration methods that have been proposed, in order to provide a framework to the work reported. Section 3 contains a list of meetings attended by the Principal Investigator to present his work and interact with research community colleagues and STI staff, and a list of publications containing work he co-authored or was acknowledged for. Section 4 summarizes the work performed by STI to which he contributed. Section 5 consists of the technical reports the Principal Investigator wrote describing his independent theoretical work elaborating and extending the scope of the original project.

  7. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  8. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  9. Two electron response to an intense x-ray free electron laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L R; Parker, J S; Meharg, K J; Armstrong, G S J; Taylor, K T, E-mail: l.moore@qub.ac.u [DAMTP, David Bates Building, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    New x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) promise an ultra-fast ultra-intense regime in which new physical phenomena, such as double core hole formation in at atom, should become directly observable. Ahead of x-ray FEL experiments, an initial key task is to theoretically explore such fundamental laser-atom interactions and processes. To study the response of a two-electron positive ion to an intense x-ray FEL pulse, our theoretical approach is a direct numerical integration, incorporating non-dipole Hamiltonian terms, of the full six-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present probabilities of double K-shell ionization in the two-electron positive ions Ne{sup 8+} and Ar{sup 16+} exposed to x-ray FEL pulses with frequencies in the range 50 au to 300 au and intensities in the range 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Design study of Thomson Laser-Electron X-ray Generator (LEX) for Millisecond Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Bessonov, E. G.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu Ya; Popov, N. L.; Dyachkov, N. V.; Postnov, A. A.; Vinogradov, S. L.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this concept study a laser-electron X-ray generator (LEX) is considered for the medical imaging of the inner vessel structure. It is demonstrated that the modern lasers and linear electron accelerators are suitable for the design of the new generation of angiography medical equipment combining higher spatial and time resolution with the reduced patient dose. Angiography setup based on LEXG can make use of different contrast media (iodine, gadolinium) working on absorption edge due to the narrow tuneable spectrum which is not possible with conventional X-ray tubes. In the present study all estimations are made for iodine-based contrast agents. The conclusion is that modern technologies allow practical implementation of LEX for angiography based on multibunch linear accelerator and photon storage device.

  11. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  12. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernick, Iddo K. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Marshall, Thomas C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at ~1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  13. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-03-29

    In this paper, we propose a seeding scheme that compresses an initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space of an electron beam by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C , where Cis the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Using two lasers as energy chirpers, such a modulation compression scheme can generate kilo-Ampershort wavelength current modulation with significant bunching factor from an initial a few tens Amper current. This compression scheme can also be used togenerate a prebunched single atto-second short wavelength current modulation and prebunched two color, two atto-second modulations.

  14. Gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Andrews

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. The theory describes the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, and assumes that the electron beam interacts with an evanescent mode traveling along the surface of a periodic waveguide with a rectangular profile. The phase velocity of the evanescent wave is synchronous with the electron velocity, but the group velocity is actually negative. The electron beam amplifies the evanescent wave, which does not itself radiate. According to this picture, the radiation observed emanating from the grating is Smith-Purcell radiation enhanced by the bunching of the electrons due to the interaction with the evanescent mode. There will also be radiation from the part of the evanescent mode that is outcoupled from the ends of the grating. This radiation appears at a lower frequency than the Smith-Purcell radiation. The new results explain both the gain and the radiation observed in the experiments of Urata and Walsh, and the cube-root current dependence of the gain inferred by Bakhtyari, Walsh, and Brownell.

  15. Electron acceleration by a radially polarized laser pulse during ionization of low density gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwar Pal Singh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration of electrons by a radially polarized intense laser pulse has been studied. The axial electric field of the laser is responsible for electron acceleration. The axial electric field increases with decreasing laser spot size; however, the laser pulse gets defocused sooner for smaller values and the electrons do not experience high electric field for long, reducing the energy they can reach. The electron remains confined in the electric field of the laser for longer and the electron energy peaks for the normalized laser spot size nearly equal to the normalized laser intensity parameter. Electron energy peaks for initial laser phase ϕ_{0}=π due to accelerating laser phase and decreases with transverse initial position of the electrons. The energy and angle of the emittance spectrum of the electrons generated during ionization of krypton and argon at low densities have been obtained and a right choice of laser parameters has been suggested to obtain high energy quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams. It has been found that argon is more suitable than krypton to obtain high energy electron beams due to higher ionization potential of inner shells for the former.

  16. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  17. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  18. Controlling electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization of triatomic molecules with orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Kling, M. F.; Emmanouilidou, A.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the control of electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization (FDI) of the two-electron triatomic molecule D3 + when driven by two orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. We employ a three-dimensional semiclassical model that fully accounts for the electron and nuclear motion in strong fields. We analyze the FDI probability and the distribution of the momentum of the escaping electron along the polarization direction of the longer wavelength and more intense laser field. These observables, when considered in conjunction, bear clear signatures of the prevalence or absence of electron-electron correlation in FDI, depending on the time delay between the two laser pulses. We find that D3 + is a better candidate than H2 for demonstrating also experimentally that electron-electron correlation indeed underlies FDI.

  19. Upgrade of laser and electron beam welding database

    CERN Document Server

    Furman, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to fix existing issues and update the existing database holding parameters of laser-beam and electron-beam welding machines. Moreover, the database had to be extended to hold the data for the new machines that arrived recently at the workshop. As a solution - the database had to be migrated to Oracle framework, the new user interface (using APEX) had to be designed and implemented with the integration with the CERN web services (EDMS, Phonebook, JMT, CDD and EDH).

  20. Review of x-ray free-electron laser theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhirong Huang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs are being developed as extremely bright sources for a next-generation x-ray facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory of the start-up, the exponential growth, and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission. The radiation characteristics of an x-ray FEL, including its transverse coherence, temporal characteristics, and harmonic content, are discussed. FEL performance in the presence of machine errors and undulator wakefields is examined. Various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are summarized.

  1. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  2. Plasma channel diagnostic based on laser centroid oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Lin, C.; Osterhoff, J.; Shiraishi, S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Tóth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-05-01

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. Experiments were performed using low-intensity (<1014 Wcm-2) laser pulses focused onto the entrance of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. Scanning the laser centroid position at the input of the channel and recording the exit position allows determination of the channel depth with an accuracy of a few percent, measurement of the transverse channel shape, and inference of the matched spot size. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  3. Three-dimensional simulation of laser–plasma-based electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A sequential three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulation code PICPSI-3D with a user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed and used to study the interaction of plasma with ultrahigh intensity laser radiation. A case study of laser–plasma-based electron acceleration has been carried out ...

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of laser–plasma-based electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sequential three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulation code PICPSI-3D with a user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed and used to study the interaction of plasma with ultrahigh intensity laser radiation. A case study of laser–plasma-based electron acceleration has been carried out to assess ...

  5. Optical control of hard X-ray polarization by electron injection in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Uschmann, Ingo; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Kämpfer, Tino; Landgraf, Björn; Jäckel, Oliver; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma particle accelerators could provide more compact sources of high-energy radiation than conventional accelerators. Moreover, because they deliver radiation in femtosecond pulses, they could improve the time resolution of X-ray absorption techniques. Here we show that we can measure and control the polarization of ultra-short, broad-band keV photon pulses emitted from a laser-plasma-based betatron source. The electron trajectories and hence the polarization of the emitted X-rays are experimentally controlled by the pulse-front tilt of the driving laser pulses. Particle-in-cell simulations show that an asymmetric plasma wave can be driven by a tilted pulse front and a non-symmetric intensity distribution of the focal spot. Both lead to a notable off-axis electron injection followed by collective electron–betatron oscillations. We expect that our method for an all-optical steering is not only useful for plasma-based X-ray sources but also has significance for future laser-based particle accelerators. PMID:24026068

  6. Dynamic molecular structure retrieval from low-energy laser-induced electron diffraction spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Dinh-Duy T.; Phan, Ngoc-Loan T.; Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang

    2017-12-01

    A recently developed quantitative rescattering theory showed that a laser-free elastic cross section can be separated from laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) spectra. Based upon this idea, Blaga et al investigated the possibility of reconstructing molecular structure from LIED spectra (2012 Nature 483 7388). In the above study, an independent atoms model (IAM) was used to interpret high-energy electron–molecule collisions induced by a mid-infrared laser. Our research aims to extend the application range of this structural retrieval method to low-energy spectra induced by more common near-infrared laser sources. The IAM is insufficient in this case, so we switch to a more comprehensive model—the multiple scattering (MS) theory. From the original version concerning only neutral targets, we upgrade the model so that it is compatible with electron–ion collisions at low energy. With available LIED experiment data of CO2 and O2, the upgraded MS is shown to be greatly effective as a tool for molecular imaging from spectra induced by a near-infrared laser. The captured image is at about 2 fs after the ionization, shorter than the period 4–6 fs by using the mid-infrared laser in Blaga’s experiment.

  7. Longitudinal space charge assisted echo seeding of a free-electron laser with laser-spoiler noise suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hacker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed lasers are employed to improve the temporal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL light. However, when these seed pulses are short relative to the particle bunch, the noisy, temporally incoherent radiation from the unseeded electrons can overwhelm the coherent, seeded radiation. In this paper, a technique to seed a particle bunch with an external laser is presented in which a new mechanism to improve the contrast between coherent and incoherent free electron laser radiation is employed together with a novel, simplified echo-seeding method. The concept relies on a combination of longitudinal space charge wakes and an echo-seeding technique to make a short, coherent pulse of FEL light together with noise background suppression. Several different simulation codes are used to illustrate the concept with conditions at the soft x-ray free-electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH.

  8. A Low-Energy-Spread Rf Accelerator for a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher,

  9. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energ...

  10. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)]|[Graduate Univ. for Advanced Stuides, Okazaki (Japan); Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  11. Simulated electronic heterodyne recording and processing of pulsed-laser holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic recording of pulsed-laser holograms is proposed. The polarization sensitivity of each resolution element of the detector is controlled independently to add an arbitrary phase to the image waves. This method which can be used to simulate heterodyne recording and to process three-dimensional optical images, is based on a similar method for heterodyne recording and processing of continuous-wave holograms.

  12. Diode Laser Based LIF Diagnostics for Argon and Helium Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, E.; Boivin, R. F.; Compton, C.; Hardin, R.; Keesee, A.; Kline, J. L.; Scime, E. E.

    2002-11-01

    A diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic that uses an inexpensive diode laser system is presented. The same diode laser is used to pump Ar II and He I transitions to obtain the ion and the neutral temperature of the respective species. The 1 MHz bandwidth diode laser has a Littrow external cavity with a mode-hop free tuning range up to 15 GHz and with a total power output of about 10 mWatt. The wavelength is measured by a wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevent wavelength drift. For the argon ion population, the laser tuned at 668.61 nm, is used to pump the 3d4F7/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p4D5/2 excited level. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p4D5/2 and the 4s4P3/2 levels (442.6 nm) is monitored by a photomultiplier detector. For neutral helium, the laser is tuned at 667.82 nm to pump a fraction of the electron population from the 21P state to the 31D upper level. Although the 21P level is not a metastable state, the close proximity of 21S metastable level makes this new He I LIF possible in collisional plasmas. Some electrons of this 31D level undergo collisional excitation transfer (optically allowed transition) to the 31P. In turn, this state decay to the metastable 21S by emitting 501.6 nm fluorescence photons. The new LIF diagnostic has been developed at West Virginia University (WVU) and tested on the Hot hELIcon eXperiment (HELIX) plasma device. Ion and neutral temperatures obtained using this new LIF diagnostic are presented and compared to previous measurements performed with a more expensive and elaborate ring dye laser system.

  13. Electronically Excited C2 from Laser Photodissociated C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Scott, Carl D.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C2 and, at early times, also from a black body continuum. The C2 radiation is observed only when C60 is excited by green (532 nm) and not with IR (1064 nm) laser radiation at energy densities of about 1.5 J/square cm. Transient measurements indicate that there are two characteristic periods of decay of radiation. The first period, lasting about 2 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 0.3 micro seconds. The second period, lasting at least 50 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 5 micro seconds. These characteristic times are thought to be associated with cooling of C60 molecules or nanosized carbon particles during the early period; and with electronically excited C2 that is a decomposition product of laser excited C60, C58, ... molecules during the later period.

  14. Generating Periodic Terahertz Structures in a Relativistic Electron Beam through Frequency Down-Conversion of Optical Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Michael

    2012-07-19

    We report generation of density modulation at terahertz (THz) frequencies in a relativistic electron beam through laser modulation of the beam longitudinal phase space. We show that by modulating the energy distribution of the beam with two lasers, density modulation at the difference frequency of the two lasers can be generated after the beam passes through a chicane. In this experiment, density modulation around 10 THz was generated by down-converting the frequencies of an 800 nm laser and a 1550 nm laser. The central frequency of the density modulation can be tuned by varying the laser wavelengths, beam energy chirp, or momentum compaction of the chicane. This technique can be applied to accelerator-based light sources for generation of coherent THz radiation and marks a significant advance toward tunable narrow-band THz sources.

  15. Design of sub-Angstrom compact free-electron laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Fares, Hesham; Ferrario, Massimo; McNeil, Brian W. J.; Robb, Gordon, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose for first time practical parameters to construct a compact sub-Angstrom Free Electron Laser (FEL) based on Compton backscattering. Our recipe is based on using picocoulomb electron bunch, enabling very low emittance and ultracold electron beam. We assume the FEL is operating in a quantum regime of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The fundamental quantum feature is a significantly narrower spectrum of the emitted radiation relative to classical SASE. The quantum regime of the SASE FEL is reached when the momentum spread of the electron beam is smaller than the photon recoil momentum. Following the formulae describing SASE FEL operation, realistic designs for quantum FEL experiments are proposed. We discuss the practical constraints that influence the experimental parameters. Numerical simulations of power spectra and intensities are presented and attractive radiation characteristics such as high flux, narrow linewidth, and short pulse structure are demonstrated.

  16. Fiber-Based Ultraviolet Laser System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this program is to develop a compact and efficient ultraviolet laser system for use in space-based uv-Raman instruments. The basis for this system...

  17. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  18. A Novel Diagnostics of Ultrashort Electron Bunches Based on Detection of Coherent Radiation from Bunched Electron Beam in an Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, Evgeny L; Yurkov, Mikhail V

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new method for measurements of the longitudinal profile of 100 femtosecond electron bunches for X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs). The method is based on detection of coherent undulator radiation produced by modulated electron beam. Seed optical quantum laser is used to produce exact optical replica of ultrashort electron bunches. The replica is generated in apparatus which consists of an input undulator (energy modulator), and output undulator (radiator) separated by a dispersion section. The radiation in the output undulator is excited by the electron bunch modulated at the optical wavelength and rapidly reaches a hundred-MW-level power. We then use the now-standard method of ultrashort laser pulse-shape measurement, a tandem combination of autocorrelator and spectrum (FROG -- frequency resolved optical gating) providing real-time single-shot measurements of the electron bunch structure. The big advantage of proposed technique is that it can be used to determine the slice energy spread and emi...

  19. Effects of beam quality in a free-electron laser oscillator with two electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soon-Kwon

    2017-11-01

    We have studied the electron beam quality in a free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator by using two electron beams of different harmonically related energies in the FEL facility, which is operated in the infrared and far-infrared regions. The electron beam quality, such as emittance, energy spread, and higher-order modes were studied using an extended three-dimensional (3D) FEL code for two electron beams that we have developed. The variations in the radiation amplitude of the electron beam's emittances, and energy spread were also calculated for a tapered wiggler for the multiparticle and multi-pass number using a new 3D code. The evolution of the radiation field intensity for higher-order modes of the wiggler with beam emittance and energy spread was studied for the two-electron beam's FEL performance. We found that the radiation intensity was degraded due to the energy spread and the emittance of the electron beam. We minimized the degradation of the radiation intensity by optimizing the tapered wiggler for the coupled two-beam FEL oscillator.

  20. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  1. Influence of non-collisional laser heating on the electron dynamics in dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Barilleau, L; Chimier, B; Geoffroy, G; Tikhonchuk, V

    2016-01-01

    The electron dynamics in dielectric materials induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically addressed. The laser driven temporal evolution of the energy distribution of electrons in the conduction band is described by a kinetic Boltzmann equation. In addition to the collisional processes for energy transfer such as electron-phonon-photon and electron-electron interactions, a non-collisional process for photon absorption in the conduction band is included. It relies on direct transitions between sub-bands of the conduction band through multiphoton absorption. This mechanism is shown to significantly contribute to the laser heating of conduction electrons for large enough laser intensities. It also increases the time required for the electron distribution to reach the equilibrium state as described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Quantitative results are provided for quartz irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm and for intensities in the range of tens of TW/cm$^2$, lo...

  2. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO 2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  3. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO$_{2}$ laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread ($\\sim1\\%$) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO$_{2}$ laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  4. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  5. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; hide

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  7. From Storage Rings to Free Electron Lasers for Hard X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, H

    2004-01-09

    The intensity of X-ray sources has increased at a rapid rate since the late 1960s by 10 orders of magnitude and more through the use of synchrotron radiation produced by bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. Three generations of radiation sources have been identified depending on amplitude and quality of the radiation provided. While user facilities of the third generation were being constructed a new concept of radiation generating devices was being developed that offers an even larger increase in peak and average brightness than had been achieved till then. The new concept of the X-ray Free Electron Laser based on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission will be the basis of fourth generation X-ray source user facilities of this century. The paper will start with a brief history of the development of x-ray sources, discuss some of the differences between storage ring and free electron laser based approaches, and close with an update of the present development of x-ray free electron laser user facilities.

  8. A novel approach to electron data background treatment in an online wide-angle spectrometer for laser-accelerated ion and electron bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F. H.; Bin, J. H.; Englbrecht, F.; Haffa, D.; Bolton, P. R.; Gao, Y.; Hartmann, J.; Hilz, P.; Kreuzer, C.; Ostermayr, T. M.; Rösch, T. F.; Speicher, M.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P. G.; Schreiber, J.

    2018-01-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is driven by electrical fields emerging when target electrons absorb laser energy and consecutively leave the target material. A direct correlation between these electrons and the accelerated ions is thus to be expected and predicted by theoretical models. We report on a modified wide-angle spectrometer, allowing the simultaneous characterization of angularly resolved energy distributions of both ions and electrons. Equipped with online pixel detectors, the RadEye1 detectors, the investigation of this correlation gets attainable on a single shot basis. In addition to first insights, we present a novel approach for reliably extracting the primary electron energy distribution from the interfering secondary radiation background. This proves vitally important for quantitative extraction of average electron energies (temperatures) and emitted total charge.

  9. Above-Threshold Ionization and Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction in Diatomic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, N; Ciappina, M F; Wolter, B; Biegert, J; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an {\\em ab-initio} treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach we obtain expressions for electrons emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centres, and a...

  10. Multistate optical memory based on serially interconnected lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.; Owens, D.; Liu, Y.S.; Hill, M. T.; Lenstra, D.; Tzanakaki, A.; Khoe, G.D.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A multistate optical memory based on serially inter-connected lasers is presented. We show that only one of the lasers can lase at a time, thus, the state of the optical memory is determined by the wavelength of the dominant laser. The light from the dominant laser suppresses its neighboring lasers

  11. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  12. Design and simulation of laser wakefield acceleration with external electron bunch injection in front of the laser pulse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irman, A.; Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present a theoretical investigation on an experimental design of a laser wakefield accelerator in which electron bunches from a photocathode radio frequency linac are injected into a capillary discharge plasma channel just in front of a few tens of terawatt drive laser pulse. The

  13. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy. In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al(99∶Si(1 and tungsten (W wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  14. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  15. Electronic tuning of integrated blue-violet GaN tunable coupled-cavity laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guziy, O.; Grzanka, S.; Leszczynski, M.; Perlin, P.; Schemmann, M.; Salemink, H.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated tunable coupled-cavity InGaN/GaN laser with the emission wavelength centered on 409 nm. The electronic tuning range was 1.6 nm and threshold currents were 650 mA per cavity for 8.7-?m-wide laser ridges. Multimode laser emission with an average full width at half maximum

  16. Laser-based agriculture system

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-03-31

    A system and method are provided for indoor agriculture using at least one growth chamber illuminated by laser light. In an example embodiment of the agriculture system, a growth chamber is provided having one or more walls defining an interior portion of the growth chamber. The agriculture system may include a removable tray disposed within the interior portion of the growth chamber. The agriculture system also includes a light source, which may be disposed outside the growth chamber. The one or more walls may include at least one aperture. The light source is configured to illuminate at least a part of the interior portion of the growth chamber. In embodiments in which the light source is disposed outside the growth chamber, the light source is configured to transmit the laser light to the interior portion of the growth chamber via the at least one aperture.

  17. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  18. High Energy Gain of Trapped Electrons in a Tapered, Diffraction-Dominated Inverse-Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Boucher, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Joshi, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Travish, G.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T.; Yoder, R. B.

    2005-04-01

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  19. Graphite oxide based targets applied in laser matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Badziak, Jan; Rosinski, Marcin; Havranek, Vladimir; Mackova, Anna; Malinsky, Petr; Sofer, Zdenek; Luxa, Jan; Cannavò, Antonino; Lorincik, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, we propose the production of a hybrid graphene based material suitable to be laser irradiated with the aim to produce quasi-monoenergetic proton beams using a femtosecond laser system. The unique lattice structure of the irradiated solid thin target can affect the inside electron propagation, their outgoing from the rear side of a thin foil, and subsequently the plasma ion acceleration. The produced targets, have been characterized in composition, roughness and structure and for completeness irradiated. The yield and energy of the ions emitted from the laser-generated plasma have been monitored and the emission of proton stream profile exhibited an acceleration of the order of several MeVs/charge state.

  20. Graphite oxide based targets applied in laser matter interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutroneo Mariapompea

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we propose the production of a hybrid graphene based material suitable to be laser irradiated with the aim to produce quasi-monoenergetic proton beams using a femtosecond laser system. The unique lattice structure of the irradiated solid thin target can affect the inside electron propagation, their outgoing from the rear side of a thin foil, and subsequently the plasma ion acceleration. The produced targets, have been characterized in composition, roughness and structure and for completeness irradiated. The yield and energy of the ions emitted from the laser-generated plasma have been monitored and the emission of proton stream profile exhibited an acceleration of the order of several MeVs/charge state.

  1. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  2. Modal analysis of a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Ackermann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the direct seeding can enhance the performance of a free-electron laser (FEL in terms of its spectral, temporal, and coherence properties and reduces fluctuations in FEL output energy and arrival-time jitter. The properties of the used seed photon pulse are of high importance. In this paper, we describe the influence of the M^{2} onto the achievable power contrast between the direct seeded and the unseeded FEL radiation. The results of these studies are compared with the data from the high harmonic generation direct seeding experiment “sFLASH” in Hamburg, Germany. A method to measure M^{2} from a single transverse intensity distribution of the high harmonics beam at waist is discussed.

  3. Microstructural features and mechanical properties of a cobalt-based laser coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol van Otterloo, J.L.de; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    Electron microscopy, mechanical hardness measurements and pin-on-disc wear experiments were carried out on a laser-coated cobalt based Stellite alloy. It was found that with optimum laser parameters a poreless coating with a hardness of 11.3 GPa can be attained. The mechanical properties of the

  4. Surface engineering with lasers : An application to co-base materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeHosson, JTM; VanOtterloo, LD; Sudarshan, TS; Khor, KA; Jeandin, M

    1997-01-01

    Electron microscopy, mechanical hardness measurements and wear experiments were carried out on laser coated cobalt based Stellite alloys. It was found that with optimum laser parameters, a poreless coating with a hardness of 11.3 GPa can be attained. Detailed analysis indicates that solid solution

  5. Using the X-ray free-electron laser to drive a photo-pumped helium-like neon X-ray laser at 23 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Joseph; Scott, Howard A.

    2011-03-01

    Nearly four decades ago resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes based on hydrogen-like and helium-like ions were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. These schemes have yet to be demonstrated because of the difficulty of finding a strong pump line with an adequate resonance to pump the laser transition. With the construction of the X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) researchers now have a very bright tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow one to study the physics and feasibility of photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we model the sodium-pumped neon X-ray laser scheme that was proposed and studied many years ago by replacing the Na He-α pump line at 1127 eV with the X-FEL. Using the X-FEL to photo-ionize Ne down to He-like Ne and then photo-pump the He-γ line we predict gains greater than 400 cm -1 on the 4f - 3d transition at 23.1 nm in He-like Ne. The 4d - 3p line at 23.16 nm and the 4p - 3s line at 22.27 nm are also predicted to lase strongly.

  6. Novel Single-Shot Diagnostics for Electrons from Laser-Plasma Interaction at SPARC_LAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bisesto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique for compact and cheap accelerators, needed in several fields, e.g., novel compact light sources for industrial and medical applications. Indeed, the high electric field available in plasma structures (>100 GV/m allows for accelerating electrons at the GeV energy scale in a few centimeters. Nevertheless, this approach still suffers from shot-to-shot instabilities, mostly related to experimental parameter fluctuations, e.g., laser intensity and plasma density. Therefore, single shot diagnostics are crucial in order to properly understand the acceleration mechanism. In this regard, at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility, we have developed two diagnostic tools to investigate properties of electrons coming from high intensity laser–matter interaction: one relying on Electro Optical Sampling (EOS for the measurement of the temporal profile of the electric field carried by fast electrons generated by a high intensity laser hitting a solid target, the other one based on Optical Transition Radiation (OTR for single shot measurements of the transverse emittance. In this work, the basic principles of both diagnostics will be presented as well as the experimental results achieved by means of the SPARC high brightness photo-injector and the high power laser FLAME.

  7. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  8. Generation of Homogeneous and Patterned Electron Beams using a Microlens Array Laser-Shaping Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, Aliaksei [NICADD, DeKalb; Edstrom, Dean [Fermilab; Gai, Wei [Argonne, HEP; Ha, Gwanghui [Argonne, HEP; Piot, Philippe [NICADD, DeKalb; Power, John [Argonne, HEP; Qiang, Gao [Unlisted, CN; Ruan, Jinhao [Fermilab; Santucci, James [Fermilab; Wisniewski, Eric [Argonne, HEP

    2016-06-01

    In photocathodes the achievable electron-beam parameters are controlled by the laser used to trigger the photoemission process. Non-ideal laser distribution hampers the final beam quality. Laser inhomogeneities, for instance, can be "amplified" by space-charge force and result in fragmented electron beams. To overcome this limitation laser shaping methods are routinely employed. In the present paper we demonstrate the use of simple microlens arrays to dramatically improve the transverse uniformity. We also show that this arrangement can be used to produce transversely-patterned electron beams. Our experiments are carried out at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility.

  9. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yanping; Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu, Yongfeng

    2012-07-11

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train.

  10. Extension of the Free-Electron Laser-Amplifier Code Tda to Resonator Configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faatz, B.; Best, R. W. B.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Tran, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of many interesting, complex phenomena in a free-electron laser (FEL) requires the use of numerical computer codes. In this paper we describe the extension of one such code (TDA), which in its original form could only be used to study free-electron laser amplifiers, to include

  11. Relativistic laser hosing instability suppression and electron acceleration in a preformed plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Wu, S. Z.; Qiao, B.; He, X. T.; Ruan, S. C.

    2017-04-01

    The hosing processes of a relativistic laser pulse, electron acceleration, and betatron radiation in a parabolic plasma channel are investigated in the direct laser acceleration regime. It is shown that the laser hosing instability would result in the generation of a randomly directed off-axis electron beam and radiation source with a large divergence angle. While employing a preformed parabolic plasma channel, the restoring force provided by the plasma channel would correct the perturbed laser wave front and thus suppress the hosing instability. As a result, the accelerated electron beam and the emitted photons are well guided and concentrated along the channel axis. The employment of a proper plasma density channel can stably guide the relativistically intense laser pulse and greatly improve the properties of the electron beam and radiation source. This scheme is of great interest for the generation of high quality electron beams and radiation sources.

  12. Experimental investigations on the influence of the photocathode laser pulse parameters on the electron bunch quality in an RF-photoelectron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenel, Marc

    2010-07-15

    Free Electron Lasers based on the SASE principle like the European XFEL require electron bunches having peak currents of several kiloamperes as well as very low transverse emittance. While high peak currents can be generated using longitudinal bunch compression techniques, the transverse emittance must have values as low as 1mmmrad already at the source. The development of electron sources fulfilling these demanding specifications is the goal of the Photo Injector Test Facility (PITZ) in DESY, Zeuthen site. The key component of a photoinjector is the electron gun cavity where the electrons bunches are generated and immediately accelerated. The extraction of the electrons is based on the photoelectric effect of the cathode which requires a laser system having special capabilities. In the first part of the thesis, measurements are presented which were performed to investigate whether the laser and the laser transport system fulfill these requirements. The second part of the thesis is dedicated to simulations as well as experimental studies on the impact of the temporal and spatial parameters of the laser pulses on the electron bunch quality. This influence is possible because the response time of the Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode is short compared to the laser pulse duration. Based on these investigations, suggestions for improvements are given and tolerances for the laser pulse properties are defined. (orig.)

  13. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  14. X-ray free electron laser: opportunities for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert K Y; Abela, Rafael; Hennig, Michael

    2017-11-08

    Past decades have shown the impact of structural information derived from complexes of drug candidates with their protein targets to facilitate the discovery of safe and effective medicines. Despite recent developments in single particle cryo-electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography has been the main method to derive structural information. The unique properties of X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) with unmet peak brilliance and beam focus allow X-ray diffraction data recording and successful structure determination from smaller and weaker diffracting crystals shortening timelines in crystal optimization. To further capitalize on the XFEL advantage, innovations in crystal sample delivery for the X-ray experiment, data collection and processing methods are required. This development was a key contributor to serial crystallography allowing structure determination at room temperature yielding physiologically more relevant structures. Adding the time resolution provided by the femtosecond X-ray pulse will enable monitoring and capturing of dynamic processes of ligand binding and associated conformational changes with great impact to the design of candidate drug compounds. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Influence of plasma density on the generation of 100's MeV electrons via Direct Laser Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Amina; Batson, T.; Arefiev, A. V.; Chen, H.; Craxton, R. S.; Davies, A.; Froula, D. H.; Haberberger, D.; Jansen, O.; Krushelnick, K.; Nilson, P. M.; Theobald, W.; Wang, T.; Williams, G. J.; Willingale, L.

    2017-10-01

    The role of plasma density and quasi-static fields in the acceleration of electrons to many times the ponderomotive energies (exceeding 400 MeV) by high-energy, picosecond duration laser pulses via Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) from underdense CH plasma was investigated. Experiments using the OMEGA EP laser facility and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the EPOCH code were performed. The existence of an optimal plasma density for the generation of high-energy, low-divergence electron beams is demonstrated. The role of quasi-static channel fields on electron energy enhancement, beam pointing and divergence elucidate the mechanisms and action of DLA at different plasma densities. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-FOA-0001109.

  16. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a CO2 laser using a metal microslit

    OpenAIRE

    Jongsuck, Bae; Ryo, Ishikawa; Sumio, Okuyama; Takashi, Miyajima; Taiji, Akizuki; Tatsuya, Okamoto; Koji, Mizuno

    2000-01-01

    A metal microslit has been used as an interaction circuit between a CO2 laser beam and nonrelativistic free electrons. Evanescent waves which are induced on the slit by illumination of the laser light modulate the energy of electrons passing close to the surface of the slit. The electron-energy change of more than ±5 eV for the 80 keV electron beam has been observed using the 7 kW laser beam at the wavelength of 10.6 μm.

  17. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a CO2 laser using a metal microslit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jongsuck; Ishikawa, Ryo; Okuyama, Sumio; Miyajima, Takashi; Akizuki, Taiji; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Mizuno, Koji

    2000-04-01

    A metal microslit has been used as an interaction circuit between a CO2 laser beam and nonrelativistic free electrons. Evanescent waves which are induced on the slit by illumination of the laser light modulate the energy of electrons passing close to the surface of the slit. The electron-energy change of more than ±5 eV for the 80 keV electron beam has been observed using the 7 kW laser beam at the wavelength of 10.6 μm.

  18. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  19. Observation of two-dimensional longitudinal-transverse correlations in an electron beam by laser-electron interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Angelova

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available During the preparatory work for the optical-replica synthesizer experiment in the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, we were able to superimpose a short, approximately 200 fs long pulse from a frequency-doubled mode-locked erbium laser with titanium-sapphire amplifier and an approximately 20 ps long electron bunch in an undulator. This induces an energy modulation in a longitudinal slice of the electron bunch. A magnetic chicane downstream of the undulator converts the energy modulation into a density modulation within the slice that causes the emission of coherent optical transition radiation from a silver-coated silicon screen. Varying the relative timing between electron and laser, we use a camera to record two-dimensional images of the slices as a function of the longitudinal position within the electron bunch.

  20. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  1. Tailoring laser wakefield accelerated electron beams. An experimental study on the influence of experimental conditions on electron beam parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couperus, Jurjen P.; Koehler, Alexander; Zarini, Omid; Huebl, Axel; Schramm, Ulrich [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Jochmann, Axel; Debus, Alexander; Irman, Arie [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. In LFWA a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse drives plasma density waves, inducing a high accelerating field gradient in the order of GV/m. To create stable reproducible electron beams, tailoring of experimental parameters like gas density, laser energy and laser pulse duration is required. In this talk we present an overview of our experimental studies with the DRACO (3 J on target, 30 fs) laser on ultrasonic gas-jet targets (He and He-N{sub 2} mixtures). We discuss the influence of experimental parameters on beam parameters like beam charge, shot-to-shot stability and energy distribution, both in the self-injecting bubble regime as well as in the ionisation injection regime.

  2. Nanoscale Electron Bunching in Laser-Triggered Ionization Injection in Plasma Accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X L; Pai, C-H; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-07-15

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Because of the phase-dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to a discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three-dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between >2k_{0} and about 5k_{0}, where k_{0} is the wave number of the injection laser. Such a nanoscale bunched beam can be diagnosed by and used to generate coherent transition radiation and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  3. Nano-scale electron bunching in laser-triggered ionization injection in plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Due to the phase dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between $> 2k_0$ and about $5k_0$, where $k_0$ is the wavenumber of the injection laser. Such a nano-scale bunched beam can be diagnosed through coherent transition radiation upon its exit from the plasma and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  4. Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korajac, Arman; Habibović, Dino; Čerkić, Aner; Busuladžić, Mustafa; Milošević, Dejan B.

    2017-10-01

    Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic (two-component) elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed in the frame of the S-matrix theory. The second Born approximation is applied in the expansion of the S-matrix element. The first term in the expansion corresponds to the single scattering, while the second term in the expansion corresponds to the double scattering of electrons on atomic targets. The double scattering is possible in the presence of a laser field. The electron that has scattered on an atomic target may be driven back by the laser field and scatter again on the same atom. The double-scattered electrons may have considerably higher energies than those that scattered only once. We have investigated the dependence of the energy spectrum on various laser-field and incident electron parameters. The calculated electron energy spectra show the plateau-like structures with abrupt cutoffs. These cutoffs are explained by a classical analysis.

  5. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  6. Impact properties and hardening behavior of laser and electron-beam welds of V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Tsai, H.C.; Park, J.H.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The authors are conducting a program to develop an optimal laser welding procedure that can be applied to large-scale fusion-reactor structural components to be fabricated from vanadium-base alloys. Results of initial investigation of mechanical properties and hardening behavior of laser and electron-beam (EB) welds of the production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti (500-kg Heat 832665) in as-welded and postwelding heat-treated (PWHT) conditions are presented in this paper. The laser weld was produced in air using a 6-kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser at a welding speed of {approx}45 mm/s. Microhardness of the laser welds was somewhat higher than that of the base metal, which was annealed at a nominal temperature of {approx}1050{degrees}C for 2 h in the factory. In spite of the moderate hardening, ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) of the initial laser ({approx}80{degrees}C) and EB ({approx}30{degrees}C) welds were significantly higher than that of the base metal ({approx}{minus}170{degrees}C). However, excellent impact properties, with DBTT < {minus}80{degrees}C and similar to those of the base metal, could be restored in both the laser and EB welds by postwelding annealing at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum.

  7. Vehicle based laser range finding in crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Detlef; Adamek, Rolf; Horn, Hans-Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Laser rangefinders and laser scanners are widely used for industrial purposes and for remote sensing. In agriculture information about crop parameters like volume, height, and density can support the optimisation of production processes. In scientific papers the measurement of these parameters by low cost laser rangefinders with one echo has been presented for short ranges. Because the cross section area of the beam increases with the measuring range, it can be expected that laser rangefinders will have a reduced measuring accuracy in small sized crops and when measuring far distances. These problems are caused by target areas smaller than the beam and by the beam striking the edges of crop objects. Lab tests under defined conditions and a real field test were performed to assess the measuring properties under such difficult conditions of a chosen low cost sensor. Based on lab tests it was shown that the accuracy was reduced, but the successful use of the sensor under field conditions demonstrated the potential to meet the demands for agricultural applications, Insights resulting from investigations made in the paper contribute to facilitating the choice or the development of laser rangefinder sensors for vehicle based measurement of crop parameters for optimisation of production processes.

  8. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  9. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  10. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  11. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  12. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  13. Impact of laser wavelength on the emission of electrons and ions from thin gold films during femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustrup, N.; O'Connor, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    This experimental study supports computational evidence that the excitation of d-band electrons have a significant impact on the material response of gold to an ultrashort laser pulse. A voltage biased Langmuir probe was used to detect the electron and positive ion emission from a 20 nm thick Au film at 343 nm, 515 nm and 1030 nm laser wavelengths. The laser wavelengths used provided photon energies above and below the interband transition threshold (ITT) for d-band excitation in gold (1.9 eV). Variations in optical properties of the Au film at different laser wavelengths were accounted for to ensure that comparisons were made at equal values of absorbed fluences. Data showed a significantly higher number of electrons emitted over a longer period when the energy of the incident photons exceeded the ITT. The electronic current generated at the probe indicated that the first electrons detected were primarily emitted via multiphoton photoemission. Electrons were also detected at later times when the photon energy exceeded the ITT and this was attributed to thermionic emission. The current generated from the positive ion emission was significantly lower than for electron emission, but indicated the formation of a plasma at a threshold fluence that increases with decreasing photon energy.

  14. Influence of laser frequency noise on scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    n this work, we study the performance of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimeter (sFPILDV) and compare two candidate 1.5 um single-frequency laser sources for the system – a fiber laser (FL) and a semiconductor laser (SL). We describe a straightforward calibration...... procedure for the sFPI-LDV and investigate the effect of different degrees of laser frequency noise between the FL and the SL on the velocimeter’s performance...

  15. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Con nement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the rst time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of K x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an e ective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser at Los

  16. Self-amplified coherent spontaneous emission in a free electron laser with “quiet” bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Goryashko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For a planar free electron laser (FEL configuration we study self-amplified coherent spontaneous emission driven by a gradient of the bunch current in the presence of different levels of noise in bunches. The longitudinal granularity of the electron bunch density originating from shot noise is maintained throughout the analysis. For the FEL model with the SwissFEL injector bunch parameters, we calculate the probability density distribution of the maximum power of the radiation pulses for different levels of shot noise. It turns out that the temporal coherence quickly increases as the noise level reduces. We also show that the FEL based on coherent spontaneous emission produces almost Fourier transform limited pulses. The analysis indicates that the time-bandwidth product is mainly determined by the bunch length and the interaction distance in an undulator. Calculations of the FEL characteristics for different rise times of the front of the current pulse are performed, and it is found that a reduced level of the power fluctuations is preserved for the bunch current pulse with a front duration up to several FEL wavelengths. We also propose a novel scheme that permits the formation of electron bunches with a reduced level of noise and a high gradient of the current at the bunch tail to enhance coherent spontaneous emission. The presented scheme uses effects of noise reduction and controlled microbunching instability and consists of a laser heater, a bunch compressor, and a shot noise suppression section. We show that shot noise reduction by 2 orders of magnitude in electron bunches produced by the SwissFEL injector can be achieved in a compact noise suppression section. The noise factor and microbunching gain of the overall proposed scheme with and without laser heater are estimated.

  17. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  18. Intense ultrashort pulse generation using the JAERI far-infrared free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Kikuzawa, N; Sawamura, M; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    An intense ultrashort optical pulse has been quasi-continuously generated using a superconducting RF linac-based free-electron laser at a wavelength of 22.5 mu m. The pulse shape and width are measured by second-order optical autocorrelation with a birefringent Te crystal. At synchronism of the optical resonator, the pulse shape is a smooth single pulse with an FWHM width of 255 fs and energy of 74 mu J. A train of subpulses is developed by increasing the desynchronism of the optical resonator. The measured results are in good agreement with numerical simulation.

  19. Variational Approach for Coupled Backward and Forward Wave Excitation in Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalom, A; Pinhasi, Y

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper [1] we have described a novel variational formulation for the propagation and generation of radiation in wave-guides. The formulation is based on the representation of all the involved quantities in the frequency domain and the decomposition of field and currents in terms of the wave-guide transversal Eigen function. In this work we present the utilization of this formalism to the derivation of a numerical scheme that is used to study the build up of radiation in free electron lasers in the linear approximation.

  20. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers Based on Dissipative Processes for Nonlinear Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of femtosecond-pulse fiber lasers with parameters appropriate for nonlinear microscopy is reviewed. Pulse-shaping in lasers with only normal-dispersion components is briefly described, and the performance of the resulting lasers is summarized. Fiber lasers based on the formation of dissipative solitons now offer performance competitive with that of solid-state lasers, but with the benefits of the fiber medium. Lasers based on self-similar pulse evolution in the gain section of a laser also offer a combination of short pulse duration and high pulse energy that will be attractive for applications in nonlinear bioimaging. PMID:23869163

  1. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z-H; Beaurepaire, B; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sánchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-11-08

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  2. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  3. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  4. LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

    2011-09-01

    A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

  5. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rebernik Ribič

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 10^{14}  W/cm^{2}, paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  6. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebernik Ribič, Primož; Rösner, Benedikt; Gauthier, David; Allaria, Enrico; Döring, Florian; Foglia, Laura; Giannessi, Luca; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Mirian, Najmeh; Principi, Emiliano; Roussel, Eléonore; Simoncig, Alberto; Spampinati, Simone; David, Christian; De Ninno, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 1014 W /cm2 , paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  7. Free Electron Laser Pulse Control by Acousto Optic Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Kanai, T; Yoshihashi-Suzuki, S

    2005-01-01

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Osaka University can be continuously varied in the range of 5.0-20.0 μm. A FEL has a double pulse structure. The structure consists of a train of macropulses of the pulse width 15 μs, and each macropulse contains a train of 330 micropulses of the pulse width 5 ps. The tunability and short pulse afford new medical applications such as investigation of protein dynamics and ablation of soft tissues. Precise control of micropulse train is very important for medical applications using FEL because macropulse with long pulse duration sometimes leads to undesirable thermal effects. FEL pulse control system using an acousto optic modulators (AOM) was developed in order to investigate of non-thermal effect between the FEL and tissue. This system provide a very good efficiency (~60 %) and a fast switching speed (>200 ns). A phosphorylated protein was irradiated with FEL that controlled the pulse. These result confirmed that the thermal effect is controlled by pulse durat...

  8. Laser-Compton scattering from a 20 MeV electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Chouffani, K; Harmon, F; Jones, J; Lancaster, G

    2002-01-01

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) experiments were carried out at the Idaho Accelerator Center. A 20 MeV electron beam was brought to a head-on collision with a 100 MW 7 ns Nd:YAG laser. We observed clear narrow LCS X-ray spectral peaks resulting from the interaction of the electron beam with the two Nd:YAG laser photon lines of 1064 and 532 nm. The LCS X-ray energy lines and widths were measured as a function of the electron beam energy and energy spread, respectively. The results recorded showed good agreement with the predicted values.

  9. Acceleration of electrons by high intensity laser radiation in a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Melikian, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of electrons in vacuum by means of the circularly-polirized electromagnetic wave, propagating along a magnetic field. We show that the electron energy growth, when using ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses (10 ps, 10^{18} Bm/cm^2, CO_{2} laser) in the presence of a magnetic field, may reach up to the value 2,1 Gev. The growth of the electron energy is shown to increase proportionally with the increase of the laser intensity and the initial energy of the ele...

  10. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  11. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  12. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses.

  13. Low emittance electron beam generation from a laser wakefield accelerator using two laser pulses with different wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionization injection triggered by short wavelength laser pulses inside a nonlinear wakefield driven by a longer wavelength laser is examined via multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that very bright electron beams can be generated through this two-color scheme in either collinear propagating or transverse colliding geometry. For a fixed laser intensity I, lasers with longer/shorter wavelength λ have larger/smaller ponderomotive potential (∝Iλ^{2}. The two-color scheme utilizes this property to separate the injection process from the wakefield excitation process. Very strong wakes can be generated at relatively low laser intensities by using a longer wavelength laser driver (e.g., a 10  μm CO_{2} laser due to its very large ponderomotive potential. On the other hand, a short wavelength laser can produce electrons with very small residual momenta (p_{⊥}∼a_{0}∼sqrt[I]λ inside the wake, leading to electron beams with very small normalized emittances (tens of nm. Using particle-in-cell simulations we show that a ∼10  fs electron beam with ∼4  pC of charge and a normalized emittance of ∼50  nm can be generated by combining a 10  μm driving laser with a 400 nm injection laser, which is an improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude compared to the typical results obtained when a single wavelength laser is used for both the wake formation and ionization injection. With the transverse colliding geometry, simulations show that similarly low emittance and much lower slice energy spread (∼30  keV, comparing with the typical value of few MeV in the longitudinal injection scheme can be simultaneously obtained for electron beams with a few pC charge. Such low slice energy spread may have significant advantages in applications relevant to future coherent light sources driven by plasma accelerators.

  14. Slippage effect on energy modulation in seeded free-electron lasers with frequency chirped seed laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Feng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Free-electron lasers (FELs seeded with external lasers hold great promise for generating high power radiation with nearly transform-limited bandwidth in the soft x-ray region. However, it has been pointed out that the initial seed laser phase error will be amplified by the frequency up-conversion process, which may degrade the quality of the output radiation produced by a harmonic generation scheme. In this paper, theoretical and simulation studies on frequency chirp amplification in seeded FEL schemes with slippage effect taken into account are presented. It is found that the seed laser imperfection experienced by the electron beam can be significantly smoothed by the slippage effect in the modulator when the slippage length is comparable to the seed laser pulse length. This smoothing effect allows one to preserve the excellent temporal coherence of seeded FELs in the presence of large frequency chirp in the seed laser. Our studies show that the tolerance on frequency chirp in the seed laser for generating nearly transform-limited soft x-ray pulses in seeded FELs is much looser than previously thought and fully coherent radiation at nanometer wavelength may be reached with current technologies.

  15. Laser-assisted electron scattering in strong-field ionization of dense water vapor by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, M.; Al-Obaidi, R.; Moguilevski, A.; Kothe, A.; Engel, N.; Metje, J.; Kiyan, I. Yu; Aziz, E. F.

    2014-08-01

    We report on strong-field ionization of dense water gas in a short infrared laser pulse. By employing a unique combination of photoelectron spectroscopy with a liquid micro-jet technique, we observe how the character of electron emission at high kinetic energies changes with the increase of the medium density. This change is associated with the process of laser-assisted electron scattering (LAES) on neighboring particles, which becomes a dominant mechanism of hot electron emission at higher medium densities. The manifestation of this mechanism is found to require densities that are orders of magnitude lower than those considered for heating the laser-generated plasmas via the LAES process. The experimental results are supported by simulations of the LAES yield with the use of the Kroll-Watson theory.

  16. Innovative single-shot diagnostics for electrons from laser wakefield acceleration at FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Cianchi, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Pompili, R.; Zigler, A.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (> 100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeters. Here we present all the plasma related activities currently underway at SPARC_LAB exploiting the high power laser FLAME. In particular, we will give an overview of the single shot diagnostics employed: Electro Optic Sampling (EOS) for temporal measurement and Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) for an innovative one shot emittance measurements. In detail, the EOS technique has been employed to measure for the first time the longitudinal profile of electric field of fast electrons escaping from a solid target, driving the ions and protons acceleration, and to study the impact of using different target shapes. Moreover, a novel scheme for one shot emittance measurements based on OTR, developed and tested at SPARC_LAB LINAC, used in an experiment on electrons from laser wakefield acceleration still undergoing, will be shown.

  17. Study of electron kinetics in nitrogen plasma induced by CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassef, O. Aied; Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, a numerical modeling is performed to study the electron kinetics in nitrogen plasma induced by CO2 laser radiation operating at wavelength 9.621 μm, and pulse duration of 60 ns corresponding to the measurements carried out by Camacho et al. (J Phys B At Mol Opt Phys 40:4573, 2007). In this experiment, the breakdown threshold intensity is determined for molecular nitrogen over a pressure range 301-760 torr. A previously developed electron cascade model (Evans and Gamal in J Phys D Appl Phys 13:1447, 1980) is modified and applied. This model is based on numerical solution of a time-dependent energy equation and a set of rate equations that describe the time variation of the formed excited states population. The effect of breakdown mechanism is decided through the calculations of the threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure considering the various physical processes that might take place during the interaction. The individual effect of each loss process on the electron energy distribution function and its parameters is studied. This study is performed at the lowest and highest values of the experimentally tested gas pressure range namely; 301 and 760 torr. The obtained results clarified the exact contribution of each loss process to the breakdown of nitrogen induced by CO2 laser radiation.

  18. Study of electron kinetics in nitrogen plasma induced by CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassef, O. Aied; Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, a numerical modeling is performed to study the electron kinetics in nitrogen plasma induced by CO2 laser radiation operating at wavelength 9.621 μm, and pulse duration of 60 ns corresponding to the measurements carried out by Camacho et al. (J Phys B At Mol Opt Phys 40:4573, 2007). In this experiment, the breakdown threshold intensity is determined for molecular nitrogen over a pressure range 301-760 torr. A previously developed electron cascade model (Evans and Gamal in J Phys D Appl Phys 13:1447, 1980) is modified and applied. This model is based on numerical solution of a time-dependent energy equation and a set of rate equations that describe the time variation of the formed excited states population. The effect of breakdown mechanism is decided through the calculations of the threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure considering the various physical processes that might take place during the interaction. The individual effect of each loss process on the electron energy distribution function and its parameters is studied. This study is performed at the lowest and highest values of the experimentally tested gas pressure range namely; 301 and 760 torr. The obtained results clarified the exact contribution of each loss process to the breakdown of nitrogen induced by CO2 laser radiation.

  19. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  20. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  1. High-quality stable electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in high density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-quality, stable electron beams are produced from self-injected laser wakefield acceleration using the interaction of moderate 3 TW, 45 fs duration Ti:sapphire laser pulses with high density (>5×10^{19}   cm^{−3} helium gas jet plasma. The electron beam has virtually background-free quasimonoenergetic distribution with energy 35.6_{−2.5}^{+3.9}  MeV, charge 3.8_{−1.2}^{+2.8}  pC, divergence and pointing variation ∼10  mrad. The stable and high quality of the electron beam opens an easy way for applications of the laser wakefield accelerator in the future, particularly due to the widespread availability of sub-10 TW class lasers with a number of laser plasma laboratories around the world.

  2. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bohler, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gilevich, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Vetter, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  3. Laser-wakefield acceleration of electron beams in a low density plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. A. Ibbotson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams, with energies greater than 500 MeV, in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by 2.5 J, 80 fs laser pulses guided in a low density plasma channel, is investigated. The laser energy required to achieve electron injection is found to depend strongly on the quality of the input laser focal spot. Simulations show that, although the matched spot size of the plasma channel is greater than the self-focused spot size, the channel assists relativistic self-focusing and enables electron injection to occur at lower plasma densities and laser powers than would be possible without a waveguide.

  4. Initial source of microbunching instability studies in a free electron laser injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, S.; Hidaka, Y; Murphy, J.B.; Podobedov, B.; Qian, H.; Shen, Y.; Wang, X.J.; Yang, X

    2011-11-16

    We present the first experimental studies of the initial source of electron beam microbunching instability in a free electron laser (FEL) injector. By utilizing for the studies a transform-limited laser pulse at the photocathode, we eliminated laser-induced microbunching at the National Synchrotron Light Source Source Development Laboratory (SDL). The detailed measurements of the resulting electron beam led us to conclude that, at SDL, microbunching arising from shot noise is not amplified to any significant level, thereby allowing us to set an upper limit on the initial modulation depth of microbunching arising from shot noise. Our analysis demonstrated that the only significant source of microbunching instability under normal operational conditions at SDL is the longitudinal modulation of the photocathode laser pulse. Our work shows that assuring a longitudinally smoothed photocathode laser pulse allows mitigating microbunching instability at a typical FEL injector with a moderate microbunching gain.

  5. Initial source of microbunching instability studies in a free electron laser injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Seletskiy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first experimental studies of the initial source of electron beam microbunching instability in a free electron laser (FEL injector. By utilizing for the studies a transform-limited laser pulse at the photocathode, we eliminated laser-induced microbunching at the National Synchrotron Light Source Source Development Laboratory (SDL. The detailed measurements of the resulting electron beam led us to conclude that, at SDL, microbunching arising from shot noise is not amplified to any significant level, thereby allowing us to set an upper limit on the initial modulation depth of microbunching arising from shot noise. Our analysis demonstrated that the only significant source of microbunching instability under normal operational conditions at SDL is the longitudinal modulation of the photocathode laser pulse. Our work shows that assuring a longitudinally smoothed photocathode laser pulse allows mitigating microbunching instability at a typical FEL injector with a moderate microbunching gain.

  6. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  7. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  8. Monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for large-scale electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2012-09-01

    A silicon-based monolithic laser source has long been envisioned as a key enabling component for large-scale electronic-photonic integration in future generations of high-performance computation and communication systems. In this paper we present a comprehensive review on the development of monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for this application. Starting with a historical review of light emission from the direct gap transition of Ge dating back to the 1960s, we focus on the rapid progress in band-engineered Ge-on-Si lasers in the past five years after a nearly 30-year gap in this research field. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active devices in Si photonics in the past decade due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. In 2007, we proposed combing tensile strain with n-type doping to compensate the energy difference between the direct and indirect band gap of Ge, thereby achieving net optical gain for CMOS-compatible diode lasers. Here we systematically present theoretical modeling, material growth methods, spontaneous emission, optical gain, and lasing under optical and electrical pumping from band-engineered Ge-on-Si, culminated by recently demonstrated electrically pumped Ge-on-Si lasers with >1 mW output in the communication wavelength window of 1500-1700 nm. The broad gain spectrum enables on-chip wavelength division multiplexing. A unique feature of band-engineered pseudo-direct gap Ge light emitters is that the emission intensity increases with temperature, exactly opposite to conventional direct gap semiconductor light-emitting devices. This extraordinary thermal anti-quenching behavior greatly facilitates monolithic integration on Si microchips where temperatures can reach up to 80 °C during operation. The same band-engineering approach can be extended to other pseudo-direct gap semiconductors, allowing us to achieve efficient light emission at wavelengths previously

  9. THz cavities and injectors for compact electron acceleration using laser-driven THz sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Fakhari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a design methodology for developing ultrasmall electron injectors and accelerators based on cascaded cavities excited by short multicycle THz pulses obtained from laser-driven THz generation schemes. Based on the developed concept for optimal coupling of the THz pulse, a THz electron injector and two accelerating stages are designed. The designed electron gun consists of a four cell cavity operating at 300 GHz and a door-knob waveguide to coaxial coupler. Moreover, special designs are proposed to mitigate the problem of thermal heat flow and induced mechanical stress to achieve a stable device. We demonstrated a gun based on cascaded cavities that is powered by only 1.1 mJ of THz energy in 300 cycles to accelerate electron bunches up to 250 keV. An additional two linac sections can be added with five and four cell cavities both operating at 300 GHz boosting the bunch energy up to 1.2 MeV using a 4-mJ THz pulse.

  10. Developing laser ablation in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for actinide detection with AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauder, W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); University of Notre Dame, Nuclear Science Laboratory, 124 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Pardo, R.C.; Kondev, F.G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Palchan, T. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Collon, P. [University of Notre Dame, Nuclear Science Laboratory, 124 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paul, M. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    A laser ablation material injection system has been developed at the ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for use in accelerator mass spectrometry experiments. Beam production with laser ablation initially suffered from instabilities due to fluctuations in laser energy and cratering on the sample surface by the laser. However, these instabilities were rectified by applying feedback correction for the laser energy and rastering the laser across the sample surface. An initial experiment successfully produced and accelerated low intensity actinide beams with up to 1000 counts per second. With continued development, laser ablation shows promise as an alternative material injection scheme for ECR ion sources and may help substantially reduce cross talk in the source.

  11. All-electronic suppression of mode hopping noise in diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple all-electronic stabilization scheme is presented for suppression of external-cavity mode-hopping noise in diode lasers. This excess noise is generated when the laser is subjected to optical feedback and may degrade the overall performance of optical systems including sensors. Suppression...

  12. Generation of ultra-short relativistic-electron-bunch by a laser wakefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Boller, Klaus J.; van Goor, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of the generation of an ultra-short (about one micron long) relativistic (up to a few GeVs) electron-bunch in a moderately nonlinear laser wakefield excited in an underdense plasma by an intense laser pulse is investigated. The ultra-short bunch is formed by trapping, effective

  13. Hermite-Gaussian Modes and Mirror Distortions in the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Pellegrini W. B. Colson and A. Renieri, editors. Free Electron Laser Handbook. North-Holland Physics, 1990. [19] W. Silfvast. Laser Fundamentals...Professor Joseph Blau Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 14. Professor Peter Crooker Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 15. Professor Wayne Roberge

  14. Tuning laser produced electron-positron jets for lab-astrophysics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fiuza, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hazi, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kemp, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marley, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barnak, D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Chang, P-Y. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Fiksel, G. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Stoeckel, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Nakai, M. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Arikawa, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Azechi, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Fujioka, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Hosoda, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Kojima, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Miyanga, N. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Morita, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Moritaka, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Nagai, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Namimoto, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Nishimura, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Ozaki, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Sakawa, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Takabe, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Zhang, Z. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE

    2015-02-23

    This paper reviews the experiments on the laser produced electron-positron jets using large laser facilities worldwide. The goal of the experiments was to optimize the parameter of the pair jets for their potential applications in laboratory-astrophysical experiment. Results on tuning the pair jet’s energy, number, emittance and magnetic collimation will be presented.

  15. Present status and future outlook of selective metallization for electronics industry by laser irradiation to metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Recently an alternative to conventional methods based on vacuum processes such as evaporation or sputtering is desired to reduce the energy consumption and the environmental impact. Printed electronics has been developed as a one of the candidates, which is based on wet processes using soluble functional materials such as organic semiconductors, inorganic nanomaterials, organic-inorganic hybrids, and so on. Although inkjet printing has been studied widely as a core technology of printed electronics, the limitation of resolution is around 20 micrometer. The combination of the inkjet printing with other selective metallization process is necessary because the resolution of several micrometers is required in some optical and electrical devices. The laser processing has emerged as an attractive technique in microelectronics because of the fascinating features such as high resolution, high degree of flexibility to control the resolution and size of the micro-patterns, high speed, and a little environmental pollution. In this paper, the present status and future outlook of selective metallization for interconnection and the formation of transparent conductive film based on the laser processing using metal nanoparticles were reported. The laser beam irradiation to metal nanoparticles causes the fast and efficient sintering by plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticle, where the absorbed energy is confined in a nanoparticle and the nanoparticle acts as a nano-heater. The laser irradiation to metal nanoparticles was applied to the laser direct writing of metal wiring and micropatterns using silver and copper nanoparticles.

  16. Space-charge effects in ultrahigh current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grüner, F. J; Schroeder, C. B; Maier, A. R; Becker, S; Mikhailova, J. M

    2009-01-01

    ...) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process...

  17. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  18. Radiobiological Effectiveness of Ultrashort Laser-Driven Electron Bunches: Micronucleus Frequency, Telomere Shortening and Cell Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Borghini, Andrea; Pulignani, Silvia; Baffigi, Federica; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Koester, Petra; Cresci, Monica; Vecoli, Cecilia; Lamia, Debora; Russo, Giorgio; Panetta, Daniele; Tripodi, Maria; Gizzi, Leonida A; Labate, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven electron accelerators are capable of producing high-energy electron bunches in shorter distances than conventional radiofrequency accelerators. To date, our knowledge of the radiobiological effects in cells exposed to electrons using a laser-plasma accelerator is still very limited. In this study, we compared the dose-response curves for micronucleus (MN) frequency and telomere length in peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to laser-driven electron pulse and X-ray radiations. Additionally, we evaluated the effects on cell survival of in vitro tumor cells after exposure to laser-driven electron pulse compared to electron beams produced by a conventional radiofrequency accelerator used for intraoperative radiation therapy. Blood samples from two different donors were exposed to six radiation doses ranging from 0 to 2 Gy. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for micronucleus induction was calculated from the alpha coefficients for electrons compared to X rays (RBE = alpha laser/alpha X rays). Cell viability was monitored in the OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell line using trypan blue exclusion assay at day 3, 5 and 7 postirradiation (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy). The RBE values obtained by comparing the alpha values were 1.3 and 1.2 for the two donors. Mean telomere length was also found to be reduced in a significant dose-dependent manner after irradiation with both electrons and X rays in both donors studied. Our findings showed a radiobiological response as mirrored by the induction of micronuclei and shortening of telomere as well as by the reduction of cell survival in blood samples and cancer cells exposed in vitro to laser-generated electron bunches. Additional studies are needed to improve preclinical validation of the radiobiological characteristics and efficacy of laser-driven electron accelerators in the future.

  19. Free electron lasers and other advanced sources of light: Scientific research opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The free electron laser uses a beam of relativistic electrons passing through a periodic, transverse magnetic field to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of these devices are: A resonance condition that involves the energy of the electron beam, the strength of the magnetic field, and the periodicity of the magnet determines the wavelength of the radiation. Because one medium, the electrons, provides the gain in all spectral regions, adjusting either the beam energy or the field strength tunes the wavelength easily and rapidly over a wide range. Waste energy leaves the medium as kinetic energy of the electrons at nearly the speed of light. Moreover, the lasting medium consists only of electrons in a vacuum, and it does not have the material damage or thermal lensing problems associated with ordinary lasers. Therefore, free electron lasers can achieve very high peak powers. The main disadvantages of the free electron laser are its size and cost. Because the free electron laser requires an electron accelerator with its associated shielding, it has not been a device that could be placed in an individual investigator's laboratory and be operated and maintained by graduate students whose primary expertise is in other areas of science. Because free electron lasers are currently used only in central facilities, their use in scientific research involves both the cost of the device, and the cost and inconvenience of maintaining a facility. Unlike synchrotrons, free electron lasers serve one user, or at most a few users, at any one time. The required electron beam energy increases with decreasing wavelength, and the cost and size of the accelerator as well as the cost and size of the magnetic structure increase with decreasing wavelength. In addition to energy requirements, the electron beam must meet other requirements for emittance, energy spread, and peak current that become more stringent at shorter wavelengths. The shortest wavelength reached by existing free

  20. Rotational coherence as an alternative to coincidence techniques at x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Ryan; Hegazy, Kareem; Hartmann, Nick; Walter, Peter; Osipov, Timur; Lindahl, Anton; Helml, Wolfram; Ilchen, Markus; Galler, Andreas; Liu, Jia; Buck, Jens; Shevchuk, Ivan; Viefhaus, Jens; Hartmann, Gregor; Knie, Andre; Demekhin, Philipp; Inhester, Ludger; Li, Zheng; Ziaja-Motyka, Beata; Medvedev, Nikita; Bostedt, Christoph; Guillemin, Renaud; Simon, Marc; Novella-Piancastelli, Maria; Miron, Catalin; LCLS-AMOI0314 Team

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate an alternative approach to coincidence particle detection, based on impulsive rotational Raman excitation, for molecular frame measurements at x-ray FELs. A train of 8 infrared laser pulses induces the lab-frame observable coherence. At a field-free alignment revival, we register the angle-resolved laboratory frame Auger and photo-electron spectral feature variations with the tumbling molecular body frame. The time and angle dependence of the electron emission patterns that constrain theory are amenable to large numbers of interactions per pulse and, more importantly, has no axial recoil requirement for kinematic reconstruction. We see this as a method to bypass experimental challenges at XFELs by accepting The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is supported by the U.S. DoE-BES Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF0051.

  1. Optical Sideband Generation: a Longitudinal Electron Beam Diagnostic Beyond the Laser Bandwidth Resolution Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Tilborg, J. van; Matlis, N. H.; Plateau, G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    Electro-optic sampling (EOS) is widely used as a technique to measure THz-domain electric field pulses such asthe self-fields of femtosecond electron beams. We present an EOS-based approach for single-shot spectral measurement that excels in simplicity (compatible with fiber integration) and bandwidth coverage (overcomes the laser bandwidth limitation), allowing few-fs electron beams or single-cycle THz pulses to be characterized with conventional picosecond probes. It is shown that the EOS-induced optical sidebands on the narrow-bandwidth optical probe are spectrally-shifted replicas of the THz pulse. An experimental demonstration on a 0-3 THz source is presented.

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  3. Innovative single-shot diagnostics for electrons accelerated through laser-plasma interaction at FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Costa, G.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Pompili, R.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (> 100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeters. Here we present all the plasma related activities currently underway at SPARC LAB exploiting the high power laser FLAME. In particular, we will give an overview of the single shot diagnostics employed: Electro Optic Sampling (EOS) for temporal measurement and optical transition radiation (OTR) for an innovative one shot emittance measurements. In detail, the EOS technique has been employed to measure for the first time the longitudinal profile of electric field of fast electrons escaping from a solid target, driving the ions and protons acceleration, and to study the impact of using different target shapes. Moreover, a novel scheme for one shot emittance measurements based on OTR, developed and tested at SPARC LAB LINAC, will be shown.

  4. Electron Acceleration by Beating of Two Intense Cross-Focused Hollow Gaussian Laser Beams in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Saleh T.; Gauniyal, Rakhi; Ahmad, Nafis; Rawat, Priyanka; Purohit, Gunjan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents propagation of two cross-focused intense hollow Gaussian laser beams (HGBs) in collisionless plasma and its effect on the generation of electron plasma wave (EPW) and electron acceleration process, when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are simultaneously operative. Nonlinear differential equations have been set up for beamwidth of laser beams, power of generated EPW, and energy gain by electrons using WKB and paraxial approximations. Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of typical laser-plasma parameters on the focusing of laser beams in plasmas and further its effect on power of excited EPW and acceleration of electrons. It is observed that focusing of two laser beams in plasma increases for higher order of hollow Gaussian beams, which significantly enhanced the power of generated EPW and energy gain. The amplitude of EPW and energy gain by electrons is found to enhance with an increase in the intensity of laser beams and plasma density. This study will be useful to plasma beat wave accelerator and in other applications requiring multiple laser beams. Supported by United Arab Emirates University for Financial under Grant No. UPAR (2014)-31S164

  5. High energy electron and ion generation from thin target using ultra short table top laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nayuki, T.; Takizawa, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Sekiya, T; Okano, Y.; Hironaka, Y.; Nakamura, K. G.; Horioka, K.; Kondo, K. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Toyko Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The influence of laser pulse duration on energetic electrons and protons generation was investigated using a Ti:sapphire laser. Energetic electrons with the temperature of 350 keV were produced by the irradiation of 90 mJ and 50 fs pulse onto a 30 {mu} m copper tape target. For ions, when laser pulse was changed by varying grating distance in the pulse compressor with keeping laser energy at constant value, the maximum proton energy was not changed so much in the region where laser pulse duration was between 55 fs and 400 fs and laser intensity was order of 10{sup 18} W/ cm{sup 2}. The maximum proton energy seems to more depend on the laser energy density on the target than laser intensity. When we evaluate the performance of ion acceleration using the value of E{sub p-max}/U{sub p} (the maximum proton energy normalized by the ponderomotive potential of the laser field), it increasing along with increasing of laser pulse duration.

  6. Pulsed gas lasers based on electric transitions of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaslin, V.M.; Petrash, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed experimental study was carried out on the most important laser systems based on electron-oscillatory-rotational transitions of diatomic molecules. A study was made of the following transitions: in the N/sub 2/ molecule the C/sup 3/P/sub u/-B/sup 3/P/sub g/ (second positive band system) and the B/sup 3/P/sub g/-A/sup 3/..sigma../sub u//sup +/ (first positive band system) transitions; in the CO molecule the transition B/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/-A/sup 1/P (band system of Angstrom); in the H/sub 2/ molecule the transition 2sE/sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/-2psigmab/sup 1/..sigma../sub u//sup +/. It is shown that in all these systems a single mechanism is responsible for the inverse population. It is based on excitation of the working levels by direct electron shock from the ground state of the molecules. The distribution of excitation and amplification among the bands is determined by the Frank-Cordon principle. The energy and temporal characteristics of light generation in tubes of equal diameter is unambiguously defined by the parameter E/N, where E is the tension of the electric field in the discharge tube, and N is the density of the working gas. It was found that cooling the active substance in these lasers leads to a sharp increase of the amplification coefficient. This feature made it possible to obtain record radiation output in most of these lasers, to observe modes of high emission in the lasers, to observe a variation of intensities in the molecular spectra, and to realize more than 180 new lines of light generation.

  7. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Asahi, K.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Yoshimi, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-04-01

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  8. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, T., E-mail: inoue-t@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute of Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan); Aoki, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Hatanaka, K. [Osaka University, Research Center for Nuclear Physics (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Murakami, T. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan); Nataraj, H. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (India); and others

    2015-04-15

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  9. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    sheath field confinement on electron dynamics. X-ray emission due to energetic electrons was imaged using a aK imaging crystal. Electronswere observed to...laser conversion efficiency into particle andfield energy. Previous efforts tominimize this effect have primarily focused on small, isolated targets...leading to enhanced fields [12] improved conversion efficiency [13] and enhanced proton energies [14]with laser pulse durations of hundreds of fs

  10. Nonlinear theory of short-wavelength free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.

    1995-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers is studied for infrared and shorter wavelengths. The configuration of interest consists in the propagation of an energetic electron beam through a drift tube in the presence of a periodic wiggler magnetic field with planar symmetry. A three-dimensional formulation is derived in which the electromagnetic field is represented as an expansion of Gaussian optical modes. Since the wiggler model is characterized by planar symmetry, the Gauss-Hermite modes are used for this purpose. A set of nonlinear differential equations is derived for the evolution of the amplitude and phase of each mode, and they are solved simultaneously in conjunction with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons in the presence of the magneto-static wiggler, self-electric and self-magnetic fields due to the charge and current distributions of the beam, and the electromagnetic fields. It is important to note that no wiggler average is used in the integration of the electron trajectories. This permits the self-consistent modeling of effects associated with (1) the injection of the beam into the wiggler, (2) emittance growth due to inhomogeneities in the wiggler and radiation fields as well as due to the self-fields, (3) the effect of wiggler imperfections, and (4) betatron oscillations. The optical guiding of the radiation field is implicitly included in the formulation. This approach has important practical advantages in analyzing FELs, since it is necessary only to characterize the beam upon injection into the wiggler, and the subsequent evolution is treated self-consistently. Numerical simulations are performed for two examples corresponding to an infrared FEL at wavelengths near 3.5 μm, and an x-ray FEL operating in the neighborhood of 1.4 Å wavelengths corresponding to the proposed linear coherent light source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results for both cases indicate that

  11. High energy electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration with a long gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehoon; Hwangbo, Yong Hun; Lee, Shin-Yeong

    2017-09-01

    A long gas jet was used as a gas target for laser wake field acceleration to increase the energy and quality of the electron beam. When the plasma density was 7 × 1018 cm-3, quasi monoenergetic electron beams with a maximum energy of 152 MeV, a beam divergence 3 mrad, and a pointing stability 4 mrad were generated with a 5 mm long gas jet. The maximum energy was close to the theoretical limit predicted from the bubble model. This means that the length of the plasma was sufficiently long to accelerate the electron to the dephasing length after the electrons were self-injected by self-focusing. As the plasma density increased, the dephasing length decreased and the electron energy decreased. The continuous injection with higher density plasmas generated highly diverging beams. As the laser power increased, a number of electron beams with different propagation directions were generated. As shown by the measured shadowgram, the laser was divided into several filaments and each filament accelerated electron beam having different directions. The electron beam generated at this time decreased as the laser energy decreased due the division of the laser into different directions.

  12. Laser-sub-cycle two-dimensional electron momentum mapping using orthogonal two-color fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Li; Roither, Stefan; Kartashov, Daniil; Wang, YanLan; Wang, ChuanLiang; Schöffler, Markus; Shafir, Dror; Corkum, Paul; Baltuška, Andrius; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli; Liu, XiaoJun; Staudte, André; Kitzler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The two-dimensional sub-cycle-time to electron momentum mapping provided by orthogonal two-color laser fields is applied to photoelectron spectroscopy. Using neon as the example we gain experimental access to the dynamics of emitted electron wave packets in electron momenta spectra measured by coincidence momentum imaging. We demonstrate the opportunities provided by this time-to-momentum mapping by investigating the influence of the parent ion on the emitted electrons on laser-sub-cycle times. It is found that depending on their sub-cycle birth time the trajectories of photoelectrons are affected differently by the ion's Coulomb field.

  13. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culfa, O; Tallents, G J; Rossall, A K; Wagenaars, E; Ridgers, C P; Murphy, C D; Dance, R J; Gray, R J; McKenna, P; Brown, C D R; James, S F; Hoarty, D J; Booth, N; Robinson, A P L; Lancaster, K L; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Ya; Kampfer, T; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Woolsey, N C

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (10^{20}Wcm^{-2}) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μm).

  14. Heating of solid target in electron refluxing dominated regime with ultra-intense laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kodama, R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Chen, S. N.; Clark, D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Fuchs, J.; Green, J. S.; Gregory, C. D.; Guillou, P.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hey, D. S.; Highbarger, K.; Jaanimagi, P.; Key, M. H.; Koenig, M.; Krushelnick, K.; Lancaster, K. L.; Loupias, B.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Mackinonn, A. J.; Mima, K.; Morace, A.; Nakamura, H.; Norryes, P. A.; Piazza, D.; Rousseaux, C.; Stephans, R. B.; Storm, M.; Tampo, M.; Theobald, W.; Woerkom, L. V.; Weber, R. L.; Wei, M. S.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-05-01

    Propagation of electron beams generated in laser-plasma interactions is strongly influenced by self-induced electrostatic fields at target-vacuum interfaces, resulting the refluxing of electrons. We confirmed the refluxing and propagation of electrons with three different kinds of target configurations; thin-wide foil, thin-narrow foil, and long-wire geometry. Enhancement of target heating, effective guiding and collimation of high density MeV electrons were observed.

  15. Evolution of MEMS scanning mirrors for laser projection in compact consumer electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauscher, Jason; Davis, Wyatt O.; Brown, Dean; Ellis, Matt; Ma, Yunfei; Sherwood, Michael E.; Bowman, David; Helsel, Mark P.; Lee, Sung; Coy, John Wyatt

    2010-02-01

    The applicability of MOEMS scanning mirrors towards the creation of "flying spot" scanned laser displays is well established. The extension of this concept towards compact embedded pico-projectors has required an evolution of scanners and packaging to accommodate the needs of the consumer electronics space. This paper describes the progression of the biaxial MOEMS scanning mirrors developed by Microvision over recent years. Various aspects of the individual designs are compared. Early devices used a combination of magnetic quasistatic actuation and resonant electrostatic operation in an evacuated atmosphere to create a projection engine for retinal scanned displays. Subsequent designs realized the elimination of both the high voltage electrostatic drive and the vacuum package, and a simplification of the actuation scheme through proprietary technical advances. Additional advances have doubled the scan angle capability and greatly miniaturized the MOEMS component while not incurring significant increase in power consumption, making it an excellent fit for the consumer pico-projector application. The simplicity of the scanned laser-based pico-projector optical design enables high resolution and a large effective image size in a thin projection engine, all of which become critical both to the viability of the technology and adoption by consumers. Microvision's first scanned laser pico-projector is built around a MOEMS scanning mirror capable of projecting 16:9 aspect ratio, WVGA display within a 6.6 mm high package. Further evolution on this path promises continued improvement in resolution, size, and power.

  16. Laser Opto-Electronic Correlator for Robotic Vision Automated Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville

    1995-01-01

    A compact laser opto-electronic correlator for pattern recognition has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Specifically it is a translation sensitivity adjustable compact optical correlator (TSACOC) utilizing convergent laser beams for the holographic filter. Its properties and performance, including the location of the correlation peak and the effects of lateral and longitudinal displacements for both filters and input images, are systematically analyzed based on the nonparaxial approximation for the reference beam. The theoretical analyses have been verified in experiments. In applying the TSACOC to important practical problems including fingerprint identification, we have found that the tolerance of the system to the input lateral displacement can be conveniently increased by changing a geometric factor of the system. The system can be compactly packaged using the miniature laser diode sources and can be used in space by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and ground commercial applications which include robotic vision, and industrial inspection of automated quality control operations. The personnel of Standard International will work closely with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to transfer the technology to the commercial market. Prototype systems will be fabricated to test the market and perfect the product. Large production will follow after successful results are achieved.

  17. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Luděk; Boháček, Pavel; Přeček, Martin; Wild, J.; Özkan, C.; Coppola, N.; Farahani, S.D.; Schulz, J.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Gaudin, J.; Bajt, S.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.N.; Loch, R.A.; Jurek, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Harmand, M.; Galasso, G.; Nagasono, M.; Saskl, K.; Sovák, P.; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2015), 254-264 ISSN 2159-3930 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fluorescent and luminescent materials * laser damage * free-electron lasers * soft x-rays * laser materials processing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.657, year: 2015

  18. Laser sources for polarized electron beams in cw and pulsed accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziefremidis, A; Fraser, D; Avramopoulos, H

    1999-01-01

    We report the characterization of a high power, high repetition rate, mode-locked laser system to be used in continuous wave and pulsed electron accelerators for the generation of polarized electron beams. The system comprises of an external cavity diode laser and a harmonically mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator and it can provide up to 3.4 W average power, with a corresponding pulse energy exceeding 1 nJ at 2856 MHz repetition rate. The system is tunable between 770-785 and 815-835 nm with two sets of diodes for the external cavity diode laser. (author)

  19. Electron density and temperature measurements in a laser produced carbon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S.; Bindhu, C.V.; Issac, R.C.; Nampoori, V.P.; Vallabhan, C.P. [Laser Division, International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    1997-09-01

    Plasma generated by fundamental radiation from a Nd:YAG laser focused onto a graphite target is studied spectroscopically. Measured line profiles of several ionic species were used to infer electron temperature and density at several sections located in front of the target surface. Line intensities of successive ionization states of carbon were used for electron temperature calculations. Stark broadened profiles of singly ionized species have been utilized for electron density measurements. Electron density as well as electron temperature were studied as functions of laser irradiance and time elapsed after the incidence of laser pulse. The validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed in light of the results obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  1. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  2. Planar Laser-Based QEPAS Trace Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yufei Ma; Ying He; Cheng Chen; Xin Yu; Jingbo Zhang; Jiangbo Peng; Rui Sun; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    A novel quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) trace gas detection scheme is reported in this paper. A cylindrical lens was employed for near-infrared laser focusing. The laser beam was shaped as a planar line laser between the gap of the quartz tuning fork (QTF) prongs. Compared with a spherical lens-based QEPAS sensor, the cylindrical lens-based QEPAS sensor has the advantages of easier laser beam alignment and a reduction of stringent stability requirements. Therefore, the repo...

  3. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  4. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-06-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  5. CTS and CZTS for solar cells made by pulsed laser deposition and pulsed electron deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    This thesis concerns the deposition of thin films for solar cells using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and pulsed electron deposition (PED). The aim was to deposit copper tin sulfide (CTS) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by pulsed laser deposition to learn about these materials in relation to copper zinc tin......, which make them promising alternatives to the commercially successful solar cell material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Complementing our group's work on pulsed laser deposition of CZTS, we collaborated with IMEM-CNR in Parma, Italy, to deposit CZTS by pulsed electron deposition for the first...... of using pulsed electron deposition was to make CZTS at a low processing temperature, avoiding the 570 °C annealing step used for our pulsed laser deposited solar cells. Preliminary solar cells had an efficiency of 0.2 % with a 300 °C deposition step without annealing. Further process control is needed...

  6. Relativistic Electron Acceleration with Ultrashort Mid-IR Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Linus; Woodbury, Daniel; Shumakova, Valentina; Gollner, Claudia; Miao, Bo; Schwartz, Robert; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius; Milchberg, Howard

    2017-10-01

    We report the first results of laser plasma wakefield acceleration driven by ultrashort mid-infrared laser pulses (λ = 3.9 μm , pulsewidth 100 fs, energy width, as well as trends in the accelerated beam profiles, charge and energy spectra which are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. These results extend earlier work with sub-TW self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration using near IR drivers to the Mid-IR, and enable us to capture time-resolved images of relativistic self-focusing of the laser pulse. This work supported by DOE (DESC0010706TDD, DESC0015516); AFOSR(FA95501310044, FA95501610121); NSF(PHY1535519); DHS.

  7. Nonadiabaticity of electron-tunneling-ionization processes in elliptical strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Chen, Yan-jun; Xia, Qin-zhi; Ye, Di-fa; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-bin

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron-tunneling process for a helium atom irradiated by an elliptical strong laser field. The momentum distribution for an electron ionized during the cycle when the laser intensity reaches its maximum is captured, such that we can ignore the interference between the wave packets ionized in different laser cycles and precisely determine the center of the momentum distribution. The quantum mechanical prediction of the center position is further compared to the semiclassical single-trajectory simulation as well as the experimental data. We find that the electron momentums along the minor axis of the laser polarization show good agreement with the nonadiabatic semiclassical calculation for a wide range of laser intensities, indicating the existence of a nonzero lateral momentum when the electron exits the barrier. On the other hand, the offset angles obtained by our quantum mechanical approach for different laser intensities are larger than the nonadiabatic semiclassical results, indicating the importance of the quantum effects during the electron's under-the-barrier dynamics.

  8. Laser-assisted electron capture and emission in slow proton-hydrogen collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong laser field on the dynamics of ion-atom collisions by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) on a numerical grid for a 2D (reduced dimensionality) and a full 3D model of the scattering system. In the 2D model the electron system is confined to the two dimensions of the scattering plane, which also includes the laser electric field vector. This allows us to study the influence of the laser intensity and polarization (linear, circular, elliptic) on the capture and ionization probabilities for a large number of collision and laser parameters. After intergrating over impact parameters of the classical projectile trajectory and after averagering over the relative phase between the laser electric field and the collision, we find for intensities above 10^13 W/cm^2 noticeable laser electric field effects and circular dichroism in the capture probability.

  9. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-01-01

    .... By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators...

  10. Modeling distributed feedback GaAs-based lasers in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Meng-Mu

    2012-01-01

    Distributed-feedback gallium-arsenide-based lasers with metal-gratings can generate stable wavelength at 980nm for applications in dentistry. This model uses the periodic optical waveguide method to calculate the coupling coefficient, which is a key parameter of laser performance. This model shows how the optical, geometrical, and material parameters depending on each other and how they affect the coupling coefficients in the laser waveguides. Numerical results compare the coupling coefficients of 980 nm lasers with those of 810 nm lasers. The modeling processes, including results, discussions, and physical interpretations, help to design and analyze lasers for more clinical and research applications in dentistry.

  11. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  12. Influence of laser induced hot electrons on the threshold for shock ignition of fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaïtis, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Le Bel, E.; Duchateau, G.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, UMR 5107,351 Cours de la Libération, 33400 Talence (France)

    2016-07-15

    The effects of Hot Electrons (HEs) generated by the nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) on the dynamics of Shock Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are investigated. The coupling between the laser beam, plasma dynamics and hot electron generation and propagation is described with a radiative hydrodynamics code using an inline model based on Paraxial Complex Geometrical Optics [Colaïtis et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 041101 (2015)]. Two targets are considered: the pure-DT HiPER target and a CH-DT design with baseline spike powers of the order of 200–300 TW. In both cases, accounting for the LPI-generated HEs leads to non-igniting targets when using the baseline spike powers. While HEs are found to increase the ignitor shock pressure, they also preheat the bulk of the imploding shell, notably causing its expansion and contamination of the hotspot with the dense shell material before the time of shock convergence. The associated increase in hotspot mass (i) increases the ignitor shock pressure required to ignite the fusion reactions and (ii) significantly increases the power losses through Bremsstrahlung X-ray radiation, thus rapidly cooling the hotspot. These effects are less prominent for the CH-DT target where the plastic ablator shields the lower energy LPI-HE spectrum. Simulations using higher laser spike powers of 500 TW suggest that the CH-DT capsule marginally ignites, with an ignition window width significantly smaller than without LPI-HEs, and with three quarters of the baseline target yield. The latter effect arises from the relation between the shock launching time and the shell areal density, which becomes relevant in presence of a LPI-HE preheating.

  13. Theory and computation of few-electron atoms in intense laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, L

    2001-01-01

    experimental peak laser intensity measurement. At 780 nm preliminary results of a comparable calculation of double-ionization are given. In anticipation of a high intensity, high frequency radiation source becoming available in Germany by 2003, a calculation at 14 nm has also been performed. Momentum distributions have revealed the new process of double-electron above threshold ionization. In this process both electrons absorb excess photons during double-ionization. The study of the helium atom-exposed to an intense laser field forms the topic of this thesis. In the context of laser-atom interactions, a laser is said to be intense if the force it exerts on an electron in an atomic orbital is comparable to the force experienced by that electron due to the binding atomic potential. The electronic response of the helium atom to an intense laser field is governed by the interactions of the two electrons between themselves, with the nucleus and with the field. The problem therefore is the fundamental three-body p...

  14. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  15. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Brijesh, P; Phuoc, K T; Corde, S; Lambert, G; Malka, V; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M; Kneip, S

    2012-01-01

    A density perturbation produced in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 +/- 3.6%, divergence of 4 +/- 0.8 mrad and charge of 6 +/- 1.8 pC.

  16. Parametric waves excitation in relativistic laser-plasma interactions for electron acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulyapov, S. A.; Ivanov, K. A.; Tsymbalov, I. N.; Krestovskih, D. A.; Savel'ev, A. B.; Ksenofontov, P. A.; Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu

    2015-11-01

    Plasma created by femtosecond laser pulse of high intensity can be used as the brilliant source of high energy electrons, ions and x- or γ-rays. In most cases, laser pulses with high contrast are used for particle acceleration. But, it has been shown, that changing parameters of pre-plasma layer on the surface of the target can significantly increase electron energies. In this work we present the results of the experimental and numerical studies of the abnormally hot electron generation mechanisms in the case of long scale pre-plasma layer subcritical density.

  17. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating

  18. Demonstration of electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Döpp, Andreas; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin; Phuoc, Kim Ta; Gautier, Julien; Goddet, Jean-Philippe; Tafzi, Amar; Flacco, Alessandro; Tissandier, Fabien; Sebban, Stéphane; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high energy electron accelerators. It could make free electron lasers available to a broad scientific community, and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high energy physics. Furthermore the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultra-fast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams, mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens, in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  19. High gain harmonic generation free electron lasers enhanced by pseudoenergy bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for high gain harmonic generation free electron lasers (HGHG FELs, which is seeded by a pair of intersecting laser beams to interact with an electron beam in a modulator undulator located in a dispersive section. The interference of the laser beams gives rise to a two-dimensional modulation in the energy-time phase space because of a strong correlation between the electron energy and the position in the direction of dispersion. This eventually forms pseudoenergy bands in the electron beam, which result in efficient harmonic generation in HGHG FELs in a similar manner to the well-known scheme using the echo effects. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that the beam quality is less deteriorated than in other existing schemes.

  20. Energy enhancer for mask based laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    A device capable of drastically improving the energy efficiency of present mask based laser materials processing systems is presented. Good accordance between experiments and simulations for a TEA-CO2 laser system designed for laser marking has been demonstrated. The energy efficiency may...

  1. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Behrens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The successful operation of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs, like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH, makes unprecedented research on matter at atomic length and ultrafast time scales possible. However, in order to take advantage of these unique light sources and to meet the strict requirements of many experiments in photon science, FEL photon pulse durations need to be known and tunable. This can be achieved by controlling the FEL driving electron beams, and high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics can be utilized to provide constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In this paper, we present comparative measurements of soft x-ray pulse durations and electron bunch lengths at FLASH. The soft x-ray pulse durations were measured by FEL radiation pulse energy statistics and compared to electron bunch lengths determined by frequency-domain spectroscopy of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range and time-domain longitudinal phase space measurements. The experimental results, theoretical considerations, and simulations show that high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics provide reasonable constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In addition, we demonstrated the generation of soft x-ray pulses with durations below 50 fs (FWHM after the implementation of the new uniform electron bunch compression scheme used at FLASH.

  2. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  3. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  4. Plasma-optical spatiotemporal diagnostics and alignment for electron and laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Knetsch, Alexander; Beaton, Andrew; Delinikolas, Panagiotis; Habib, Fahim; Manahan, Grace; Scherkl, Paul; Ullmann, Daniel; Sutherland, Andrew; Karger, Oliver; Rosenzweig, James; Hidding, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    The steadily increasing demand for compact accelerator-driven light sources imposes new challenges for generating compact, high-quality electron beams and concomitant μm-scale, fs-scale diagnostics. During the E210 experimental campaign at FACET (SLAC), we have amended state-of-the-art electro-optical sampling timing diagnostics and optical transition radiation spatial diagnostics with novel plasma-based techniques. By harnessing the ultrasensitive plasma response to intersecting laser and electron beams, we have developed novel diagnostic techniques which potentially enable spatiotemporal alignment with sub-fs and sub- μm accuracy. Furthermore, the diagnostics can be realized in a simple and robust layout; they are based on measuring the time-integrated plasma recombination light from tunnel ionization as well as electron impact ionization. They thus map ultrashort and small dynamics onto much longer and larger scales, such that the main diagnostic element is a simple imaging device. These techniques, the underlying physics and their potentially far-reaching impact will be presented and discussed.

  5. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  6. Experimental Characterization Of The Saturating, Near Infrared, Self-amplified Spontaneous Emission Free Electron Laser Analysis Of Radiation Properties And Electron Beam Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Murokh, A

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the main results of the VISA experiment (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) are presented and analyzed. The purpose of the experiment was to build a state-of-the-art single pass self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) based on a high brightness electron beam, and characterize its operation, including saturation, in the near infrared spectral region. This experiment was hosted by Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is a users facility that provides high brightness relativistic electron beams generated with the photoinjector. During the experiment, SASE FEL performance was studied in two regimes: a long bunch, lower gain operation; and a short bunch high gain regime. The transition between the two conditions was possible due to a novel bunch compression mechanism, which was discovered in the course of the experiment. This compression allowed the variation of peak current in the electron beam before it was launched into the 4-m VISA...

  7. Recent results in mirror based high power laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Elvang, Mads

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, recent results in high power laser cutting, obtained in reseach and development projects are presented. Two types of mirror based focussing systems for laser cutting have been developed and applied in laser cutting studies on CO2-lasers up to 12 kW. In shipyard environment cutting...... speed increase relative to state-of-the-art cutting of over 100 % has been achieved....

  8. A Shuttle based laser system for space communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Bruno, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    A key element of NASA-Goddard's plan for future laser space communications is the Space Shuttle-based Laser Technology Experiments Facility (LTEF), which will be designed to communicate with a cooperative laser system under development for the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) and will conduct a comprehensive set of acquisition, tracking, and communication experiments. Attention is presently given to the challenges faced by designers in achieving LTEF acquisition of the ACTS downlink beacon laser.

  9. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Brunetti, E; Gil, D Reboredo; Welsh, G H; Li, F Y; Cipiccia, S; Ersfeld, B; Grant, D W; Grant, P A; Islam, M R; Tooley, M P; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M; Sheng, Z M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2017-03-10

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5-10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°-60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators.

  10. Beam dynamics analysis of femtosecond microbunches produced by the staged electron laser acceleration experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of the femtosecond (fs microbunches, created during laser acceleration, is a crucial step to enable staging of the laser acceleration process. This paper focuses on the optimization of the beam dynamics of fs microbunches transported through the staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA-II experiment being carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. STELLA-II consists of an inverse free electron laser (IFEL untapered undulator, which acts as an electron beam energy modulator; a magnetic chicane, which acts as a buncher; a second IFEL tapered undulator, which acts as an accelerator; and a dipole, which serves as an energy spectrometer. When the energy-modulated macrobunch traverses through the chicane and a short drift space, microbunches of order fs in duration (i.e., ∼3  fs FWHM are formed. The 3-fs microbunches are accelerated by interacting with a high-power CO_{2} laser beam in the following tapered undulator. These extremely short microbunches may experience significant space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation effects when traversing the STELLA-II transport line. These effects are analyzed and the safe operating conditions are determined. With less than 0.5-pC microbunch charge, both microbunch debunching and emittance growth are negligible, and the energy-spread increase is less than 5%. These results are also useful for the laser electron acceleration project at SLAC and in possible future programs where the fs microbunches are employed for other purposes.

  11. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  12. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, X; Reboredo Gil, David; Welsh, Gregor H; Li, Y.F; Cipiccia, Silvia; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Grant, D. W; Grant, P. A; Islam, Muhammad; Tooley, M.B; Vieux, Gregory; Wiggins, Sally; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lowerenergy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wake...

  13. Modified stimulated Raman scattering of a laser induced by trapped electrons in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliyan, Sweta; Rafat, Mohd.; Ahmad, Nafis; Sajal, Vivek

    2017-10-01

    The plasma wave, generated in stimulated Raman scattering process by an intense laser in the plasmas, traps a significant number of electrons in its potential energy minima. These electrons travel with the phase velocity of plasma wave and oscillate with bounce frequency. When the bounce frequency of electrons becomes equal to the growth rate of Raman process, resonance takes place. Now, Raman scattering gets modified by parametrically exciting a trapped electron mode and an electromagnetic sideband. The ponderomotive force due to the pump and sideband drives the plasma wave, whereas the density perturbation due to the trapped electron mode couples with the oscillating velocity of electrons due to the laser to produce a nonlinear current, driving the sideband.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy comparison of the cleaning efficacy of a root canal system by Nd:YAG laser and rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Shakoei, Sahar; Ebrahimpour, Delaram; Taghavi, Pedram

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the cleaning efficacy of a root canal system by Nd:YAG laser and rotary instruments. Sixty single-rooted human teeth were divided into four experimental groups (n=15). In the first group the teeth were prepared with a step-back technique using conventional K-files. In the second and third groups, tooth preparation was carried out using Nd:YAG laser and rotary NiTi instruments, respectively. Teeth in the fourth group were prepared by combined laser and rotary methods. The smear layer remaining on canal walls was then assessed by scanning electron microscopy in the coronal, middle, and apical portions. The comparison of smear layer removal efficacy between groups was carried out by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The mean grades of smear layer removal in rotary-laser, rotary, laser and step-back techniques were 1.34 ± 0.18, 2.2 ± 0.28, 1.91 ± 0.25, and 2.42 ± 0.19, respectively. On the whole, differences between rotary-laser and rotary groups, step-back, and the three other techniques (rotary, laser, and rotary-laser) were significant at p=0.034. Based on the findings of this study, the cleaning efficacy of rotary, laser, and rotary-laser techniques were better than the step-back technique and the combined laser and rotary technique was the most efficient method.

  15. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  16. Autocorrelation measurement of fast electron pulses emitted through the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with a solid target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Otani, Kazuto; Hashida, Masaki; Hata, Masayasu; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Sakabe, Shuji

    2012-11-02

    We report the first direct measurement of the emission duration of laser-accelerated fast electrons from the surface of a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The emission duration is determined by autocorrelation measurement using the Coulomb repulsive forces that act on two equivalent electron pulses. The emission duration depends on the laser pulse duration for laser pulses of 200-690 fs. Numerical modeling of three-dimensional charged particle dynamics indicates that the emission duration of fast electrons is almost equal to the duration of the laser pulse.

  17. Free Electron Laser For Siberian Centre For Photochemical Research The Control System For The Magnet Power Supplies

    CERN Document Server

    Velikanov, Yu M; Evtushenko, Yu A; Kayran, D A; Kozak, V R; Kuper, E A; Medvedev, L E; Medvedko, A S; Oreshkov, A D; Petrov, S P; Serednyakov, S I; Tararyshkin, S V; Veremeenko, V F; Vinokurov, N A; Zagorodnikov, E I

    2004-01-01

    A control system for the magnetic system of the free electron laser (FEL) is described. The characteristics and structure of the power supply system are presented. The control system is based on embedded intelligent controllers with the CAN-BUS interfaced. The control software structure and capabilities are described. A possibility of connection of the control software to the integrated control system using the Epics Channel Access protocol is also discussed.

  18. Automatic electronic-controlled mode locking self-start in fibre lasers with non-linear polarisation evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnatarov, Daba; Khripunov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Ivanenko, Aleksey; Kukarin, Sergey

    2013-09-09

    The present work demonstrates a fibre-laser system with automatic electronic-controlled triggering of dissipative soliton generation mode. Passive mode locking based on the effect of non-linear polarisation evolution has been achieved through a polarisation controller containing a single low-voltage liquid crystal plate whose optimal wave delay was determined from analysis of inter-mode beat spectrum of the output radiation.

  19. Investigation of Plasma Processes in Electronic Transition Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-30

    Electrical insulator FIG. 1. Illustraiionof heated HgBr(fi|/HgBr, laser discharge cell. 1057 AppI Phys. Lett. 37(12), 15 December1980 003-6951/80/241057... insulated from each other by shielded alumina spacers and, when assembled into the collision chamber, constituted an enclosure from which the loss...nors typically used in rare-gas fluoride lasers. Formation of XeCl(5) by way ofXeCPjyHCl reactions is slightly endo- thermic at 300 °K,’ reflecting the

  20. Numerical calculations of the electron beam emittance for laser acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balascuta, Septimiu

    2017-06-01

    At the E6 experimental area at ELI-NP, two 10 PW Laser (pump and probe) pulses, with their directions making an 135° angle, will be used for the study of the radiation reaction, non-linear Thomson scattering, electron beam cooling and other QED phenomena in the relativistic regime. The pump 10 PW Laser beam focused in a gas-jet will generate a plasma wakefield that accelerate electrons by self-injection. The probe 10PW Laser pulse has to be synchronized and focused on the electron bunch. In order to maximize the flux of gamma rays produced in this collision, for a given Laser field intensity, the transversal area of the electron beam at the collision point has to be smaller than the focus of the probe pulse. This work presents the calculation of electron beam emittance and angular divergence, versus the distance traveled by electron bunch in vacuum. A configuration of dipole permanent magnets is proposed for the study of energy distribution of electrons and positrons.

  1. Electron-molecule scattering in a strong laser field: Two-center interference effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakić, J.; Habibović, D.; Čerkić, A.; Busuladžić, M.; Milošević, D. B.

    2017-10-01

    Laser-assisted scattering of electrons on diatomic molecules is considered using the S -matrix theory within the second Born approximation. The first term of the expansion in powers of the scattering potential corresponds to the direct or single laser-assisted scattering of electrons on molecular targets, while the second term of this expansion corresponds to the laser-assisted rescattering or double scattering. The rescattered electrons may have considerably higher energies in the final state than those that scattered only once. For multicenter polyatomic molecules scattering and rescattering may happen at any center and in any order. All these cases contribute to the scattering amplitude and the interference of different contributions leads to an increase or a decrease of the differential cross section in particular electron energy regions. For diatomic molecules there are two such contributions for single scattering and four contributions for double scattering. Analyzing the spectra of the scattered electrons, we find two interesting effects. For certain molecular orientations, the plateaus in the electron energy spectrum, characteristic of laser-assisted electron-atom scattering, are replaced by a sequence of gradually declining maxima, caused by the two-center interference effects. The second effect is the appearance of symmetric U -shaped structures in the angle-resolved energy spectra, which are described very well by the analytical formulas we provide.

  2. Laser-based detection of chemical contraband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Robert G.; Kelly, James F.; Martin, Steven W.; Mong, Gary M.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of our work is tow fold; 1) develop a portable and rapid laser based air sampler for detection of specific chemical contraband and 2) compile a spectral data base in both the near- and mid-IR of sufficiently high quality to be useful for gas phase spectroscopic identification of chemical contraband. During the synthesis or 'cooking' of many illicit chemical substances, relatively high concentrations of volatile solvents, chemical precursors and byproducts are unavoidably released to the atmosphere. In some instances, the final product may have sufficient vapor pressure to be detectable in the surrounding air. The detection of a single high-value effluent or the simultaneous detection of two or more low-value effluents can be used as reliable indicators of a nearby clandestine cooking operation. The designation of high- versus low-value effluent reflects both the commercial availability and legitimate usage of a specific chemical. This paper will describe PNNL's progress and efforts towards the development of a portable laser based air sampling system for the detection of clandestine manufacturing of methamphetamine. Although our current efforts ar focused on methamphetamine, we see no fundamental limitations on detection of other forms of chemical contraband manufacturing. This also includes the synthesis of certain classes of chemical weapons that have recently been deployed by terrorist groups.

  3. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  4. A laser triggered electron source for pulsed radiolysis

    CERN Document Server

    Monard, H; Le Duff, J; Garvey, Terence; Mouton, B; Rodier, J; Thiery, Y; Gaillard, M

    1999-01-01

    We present the design of a photo-injector based accelerator for pulsed radiolysis applications. This machine is destined to meet the needs of the physical chemistry community at the Universite de Paris XI. A 4 MeV Energy electron pulse of a few picoseconds duration and with a charge in the range of 1 to 10 nC is produced from a Cs/sub 2 /Te photocathode. The photocathode is placed in the half energy spread cell of a 1-1/2 cell, 3 GHz RF gun, whose design is based on the gun used for the drive beam of the CERN CLIC Test facility. A 4 cell "booster" cavity is then used to accelerate the beam to an energy of 9 MeV. The transport system consists of a quadrupole triplet downsteam of the booster, two rectangular, 30 degree bend, dipoles with a pair of quadrupoles between them and a second triplet downstream of the second dipole. Energy dependent path length effects in the two dipoles allow the possibility of magnetic bunch compression depending on the phase-energy correlation of the bunch exiting the booster cavity...

  5. Detailed characterization of electron sources yielding first demonstration of European X-ray Free-Electron Laser beam quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoinjector test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ, was built to develop and optimize photoelectron sources for superconducting linacs for high-brilliance, short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL applications like the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the European x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL. In this paper, the detailed characterization of two laser-driven rf guns with different operating conditions is described. One experimental optimization of the beam parameters was performed at an accelerating gradient of about 43  MV/m at the photocathode and the other at about 60  MV/m. In both cases, electron beams with very high phase-space density have been demonstrated at a bunch charge of 1 nC and are compared with corresponding simulations. The rf gun optimized for the lower gradient has surpassed all the FLASH requirements on beam quality and rf parameters (gradient, rf pulse length, repetition rate and serves as a spare gun for this facility. The rf gun studied with increased accelerating gradient at the cathode produced beams with even higher brightness, yielding the first demonstration of the beam quality required for driving the European XFEL: The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in the two transverse directions was measured to be 1.26±0.13  mm mrad for a 1-nC electron bunch. When a 10% charge cut is applied excluding electrons from those phase-space regions where the measured phase-space density is below a certain level and which are not expected to contribute to the lasing process, the normalized projected rms emittance is about 0.9 mm mrad.

  6. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  7. A mirrorless photonic free-electron laser oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, P.J.M.; Strooisma, A.; Denis, T.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic crystals have been used to provide fundamental control over the interaction between light and matter, including stimulated emission. For example, in Bloch-mode lasers, the photonic crystal provides field enhancement through reduced group velocity and offers larger mode volumes through

  8. A Cerenkov free electron laser with high peak power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Couperus, J.; Witteman, W.J.; Lebedev, A.N.; Krastelev, E.G.; Agafonov, A.V.; Voronin, V.S.; Krasnopolsky, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A Cherenkov FEL can be a suitable source for radiation from the millimeter wavelength region down to the far infrared. With only a few different dielectric materials the laser can range from 6 mm down to ¿ 600 ¿m. Nonlinear theory shows, for an amplifier configuration, power levels of about 100 kW

  9. Beam Diagnostics for Laser Undulator Based on Compton Backward Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, R

    2005-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on Compton backward scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser (10ps FWHM) and about 5 MeV high quality electron beam (10ps FWHM) generated from rf gun system. The range of X-ray energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein's coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. To generate the soft X-ray pulse stably, the electron beam diagnostics have been developed such as the emittance measurement using double slit scan technique, the bunch length measurement using two frequency analysis technique. In this confere...

  10. Intense γ ray generated by refocusing laser pulse on wakefield accelerated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Jinguang; Li, Yifei; Zhu, Changqing; Li, Minghua; He, Yuhang; Li, Dazhang; Wang, Weimin; Chen, Liming

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast x/γ ray emission from the combination of laser wake-field acceleration and plasma mirror has been investigated as a promising Thomson scattering source. However, the photon energy and yield of radiation are limited to the intensity of reflected laser pulses. We use the 2D particle in cell simulation to demonstrate that a 75TW driven laser pulse can be refocused on the accelerated electron bunches through a hemispherical plasma mirror with a small f number of 0.25. The energetic electrons with the maximum energy about 350 MeV collide with the reflected laser pulse of a0 = 3.82 at the focal spot, producing high order multi-photon Thomson scattering, and resulting in the scattering spectrum which extends up to 21.2 MeV. Such a high energy γ ray source could be applied to photonuclear reaction and materials science.

  11. Plasma mirror implementation on LFEX laser for ion and fast electron fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, A.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Yogo, A.; Tosaki, S.; Sakata, S.; Abe, Y.; Lee, S. H.; Matsuo, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Norimatsu, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Miyanaga, N.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we report the successful implementation of plasma mirror (PM) technology on an LFEX laser facility at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. The LFEX laser pulse was successfully refocused at the target chamber center (TCC) by means of a spherical plasma mirror, resulting in 5  ×  1018 W cm-2 laser intensity, with 45% reflectivity at a laser flux of about 90 J cm-2 on the PM. Experimental results show stable focusing and pointing of the LFEX pulse after PM refocusing. The contrast improvement was demonstrated by both cooler fast electron slope temperature distribution as well as by the ability to shoot sub-µm plastic foils obtaining proton beams with maximum energy exceeding 20 MeV. Experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by 2D particle in cell simulations.

  12. Plasma optical modulation for lasers based on the plasma induced by femtosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chao; Fu, Xiquan; Hu, Yonghua; Deng, Yangbao; Shi, Xiaohui; Zhan, Shiping; Xi, Zaifang

    2017-06-26

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of plasma optical modulation for probe lasers based on the plasma induced by pump pulses. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in carbon disulfide, where a drive laser pulse first excites plasma channels while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma. The modulation on the probe beam can be conveniently adjusted through electron density, plasma width, propagation distance of plasma, the power of pump lasers, or the pump beam's profile. The experimental results and theoretical solutions are very consistent, which fully illustrates that this method for plasma optical modulation is reasonable. This pump-probe method is also a potential measurement technique for inferring the on-axis plasma density shape.

  13. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  14. Determination of the electron affinity of astatine and polonium by laser photodetachment

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to conduct the first electron affinity (EA) measurements of the two elements astatine (At) and polonium (Po). Collinear photo-detachment spectroscopy will allow us to measure these quantities with an uncertainty limited only by the spectral line width of the laser. We plan to use negative ion beams of the two radioactive elements At and Po, which are only accessible on-line and at ISOLDE. The feasibility of our proposed method and the functionality of the experimental setup have been demonstrated at ISOLDE in off-line tests by the clear observation of the photo-detachment threshold for stable iodine. This proposal is based on our Letter of Intent I-148.

  15. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses.

  16. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation for electron-ion dynamics in molecules under intense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Y; Nakatsukasa, T; Yabana, K

    2009-02-11

    We have developed a simulation method to describe three-dimensional dynamics of electrons and ions in a molecule based on the time-dependent density-functional theory. We solve the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation for electrons employing the real-space and real-time method, while the ion dynamics are described in classical mechanics by the Ehrenfest method. For an efficient calculation in massively parallel computers, the code is parallelized dividing the spatial grid points. We apply the method to the Coulomb explosion of the H(2)S molecule under an intense and ultrashort laser pulse and investigate the mechanism of the process.

  17. Analytic description of elastic electron-atom scattering in an elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.; Zheltukhin, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    An analytic description of laser-assisted electron-atom scattering (LAES) in an elliptically polarized field is presented using time-dependent effective range (TDER) theory to treat both electron-laser and electron-atom interactions nonperturbatively. Closed-form formulas describing plateau features in LAES spectra are derived quantum mechanically in the low-frequency limit. These formulas provide an analytic explanation for key features of the LAES differential cross section. For the low-energy region of the LAES spectrum, our result generalizes the Kroll-Watson formula to the case of elliptic polarization. For the high-energy (rescattering) plateau in the LAES spectrum, our result generalizes prior results for a linearly polarized field valid for the high-energy end of the rescattering plateau [Flegel , J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/42/24/241002 42, 241002 (2009)] and confirms the factorization of the LAES cross section into three factors: two field-free elastic electron-atom scattering cross sections (with laser-modified momenta) and a laser field-dependent factor (insensitive to the scattering potential) describing the laser-driven motion of the electron in the elliptically polarized field. We present also approximate analytic expressions for the exact TDER LAES amplitude that are valid over the entire rescattering plateau and reduce to the three-factor form in the plateau cutoff region. The theory is illustrated for the cases of e-H scattering in a CO2-laser field and e-F scattering in a midinfrared laser field of wavelength λ=3.5μm, for which the analytic results are shown to be in good agreement with exact numerical TDER results.

  18. Heat-Flux Measurements in Laser-Produced Plasmas Using Thomson Scattering from Electron Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Cao, D.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2017-10-01

    An experiment was designed to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas using collective Thomson scattering. Adjustments to the electron distribution function resulting from heat flux affect the shape of the collective Thomson scattering features through wave-particle resonance. The amplitude of the Spitzer-Härm electron distribution function correction term (f1) was varied to match the data and determines the value of the heat flux. Independent measurements of temperature and density obtained from Thomson scattering were used to infer the classical heat flux (q = - κ∇Te) . Time-resolved Thomson-scattering data were obtained at five locations in the corona along the target normal in a blowoff plasma formed from a planar Al target with 1.5 kJ of 351-nm laser light in a 2-ns square pulse. The flux measured through the Thomson-scattering spectra is a factor of 5 less than the κ∇Te measurements. The lack of collisions of heat-carrying electrons suggests a nonlocal model is needed to accurately describe the heat flux. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  20. Temporal characterization of ultrashort linearly chirped electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for diagnosing the temporal characteristics of ultrashort electron bunches with linear energy chirp generated from a laser wakefield accelerator is described. When the ionization-injected bunch interacts with the back of the drive laser, it is deflected and stretched along the direction of the electric field of the laser. Upon exiting the plasma, if the bunch goes through a narrow slit in front of the dipole magnet that disperses the electrons in the plane of the laser polarization, it can form a series of bunchlets that have different energies but are separated by half a laser wavelength. Since only the electrons that are undeflected by the laser go through the slit, the energy spectrum of the bunch is modulated. By analyzing the modulated energy spectrum, the shots where the bunch has a linear energy chirp can be recognized. Consequently, the energy chirp and beam current profile of those bunches can be reconstructed. This method is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations and experiment.

  1. Vehicle Based Laser Range Finding in Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Juergen Horn; Rolf Adamek; Detlef Ehlert

    2009-01-01

    Laser rangefinders and laser scanners are widely used for industrial purposes and for remote sensing. In agriculture information about crop parameters like volume, height, and density can support the optimisation of production processes. In scientific papers the measurement of these parameters by low cost laser rangefinders with one echo has been presented for short ranges. Because the cross section area of the beam increases with the measuring range, it can be expected that laser rangefinder...

  2. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  3. Energetic electron-bunch generation in a phase-locked longitudinal laser electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, K D; Huang, T W; Ju, L B; Li, R; Yang, S L; Yang, Y C; Wu, S Z; Zhang, H; Qiao, B; Ruan, S C; Zhou, C T; He, X T

    2016-04-01

    Energetic electron acceleration processes in a plasma hollow tube irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse are investigated. It is found that the longitudinal component of the laser field is much enhanced when a linear polarized Gaussian laser pulse propagates through the plasma tube. This longitudinal field is of π/2 phase shift relative to the transverse electric field and has a π phase interval between its upper and lower parts. The electrons in the plasma tube are first pulled out by the transverse electric field and then trapped by the longitudinal electric field. The trapped electrons can further be accelerated to higher energy in the presence of the longitudinal electric field. This acceleration mechanism is clearly illustrated by both particle-in-cell simulations and single particle modelings.

  4. Electron injection and emittance control by transverse colliding pulses in a laser-plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A method to inject electron beams with controllable transverse emittances in a laser-plasma accelerators is proposed and analyzed. It uses two colliding laser pulses that propagate transversely to the plasma wave. For colliding pulses with equal frequencies, a beam with very low emittance is generated when the collision is close to the density peak of the plasma wave. Electrons near the axis are accelerated longitudinally by the ponderomotive force of the colliding pulses, accelerated transversely by the beat wave, and subsequently injected into the second bucket of the wake. Ionization is used to increase the transverse injection area and the final trapped charge. Simulations show that the transverse emittance can be less than the 0.1 mm mrad level, which is important for many applications. For colliding laser pulses with different frequencies, the beat wave can produce asymmetric injection, which can enhance betatron radiation generated by the electron beam.

  5. Short period, high field cryogenic undulator for extreme performance x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Short period, high field undulators can enable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs at low beam energy, with decreased gain length, thus allowing much more compact and less costly FEL systems. We describe an ongoing initiative to develop such an undulator based on an approach that utilizes novel cryogenic materials. While this effort was begun in the context of extending the photon energy regime of a laser-plasma accelerator based electron source, we consider here implications of its application to sub-fs scenarios in which more conventional injectors are employed. The use of such low-charge, ultrashort beams, which has recently been proposed as a method of obtaining single-spike performance in x-ray FELs, is seen in simulation to give unprecedented beam brightness. This brightness, when considered in tandem with short wavelength, high field undulators, enables extremely high performance FELs. Two examples discussed in this paper illustrate this point well. The first is the use of the SPARX injector at 2.1 GeV with 1 pC of charge to give 8 GW peak power in a single spike at 6.5 Å with a photon beam peak brightness greater than 10^{35}  photons/(s mm^{2} mrad^{2}  0.1%  BW, which will also reach LCLS wavelengths on the 5th harmonic. The second is the exploitation of the LCLS injector with 0.25 pC, 150 as pulses to lase at 1.5 Å using only 4.5 GeV energy; beyond this possibility, we present start-to-end simulations of lasing at unprecedented short wavelength, 0.15 Å, using 13.65 GeV LCLS design energy.

  6. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  7. Solar-pumped electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.; Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using solar-pumped lasers as solar energy converters is examined. The absorbing media considered are halogens or halogen compounds, which are dissociated to yield excited atoms, which then hand over energy to a molecular lasing medium. Estimates of the temperature effects for a Br2-CO2-He system with He as the cooling gas are given. High temperatures can cause the lower energy levels of the CO2 laser transition to be filled. The inverted populations are calculated and lasing should be possible. However, the efficiency is less than 0.001. Examination of other halogen-molecular lasant combinations (where the rate coefficients are known) indicate efficiencies in all cases of less than 0.005.

  8. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001JTPLA20021-364010.1134/1.1427124; Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.046504]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser wakefield, considerably compressed and accelerated to an ultrarelativistic energy. In this paper we show the possibility of the generation of an extremely short (on the order of 1   μm long or a few femtoseconds in duration relativistic-electron-bunch by this mechanism. The initial electron bunch, which can be generated, for example, by a laser-driven photocathode rf gun, should have an energy of a few hundred keVs to a few MeVs, a duration in the picosecond range or less and a relatively low concentration. The trapping conditions and parameters of an accelerated bunch are investigated. The laser pulse dynamics as well as a possible experimental setup for the demonstration of the injection scheme are also considered.

  9. Space-charge effects in ultrahigh current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Grüner

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron laser (FEL. Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultrahigh peak beam currents (10–100 kA generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultracompact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution, which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  10. Effects of the precursor electron bunch on quasi-phase matched direct laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.-W.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Liu, Y.-L.; Chen, S.-H.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-12-01

    Direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons can be achieved by utilizing the axial field of a well-guided, radially polarized laser pulse in a density-modulated plasma waveguide. When a laser pulse of a few terawatt (TW) peak power is applied, however, the laser ponderomotive force perturbs plasma electrons to concentrate in the center, such that the generated electrostatic fields can significantly defocus the externally injected electron witness bunch and considerably deteriorate the acceleration efficiency. To improve the performance of DLA, a leading electron bunch, which acts as a precursor, can be introduced in DLA to effectively confine the witness bunch. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been conducted to demonstrate that the transverse properties of the witness bunch can be significantly improved when a precursor bunch is used. Selected bunch transverse sizes, bunch charges, and axial separation from the witness bunch have been assigned to the precursor in a series of DLA simulations. Since a favorable ion-focusing force is provided by the precursor, the transverse properties of witness bunch can be maintained when a relatively high-power (˜2 TW) laser pulse is used in DLA, and an improved overall acceleration efficiency can be achieved.

  11. Analysis of data transmission technique based on pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, T.; Zygmunt, M.; Knysak, P.; Wojtanowski, J.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed lasers are used mainly in lidar systems as sources of short and highly energetic light pulses. In data transmission systems continuous wave lasers are typically applied, however it is also possible to use pulsed lasers in such systems. Such approach seems to be especially reasonable for devices where a pulsed laser is applied anyway and executes another function (rangefinding). The article discusses a data transmission concept based on a pulsed laser technology. Advantages and limits of such a transmission method are described. Influence of individual transmission elements on the effective data transmission speed is analysed.

  12. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M. [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece); Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D. [Oxford Lasers Ltd, Unit 8 Moorbrook Park, Oxfordshire OX11 7HP (United Kingdom); Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 – UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Zergioti, I., E-mail: zergioti@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Laser Direct Writing of metallic patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm. • Selective Laser Ablation of 50 nm thick metal films on flexible substrates. • Selective Laser sintering resulting in an electrical resistivity of 9 μΩ cm. • Laser fabrication of interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications. - Abstract: To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm{sup 2}. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, T. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Reis, D. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  14. A “slingshot” laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, Gaetano, E-mail: gaetano.fiore@na.infn.it [Dip. di Matematica e Applicazioni, Università “Federico II”, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); De Nicola, Sergio [SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed Fiore et al. [1] and Fiore and De Nicola [2] electron acceleration mechanism named “slingshot effect”: under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  15. Effects of front-surface target structures on properties of relativistic laser-plasma electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Krygier, A G; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Freeman, R R

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the role of prescribed geometrical structures on the front of a target in determining the energy and spatial distribution of relativistic laser-plasma electrons. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation studies apply to short-pulse, high-intensity laser pulses, and indicate that a judicious choice of target front-surface geometry provides the realistic possibility of greatly enhancing the yield of high-energy electrons while simultaneously confining the emission to narrow (<5°) angular cones.

  16. Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams

    OpenAIRE

    Vidya Ramanathan; Sudeep Banerjee; Nathan Powers; Nathaniel Cunningham; Nathan A. Chandler-Smith; Kun Zhao; Kevin Brown; Donald Umstadter; Shaun Clarke; Sara Pozzi; James Beene; Vane, C R; David Schultz

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100  MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense ma...

  17. Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Ramanathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100  MeV was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

  18. Submillimeter-Resolution Radiography of Shielded Structures with Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, Vidya [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Banerjee, Sudeep [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Powell, Nathan [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cummingham, N. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandler-Smith, Nate [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Zhao, Kun [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Brown, Kevin [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Umstadter, Donald [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Clarke, Shaun [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100 MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

  19. Projection imaging with directional electron and proton beams emitted from an ultrashort intense laser-driven thin foil target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Choi, I. W.; Daido, H.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Yogo, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Daito, I.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Yu, T. J.; Jeong, T. M.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, C. M.; Kang, S. W.; Pae, K. H.; Oishi, Y.; Lee, J.

    2015-02-01

    Projection images of a metal mesh produced by directional MeV electron beam together with directional proton beam, emitted simultaneously from a thin foil target irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser, are recorded on an imaging plate for the electron imaging and on a CR-39 nuclear track detector for the proton imaging. The directional electron beam means the portion of the electron beam which is emitted along the same direction (i.e., target normal direction) as the proton beam. The mesh patterns are projected to each detector by the electron beam and the proton beam originated from tiny virtual sources of ~20 µm and ~10 µm diameters, respectively. Based on the observed quality and magnification of the projection images, we estimate sizes and locations of the virtual sources for both beams and characterize their directionalities. To carry out physical interpretation of the directional electron beam qualitatively, we perform 2D particle-in-cell simulation which reproduces a directional escaping electron component, together with a non-directional dragged-back electron component, the latter mainly contributes to building a sheath electric field for proton acceleration. The experimental and simulation results reveal various possible applications of the simultaneous, synchronized electron and proton sources to radiography and pump-probe measurements with temporal resolution of ~ps and spatial resolution of a few tens of µm.

  20. Cleaning space debris with a space-based laser system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Shuangyan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-energy pulsed laser radiation may be the most feasible means to mitigate the threat of collision of a space station or other valuable space assets with orbital debris in the size range of 1–10 cm. Under laser irradiation, part of the debris material is ablated and provides an impulse to the debris particle. Proper direction of the impulse vector either deflects the object trajectory or forces the debris on a trajectory through the upper atmosphere, where it burns up. Most research concentrates on ground-based laser systems but pays little attention to space-based laser systems. There are drawbacks of a ground-based laser system in cleaning space debris. Therefore the placement of a laser system in space is proposed and investigated. Under assumed conditions, the elimination process of space debris is analyzed. Several factors such as laser repetition frequency, relative movement between the laser and debris, and inclination of debris particles which may exercise influence to the elimination effects are discussed. A project of a space-based laser system is proposed according to the numerical results of a computer study. The proposed laser system can eliminate debris of 1–10 cm and succeed in protecting a space station.

  1. Proposed Physics Experiments for Laser-Driven Electron Linear Acceleration in a Dielectric Loaded Vacuum, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byer, Robert L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics. Edward L. Ginzton Lab.

    2016-07-08

    This final report summarizes the last three years of research on the development of advanced linear electron accelerators that utilize dielectric wave-guide vacuum channels pumped by high energy laser fields to accelerate beams of electrons.

  2. Key techniques for space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Xiong, Sheng-jun; Liu, Xiao-long; Han, Wei-hua

    2014-12-01

    In space, the absence of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, dispersion and aerosol factors on laser transmission. Therefore, space-based laser has important values in satellite communication, satellite attitude controlling, space debris clearing, and long distance energy transmission, etc. On the other hand, solar energy is a kind of clean and renewable resources, the average intensity of solar irradiation on the earth is 1353W/m2, and it is even higher in space. Therefore, the space-based solar pumped lasers has attracted much research in recent years, most research focuses on solar pumped solid state lasers and solar pumped fiber lasers. The two lasing principle is based on stimulated emission of the rare earth ions such as Nd, Yb, Cr. The rare earth ions absorb light only in narrow bands. This leads to inefficient absorption of the broad-band solar spectrum, and increases the system heating load, which make the system solar to laser power conversion efficiency very low. As a solar pumped semiconductor lasers could absorb all photons with energy greater than the bandgap. Thus, solar pumped semiconductor lasers could have considerably higher efficiencies than other solar pumped lasers. Besides, solar pumped semiconductor lasers has smaller volume chip, simpler structure and better heat dissipation, it can be mounted on a small satellite platform, can compose satellite array, which can greatly improve the output power of the system, and have flexible character. This paper summarizes the research progress of space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers, analyses of the key technologies based on several application areas, including the processing of semiconductor chip, the design of small and efficient solar condenser, and the cooling system of lasers, etc. We conclude that the solar pumped vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers will have a wide application prospects in the space.

  3. Formation of plasmonic colloidal silver for flexible and printed electronics using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S., E-mail: skasa@physics.auth.gr [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kaziannis, S. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Pliatsikas, N. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A.; Karantzalis, A.E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidis, C. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Lidorikis, E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Patsalas, P. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Silver plasmonic colloidal in organic solvents by ps laser ablation process. • Ag NPs that meet size requirements of the printed organic electronics technology. • Ag NPs size refinement by secondary process using the 355 nm beam of a ns laser. - Abstract: Laser ablation (LA) in liquids has been used for the development of various nanoparticles (NPs); among them, Ag NPs in aqueous solutions (usually produced by nanosecond (ns) LA) have attracted exceptional interest due to its strong plasmonic response. In this work, we present a comprehensive study of the LA of Ag in water, chloroform and toluene, with and without PVP, using a picosecond (ps) Nd:YAG laser and we consider a wide range of LA parameters such as the laser wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), the pulse energy (0.3–17 mJ) and the number of pulses. In addition, we consider the use of a secondary nanosecond laser beam for the refinement of the NPs size distribution. The optical properties of the NPs were evaluated by in situ optical transmittance measurements in the UV–vis spectral ranges. The morphology of the NPs and the formation of aggregates were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The ps LA process resulted in the development of bigger Ag NPs, compared to the ns LA, compatible with the size requirements of the printed organic electronics technology. The optimum conditions for the ps LA of Ag in organic solvents include the use of the 355 nm beam at low pulse energy (<1 mJ); these conditions rendered isolated Ag nanoparticles manifesting strong and well defined surface plasmon resonance peak. The use of the secondary ns laser beam was proven to be able to refine the nanoparticles to intermediate size between those produced by the single ns or ps LA.

  4. Compact 13.5-nm free-electron laser for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Socol

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical lithography has been actively used over the past decades to produce more and more dense integrated circuits. To keep with the pace of the miniaturization, light of shorter and shorter wavelength was used with time. The capabilities of the present 193-nm UV photolithography were expanded time after time, but it is now believed that further progress will require deployment of extreme ultraviolet (EUV lithography based on the use of 13.5-nm radiation. However, presently no light source exists with sufficient average power to enable high-volume manufacturing. We report here the results of a study that shows the feasibility of a free-electron laser EUV source driven by a multiturn superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL. The proposed 40×20  m^{2} facility, using MW-scale consumption from the power grid, is estimated to provide about 5 kW of average EUV power. We elaborate the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE option, which is presently technically feasible. A regenerative-amplifier option is also discussed. The proposed design is based on a short-period (2–3 cm undulator. The corresponding electron beam energy is about 0.5–1.0 GeV. The proposed accelerator consists of a photoinjector, a booster, and a multiturn ERL.

  5. Net electron energy gain induced by superluminal phase velocity and subluminal group velocity of a laser in a plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Hong; Yao, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2017-08-01

    We examine electron dynamics induced by laser-plasma interaction in a two-dimensional plasma channel, taking into action the laser phase velocity as well as the group velocity. The coupled effects of phase velocity, group velocity, and plasma channel on electron dynamics are discussed in detail. The superluminal phase velocity and the corresponding subluminal group velocity of the laser result in rich and complex electron dynamics, which are depicted in the plane of the phase velocity and plasma charge density. For weak superluminosity of the phase velocity, the effects of the phase velocity and the group velocity can be neglected. For moderate superluminosity of the phase velocity, a cross-over region can exist, where the highly energetic electron could be found and the net energy gain is several times greater than the energy gain in vacuum. For strong superluminosity of the phase velocity, the dephasing rate increases and thus limits the electron energy gain from the laser. However, the asymmetric laser pulse, attributed by the superluminal phase velocity and the subluminal group velocity, results in the electron getting adjustable net energy gain from the laser. The electron oscillations are no longer limited by the charge density threshold and the electron can always get net energy from the laser. These electron dynamics can also be modified by adjusting the polarization of the laser.

  6. On the Production of Flat Electron Bunches for Laser Wake Field Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S.V.; Tajima, T.; /JAERI, Kyoto; Chao, A.; Pitthan, R.; /SLAC; Schuler, K.-P.; /DESY; Zhidkov, A.G.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo; Nemoto, K.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo

    2006-06-27

    We suggest a novel method for injection of electrons into the acceleration phase of particle accelerators, producing low emittance beams appropriate even for the demanding high energy Linear Collider specifications. In this paper we work out the injection into the acceleration phase of the wake field in a plasma behind a high intensity laser pulse, taking advantage of the laser polarization and focusing. With the aid of catastrophe theory we categorize the injection dynamics. The scheme uses the structurally stable regime of transverse wake wave breaking, when electron trajectory self-intersection leads to the formation of a flat electron bunch. As shown in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of a laser pulse in a line-focus with an underdense plasma, the electrons, injected via the transverse wake wave breaking and accelerated by the wake wave, perform betatron oscillations with different amplitudes and frequencies along the two transverse coordinates. The polarization and focusing geometry lead to a way to produce relativistic electron bunches with asymmetric emittance (flat beam). An approach for generating flat laser accelerated ion beams is briefly discussed.

  7. Microstresses and microstructure in thick cobalt-based laser deposited coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Oliveira, U.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2007-01-01

    Microstresses in a thick laser clad Co-based coating on steel substrate were investigated with 3D X-ray microscopy using an intense synchrotron microfocused beam. The microstructure was examined with tight microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray energy

  8. Characterization of fast photoelectron packets in weak and strong laser fields in ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Tae Park, Sang; Zewail, Ahmed H; Flannigan, David J

    2014-11-01

    The development of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) and variants thereof (e.g., photon-induced near-field electron microscopy, PINEM) has made it possible to image atomic-scale dynamics on the femtosecond timescale. Accessing the femtosecond regime with UEM currently relies on the generation of photoelectrons with an ultrafast laser pulse and operation in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion. With this approach, temporal resolution is limited mainly by the durations of the pump laser pulse and probe electron packet. The ability to accurately determine the duration of the electron packets, and thus the instrument response function, is critically important for interpretation of dynamics occurring near the temporal resolution limit, in addition to quantifying the effects of the imaging mode. Here, we describe a technique for in situ characterization of ultrashort electron packets that makes use of coupling with photons in the evanescent near-field of the specimen. We show that within the weakly-interacting (i.e., low laser fluence) regime, the zero-loss peak temporal cross-section is precisely the convolution of electron packet and photon pulse profiles. Beyond this regime, we outline the effects of non-linear processes and show that temporal cross-sections of high-order peaks explicitly reveal the electron packet profile, while use of the zero-loss peak becomes increasingly unreliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Proton beam shaped by “particle lens” formed by laser-driven hot electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, S. H.; Shen, B. F., E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: wwpvin@hotmail.com, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn; Wang, W. P., E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: wwpvin@hotmail.com, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn; Zhang, H.; Zhang, L. G.; Huang, S.; Xu, Z. Z. [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); He, S. K.; Lu, F.; Zhang, F. Q.; Deng, Z. G.; Dong, K. G.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhou, K. N.; Xie, N.; Wang, X. D.; Liu, H. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Gu, Y. Q., E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: wwpvin@hotmail.com, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn; Zhang, B. H. [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-05-23

    Two-dimensional tailoring of a proton beam is realized by a “particle lens” in our experiment. A large quantity of electrons, generated by an intense femtosecond laser irradiating a polymer target, produces an electric field strong enough to change the trajectory and distribution of energetic protons flying through the electron area. The experiment shows that a strip pattern of the proton beam appears when hot electrons initially converge inside the plastic plate. Then the shape of the proton beam changes to a “fountain-like” pattern when these hot electrons diffuse after propagating a distance.

  10. Instantaneous nonvertical electronic transitions with shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Is it possible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2003-01-01

    electronic state. Now, applying pulse shaping via the modulation of the phases of each spectral component of an ultrashort pulse, it is tempting to ask whether it is also possible to induce instantaneous nonvertical transitions to bound electronic states, provided that the phases of each spectral component......In molecular electronic transitions, a vertical transition can be induced by an ultrashort laser pulse. That is, a replica of the initial nuclear state-times the transition dipole moment of the electronic transition-can be created instantaneously (on the time scale of nuclear motion) in the excited...

  11. Demonstration of electron acceleration in a laser-driven dielectric microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; Wu, Z.; Montazeri, B.; McGuinness, C.; McNeur, J.; Leedle, K. J.; Walz, D.; Sozer, E. B.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B.; Travish, G.; Byer, R. L.

    2013-11-01

    The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today's accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250MeVm-1) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563+/-104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10-30MeVm-1, and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6MeVm-1 (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV-GeV (106-109eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (1012eV) scale.

  12. Laser-based sensor for detection of hazardous gases in the air using waveguide CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Bakhtiari, Imran A; Dastageer, Abdul K

    2007-06-01

    A spectrometer based on the principle of photoacoustic spectroscopy has been developed recently at our laboratory for the detection of hazardous gases such as O3, C2H4, SO2, NO2 and SF6. In most of our earlier works, we employed a mechanical chopper to modulate the laser beam and this chopper modulation has the crucial disadvantage of instability in the chopper frequency. Even a minor shift of about 1 Hz in the modulation frequency could significantly reduce the photoacoustic signal by an order of magnitude at the acoustic resonant mode of the photoacoustic cell. To overcome this problem, we developed a photoacoustic spectrometer where a wave guided CW CO2 laser beam is modulated electronically with the external frequency generator. Our preliminary results show that the electronic modulation of CO2 laser beam improved the sensitivity of our spectrometer by a factor of 6. The parametric dependence of photoacoustic signal on laser power, modulation frequency and trace gas concentration, was investigated and the comparison between the two modulation techniques is presented in this paper for detection of trace gases such as C2H4.

  13. New concept of waveguide for inverse free electron laser accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zakowicz, W Z

    2000-01-01

    A segmented waveguide formed by a periodic system of pairs of wedge prisms with a gap between them is proposed. The prisms are made of single-crystal sapphire for which the refraction index nu<1 for CO sub 2 laser radiation (lambda=10.6 mu m). The attenuation of 0.1 db/m can be estimated for a 5 mm diameter radiation beam for which the Rayleigh distance is approximately 1 m. The gap between adjacent prisms can be useful in FEL-like applications.

  14. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  15. External magnetic field effect on the growth rate of a plasma-loaded free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeildoost, N.; Jafari, S.; Abbasi, E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to extend the production of intense coherent radiation to angstrom wavelengths, a laser wave is employed as a laser wiggler which propagates through a magnetized plasma channel. The plasma-loaded laser wigglers increase the ability of laser guidance and electron bunching process compared to the counterpropagating laser wigglers in vacuum. The presence of the plasma medium can make it possible to propagate the laser wiggler and the electron beam parallel to each other so that the focusing of the pulse will be saved. In addition, employing an external guide magnetic field can confine both the ambient plasma and the transverse motions of the electron beam, therefore, improving the free-electron lasers' efficiency, properly. Electron trajectories have been obtained by solving the steady state equations of motion for a single particle and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method has been used to simulate the electron orbits. To study the growth rate of a laser-pumped free-electron laser in the presence of a plasma medium, perturbation analysis has been performed to combine the momentum transfer, continuity, and wave equations, respectively. Numerical calculations indicate that by increasing the guide magnetic field frequency, the growth rate for group I orbits increases, while for group II and III orbits decreases.

  16. A tunable electron beam source using trapping of electrons in a density down-ramp in laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerfelt, Henrik; Hansson, Martin; Gallardo González, Isabel; Davoine, Xavier; Lundh, Olle

    2017-09-25

    One challenge in the development of laser wakefield accelerators is to demonstrate sufficient control and reproducibility of the parameters of the generated bunches of accelerated electrons. Here we report on a numerical study, where we demonstrate that trapping using density down-ramps allows for tuning of several electron bunch parameters by varying the properties of the density down-ramp. We show that the electron bunch length is determined by the difference in density before and after the ramp. Furthermore, the transverse emittance of the bunch is controlled by the steepness of the ramp. Finally, the amount of trapped charge depends both on the density difference and on the steepness of the ramp. We emphasize that both parameters of the density ramp are feasible to vary experimentally. We therefore conclude that this tunable electron accelerator makes it suitable for a wide range of applications, from those requiring short pulse length and low emittance, such as the free-electron lasers, to those requiring high-charge, large-emittance bunches to maximize betatron X-ray generation.

  17. Ultrashort laser pulse-induced anti-Stokes photoluminescence of hot electrons in gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikov, D. S.; Yurkevich, A. A.; Kotelev, M. S.; Ziangirova, M.; Chefonov, O. V.; Ilina, I. V.; Vinokurov, V. A.; Muradov, A. V.; Itzkan, I.; Agranat, M. B.; Perelman, L. T.

    2014-07-01

    We report observing anti-Stokes broadband radiation induced in gold nanorods by ultrashort laser pulses. The radiation is in the visible spectral range along with the second harmonic peak. Unlike conventional photoluminescence of metal nanoparticles, the energy of the excitation photons is smaller than the gap between the top of the d band and the Fermi level. Because the gold nanorods are irradiated with a pulse whose time is shorter than the electron-phonon equilibration time in gold, the energy is absorbed by s/p band electrons, creating a temperature difference between the electrons and the lattice, as described by the two-temperature model. Therefore, we identify the origin of the observed radiation as the recombination of hot conduction electrons with the d band holes created by the same ultrashort laser pulse.

  18. On the way to stabilized laser-driven GeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Shao-wei; Weineisen, Tobias; Fuchs, Matthias; Popp, Antonia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Weingartner, Raphael; Ahmad, Izhar; Schmid, Karl; Marx, Benjamin; Krausz, Ferenc; Gruener, Florian; Karsch, Stefan [Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Osterhoff, Jens [LOASIS Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Schroeder, Hartmut; Haas, Harald [Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Munich (Germany); Rowlands-Rees, Tom; Hooker, Simon [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Laser-driven-wakefield electron accelerators have shown electron beams with energies of up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale plasma accelerator. In order to achieve higher electron energies, these acceleration distances need to be increased. This can be realized with a discharge capillary. However, a discharge typically introduces instabilities on both pointing and energy of the generated electrons. In order to improve the stability, we demonstrate a preliminary test of a modified discharge which includes a pre-pulse circuit before the firing of the main pulse. We also show gas density shaping by a laser- machined nozzle which should be able to make a more precise injection in the capillary accelerator thus reducing the energy instability.

  19. Spin dynamics in Kapitza-Dirac scattering of electrons from bichromatic laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dellweg, Matthias M; Müller, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Kapitza-Dirac scattering of nonrelativistic electrons from counterpropagating bichromatic laser waves of linear polarization i s studied. The focus lies on the electronic spin dynamics in the Bragg regime when the laser fields possess a frequency ratio of two. To this end, the time-dependent Pauli equation is solved numerically, both in coordinate space and momentum space. Our numerical results are corroborated by analytical derivations. We demonstrate that, for certain incident electron momenta, the scattering crucially relies on the electron spin which undergo es characteristic Rabi-like oscillations. A parameter regime is identified where the Rabi oscillations reach maximum amplitude. We also briefly discuss spin-dependent Kapitza-Dirac scattering of protons.

  20. Microstructural stability of wrought, laser and electron beam glazed NARloy-Z alloy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.; Jerman, G.; Bhat, B.; Poorman, R.

    1993-11-01

    Microstructure of wrought, laser, and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z(Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr) was investigated for thermal stability at elevated temperatures (539 to 760 C (1,100 to 1,400 F)) up to 94 h. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis were employed for studying microstructural evolution and kinetics of precipitation. Grain boundary precipitation and precipitate free zones (PFZ`s) were observed in the wrought alloy after exposing to temperatures above 605 C (1,120 F). The fine-grained microstructure observed in the laser and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z was much more stable at elevated temperatures. Microstructural changes correlated well with hardness measurements.

  1. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  2. Quantized form factor shift in the presence of free electron laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fratini, F; Hayrapetyan, A G; Jänkälä, K; Amaro, P; Santos, J P

    2015-01-01

    In electron scattering, the target form factors contribute significantly to the diffraction pattern and carry information on the target electromagnetic charge distribution. Here we show that the presence of electromagnetic radiation, as intense as currently available in Free Electron Lasers, shifts the dependence of the target form factors by a quantity that depends on the number of photons absorbed or emitted by the electron as well as on the parameters of the electromagnetic radiation. As example, we show the impact of intense ultraviolet and soft X-ray radiation on elastic electron scattering by Ne-like Argon ion and by Xenon atom. We find that the shift brought by the radiation to the form factor is in the order of some percent. Our results may open up a new avenue to explore matter with the assistance of laser.

  3. Investigation of the Electron Acceleration by a High-Power Laser and a Density-Tapered Mixed-Gas Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinju; Phung, Vanessa L. J.; Kim, Minseok; Hur, Min-Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can generate about 1000 times stronger acceleration field compared with RF-based conventional accelerators, which can be done by high power laser and plasma. There are many issues in this research and one of them is development of a good plasma source for higher electron beam energy. For this purpose, we are investigating a special type of plasma source, which is a density-tapered gas cell with a mixed-gas for easy injection. By this type of special gas cell, we expect higher electron beam energies with easy injection in the wakefield. In this poster, some experimental results for electron beam generation with the density-tapered mixed-gas cell are presented. In addition to the experimental results, CFD (Computational-Fluid-Dynamics) and PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation results are also presented for comparison studies.

  4. High brightness laser source based on polarization coupling of two diode lasers with asymmetric feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Chi, M.; Sass, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this letter, we show that polarization coupling and asymmetric diode-laser feedback can be used to combine two diode-laser beams with low spatial coherence into a single beam with high spatial coherence. The coupled laser source is based on two similar laser systems each consisting of a 1 mumx......200 mum broad area laser diode applied with a specially designed feedback circuit. When operating at two times threshold, 50% of the freely running system output power is obtained in a single beam with an M-2 beam quality factor of 1.6+/-0.1, whereas the M-2 values of the two freely running diode...... lasers are 29+/-1 and 34+/-1, respectively. (C) 2003 American Institute of Physics....

  5. Self-generated magnetic fields and electron transport in laser driven hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John; Alley, Ed; Hammer, Jim; Town, Richard; Haines, Malcolm

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that magnetic fields can be generated during the interaction of an intense laser beam with solid targets. The principle source of magnetic field from Ohm's law is the familiar grad(T)xgrad(n) term, which results in Megagauss fields for laser intensities typical of inertial fusion and other high energy density experiments. In a hohlraum the main consequence of this is to increase the electron temperature by x2 near the laser entrance holes because of reduced thermal conduction in the cross-field (axial) direction. Despite the "localizing" effect of the magnetic field on the electrons, it appears that the diffusion approximation for electron heat flow breaks down, with the departure becoming progressively worse as the laser power is increased. The results of Lasnex simulations are used to illustrate these effects for laser powers ranging from 10TW to 500TW which cover conditions from Nova to NIF. Potential knock on consequences for inertial fusion are discussed. -This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  6. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions resulting from direct laser acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Toncian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The irradiation of few-nm-thick targets by a finite-contrast high-intensity short-pulse laser results in a strong pre-expansion of these targets at the arrival time of the main pulse. The targets decompress to near and lower than critical densities with plasmas extending over few micrometers, i.e. multiple wavelengths. The interaction of the main pulse with such a highly localized but inhomogeneous target leads to the generation of a short channel and further self-focusing of the laser beam. Experiments at the Glass Hybrid OPCPA Scaled Test-bed (GHOST laser system at University of Texas, Austin using such targets measured non-Maxwellian, peaked electron distribution with large bunch charge and high electron density in the laser propagation direction. These results are reproduced in 2D PIC simulations using the EPOCH code, identifying direct laser acceleration (DLA [1] as the responsible mechanism. This is the first time that DLA has been observed to produce peaked spectra as opposed to broad, Maxwellian spectra observed in earlier experiments [2]. This high-density electrons have potential applications as injector beams for a further wakefield acceleration stage as well as for pump-probe applications.

  7. Focusing effects in laser-electron Thomson scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Harvey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of laser pulse focusing on the spectral properties of Thomson scattered radiation. Modeling the laser as a paraxial beam we find that, in all but the most extreme cases of focusing, the temporal envelope has a much bigger effect on the spectrum than the focusing itself. For the case of ultrashort pulses, where the paraxial model is no longer valid, we adopt a subcycle vector beam description of the field. It is found that the emission harmonics are blue shifted and broaden out in frequency space as the pulse becomes shorter. Additionally the carrier envelope phase becomes important, resulting in an angular asymmetry in the spectrum. We then use the same model to study the effects of focusing beyond the limit where the paraxial expansion is valid. It is found that fields focussed to subwavelength spot sizes produce spectra that are qualitatively similar to those from subcycle pulses due to the shortening of the pulse with focusing. Finally, we study high-intensity fields and find that, in general, the focusing makes negligible difference to the spectra in the regime of radiation reaction.

  8. Focussing effects in laser-electron Thomson scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, C; Holkundkar, A R

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of laser pulse focussing on the spectral properties of Thomson scattered radiation. Modelling the laser as a paraxial beam we find that, in all but the most extreme cases of focussing, the temporal envelope has a much bigger effect on the spectrum than the focussing itself. For the case of ultra-short pulses where the paraxial model is no longer valid, we adopt a sub-cycle vector beam description of the field. It is found that the emission harmonics are blue shifted and broaden out in frequency space as the pulse becomes shorter. Additionally the carrier envelope phase becomes important, resulting in an angular asymmetry in the spectrum. We then use the same model to study the effects of focussing beyond the limit where the paraxial expansion is valid. It is found that fields focussed to sub-wavelength spot sizes produce spectra that are qualitatively similar to those from sub-cycle pulses due to the shortening of the pulse with focussing. Finally, we study high-intensity fields and find ...

  9. Theory and simulation of an inverse free-electron laser experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J.-M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high-power CO2 laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam moving along a wiggler has been carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2690 (1996)]. The data generated by this inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) experiment are studied by means of theory and simulation. Included in the simulations are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge; energy spread of the electrons; and arbitrary wiggler-field profile. Two types of wiggler profile are considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period. (The period of the wiggler is ˜3 cm, its magnetic field is ˜1 T, and the wiggler length is 0.47 m.) The energy increment of the electrons (˜1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (˜40 MeV). At a laser power level ˜0.5 Gw, the simulation results on energy gain are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Preliminary results on the electron energy distribution at the end of the IFEL are presented. Whereas the experiment produces a near-monotone distribution of electron energies with the peak shifted to higher energy, the simulation shows a more structured and non-monotonic distribution at the end of the wiggler. Effects that may help reconcile these differences are considered.

  10. Ultrasensitive photoacoustic sensor based on quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Gautam, Surya; Kumar, Subodh; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivastava, Hari B; Thakur, Surya N; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2017-04-05

    The paper focuses on development of ultra-sonic detection system based on laser photoacoustic spectroscopic technique and processing of signal for detection of very low quantity chemicals, explosive materials, and mixtures of these hazardous molecules. The detection system has been developed for the first time with specially designed one side open photo-acoustic cell having high quality factor. Explosive and Hazardous materials like RDX, DNT, PETN, Gun Powder, TATP (Tri acetone tri-peroxide) and their simulants like Acetone were detected in 7 to 9μm wavelength band. Lock in amplifier electronic instrument was used for the detection of hazardous chemicals and mixture of explosives in very low quantity. Detection limit of the photoacoustic ultrasonic sensor was also carried out of powder, liquid and adsorbed on surfaces. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Ultrasensitive photoacoustic sensor based on quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Gautam, Surya; Kumar, Subodh; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivastava, Hari B.; Thakur, Surya N.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    2017-04-01

    The paper focuses on development of ultra-sonic detection system based on laser photoacoustic spectroscopic technique and processing of signal for detection of very low quantity chemicals, explosive materials, and mixtures of these hazardous molecules. The detection system has been developed for the first time with specially designed one side open photo-acoustic cell having high quality factor. Explosive and Hazardous materials like RDX, DNT, PETN, Gun Powder, TATP (Tri acetone tri-peroxide) and their simulants like Acetone were detected in 7 to 9 μm wavelength band. Lock in amplifier electronic instrument was used for the detection of hazardous chemicals and mixture of explosives in very low quantity. Detection limit of the photoacoustic ultrasonic sensor was also carried out of powder, liquid and adsorbed on surfaces.

  12. Planar Laser-Based QEPAS Trace Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS trace gas detection scheme is reported in this paper. A cylindrical lens was employed for near-infrared laser focusing. The laser beam was shaped as a planar line laser between the gap of the quartz tuning fork (QTF prongs. Compared with a spherical lens-based QEPAS sensor, the cylindrical lens-based QEPAS sensor has the advantages of easier laser beam alignment and a reduction of stringent stability requirements. Therefore, the reported approach is useful in long-term and continuous sensor operation.

  13. Planar Laser-Based QEPAS Trace Gas Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jingbo; Peng, Jiangbo; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K

    2016-06-28

    A novel quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) trace gas detection scheme is reported in this paper. A cylindrical lens was employed for near-infrared laser focusing. The laser beam was shaped as a planar line laser between the gap of the quartz tuning fork (QTF) prongs. Compared with a spherical lens-based QEPAS sensor, the cylindrical lens-based QEPAS sensor has the advantages of easier laser beam alignment and a reduction of stringent stability requirements. Therefore, the reported approach is useful in long-term and continuous sensor operation.

  14. Transverse Dynamics and Energy Tuning of Fast Electrons Generated in Sub-Relativistic Intensity Laser Pulse Interaction with Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, M.; Kando, M.; Daito, I.; Kotaki, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Koga, J.; Nakajima, K.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.

    2006-01-01

    The regimes of quasi-mono-energetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  15. Transverse dynamics and energy tuning of fast electrons generated in sub-relativistic intensity laser pulse interaction with plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)]. E-mail: mori.michiaki@jaea.go.jp; Kando, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Daito, I. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kotaki, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hayashi, Y. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Yamazaki, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Ogura, K. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Sagisaka, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Koga, J. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Nakajima, K. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Daido, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Bulanov, S.V.; Kimura, T. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2006-07-31

    The regimes of quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  16. Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Trivellin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i transmissive phosphor layers; (ii a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

  17. Integration and test of high-speed transmitter electronics for free-space laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Nitin J.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, has developed the electronics for a free-space, direct-detection laser communications system demonstration. Under the High-Speed Laser Integrated Terminal Electronics (Hi-LITE) Project, NASA Lewis has built a prototype full-duplex, dual-channel electronics transmitter and receiver operating at 325 megabit S per second (Mbps) per channel and using quaternary pulse-position modulation (QPPM). This paper describes the integration and testing of the transmitter portion for future application in free-space, direct-detection laser communications. A companion paper reviews the receiver portion of the prototype electronics. Minor modifications to the transmitter were made since the initial report on the entire system, and this paper addresses them. The digital electronics are implemented in gallium arsenide integrated circuits mounted on prototype boards. The fabrication and implementation issues related to these high-speed devices are discussed. The transmitter's test results are documented, and its functionality is verified by exercising all modes of operation. Various testing issues pertaining to high-speed circuits are addressed. A description of the transmitter electronics packaging concludes the paper.

  18. Hot electron production in laser solid interactions with a controlled pre-pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Dance, R. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L. [CLF, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Lancaster, K. L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); CLF, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pikuz, S. A. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Faenov, A. Ya. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I. [Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Hot electron generation plays an important role in the fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other applications with ultra-intense lasers. Hot electrons of temperature up to 10–20 MeV have been produced by high contrast picosecond duration laser pulses focussed to intensities of ∼10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2} with a deliberate pre-pulse on solid targets using the Vulcan Petawatt Laser facility. We present measurements of the number and temperature of hot electrons obtained using an electron spectrometer. The results are correlated to the density scale length of the plasma produced by a controlled pre-pulse measured using an optical probe diagnostic. 1D simulations predict electron temperature variations with plasma density scale length in agreement with the experiment at shorter plasma scale lengths (<7.5μm), but with the experimental temperatures (13–17 MeV) dropping below the simulation values (20–25 MeV) at longer scale lengths. The experimental results show that longer interaction plasmas produced by pre-pulses enable significantly greater number of hot electrons to be produced.

  19. The Effect of Background Pressure on Electron Acceleration from Ultra-Intense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Manh; Ngirmang, Gregory; Orban, Chris; Morrison, John; Chowdhury, Enam; Roquemore, William

    2017-10-01

    We present two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations that investigate the role of background pressure on the acceleration of electrons from ultra intense laser interaction at normal incidence with liquid density ethylene glycol targets. The interaction was simulated at ten different pressures varying from 7.8 mTorr to 26 Torr. We calculated conversion efficiencies from the simulation results and plotted the efficiencies with respect to the background pressure. The results revealed that the laser to > 100 keV electron conversion efficiency remained flat around 0.35% from 7.8 mTorr to 1.2 Torr and increased exponentially from 1.2 Torr onward to about 1.47% at 26 Torr. Increasing the background pressure clearly has a dramatic effect on the acceleration of electrons from the target. We explain how electrostatic effects, in particular the neutralization of the target by the background plasma, allows electrons to escape more easily and that this effect is strengthened with higher densities. This work could facilitate the design of future experiments in increasing laser to electron conversion efficiency and generating substantial bursts of electrons with relativistic energies. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under LRIR Project 17RQCOR504 under the management of Dr. Riq Parra and Dr. Jean-Luc Cambier. Support was also provided by the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  20. Enhanced single-stage laser-driven electron acceleration by self-controlled ionization injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A M; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    We report on overall enhancement of a single-stage laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the ionization injection in a mixture of 0.3% nitrogen gas in 99.7% helium gas. Upon the interaction of 30-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a gas jet of the above gas mixture, >300 MeV electron beams were generated at a helium plasma densities of 3.3-8.5 × 10(18) cm(-3). Compared with the uncontrolled electron self-injection in pure helium gas jet, the ionization injection process due to the presence of ultra-low nitrogen concentrations appears to be self-controlled; it has led to the generation of electron beams with higher energies, higher charge, lower density threshold for trapping, and a narrower energy spread without dark current (low energy electrons) or multiple bunches. It is foreseen that further optimization of such a scheme is expected to bring the electron beam energy-spread down to 1%, making them suitable for driving ultra-compact free-electron lasers.