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Sample records for electron impact single

  1. Electron impact single ionization of copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron impact single ionization cross sections of copper have been calculated in the binary encounter approximation using accurate expression for as given by Vriens and Hartree–Fock momentum distribution for the target electron. The BEA calculation based on the usual procedure does not show satisfactory ...

  2. Single molecule electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunwook; Reed, Mark A; Lee, Takhee

    2011-04-12

    Single molecule electronic devices in which individual molecules are utilized as active electronic components constitute a promising approach for the ultimate miniaturization and integration of electronic devices in nanotechnology through the bottom-up strategy. Thus, the ability to understand, control, and exploit charge transport at the level of single molecules has become a long-standing desire of scientists and engineers from different disciplines for various potential device applications. Indeed, a study on charge transport through single molecules attached to metallic electrodes is a very challenging task, but rapid advances have been made in recent years. This review article focuses on experimental aspects of electronic devices made with single molecules, with a primary focus on the characterization and manipulation of charge transport in this regime. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electron impact single ionization of mono- and di-positive ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Physics, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh. 2Department of Physics, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790, USA. *E-mail: mauddin@ru.ac.bd. MS received 30 March 2005; revised 22 September 2005; accepted 15 April 2006. Abstract. The electron impact ionization cross-sections of mono- ...

  4. Dynamics of single or double ionization of small systems from coincidence electron impact experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmam-Bennani, A; Staicu Casagrande, E M; Naja, A, E-mail: azzedine.bennani@u-psud.f [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (LCAM, UMR8625), Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay cedex (France)

    2010-06-01

    In this brief review, we illustrate the potentialities and the power of electron-electron coincidence studies to investigate the dynamics of single ionization SI [(e,2e) case] or double ionization DI [(e,3e) case] processes. An example for (e,2e) SI of rare gas atoms is presented with a new insight into the behaviour of the recoil versus the binary intensity. A second example for (e,2e) SI of molecules is used to illustrate the observation of a purely molecular effect, namely the signature of interference effects due to the two-center nature of the H{sub 2} molecule. The third example discusses an unprecedented triple coincidence study involving the scattered - ejected - Auger electrons emitted from an argon target. It is shown that the method allows to disentangle the contribution of various DI mechanisms.

  5. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  6. Coincidence angular correlation in electron impact single or double ionisation of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagrande, E M Staicu [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR 862), Bat. 351, Universite de Paris-Sud XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Naja, A [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR 862), Bat. 351, Universite de Paris-Sud XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Ren, X G [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR 862), Bat. 351, Universite de Paris-Sud XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Nekkab, M [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif (Algeria); Catoire, F [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR 862), Bat. 351, Universite de Paris-Sud XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mezdari, F [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR 862), Bat. 351, Universite de Paris-Sud XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Lahmam-Bennani, A [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR 862), Bat. 351, Universite de Paris-Sud XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Madison, D [Department of Physics, University of Missoun-Rolla, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Chuluunbaatar, O [Joint Institute for Nuclear research, Dubna, Moscow region 141980 (Russian Federation); Joulakian, B [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions (FR 2843), Institut de Physique, 1 rue Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-11-15

    Experimental results obtained with our multi parameter multi-coincidence spectrometer are presented for the (e,3e) double ionisation of Ar and (e,2e) single ionisation of small molecules. The (e,3e) measurements are discussed in terms of competition between the two double ionisation processes present under the chosen kinematics, and qualitative conclusions are given. The results for the ionisation of H{sub 2} and the outer orbital of N{sub 2} are compared with the predictions of the most elaborate available theoretical models for description of the molecular ionisation process. Overall reasonable agreement is observed and tentative interpretations for the discrepancies are discussed.

  7. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for real-time charge readout and precise tuning of the tunnel barriers of the quantum dot. The second part of this thesis describes the realization of exceptionally clean Carbon Nanotube quantum dots....

  8. Single particle electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Folea, Mihaela; Kouril, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) in combination with image analysis is a powerful technique to study protein structures at low, medium, and high resolution. Since electron micrographs of biological objects are very noisy, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by image processing is an integral part of

  9. Single impacts of keV fullerene ions on free standing graphene: Emission of ions and electrons from confined volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Geng, Sheng; Schweikert, Emile A., E-mail: schweikert@chem.tamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3144 (United States); Czerwinski, Bartlomiej [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences–Bio and Soft Matter (IMCN/BSMA), Université Catholique de Louvain, 1 Croix du Sud, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå (Sweden); Young, Amanda E. [Materials Characterization Facility, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3122 (United States); Delcorte, Arnaud [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences–Bio and Soft Matter (IMCN/BSMA), Université Catholique de Louvain, 1 Croix du Sud, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2015-10-28

    We present the first data from individual C{sub 60} impacting one to four layer graphene at 25 and 50 keV. Negative secondary ions and electrons emitted in transmission were recorded separately from each impact. The yields for C{sub n}{sup −} clusters are above 10% for n ≤ 4, they oscillate with electron affinities and decrease exponentially with n. The result can be explained with the aid of MD simulation as a post-collision process where sufficient vibrational energy is accumulated around the rim of the impact hole for sputtering of carbon clusters. The ionization probability can be estimated by comparing experimental yields of C{sub n}{sup −} with those of C{sub n}{sup 0} from MD simulation, where it increases exponentially with n. The ionization probability can be approximated with ejecta from a thermally excited (3700 K) rim damped by cluster fragmentation and electron detachment. The experimental electron probability distributions are Poisson-like. On average, three electrons of thermal energies are emitted per impact. The thermal excitation model invoked for C{sub n}{sup −} emission can also explain the emission of electrons. The interaction of C{sub 60} with graphene is fundamentally different from impacts on 3D targets. A key characteristic is the high degree of ionization of the ejecta.

  10. Single molecule electronics and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  11. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahme, S; Kealhofer, C; Krausz, F; Baum, P

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration.

  12. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lahme

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration.

  13. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  14. The Electronic Communication Environment Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery P. Terin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available What we understand is dependant on how we understand, by what means. With this in mind the electronic communication environment impact can be understood differently. The author singles out and interrelates lineality and simultaneity as the two competing modes of reasoning, whose application leads to strikingly contrasting results. The figure/ground approach, as it is practiced by contemporary researchers, allows to operate in the field more adequately. This fact is very important to know taking into consideration both its managerial potential and the educational promises. To add, the students today are known to be greatly influenced by the synchronous mode of perception and thinking as it is readily offered by electronic gadgets. On the other hand, they are often seen being estranged by the literary establishment's approaches still in use. In other words, there have emerged whole clusters of new problems in this respect both for the teachers and the studies themselves. To deal with them successfully, our task is to increasingly concentrate on renovating our electronic experiences communicating with the students to overcome the forthcoming difficulties in the process of promoting the new educational agenda and getting them adequately prepared for the new challenges of the electronic communication world. At to the notions which may be of great importance with this in mind, they include information retrieval, pattern recognition and interfacing, to name for the beginning just a few of them.

  15. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography.

  16. Proximity effect of electron beam lithography on single-electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical characteristics of the single-electron transistor were observed to be consistent with the expected behavior of electron transport through gated quantum dots, up to 150 K. The dependence of the electrical characteristics on the dot size reveals that the d oscillation follows from the Coulomb blockade by poly-Si ...

  17. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  18. Proximity effect of electron beam lithography on single-electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    monly used technique in this field, and many researchers have been investigating its application to make nanopatterns. In electron beam lithography, the well-known proximity effect refers to .... electrodes are grounded. The charging effect, which blocks the injection/ejection of a single charge into/from a quantum dot, ...

  19. Single electron tunneling based arithmetic computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lageweg, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation we investigate the implementation of computer arithmetic operations with Single Electron Tunneling (SET) technology based circuits. In our research we focus on the effective utilization of the SET technologys specific characteristic, i.e., the ability to control the transport of

  20. Employment Impact of Electronic Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic business is stimulating employment in some sectors across industries, such as computer-related and customer service occupations, and diminishing employment in others, such as administrative support and marketing/sales. Similarly, employment impacts will vary by industry. (Contains 56 notes and references.) (SK)

  1. Compact ultrafast orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line gas analysis by electron impact ionization and soft single photon ionization using an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp as VUV-light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlberger, F; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Gonin, M; Fuhrer, K; Zimmermann, R

    2007-11-01

    Orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometers (oaTOFMS), which are exhibiting a pulsed orthogonal extraction of ion bunches into the TOF mass analyzer from a continuous primary ion beam, are well-suited for continuous ionization methods such as electron impact ionization (EI). Recently an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL) was introduced, which emits intensive vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at, e.g., 126 nm (argon excimer) and is well suited as the light source for soft single photon ionization (SPI) of organic molecules. In this paper, a new compact oaTOFMS system which allows switching between SPI, using VUV-light from an EBEL-light source, and conventional EI is described. With the oaTOFMS system, EBEL-SPI and EI mass spectral transients can be recorded at very high repetition rates (up to 100 kHz), enabling high duty cycles and therefore good detection efficiencies. By using a transient recorder card with the capability to perform on-board accumulation of the oaTOF transients, final mass spectra with a dynamic range of 106 can be saved to the hard disk at a rate of 10 Hz. As it is possible to change the ionization modes (EI and SPI) rapidly, a comprehensive monitoring of complex gases with highly dynamic compositions, such as cigarette smoke, is possible. In this context, the EI based mass spectra address the bulk composition (compounds such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. in the up to percentage concentration range) as well as some inorganic trace gases such as argon, sulfur dioxide, etc. down to the low ppm level. The EBEL-SPI mass spectra on the other hand are revealing the organic composition down to the lower ppb concentration range.

  2. Electron Impact Excitation-Ionization of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Esam Abobakr A.

    In the last few decades, the study of atomic collisions by electron-impact has made significant advances. The most difficult case to study is electron impact ionization of molecules for which many approximations have to be made and the validity of these approximations can only be checked by comparing with experiment. In this thesis, I have examined the Molecular three-body distorted wave (M3DW) or Molecular four-body distorted wave (M4DW) approximations for electron-impact ionization. These models use a fully quantum mechanical approach where all particles are treated quantum mechanically and the post collision interaction (PCI) is treated to all orders of perturbation. These electron impact ionization collisions play central roles in the physics and chemistry of upper atmosphere, biofuel, the operation of discharges and lasers, radiation induced damage in biological material like damage to DNA by secondary electrons, and plasma etching processes. For the M3DW model, I will present results for electron impact single ionization of small molecules such as Water, Ethane, and Carbon Dioxide and the much larger molecules Tetrahydrofuran, phenol, furfural, 1-4 Benzoquinone. I will also present results for the four-body problem in which there are two target electrons involved in the collision. M4DW results will be presented for dissociative excitation-ionization of orientated D2. I will show that M4DW calculations using a variational wave function for the ground state that included s- and p- orbital states give better agreement to the experimental measurements than a ground state approximated as a product of two 1s-type Dyson orbitals.

  3. Neural Circuitry Based on Single Electron Transistors and Single Electron Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïmen BOUBAKER

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and explain a neural circuitry based on single electron transistors ‘SET’ which can be used in classification and recognition. We implement, after that, a Winner-Take-All ‘WTA’ neural network with lateral inhibition architecture. The original idea of this work is reflected, first, in the proposed new single electron memory ‘SEM’ design by hybridising two promising Single Electron Memory ‘SEM’ and the MTJ/Ring memory and second, in modeling and simulation results of neural memory based on SET. We prove the charge storage in quantum dot in two types of memories.

  4. Electron impact experimental study of single and double ionisation of atoms and small molecules; Etude experimentale par impact electronique de l'ionisation simple et double d'atomes et de petites molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naja, A.

    2008-11-15

    (e,2e) and (e,3e) experiments constitute a privileged tool for studying the dynamics of electron impact single and double ionization of small systems, and more generally for contributing to the understanding of the N-body interaction problem. In this work, we have performed such experiments in an unexplored kinematical regime where the momentum transferred to the residual ion is large, so that the ion plays a major role in the interaction process. The experimental results are compared to those of the most sophisticated theoretical models. We have measured the triply differential cross sections (TDCS) for single ionization of He and H{sub 2}. Their comparison allowed showing the presence for the H{sub 2} molecule of Young type quantal interference effects. We then discuss TDCS measurements for Ne and N{sub 2} ionized either on an outer or an inner orbital. The results show the importance of the post collisional interactions and the role played by the nucleus. Finally, we study the competition between different ionization processes of argon: (e,2e) single ionization of the inner 2p shell on the one hand, and a direct (3p{sup -2}) (e,3e) double ionization or an indirect one via the Auger process implying the 2p shell, on the other hand. Under the chosen kinematics, these processes may compete or interfere with each other. The emphasis is put on their respective contribution, particularly for the Auger effect. Several structures observed in the angular distribution of the (e,3e) cross section are attributed to different ionization mechanisms. (author)

  5. Following electron impact excitations of Rn, Ra, Th, U and Pu single atom L sub-shells ionization cross section calculations by using Lotz’s equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayinol, M., E-mail: aydinolm@dicle.edu.tr [Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Diyarbakir, 21280 Turkey (Turkey); Aydeniz, D., E-mail: daydeniz@hotmail.com [Artuklu University, At Rectorate of Artuklu University, Mardin (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    L shell ionization cross section and L{sub i} subshells ionization cross sections of Rn, Ra, Th, U, Pu atoms calculated. For each of atoms, ten different electron impact energy values (E{sub o}) are used. Calculations carried out by using Lotz equation in Matlab. First, calculations done for non-relativistic case by using non-relativistic Lotz equation then repeated with relativistic Lotz equation. σ{sub L} total and σ{sub Li}(i = 1,2,3) subshells ionisation cross section values obtained for E{sub o} values in the energy range of E{sub Li} electron-atom impact studies.

  6. Measuring Electron Tunneling Times as a Means of Single Shot/Single Electron Spin Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hans D.; Szkopek, Thomas; Rao, Deepak S.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2004-03-01

    In this talk, we present our strategy for measuring the spin of a single electron trapped in an gate-defined quantum dot in a single shot measurement. The electron is allowed to tunnel out of the electron into a spin dependent final state, or conversely, an external electron with a definite spin is allowed to tunnel onto the dot. The measurement of spin is thereby turned into a measurement of time. A necessary prerequisite is the ability to reliably and accurately measure the dwell time for single electrons on the quantum dot with microsecond accuracy. We report on our experimental progress in this area, where rather than using a relatively hard to fabricate SET for charge detection, we employ a quantum point contact FET that is cofabricated with the quantum dot.

  7. Single-shot dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrange, T.; Armstrong, M. R.; Boyden, K.; Brown, C. G.; Campbell, G. H.; Colvin, J. D.; DeHope, W. J.; Frank, A. M.; Gibson, D. J.; Hartemann, F. V.; Kim, J. S.; King, W. E.; Pyke, B. J.; Reed, B. W.; Shirk, M. D.; Shuttlesworth, R. M.; Stuart, B. C.; Torralva, B. R.; Browning, N. D.

    2006-07-01

    A dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) has been designed and implemented to study structural dynamics in condensed matter systems. The DTEM is a conventional in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) modified to drive material processes with a nanosecond laser, "pump" pulse and measure it shortly afterward with a 30-ns-long probe pulse of ˜107 electrons. An image with a resolution of <20nm may be obtained with a single pulse, largely eliminating the need to average multiple measurements and enabling the study of unique, irreversible events with nanosecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Space charge effects, while unavoidable at such a high current, may be kept to reasonable levels by appropriate choices of operating parameters. Applications include the study of phase transformations and defect dynamics at length and time scales difficult to access with any other technique. This single-shot approach is complementary to stroboscopic TEM, which is capable of much higher temporal resolution but is restricted to the study of processes with a very high degree of repeatability.

  8. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and α particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad

    2010-02-01

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and α particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  9. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [University of California - Irvine

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting, solar energy

  10. A high efficiency superconducting nanowire single electron detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosticher, M.; Ladan, F.R.; Maneval, J.P.; Dorenbos, S.N.; Zijlstra, T.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Zwiller, V.; Lupa?cu, A.; Nogues, G.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of single electrons using a Nb0.7Ti0.3N superconducting wire deposited on an oxidized silicon substrate. While it is known that this device is sensitive to single photons, we show that it also detects single electrons with kilo-electron-volt energy emitted from the cathode of

  11. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  12. Single electron multiplication distribution in GEM avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, András; Hamar, Gergő; Kiss, Gábor; Varga, Dezső

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, measurement results and experimental methodology are presented on the determination of multiplication distributions of avalanches initiated by single electron in GEM foils. The measurement relies on the amplification of photoelectrons by the GEM under study, which is subsequently amplified in an MWPC for signal enhancement and readout. The intrinsic detector resolution, namely the sigma-over-mean ratio of the multiplication distribution is also elaborated. Small gain dependence of the shape of the avalanche response distribution is observed in the range of net effective gain of 15 to 100. The distribution has an exponentially decaying tail at large amplitudes. At small amplitudes, the applied working gas is seen to have a well visible effect on the shape of the multiplication distribution. Equivalently, the working gas has an influence on the intrinsic detector resolution of GEMs via suppression of the low amplitude responses. A sigma-over-mean ratio of 0.75 was reached using a neon based mixture, whereas other gases provided an intrinsic detector resolution closer to 1, meaning a multiplication distribution closer to the low-field limit exponential case.

  13. arXiv Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-26

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068  e- rms/pixel. This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while ...

  14. Design of Stretchable Electronics Against Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J H; Pharr, M; Feng, X; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-10-01

    Stretchable electronics offer soft, biocompatible mechanical properties; these same properties make them susceptible to device failure associated with physical impact. This paper studies designs for stretchable electronics that resist failure from impacts due to incorporation of a viscoelastic encapsulation layer. Results indicate that the impact resistance depends on the thickness and viscoelastic properties of the encapsulation layer, as well as the duration of impact. An analytic model for the critical thickness of the encapsulation layer is established. It is shown that a commercially available, low modulus silicone material offers viscous properties that make it a good candidate as the encapsulation layer for stretchable electronics.

  15. Quantitative High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Gamm, B.; Popescu, R.; Blank, H.; Schneider, R; Beyer, A.; Gölzhäuser, A.; Gerthsen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Single atoms can be considered as basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling of image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate which induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weick...

  16. Low-energy cross-section calculations of single molecules by electron impact: a classical Monte Carlo transport approach with quantum mechanical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J. R.; Akabani, G.

    2014-05-01

    The present state of modeling radio-induced effects at the cellular level does not account for the microscopic inhomogeneity of the nucleus from the non-aqueous contents (i.e. proteins, DNA) by approximating the entire cellular nucleus as a homogenous medium of water. Charged particle track-structure calculations utilizing this approximation are therefore neglecting to account for approximately 30% of the molecular variation within the nucleus. To truly understand what happens when biological matter is irradiated, charged particle track-structure calculations need detailed knowledge of the secondary electron cascade, resulting from interactions with not only the primary biological component—water--but also the non-aqueous contents, down to very low energies. This paper presents our work on a generic approach for calculating low-energy interaction cross-sections between incident charged particles and individual molecules. The purpose of our work is to develop a self-consistent computational method for predicting molecule-specific interaction cross-sections, such as the component molecules of DNA and proteins (i.e. nucleotides and amino acids), in the very low-energy regime. These results would then be applied in a track-structure code and thereby reduce the homogenous water approximation. The present methodology—inspired by seeking a combination of the accuracy of quantum mechanics and the scalability, robustness, and flexibility of Monte Carlo methods—begins with the calculation of a solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation and proceeds to use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the perturbations in the internal electron field to determine the interaction processes, such as ionization and excitation. As a test of our model, the approach is applied to a water molecule in the same method as it would be applied to a nucleotide or amino acid and compared with the low-energy cross-sections from the GEANT4-DNA physics package of the Geant4 simulation toolkit

  17. Opto-electronics on Single Nanowire Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal for nanoscale opto-electronics is the transfer of single electron spin states into single photon polarization states (and vice versa), thereby interfacing quantum transport and quantum optics. Such an interface enables new experiments in the field of quantum information processing.

  18. The impact of electronic commerce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Kaiyin

    1997-01-01

    The development of electronic commerce offers a promising way for business to meet challenges of the ever changing market. The fast advancing information infrastructure makes the connectiviry possible to reach almost everywhere in the world, but it does not ensure a successful business process. The

  19. Transistors - From Point Contact to Single Electron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure 1. Energy band diagram of metal-semi- conductor barrier on (a) n- type and (b) p-type semi- conductor. Abbreviations. FET - Field Effect Transistor. HEMT - High Electron Mobility. Transistor. MESFET - Metal Semiconductor. FET. MOSFET -. Metal Oxide. Semiconductor FET. MODFET - Modulation Doped. FET.

  20. Validating maps from single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Peter B; Rubinstein, John L

    2015-10-01

    Progress in single particle cryo-EM, most recently due to the introduction of direct detector devices, has made the high-resolution structure determination of biological assemblies smaller than 500kDa more routine, but has also increased attention on the need for tools to demonstrate the validity of single particle maps. Although map validation is a continuing subject of research, some consensus has been reached on procedures that reduce model bias and over-fitting during map refinement as well as specific tests that demonstrate map validity. Tilt-pair analysis may be used as a method for demonstrating the consistency at low resolution of a map with image data. For higher-resolution maps, new procedures for more robust resolution assessment and for validating the refinement of atomic coordinate models into single particle maps have been developed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron Impact of Laser Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-14

    60 10 first Porn approximation. E trx tiqy oFVI 0.4" 0. \\\\ ... * 94 D. E. Golden and N. C Stepb together with the calculations of Baluja and McDowell...monochromator and are detected by a RCA C31034A-02 ported coincidence measurements between energy aria- photomultiplier tube (PMT) cooled to -20 ’C. The pho...The recent R-matrix calculation of Fon Conventional tube lenses focus the electron beam et al.14 is in fair agreement with the small-angle onto the

  2. Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Sofo-Haro, Miguel [Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Fermilab; Essig, Rouven [YITP, Stony Brook; Guardincerri, Yann [Fermilab; Holland, Steve [LBL, Berkeley; Volansky, Tomer [Tel Aviv U.; Yu, Tien-Tien [CERN

    2017-05-31

    We have developed a non-destructive readout system that uses a floating-gate amplifier on a thick, fully depleted charge coupled device (CCD) to achieve ultra-low readout noise of 0.068 e- rms/pix. This is the first time that discrete sub-electron readout noise has been achieved reproducibly over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This allows the precise counting of the number of electrons in each pixel, ranging from pixels with 0 electrons to more than 1500 electrons. The resulting CCD detector is thus an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while astronomical applications include future direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  3. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule......, and how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong....

  4. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  5. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  6. Coupling a single electron to a Bose-Einstein condensate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balewski, Jonathan B.; Krupp, Alexander T.; Gaj, Anita

    2013-01-01

    -Cooper-Schrieffer superconductivity. Here we study the interaction of a single localized electron with a Bose-Einstein condensate and show that the electron can excite phonons and eventually trigger a collective oscillation of the whole condensate. We find that the coupling is surprisingly strong compared to that of ionic impurities......The coupling of electrons to matter lies at the heart of our understanding of material properties such as electrical conductivity. Electron-phonon coupling can lead to the formation of a Cooper pair out of two repelling electrons, which forms the basis for Bardeen...... anticipate future experiments on electron orbital imaging, the investigation of phonon-mediated coupling of single electrons, and applications in quantum optics....

  7. Electron impact single ionization of copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [21] W T Rogers, G Stefani, G Camilloni, G H Dunn, A Z Msezane and R J W Henry, Phys. Rev. A25, 737 (1982). [22] D S Belic, R A Falk, C Timmer and G H Dunn, Phys. Rev. A36, 1073 (1987). [23] D C Gregory, P F Ditner and D H Crandall, Phys. Rev. A27, 724 (1983). [24] C J Patton, K O Lozhkin, M B Shah, J Geddes and ...

  8. Single electron based binary multipliers with overflow detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Power consumption in the single electron circuit is low irrespective of Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) or Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Power consumption can be drastically reduced by reducing the nodes. The processing speed of SED will be nearly close to electronic speed. Noise during ...

  9. Coherent single electron spin control in a slanting Zeeman field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tokura, Yasuhiro; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Obata, Toshiaki; Tarucha, Seigo

    2006-01-01

    We consider a single electron in a 1D quantum dot with a static slanting Zeeman field. By combining the spin and orbital degrees of freedom of the electron, an effective quantum two-level (qubit) system is defined. This pseudospin can be coherently manipulated by the voltage applied to the gate

  10. Single-Electron and Single-Photon Sensitivity with a Silicon Skipper CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Sofo-Haro, Miguel; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-01

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068 e- rms /pixel . This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while future astronomical applications may include direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  11. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  12. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  13. The STEREO IMPACT Suprathermal Electron (STE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Larson, D. E.; Luhmann, J. G.; McBride, S. E.; Maier, M. R.; Moreau, T.; Tindall, C. S.; Turin, P.; Wang, Linghua

    2008-04-01

    The Suprathermal Electron (STE) instrument, part of the IMPACT investigation on both spacecraft of NASA’s STEREO mission, is designed to measure electrons from ˜2 to ˜100 keV. This is the primary energy range for impulsive electron/3He-rich energetic particle events that are the most frequently occurring transient particle emissions from the Sun, for the electrons that generate solar type III radio emission, for the shock accelerated electrons that produce type II radio emission, and for the superhalo electrons (whose origin is unknown) that are present in the interplanetary medium even during the quietest times. These electrons are ideal for tracing heliospheric magnetic field lines back to their source regions on the Sun and for determining field line lengths, thus probing the structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and of the ambient inner heliosphere. STE utilizes arrays of small, passively cooled thin window silicon semiconductor detectors, coupled to state-of-the-art pulse-reset front-end electronics, to detect electrons down to ˜2 keV with about 2 orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity over previous sensors at energies below ˜20 keV. STE provides energy resolution of Δ E/ E˜10 25% and the angular resolution of ˜20° over two oppositely directed ˜80°×80° fields of view centered on the nominal Parker spiral field direction.

  14. Testing Electronic Devices for Single-Event Upset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Malone, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report prepared describes equipment and summarizes both pretest and onsite procedures for testing of digital electronic devices for susceptibility to single-event upset. Term "single-event upset" denotes variety of temporary or permanent bit flips or latchup induced by single particles of ionizing radiation. Vacuum chamber houses device under test while exposed to ion beam. Vacuum chamber and associated equipment must be brought to ion-beam facility for test.

  15. Review of Electronics Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Cong, Sen; Cao, Xuan; Wu, Fanqi; Liu, Qingzhou; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-08-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are extremely promising materials for building next-generation electronics due to their unique physical and electronic properties. In this article, we will review the research efforts and achievements of SWNTs in three electronic fields, namely analog radio-frequency electronics, digital electronics, and macroelectronics. In each SWNT-based electronic field, we will present the major challenges, the evolutions of the methods to overcome these challenges, and the state-of-the-art of the achievements. At last, we will discuss future directions which could lead to the broad applications of SWNTs. We hope this review could inspire more research on SWNT-based electronics, and accelerate the applications of SWNTs.

  16. Obesity's impact on intrapartum electronic fetal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Brian; Lewis, David; Mulekar, Madhuri; Baker, Susan

    2017-09-17

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact maternal obesity has on the percentage of unmonitored electronic fetal monitoring (EFM). Women undergoing induction of labor at term were categorized into three groups: Group 1 (body mass index (BMI) fetal distress is present.

  17. Decoherence Assisted Single Electron Trapping at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhalawany, Ahmed; Leuenberger, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate electron transport in heterostructure semiconductor nanowire (NW). We develop a new mechanism to trap an electron in a quantum dot (QD) by means of decoherence. There are six QDs in the NW. Bias voltage (Vb) is applied across the NW and gate voltage (Vg) is applied to the auxiliary QD to control single charge tunneling. The single electron dynamics along the NW is calculated by means of the generalized master equation based on the tight binding model taking into account electron LO phonon interaction (ELOPI) and thermal broadening inside the QDs. It is shown that the decoherence, which is in the pico-second (ps) regime, speeds up the trapping of the electron in the central QD with probability of 70% in less than 2 ps. Our results can be used for the implementation of high temperature single photon source (SPS) or single electron transistor (SET). We acknowledge support from NSF (Grant No. ECCS-0725514), DARPA/MTO (Grant No. HR0011-08-1-0059), NSF (Grant No. ECCS-0901784), AFOSR (Grant No. FA9550-09-1-0450), and NSF (Grant No. ECCS-1128597).

  18. Single electron counting using a dual MCP assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yuzhen [School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Shulin, E-mail: liusl@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, Tianchi, E-mail: tianchi@u.washington.edu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Yan, Baojun; Wang, Peiliang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, Yang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Science, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Lei, Xiangcui [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Luping [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Wen, Kaile [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi, Ming [School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); and others

    2016-09-11

    The gain, pulse height resolution and peak-to-valley ratio of single electrons detected by using a Chevron configured Microchannel Plate (MCP) assembly are studied. The two MCPs are separated by a 280 µm gap and are biased by four electrodes. The purpose of the study is to determine the optimum bias voltage arrangements for single electron counting. By comparing the results of various bias voltage combinations, we conclude that good performance for the electron counting can be achieved by operating the MCP assembly in saturation mode. In addition, by applying a small reverse bias voltage across the gap while adjusting the bias voltages of the MCPs, optimum performance of electron counting can be obtained. - Highlights: • Dual MCPs assembly with four electrodes using different voltage combinations has been investigated for single electron counting. • Both the MCP voltages and the gap voltage can affect the gain, pulse height resolution and P/V ratio. • A high gain of the first stage MCP, a saturation mode of the second stage MCP and an appropriately reverse gap voltage can improve the resolution greatly. • The optimum voltage arrangements is significant for the design of MCP detectors in single electron counting applications.

  19. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO(2+) + NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Michael A; Lockyear, Jessica F; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Price, Stephen D

    2011-11-07

    The single-electron transfer reaction between NO(2+) and NO, which initially forms a pair of NO(+) ions, has been studied using a position-sensitive coincidence technique. The reactivity in this class of collision system, which involves the interaction of a dication with its neutral precursor, provides a sensitive test of recent ideas concerning electronic state selectivity in dicationic single-electron transfer reactions. In stark contrast to the recently observed single-electron transfer reactivity in the analogous CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) and O(2)(2+)/O(2) collision systems, electron transfer between NO(2+) and NO generates two product NO(+) ions which behave in an identical manner, whether the ions are formed from NO(2+) or NO. This observed behaviour is in excellent accord with the recently proposed rationalization of the state selectivity in dication-molecule SET reactions using simple propensity rules involving one-electron transitions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  20. Computer simulation of cluster impact induced electronic excitation of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidtmann, B.; Hanke, S.; Duvenbeck, A. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Wucher, A., E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-deu.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    We present a computational study of electronic excitation upon bombardment of a metal surface with cluster projectiles. Our model employs a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to calculate the particle dynamics following the projectile impact. Kinetic excitation is implemented via two mechanisms describing the electronic energy loss of moving particles: autoionization in close binary collisions and a velocity proportional friction force resulting from direct atom–electron collisions. Two different friction models are compared with respect to the predicted sputter yields after single atom and cluster bombardment. We find that a density dependent friction coefficient leads to a significant reduction of the total energy transferred to the electronic sub-system as compared to the Lindhard friction model, thereby strongly enhancing the predicted sputter yield under cluster bombardment conditions. In contrast, the yield predicted for monoatomic projectile bombardment remains practically unchanged.

  1. Electronic transport in benzodifuran single-molecule transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, An; Li, Hui; Chen, Songjie; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Liao, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices.Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The fabrication procedure for BDF single

  2. Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Björn; Blank, Holger; Popescu, Radian; Schneider, Reinhard; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.

  3. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  4. A single-electron approach for many-electron dynamics in high-order harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel ab-initio single-electron approach to correlated electron dynamics in strong laser fields. By writing the electronic wavefunction as a product of a marginal one-electron wavefunction and a conditional wavefunction, we show that the exact harmonic spectrum can be obtained from a single-electron Schr\\"odinger equation. To obtain the one-electron potential in practice, we propose an adiabatic approximation, i.e. a potential is generated that depends only on the position of one electron. This potential, together with the laser interaction, is then used to obtain the dynamics of the system. For a model Helium atom in a laser field, we show that by using our approach, the high-order harmonic generation spectrum can be obtained to a good approximation.

  5. Conversion from Single Photon to Single Electron Spin Using Electrically Controllable Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiwa, Akira; Fujita, Takafumi; Kiyama, Haruki; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2017-01-01

    Polarization is a fundamental property of light and could provide various solutions to the development of secure optical communications with high capacity and high speed. In particular, the coherent quantum state conversion between single photons and single electron spins is a prerequisite for long-distance quantum communications and distributed quantum computation. Electrically defined quantum dots have already been proven to be suitable for scalable solid state qubits by demonstrations of single-spin coherent manipulations and two-qubit gate operations. Thus, their capacity for quantum information technologies would be considerably extended by the achievement of entanglement between an electron spin in the quantum dots and a photon. In this review paper, we show the basic technologies for trapping single electrons generated by single photons in quantum dots and for detecting their spins using the Pauli effect with sensitive charge sensors.

  6. Preparation of Single-Crystalline Heterojunctions for Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiake; Li, Qinfen; Xue, Guobiao; Chen, Hongzheng; Li, Hanying

    2017-04-01

    Organic single-crystalline heterojunctions are composed of different single crystals interfaced together. The intrinsic highly ordered heterostructure in these multicomponent solids holds the capacity for multifunctions, as well as superior charge-transporting properties, promising high-performance electronic applications such as ambipolar transistors and solar cells. However, this kind of heterojunction is not easily available and the preparation methods need to be developed. Recent advances in the efficient strategies that have emerged in yielding high-quality single-crystalline heterojunctions are highlighted here. The advantages and limitations of each strategy are also discussed. The obtained single-crystalline heterojunctions have started to exhibit rich physical properties, including metallic conduction, photovoltaic effects, and so on. Further structural optimization of the heterojunctions to accommodate the electronic device configuration is necessary to significantly advance this research direction. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Preparation of single-celled marine dinoflagellates for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truby, E W

    1997-02-15

    Electron microscopy has been used successfully to study and identify single-celled marine dinoflagellates including parasitic ones and others, such as those that cause red tide. Delicate cells can be preserved for scanning electron microscopy with a combined glutaraldehydeosmium tetroxide mixture that is adjusted for the osmolality of the medium. The protocol allows resolution of fine morphological features. Preservation for transmission electron microscopy can be accomplished with a standard glutaraldehyde fixation and osmium-tetroxide post-fixation in a suitable buffer, but again, the osmolality of the mixture must be adjusted. The protocol allows ultrastructural resolution of vesiculated cells and has been modified for small sample sizes.

  8. Electron impact phenomena and the properties of gaseous ions

    CERN Document Server

    Field, F H; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1970-01-01

    Electron Impact Phenomena and the Properties of Gaseous Ions, Revised Edition deals with data pertaining to electron impact and to molecular gaseous ionic phenomena. This book discusses electron impact phenomena in gases at low pressure that involve low-energy electrons, which result in ion formation. The text also describes the use of mass spectrometers in electron impact studies and the degree of accuracy obtained when measuring electron impact energies. This book also reviews relatively low speed electrons and the transitions that result in the ionization of the atomic system. This text the

  9. Single Electron Capture in Slow Collisions of Doubly Charged Ions with Dinuclear Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannspeter Winter

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We have performed translational-spectroscopical measurements on single electron capture (SEC by impact of slow (impact energy ≤ 1 keV doubly charged ions on dinuclear molecules. For impact of C2+ and N2+ ions the influence of their metastable fractions on the SEC probability has been studied. For impact of 4He2+ on O2 and CO direct and dissociative SEC have been investigated. For all collision systems studied the principal SEC channels can be explained by the "reaction window" which results from multichannel-Landau-Zener treatments for the collisional quasimolecules.

  10. Single-Molecule Electronic Measurements with Metal Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    A review of concepts like tunneling through a metal-molecule-metal-junction, contrast with electrochemical and optical-charge injection, strong-coupling limit, calculations of tunnel transport, electron transfer through Redox-active molecules is presented. This is followed by a discussion of experimental approaches for single-molecule measurements.

  11. Sharpening high resolution information in single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J J; Luque, D; Castón, J R; Carrascosa, J L

    2008-10-01

    Advances in single particle electron cryomicroscopy have made possible to elucidate routinely the structure of biological specimens at subnanometer resolution. At this resolution, secondary structure elements are discernable by their signature. However, identification and interpretation of high resolution structural features are hindered by the contrast loss caused by experimental and computational factors. This contrast loss is traditionally modeled by a Gaussian decay of structure factors with a temperature factor, or B-factor. Standard restoration procedures usually sharpen the experimental maps either by applying a Gaussian function with an inverse ad hoc B-factor, or according to the amplitude decay of a reference structure. EM-BFACTOR is a program that has been designed to widely facilitate the use of the novel method for objective B-factor determination and contrast restoration introduced by Rosenthal and Henderson [Rosenthal, P.B., Henderson, R., 2003. Optimal determination of particle orientation, absolute hand, and contrast loss in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. J. Mol. Biol. 333, 721-745]. The program has been developed to interact with the most common packages for single particle electron cryomicroscopy. This sharpening method has been further investigated via EM-BFACTOR, concluding that it helps to unravel the high resolution molecular features concealed in experimental density maps, thereby making them better suited for interpretation. Therefore, the method may facilitate the analysis of experimental data in high resolution single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

  12. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...

  13. Effects of overheating in a single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korotkov, A. N.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Vasenko, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Heating of a single-electron transistor (SET) caused by the current flowing through it is considered. The current and the temperature increase should be calculated self-consistently taking into account various paths of the heat drain. Even if there is no heat drain from the central electrode...

  14. Transistors-From Point Contact to Single Electron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Transistors – From Point Contact to Single Electron. D N Bose. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 39-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/12/0039-0054 ...

  15. Single ionization and electron capture in He2++Na collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, S; Olson, RE; Ott, H; Hasan, VG; Morgenstern, R; Hoekstra, R

    2005-01-01

    Single-electron capture and ionization in He2+ + Na collisions at energies around the matching velocity (2-13 keV amu(-1)) have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. State-selective cross section for capture into the n = 2, 3, 4 and n >= 5, and the ionization cross section as well as

  16. Simulation of single-electron tunnelling circuits using SPICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Haar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Single-electron tunnelling (SET) devices have very promising properties, like their extremely low power consumption, their extremely high switching speeds and their extremely small physical dimensions. Since the field of SET devices is far from being fully exploited, and their device properties seem

  17. All-electric spin control in interference single electron transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donarini, Andrea; Begemann, Georg; Grifoni, Milena

    2009-08-01

    Single particle interference lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. The archetypal double-slit experiment(1) has been repeated with electrons in vacuum(2,3) up to the more massive C(60) molecules.(4) Mesoscopic rings threaded by a magnetic flux provide the solid-state analogues.(5,6) Intramolecular interference has been recently discussed in molecular junctions.(7-11) Here we propose to exploit interference to achieve all-electrical control of a single electron spin in quantum dots, a highly desirable property for spintronics(12-14) and spin-qubit applications.(15-19) The device consists of an interference single electron transistor,(10,11) where destructive interference between orbitally degenerate electronic states produces current blocking at specific bias voltages. We show that in the presence of parallel polarized ferromagnetic leads the interplay between interference and the exchange interaction on the system generates an effective energy renormalization yielding different blocking biases for majority and minority spins. Hence, by tuning the bias voltage full control over the spin of the trapped electron is achieved.

  18. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A; Sue, Andrew C-H; Stoddart, J Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-11-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications.

  19. Single Crystal Diamond Needle as Point Electron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Purcell, Stephen T.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-10-01

    Diamond has been considered to be one of the most attractive materials for cold-cathode applications during past two decades. However, its real application is hampered by the necessity to provide appropriate amount and transport of electrons to emitter surface which is usually achieved by using nanometer size or highly defective crystallites having much lower physical characteristics than the ideal diamond. Here, for the first time the use of single crystal diamond emitter with high aspect ratio as a point electron source is reported. Single crystal diamond needles were obtained by selective oxidation of polycrystalline diamond films produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Field emission currents and total electron energy distributions were measured for individual diamond needles as functions of extraction voltage and temperature. The needles demonstrate current saturation phenomenon and sensitivity of emission to temperature. The analysis of the voltage drops measured via electron energy analyzer shows that the conduction is provided by the surface of the diamond needles and is governed by Poole-Frenkel transport mechanism with characteristic trap energy of 0.2-0.3 eV. The temperature-sensitive FE characteristics of the diamond needles are of great interest for production of the point electron beam sources and sensors for vacuum electronics.

  20. Enhancement mode single electron transistor in pure silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binhui; Yang, C. H.; Jones, G. M.; Yang, M. J.

    2007-03-01

    Solid state implementations of lateral qubits offer the advantage of being scalable and can be easily integrated by existing main stream IC technologies. In addition, the two Zeeman states of an electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) provide a promising candidate for a qubit. Spins in lateral QDs in the GaAs/AlGaAs single electron transistors (SETs) have been intensively investigated. In contrast, Si provides a number of advantages, including long spin coherence time, large g-factor, and small spin-orbit coupling effect. We have demonstrated Si SET in the few electron regime.* In this talk, we will report the isolation of a single electron in a Si QD using a fabrication technique that incorporates the standard Al/SiO2/Si system with an enhancement mode SET structure. Our SET is built in highly resistive Si substrates with bilayer gates. The high purity Si minimizes the potential disorder from impurities. The top gate induces 2D electrons, and several side gates help define the tunneling barriers, fine tune the shape of the QD, and control the number of electrons in it. We will discuss the operating principle, computer simulation, and low temperature transport data. *APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS 89, 073106 (2006)

  1. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  2. Electron Impact Ionization of the Rare Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Birgit

    2008-10-01

    Detailed information about the electron impact ionization process can be obtained from fully differential cross section measurements, in which the ionized electron is detected in coincidence with the outgoing scattered projectile electron. Incident and outgoing electron momenta are completely determined in these measurements. A considerable body of experimental and theoretical data exists for H and He targets, and the level of agreement between theory and experiment for these simple atoms is exceptional. However, there are still significant discrepancies between theory and experiment in the case of ionization of more complex atomic targets such as the heavier rare gas atoms. In this talk I will present recent measurements and theoretical predictions of fully differential cross sections for ionization of a range of rare gas targets: He, Ne, Ar and Xe. The talk will concentrate primarily on experiments which have been performed by two experimental groups, our group in Australia [1-3] and that of Lahmam-Bennani [3-5] in France. The experimental conditions span two different kinematic regimes, one with intermediate incident electron energy and low ejected electron energy, and the other with higher incident electron energy, and ejected electron energies which correspond to large energy transfer in the collision process. All experiments have been performed in a coplanar asymmetric configuration in which the scattered electron is detected at a small forward scattering angle. The experimental apparatus used in Australia is of quite different design to that in France, and I will present the results of an experiment in which the two groups have collaborated to produce data under identical kinematic conditions and for the same targets, using these two very different experimental approaches. This comprehensive set of experimental data has provided an interesting challenge to theory, and I will discuss the state of play with regard to the alignment between curent state

  3. Dynamics of a single-atom electron pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, J.; Tettamanzi, G. C.; Rogge, S.

    2017-01-01

    Single-electron pumps based on isolated impurity atoms have recently been experimentally demonstrated. In these devices the Coulomb potential of an atom creates a localised electron state with a large charging energy and considerable orbital level spacings, enabling robust charge capturing processes. In contrast to the frequently used gate-defined quantum dot pumps, which experience a strongly time-dependent potential, the confinement potential in these single-atom pumps is hardly affected by the periodic driving of the system. Here we describe the behaviour and performance of an atomic, single parameter, electron pump. This is done by considering the loading, isolating and unloading of one electron at the time, on a phosphorous atom embedded in a silicon double gate transistor. The most important feature of the atom pump is its very isolated ground state, which is populated through the fast loading of much higher lying excited states and a subsequent fast relaxation process. This leads to a substantial increase in pumping accuracy, and is opposed to the adverse role of excited states observed for quantum dot pumps due to non-adiabatic excitations. The pumping performance is investigated as a function of dopant position, revealing a pumping behaviour robust against the expected variability in atomic position. PMID:28295055

  4. Influence of the dynamic screening on single-electron ionization of multi-electron atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Fojon, O A; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de FIsica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Hanssen, J, E-mail: monti@ifir-conicet.gov.a [Institut de Chimie, Physique et Materiaux, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Bv. Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2010-10-28

    A complete formulation of the post-version of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state model to investigate single-electron ionization of multi-electron atoms by fast bare ion beams is considered. The influence of the non-ionized electrons on the dynamic evolution of the ejected electron is analysed showing that the corresponding interaction plays a main role in the determination of double differential cross sections. It is demonstrated that its inclusion as an additional term in the perturbative potential of the exit channel avoids discrepancies between the pre- and post-versions of the studied distorted wave model.

  5. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  6. Control Chaotic Diffusion in a Single Pass Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniazzi, A

    2005-01-01

    We apply an innovative strategy to control chaotic diffusion in conservative systems to the case of a single pass Free Electron Laser. The core of our approach is a small apt modification of the system which channels chaos by building barriers to diffusion. By confining the electrons in phase space and limiting the oscillations of the dense core, we aim at stabilizing the laser intensity. Calculations are perfomed within the framework of a simplified Hamiltonian picture. Further extensions and future experimental applications are also discussed.

  7. Statistical Methods for Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) is a form of transmission electron microscopy, aimed at reconstructing the 3D structure of a macromolecular complex from a large set of 2D projection images, as they exhibit a very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In the single-particle reconstruction (SPR) problem...... in this thesis attempt to solve a specific part of the reconstruction problem in a statistically sound manner. Firstly, we propose two methods for solving the problems (1) and (2). They can ultimately be extended and combined into a statistically sound solution to the full SPR problem. We use Bayesian...

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu......(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...

  9. Pair tunneling resonance in the single-electron transport regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijnse, M; Wegewijs, M R; Hettler, M H

    2009-10-09

    We predict a new electron pair tunneling (PT) resonance in nonlinear transport through quantum dots with positive charging energies exceeding the broadening due to thermal and quantum fluctuations. The PT resonance shows up in the single-electron transport (SET) regime as a peak in the derivative of the nonlinear conductance, d(2)I/dV(2), when the electrochemical potential of one electrode matches the average of two subsequent charge addition energies. For a single level quantum dot (Anderson model) we find the analytic peak shape and the dependence on temperature, magnetic field, and junction asymmetry and compare with the inelastic cotunneling peak which is of the same order of magnitude. In experimental transport spectroscopy the PT resonance may be mistaken for a weak SET resonance judging only by the voltage dependence of its position. Our results provide essential clues to avoid such erroneous interpretation.

  10. Toward Single Electron Nanoelectronics Using Self-Assembled DNA Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Kosti; Leppiniemi, Jenni; Shen, Boxuan; Hytönen, Vesa P; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Toppari, J Jussi

    2016-11-09

    DNA based structures offer an adaptable and robust way to develop customized nanostructures for various purposes in bionanotechnology. One main aim in this field is to develop a DNA nanobreadboard for a controllable attachment of nanoparticles or biomolecules to form specific nanoelectronic devices. Here we conjugate three gold nanoparticles on a defined size TX-tile assembly into a linear pattern to form nanometer scale isolated islands that could be utilized in a room temperature single electron transistor. To demonstrate this, conjugated structures were trapped using dielectrophoresis for current-voltage characterization. After trapping only high resistance behavior was observed. However, after extending the islands by chemical growth of gold, several structures exhibited Coulomb blockade behavior from 4.2 K up to room temperature, which gives a good indication that self-assembled DNA structures could be used for nanoelectronic patterning and single electron devices.

  11. Gain Dependence of the Noise in the Single Electron Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Starmark, B.; Henning, Torsten; Korotkov, A. N.; Claeson, T.; Delsing, P.

    1998-01-01

    An extensive investigation of low frequency noise in single electron transistors as a function of gain is presented. Comparing the output noise with gain for a large number of bias points, it is found that the noise is dominated by external charge noise. For low gains we find an additional noise contribution which is compared to a model including resistance fluctuations. We conclude that this excess noise is not only due to resistance fluctuations. For one sample, we find a record low minimum...

  12. A Single-Cell Electronic Sensor of Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupin, D. D.

    2017-11-01

    Here we propose a simple label-free bio-electronic toxin detector based on nondestructive impedance spectroscopy (IS) method with a single living cell as a sensing element. The toxins distort cell membrane, which significantly affects on the impedance level of an electrode, which covered by a cell. This effect could be used for toxin detection. We believe that our bio-sensor will open a new roadmap in water purity purposes and will save many a one lives.

  13. Double-beta decay with emission of single free electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babič, A.; Štefánik, D.; Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Šimkovic, F.

    2017-10-01

    We study a new mode of the neutrinoless and two-neutrino double-beta decays in which one of the electrons is emitted from the atom, while the other is directly produced in one of the available s1/2 or p1/2 subshells of the daughter ion. We calculate the phase-space factors, estimate the half-lives and derive the single-electron spectra for 0+ → 0+ ground-state nuclear transitions of the most relevant double-beta-decay isotopes: 48Ca, 76Ge, 82Se, 100Mo, 136Xe and 150Nd. The relativistic electron wave functions are evaluated at the nuclear radius by means of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock package Grasp2K. We discuss the prospects for detecting these new modes in the tracking-and-calorimetry experiments NEMO-3 and SuperNEMO.

  14. Fluctuation of average position of electrons in Coulomb island in Si single-electron transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiguchi, Seiji, E-mail: seijih@ipc.akita-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Sciense, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata-gakuen-machi, Akita-shi, Akita, 010-8502 Japan (Japan); Fujiwara, Akira [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa, 243-0198 Japan (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Average position of electrons along thickness direction in a Coulomb island in an n-channel Si single-electron transistor is estimated by analyzing the back-gate voltage dependence of peak voltage (defined as the gate voltage giving a drain current peak) as a function of peak number. It is found that the accuracy of estimated average position is better than 0.5 nm and that the average position fluctuates as the peak number increases.

  15. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  16. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    . Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6968-6972]. The RSSR- radical produced in the above reaction was reoxidized in a slower intramolecular electron-transfer process (30-70 s-1 at 298 K) concomitant with a further reduction of the Cu(II) ion. The temperature dependence of the latter rates was determined...... and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force......Single-site mutants of the blue, single-copper protein, azurin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reduced by CO2- radicals in pulse radiolysis experiments. The single disulfide group was reduced directly by CO2- with rates similar to those of the native protein [Farver, O., & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc...

  17. Manipulating single electron spins and coherence in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awschalom, David

    2008-05-01

    The non-destructive detection of a single electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) is demonstrated using a time- averaged magneto-optical Kerr rotation measurementootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, O. Gywat, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Science 314, 1916 (2006).. This technique provides a means to directly probe the spin off- resonance, thus minimally disturbing the system. Furthermore, the ability to sequentially initialize, manipulate, and read out the state of a qubit, such as an electron spin in a quantum dot, is necessary for virtually any scheme for quantum information processing. In addition to the time-averaged measurements, we have extended the single dot KR technique into the time domain with pulsed pump and probe lasers, allowing the observation of the coherent evolution of an electron spin stateootnotetextM. H. Mikkelsen, J. Berezovsky, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Nature Physics 3, 770 (2007).. The dot is formed by interface fluctuations of a GaAs quantum well and embedded in a diode structure to allow controllable gating/charging of the QD. To enhance the small single spin signal, the QD is positioned within a vertical optical cavity. Observations of coherent single spin precession in an applied magnetic field allow a direct measurement of the electron g-factor and transverse spin lifetime. These measurements reveal information about the relevant spin decoherence mechanisms, while also providing a sensitive probe of the local nuclear spin environment. Finally, we have recently eveloped a scheme for high speed all-optical manipulation of the spin state that enables multiple operations within the coherence timeootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, accepted for publication (2008).. The results represent progress toward the control and coupling of single spins and photons for quantum information processingootnotetextS. Ghosh, W.H. Wang, F. M. Mendoza, R. C

  18. Electron impact mass spectrometry of alkanes in supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1995-02-01

    existed even with C40H82 for GC-MS in supersonic molecular beams. The minimum detected amount of eicosane (C20, H42) was shown to be 60 fg. This was demonstrated by using single ion monitoring with the quadrupole mass analyzer tuned to the molecular weight peak of 282 u. The coupling of electron impact mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams with hyperthermal surface ionization and a fast GC-MS inlet is briefly discussed.

  19. Electron-impact Ionization Of Li2 And Li+2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Electron-impact ionization cross sections for Li{sub 2} and Li{sup +}{sub 2} are calculated using a configuration-average distorted-wave method. Bound orbitals for the molecule and its ions are calculated using a single configuration self-consistent field method based on a linear combination of Slater-type orbitals. The bound orbitals are transformed onto a two-dimensional lattice ({tau}, {theta}), which is variable in the radial coordinate and constant in the angular coordinate, from which Hartree with local exchange potentials are constructed. The single particle Schrodinger equation is then solved for continuum distorted-waves with S-matrix boundary conditions. Total ionization cross sections for Li{sub 2} at an equilibrium internuclear separation of R = 5.0 and for Li{sup +}{sub 2} at an equilibrium internuclear separation of R = 5.9 are presented.

  20. Single-stage electronic ballast with high-power factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chun-Yoon; Kwon, Jung-Min; Kwon, Bong-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    This article proposes a single-stage electronic ballast circuit with high-power factor. The proposed circuit was derived by sharing the switches of the power factor correction (PFC) and the half-bridge LCC resonant inverter. This integration of switches forms the proposed single-stage electronic ballast, which provides an almost unity power factor and a ripple-free input current by using a coupled inductor without increasing the voltage stress. In addition, it realises zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) by employing the self-oscillation technique. The saturable transformer constituting the self-oscillating drive limits the lamp current and dominates the switching frequency of the ballast. Therefore, the proposed single-stage ballast has the advantage of high-power factor, high efficiency, low cost and high reliability. Steady-state analysis of the PFC and the half-bridge LCC resonant inverter are described. The results of experiments performed using a 30 W fluorescent lamp are also presented to confirm the performance of the proposed ballast.

  1. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-08-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Single Microwave Photon Detection with a Trapped Electron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Cridland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the use of an electron in a Penning trap as a detector of single microwave photons. At the University of Sussex we are developing a chip Penning trap technology, designed to be integrated within quantum circuits. Microwave photons are guided into the trap and interact with the electron’s quantum cyclotron motion. This is an electric dipole transition, where the near field of the microwave radiation induces quantum jumps of the cyclotron harmonic oscillator. The quantum jumps can be monitored using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, providing the quantum non demolition signal of the microwave quanta. We calculate the quantum efficiency of photon detection and discuss the main features and technical challenges for the trapped electron as a quantum microwave sensor.

  3. Single particle electron cryomicroscopy: trends, issues and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Henderson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    There has been enormous progress during the last few years in the determination of three-dimensional biological structures by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM), allowing maps to be obtained with higher resolution and from fewer images than required previously. This is due principally to the introduction of a new type of direct electron detector that has 2- to 3-fold higher detective quantum efficiency than available previously, and to the improvement of the computational algorithms for image processing. In spite of the great strides that have been made, quantitative analysis shows that there are still significant gains to be made provided that the problems associated with image degradation can be solved, possibly by minimising beam-induced specimen movement and charge build up during imaging. If this can be achieved, it should be possible to obtain near atomic resolution structures of smaller single particles, using fewer images and resolving more conformational states than at present, thus realising the full potential of the method. The recent popularity of cryoEM for molecular structure determination also highlights the need for lower cost microscopes, so we encourage development of an inexpensive, 100 keV electron cryomicroscope with a high-brightness field emission gun to make the method accessible to individual groups or institutions that cannot afford the investment and running costs of a state-of-the-art 300 keV installation. A key requisite for successful high-resolution structure determination by cryoEM includes interpretation of images and optimising the biochemistry and grid preparation to obtain nicely distributed macromolecules of interest. We thus include in this review a gallery of cryoEM micrographs that shows illustrative examples of single particle images of large and small macromolecular complexes.

  4. Irreversibility on the Level of Single-Electron Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Küng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a low-temperature experimental test of the fluctuation theorem for electron transport through a double quantum dot. The rare entropy-consuming system trajectories are detected in the form of single charges flowing against the source-drain bias by using time-resolved charge detection with a quantum point contact. We find that these trajectories appear with a frequency that agrees with the theoretical predictions even under strong nonequilibrium conditions, when the finite bandwidth of the charge detection is taken into account.

  5. Impact of electron irradiation on electron holographic potentiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. B.; Niermann, T.; Lehmann, M. [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Berger, D. [Technische Universität Berlin, Zentraleinrichtung für Elektronenmikroskopie, Strae des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Knauer, A.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibnitz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Koslow, I.; Kneissl, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibnitz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    While electron holography in the transmission electron microscope offers the possibility to measure maps of the electrostatic potential of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions, these measurements are known to underestimate the absolute value of the potential, especially in GaN. We have varied the dose rates of electron irradiation over several orders of magnitude and observed strong variations of the holographically detected voltages. Overall, the results indicate that the electron beam generates electrical currents within the specimens primarily by the photovoltaic effect and due to secondary electron emission. These currents have to be considered for a quantitative interpretation of electron holographic measurements, as their negligence contributes to large parts in the observed discrepancy between the measured and expected potential values in GaN.

  6. Overview and future of single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) has experienced a quantum leap in its capability in recent years, due to improved microscopes, better detectors and better software. It is now possible to obtain near-atomic resolution 3D density maps of macromolecular assemblies using single particle cryoEM without the need for crystals. Although this recent progress has produced some outstanding achievements, we have still only partly realised the full potential of single particle cryoEM. If one or two remaining problems can be solved, it will become an even more powerful method in structural biology that should closely approach the limit of what is theoretically possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Southworth, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs in image acquisition have enabled single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to achieve near-atomic resolution structural information for biological complexes. The improvements in image quality coupled with powerful computational methods for sorting distinct particle populations now also allow the determination of compositional and conformational ensembles, thereby providing key insights into macromolecular function. However, the inherent instability and dynamic nature of biological assemblies remain a tremendous challenge that often requires tailored approaches for successful implementation of the methodology. Here, we briefly describe the fundamentals of single-particle cryo-EM with an emphasis on covering the breadth of techniques and approaches, including low- and high-resolution methods, aiming to illustrate specific steps that are crucial for obtaining structural information by this method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of electronic stability control (ESC) on single-vehicle injury accidents while controlling for a number of confounders influencing the accident risk. Methods: Using police-registered injury accidents from 2004 to 2011 in Denmark with cars...... the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section...... characteristics. Results: The present study calculated the crude odds ratio for ESC-equipped cars of getting in a single-vehicle injury accident as 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47) and the adjusted odds ratio as 0.69 (95% CI, 0.54-0.88). No difference was found in the effectiveness of ESC across...

  9. A pseudo-single-crystalline germanium film for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, H.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Hamaya, K., E-mail: hamaya@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kasahara, K.; Park, J.-H.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kudo, K.; Okamoto, H.; Moto, K.; Tsunoda, I. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2659-2 Suya, Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate large-area (∼600 μm), (111)-oriented, and high-crystallinity, i.e., pseudo-single-crystalline, germanium (Ge) films at 275 °C, where the temperature is lower than the softening temperature of a flexible substrate. A modulated gold-induced layer exchange crystallization method with an atomic-layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier and amorphous-Ge/Au multilayers is established. From the Raman measurements, we can judge that the crystallinity of the obtained Ge films is higher than those grown by aluminum-induced-crystallization methods. Even on a flexible substrate, the pseudo-single-crystalline Ge films for the circuit with thin-film transistor arrays can be achieved, leading to high-performance flexible electronics based on an inorganic-semiconductor channel.

  10. Electronic Single Molecule Identification of Carbohydrate Isomers by Recognition Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Im, JongOne; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-01-01

    Glycans play a central role as mediators in most biological processes, but their structures are complicated by isomerism. Epimers and anomers, regioisomers, and branched sequences contribute to a structural variability that dwarfs those of nucleic acids and proteins, challenging even the most sophisticated analytical tools, such as NMR and mass spectrometry. Here, we introduce an electron tunneling technique that is label-free and can identify carbohydrates at the single-molecule level, offering significant benefits over existing technology. It is capable of analyzing sub-picomole quantities of sample, counting the number of individual molecules in each subset in a population of coexisting isomers, and is quantitative over more than four orders of magnitude of concentration. It resolves epimers not well separated by ion-mobility and can be implemented on a silicon chip. It also provides a readout mechanism for direct single-molecule sequencing of linear oligosaccharides.

  11. Single-electron transistors fabricated with sidewall spacer patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-Gook; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rok; Song, Ki-Whan; Lee, Jong Duk

    2003-09-01

    We have implemented a sidewall spacer patterning method for novel dual-gate single-electron transistor (DGSET) and metal-oxide-semiconductor-based SET (MOSET) based on the uniform SOI wire, using conventional lithography and processing technology. A 30 nm wide silicon quantum wire is defined by a sidewall spacer patterning method, and depletion gates for two tunnel junctions of the DGSET are formed by the doped polycrystalline silicon sidewall. The fabricated DGSET and MOSET show clear single-electron tunneling phenomena at liquid nitrogen temperature and insensitivity of the Coulomb oscillation period to gate bias conditions. On the basis of the phase control capability of the sidewall depletion gates, we have proposed a complementary self-biasing method, which enables the SET/CMOS hybrid multi-valued logic (MVL) to operate perfectly well at high temperature, where the peak-to-valley current ratio of Coulomb oscillation severely decreases. The suggested scheme is evaluated by SPICE simulation with an analytical DGSET model, and it is confirmed that even DGSETs with a large Si island can be utilized efficiently in the multi-valued logic.

  12. Toward single mode, atomic size electron vortex beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Lovejoy, Tracy J; Dellby, Niklas

    2014-06-01

    We propose a practical method of producing a single mode electron vortex beam suitable for use in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The method involves using a holographic "fork" aperture to produce a row of beams of different orbital angular momenta, as is now well established, magnifying the row so that neighboring beams are separated by about 1 µm, selecting the desired beam with a narrow slit, and demagnifying the selected beam down to 1-2 Å in size. We show that the method can be implemented by adding two condenser lenses plus a selection slit to a straight-column cold-field emission STEM. It can also be carried out in an existing instrument, the monochromated Nion high-energy-resolution monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy-STEM, by using its monochromator in a novel way. We estimate that atom-sized vortex beams with ≥ 20 pA of current should be attainable at 100-200 keV in either instrument.

  13. Electron impact excitation of helium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Ying; Zeng, De-Ling; Gao, Xiang; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-08-01

    A method to deal with the electron impact excitation cross sections of an atom from low to high incident energies are presented. This method combines the partial wave method and the first Born approximation (FBA), i.e., replacing the several lowest partial wave cross sections of the total cross sections within FBA by the corresponding exact partial wave cross sections. A new set of codes are developed to calculate the FBA partial wave cross sections. Using this method, the convergent e-He collision cross sections of optical-forbidden and optical-allowed transitions at low to high incident energies are obtained. The calculation results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the method. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB921501 and 2013CB922200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274035, 11275029, 11328401, 11371218, 11474031, 11474032, and 11474034), and the Foundation of Development of Science and Technology of Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0102005 and 2014A0102005).

  14. Single-layer MoS2 electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke, Dominik; Bertolazzi, Simone; Kis, Andras

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: Atomic crystals of two-dimensional materials consisting of single sheets extracted from layered materials are gaining increasing attention. The most well-known material from this group is graphene, a single layer of graphite that can be extracted from the bulk material or grown on a suitable substrate. Its discovery has given rise to intense research effort culminating in the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov. Graphene however represents only the proverbial tip of the iceberg, and increasing attention of researchers is now turning towards the veritable zoo of so-called "other 2D materials". They have properties complementary to graphene, which in its pristine form lacks a bandgap: MoS2, for example, is a semiconductor, while NbSe2 is a superconductor. They could hold the key to important practical applications and new scientific discoveries in the two-dimensional limit. This family of materials has been studied since the 1960s, but most of the research focused on their tribological applications: MoS2 is best known today as a high-performance dry lubricant for ultrahigh-vacuum applications and in car engines. The realization that single layers of MoS2 and related materials could also be used in functional electronic devices where they could offer advantages compared with silicon or graphene created a renewed interest in these materials. MoS2 is currently gaining the most attention because the material is easily available in the form of a mineral, molybdenite, but other 2D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors are expected to have qualitatively similar properties. In this Account, we describe recent progress in the area of single-layer MoS2-based devices for electronic circuits. We will start with MoS2 transistors, which showed for the first time that devices based on MoS2 and related TMDs could have electrical properties on the same level as other, more established semiconducting materials. This

  15. Basic concepts of quantum interference and electron transport in single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, C J

    2015-02-21

    This tutorial outlines the basic theoretical concepts and tools which underpin the fundamentals of phase-coherent electron transport through single molecules. The key quantity of interest is the transmission coefficient T(E), which yields the electrical conductance, current-voltage relations, the thermopower S and the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of single-molecule devices. Since T(E) is strongly affected by quantum interference (QI), three manifestations of QI in single-molecules are discussed, namely Mach-Zehnder interferometry, Breit-Wigner resonances and Fano resonances. A simple MATLAB code is provided, which allows the novice reader to explore QI in multi-branched structures described by a tight-binding (Hückel) Hamiltonian. More generally, the strengths and limitations of materials-specific transport modelling based on density functional theory are discussed.

  16. Differential cross sections for the electron impact ionization of Ar (3 p) atoms for equal energy final state electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Ghanshyam; Singh, Prithvi

    2017-06-01

    The electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing conditions has been studied in detail. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. We report in this communication the results of triple differential cross sections (TDCSs) for electron impact ionization of Ar (3 p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. We calculate TDCS in the modified distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) formalism including post collision interaction (PCI) and polarization potential. We compare the results of our calculation with available measurements [Phys. Rev. A 87, 022712 (2013)]. We study the effect of PCI, target polarization on the trends of TDCS for the single ionization of Ar (3 p) targets.

  17. Lead-Free Electronics: Impact for Space Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pb is used as a constituent in solder alloys used to connect and attach electronic parts to printed wiring boards (PWBs). Similar Pbbearing alloys are electroplated or hot dipped onto the terminations of electronic parts to protect the terminations and make them solderable. Changing to Pb-free solders and termination finishes has introduced significant technical challenges into the supply chain. Tin/lead (Sn/Pb) alloys have been the solders of choice for electronics for more than 50 years. Pb-free solder alloys are available but there is not a plug-in replacement for 60/40 or 63/37 (Sn/Pb) alloys, which have been the industry workhorses.

  18. Electron cryomicroscopy of single particles at subnanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Ludtke, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle reconstruction have advanced substantially over the past two decades. There are now numerous examples of structures that have been solved using this technique to better than 10 A resolution. At such resolutions, direct identification of alpha helices is possible and, often, beta-sheet-containing regions can be identified. The most numerous subnanometer resolution structures are the icosahedral viruses, as higher resolution is easier to achieve with higher symmetry. Important non-icosahedral structures solved to subnanometer resolution include several ribosome structures, clathrin assemblies and, most recently, the Ca2+ release channel. There is now hope that, in the next few years, this technique will achieve resolutions approaching 4 A, permitting a complete trace of the protein backbone without reference to a crystal structure.

  19. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz electromagnetic radiation and especially high energy...... of order seconds. In some cases, the positive and negative slopes of the V(Vg) curve have different overlaid noise patterns. For fixed bias on both slopes, we measure the same noise spectrum, and believe that the asymmetric noise is due to dynamic charge trapping near or inside one of the junctions induced...... when ramping the junction voltage. Dynamic trapping may limit the high frequency applications of the SET transistor. Also reported on are the effects of rf irradiation and the dependence of the SET transistor noise on bias voltage. ©1998 American Institute of Physics....

  20. Beam Instrumentation for the Single Electron DAFNE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitelli, G; Valente, P; Vescovi, M

    2003-01-01

    The DAΦNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) has been successfully commissioned in February 2002, and started operation in November of the same year. Although the BTF is a beam transfer line optimized for single particle production, mainly for high energy detectors calibration, it can provide electrons and positrons in a wide range of multiplicity: between 1-1010, with energies from a few tens of MeV up to 800 MeV. The large multiplicity range requires many different diagnostic devices, from high-energy calorimeters and ionization/fluorescence chambers in the few particles range, to standard beam diagnostics systems. The schemes of operation, the commissioning results, as well as the beam diagnostics are presented.

  1. Radio-frequency reflectometry on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs single electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Keane, Z. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However, these d......Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However...

  2. Recent developments in SiC single-crystal electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P. A.; Chelnokov, V. E.

    1992-07-01

    The present paper is an analytical review of the last five or six years of research and development in SiC. It outlines the major achievements in single crystal growth and device technology. Electrical performance of SiC devices designed during these years and some new trends in SiC electronics are also discussed. During the 1980s the studies on sublimation and liquid-phase epitaxial growth of SiC single crystal were continued successfully. At that time, such methods as chemical vapour deposition, thermal oxidation, 'dry' plasma etching and ion implantation which yielded good results with silicon, came into use. As a result of the technological progress, discrete devices appeared, which incorporated the potential advantages of SiC as a wide bandgap material. Among these were high temperature (500-600 degrees C) rectifier diodes and field-effect transistors, high efficiency light-emitting diodes for the short-wave region of the visible spectrum, and detectors of ultraviolet radiation. It should be stressed that the devices were of commercial quality and could be applied in various fields (control systems of automobile engines, aerospace apparatus, geophysical equipment, colour displays in information systems, etc.). The developments in technology and the promising results of research on electrical performance of the devices already available give hope that in the near future SiC may become the basic material for power microwave devices, and for thermo- and radiation-resistant integrated circuits. This process can be stimulated by further perfection of single-crystal substrates of large area, by development of stable high temperature ohmic contacts, micro- and heterostructures.

  3. SINGLE ELECTRON AMPLIFICATION IN A 'SINGLE-MCP + MICROMEGAS + PADS' DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, J

    2004-09-20

    We have tested a new gaseous detector structure based on a tandem of two parts, the first one is a single MCP plate (sometimes called the Microchannel plate or Capillary plates), and the second one is a Micromegas with pad readout. The new detector responds very well to a single electron signal, both in helium-based and Argon-based gases, and it can reach a very large gain. Our overall aim is to couple the proposed electrode structure to a Bialkali photocathode. The main advantage of this avenue of research is that such a detector would operate easily in a very large magnetic field, and it could achieve excellent position resolution and large pixelization, compared to existing vacuum-based MCP-PMT detectors.

  4. Evaluation of the Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current-Voltage and Thermopower Measurements: Application to C60Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-16

    The electronic structure of molecular junctions has a significant impact on their transport properties. Despite the decisive role of the electronic structure, a complete characterization of the electronic structure remains a challenge. This is because there is no straightforward way of measuring electron spectroscopy for an individual molecule trapped in a nanoscale gap between two metal electrodes. Herein, a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the electronic structure in single-molecule junctions based on the analysis of current-voltage (I-V) and thermoelectric characteristics is described. It is shown that the electronic structure of the prototypical C 60 single-molecule junction can be resolved by analyzing complementary results of the I-V and thermoelectric measurement. This combined approach confirmed that the C 60 single-molecule junction was highly conductive with molecular electronic conductances of 0.033 and 0.003 G 0 and a molecular Seebeck coefficient of -12 μV K -1 . In addition, we revealed that charge transport was mediated by a LUMO whose energy level was located 0.5≈0.6 eV above the Fermi level of the Au electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Academic Impact of a Public Electronic Health Database: Bibliometric Analysis of Studies Using the General Practice Research Database

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Wu, Jau-Ching; Haschler, Ingo; Majeed, Azeem; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies that use electronic health databases as research material are getting popular but the influence of a single electronic health database had not been well investigated yet. The United Kingdom's General Practice Research Database (GPRD) is one of the few electronic health databases publicly available to academic researchers. This study analyzed studies that used GPRD to demonstrate the scientific production and academic impact by a single public health database. METHODOLOGY A...

  6. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  7. Single-side electron multipacting at the photocathode in rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hui Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple electron impacting (multipacting can take place in rf fields when the rf components are composed of materials with a secondary electron yield greater than one. In rf gun cavities, multipacting may change the properties of the vacuum components or even damage them. First systematic measurements of the multipacting occurring in a photocathode rf gun were made at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory in 2000. The multipacting properties were found to depend on the cathode material and the solenoid field configuration. In this study, we measure the multipacting properties in more detail and model the secondary electron generation for numerical simulation. Measurements and simulations for the photoinjectors at Fermilab and DESY are compared. The multipacting takes place at the photocathode in rf guns and is categorized as single-side multipacting. In a low rf field, the electrons emitted from the cathode area do not leave the gun cavity within one rf cycle and have an opportunity to travel back and hit the cathode. The solenoid field distribution in the vicinity of the cathode changes the probability of electron bombardment of the cathode and makes a major contribution to the multipacting behavior.

  8. Research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hoshing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To consider the research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes due to their manufacture, use and disposal. Methods Literature searches were conducted through December 2013. Studies were included in this review if they related to the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes. Results Scientific information on the environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing, use and disposal is very limited. No studies formally evaluated the environmental impacts of the...

  9. Innovative single-shot diagnostics for electrons accelerated through laser-plasma interaction at FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Costa, G.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Pompili, R.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (> 100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeters. Here we present all the plasma related activities currently underway at SPARC LAB exploiting the high power laser FLAME. In particular, we will give an overview of the single shot diagnostics employed: Electro Optic Sampling (EOS) for temporal measurement and optical transition radiation (OTR) for an innovative one shot emittance measurements. In detail, the EOS technique has been employed to measure for the first time the longitudinal profile of electric field of fast electrons escaping from a solid target, driving the ions and protons acceleration, and to study the impact of using different target shapes. Moreover, a novel scheme for one shot emittance measurements based on OTR, developed and tested at SPARC LAB LINAC, will be shown.

  10. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated approximately 125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography as a viable manufacturing technology. However, beyond the 7 nm technology node existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multi-patterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes. Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should free-electron lasers become the preferred next generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE), (2) regenerative amplification (RAFEL), or (3) self-seeding (SS-FEL). Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provide a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUV lithography applications.

  11. Problems in single-particle dynamics specific to electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Renieri, A

    1977-01-01

    The author investigates the specific problems related to the electron motion in a circular high-energy accelerator. The main difference between electrons and protons (or other heavy particles) is the synchrotron radiation energy loss. This phenomenon is negligible for heavy particles, but not for electrons. (5 refs).

  12. The study of vacuolar-type ATPases by single particle electron microscopy1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Jianhua; Rubinstein, John L

    2014-01-01

    .... Electron microscopy (EM) techniques, especially single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and negative-stain EM, have provided extensive insight into the structure and function of these protein complexes...

  13. impact of the use of electronic resources on research output

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    manda

    Abstract. This paper examines the impact of the use of electronic information resources on research output in the universities in Tanzania. Research for this paper was conducted in five public universities in Tanzania with varied levels of access to electronic information resources. The selection of the sample universities was ...

  14. The impact of electronic information resource use on research output

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the impact of the use of electronic information resources on research output in the universities in Tanzania. Research for this paper was conducted in five public universities in Tanzania with varied levels of access to electronic information resources. The selection of the sample universities was ...

  15. AM1 and electron impact mass spectrometry study of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, in electron impact mass spectrometry (EIMS), it has been found a good correlation between the fragmentation processes of coumarins and the electronic charges of the atoms of their skeleton. In this paper, the same analytical method has been applied to 4-acyl isochroman-1,3-diones, whose mass spectra had ...

  16. Electronic bolus design impacts on administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentz, F; Umstätter, C; Gilaverte, S; Prado, O R; Silva, C J A; Monteiro, A L G

    2014-06-01

    Electronic identification of animals has become increasingly important worldwide to improve and ensure traceability. In warm and hot climates, such as Brazil, boluses can have advantages over ear tags as the internal devices reduce the risks of ear tag losses, tissue damage, and lesions on the ear. Electronic boluses, however, are often perceived as having negative characteristics, including reported difficulties of administration in small ruminants. This paper describes the factors associated with bolus design that affect the swallowing of a bolus in sheep. Other factors that might influence bolus swallowing time have also been considered. In addition, the effect of bolus design on its performance was evaluated. A total of 56 Suffolk ewes were used to assess the ease of administration and retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (mini, 11.5 × 58.0 mm and 21.7 g; small, 14.8 × 48.5 mm and 29.5 g; standard, 19.3 × 69.8 mm and 74.4 g) during a whole productive year, including pregnancy and lamb suckling. Ewe age (5.6 ± 2.3 yr) and weight (85.07 ± 8.2 kg BW) were recorded, as well as time for bolus swallowing. The deglutition of the bolus and any resulting blockages in the esophagus were monitored by visual observations. Retention and readability of the boluses were regularly monitored for d 1, wk 1, mo 1, and every mo until 1 yr. Time for bolus swallowing differed substantially with bolus type and was greater (P 0.05). The bolus o.d. and length were positively correlated with swallowing time (P electronic boluses showed 100% retention rate, and at 12 mo, bolus retention was 100%, 94.5%, and 100% for mini, small, and standard boluses, respectively (P > 0.05). At 12 mo, all boluses showed 100% readability, except for small boluses, which had a readability of 94.5%. In conclusion, bolus design affected swallowing time and bolus readability. A reduction in boluses length and o.d. needs to be carried out to provide ease of administration and for boluses to

  17. Impact of electron-hole correlations on the 1T-TiSe_{2} electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, G; Monney, C; Hildebrand, B; Aebi, P; Beck, H

    2015-02-27

    Several experiments have been performed on 1T-TiSe_{2} in order to identify whether the electronic structure is semimetallic or semiconducting without reaching a consensus. In this Letter, we theoretically study the impact of electron-hole and electron-phonon correlations on the bare semimetallic and semiconducting electronic structure. The resulting electron spectral functions provide a direct comparison of both cases and demonstrate that 1T-TiSe_{2} is of predominant semiconducting character with some spectral weight crossing the Fermi level.

  18. From nanofabrication to self-fabrication--tailored chemistry for control of single molecule electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule electronics is a field of research focused on the use of single molecules as electronics components. During the past 15 years the field has concentrated on development of test beds for measurements on single molecules. Bottom-up approaches to single molecule devices are emerging...... the electronic properties of a single molecule by chemical design....... as alternatives to the dominant top-down nanofabrication techniques. One example is solution-based self-assembly of a molecule enclosed by two gold nanorod electrodes. This article will discuss recent attempts to control the self-assembly process by the use of supramolecular chemistry and how to tailor...

  19. Dynamic correlation in the electron angular distribution in ionization of helium by ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Fojon, O A; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Hanssen, J, E-mail: rivarola@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Institut de Chimie, Physique et Materiaux, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Bv. Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2011-04-01

    Single ionization of helium by proton impact is investigated in terms of a four-body distorted wave model. In this approximation both electrons are considered as active, being one of them ionized whereas the other remains in a residual target bound state. The influence of dynamic correlation between electrons is investigated by comparison with a four-body uncorrelated distorted wave model. Double differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle for fixed electron energies and different collision energies are presented.

  20. Single-stage unity power factor based electronic ballast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper deals with the design, modeling, analysis and implementation of unity power factor (UPF) based electronic ballast for a fluorescent lamp (FL). The proposed electronic ballast uses a boost AC–DC converter as a power factor corrector (PFC) to improve the power quality at the input ac mains. In this singlestage ...

  1. Prognostic impact of external beam radiation therapy in patients treated with and without extended surgery and intraoperative electrons for locally recurrent rectal cancer: 16-year experience in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Felipe A; Sole, Claudio V; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; Lozano, Miguel A; Del Valle, Emilio; Rodriguez, Marcos; Muñoz-Calero, Alberto; Turégano, Fernando; Herranz, Rafael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Luis; García-Sabrido, Jose Luis

    2013-08-01

    To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertschy, Mark D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Since the invention of quantum mechanics, even the simplest example of collisional breakup in a system of charged particles, e- + H → H+ + e- + e+, has stood as one of the last unsolved fundamental problems in atomic physics. A complete solution requires calculating the energies and directions for a final state in which three charged particles are moving apart. Advances in the formal description of three-body breakup have yet to lead to a viable computational method. Traditional approaches, based on two-body formalisms, have been unable to produce differential cross sections for the three-body final state. Now, by using a mathematical transformation of the Schrodinger equation that makes the final state tractable, a complete solution has finally been achieved, Under this transformation, the scattering wave function can be calculated without imposing explicit scattering boundary conditions. This approach has produced the first triple differential cross sections that agree on an absolute scale with experiment as well as the first ab initio calculations of the single differential cross section.

  3. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic

  4. Vibrationally mediated control of single-electron transmission in weakly coupled molecule-metal junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We propose a mechanism which allows one to control the transmission of single electrons through a molecular junction. The principle utilizes the emergence of transmission sidebands when molecular vibrational modes are coupled to the electronic state mediating the transmission. We will show that i....... As an example we perform a density-functional theory analysis of a benzene molecule between two Au(111) contacts and show that exciting a particular vibrational mode can give rise to transmission of a single electron....

  5. Noise performance of the radio-frequency single-electron transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Roschier, Leif; Hakonen, Pertti J.; Bladh, K.; Delsing, P.; Lehnert, K. W.; Spietz, Lafe; Schoelkopf, Rob

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed a radio-frequency single-electron-transistor (RF-SET) circuit that includes a high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT)amplifier, coupled to the single-electron-transistor (SET) via an impedance transformer. We consider how power is transferred between different components of the circuit, model noise components, and analyze the operating conditions of practical importance. The results are compared with experimental data on SETs. Good agreement is obtained between our noise mod...

  6. Single Parenthood Impact on Street Children in Ibadan Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Throughout the world, there are children who are drifted away from homes or families of orientations. They are commonly referred to as “runaway” children. This study examined single parenthood impact on street children in Ibadan Metropolis, Nigeria .The study made use of random sampling techniques and the data ...

  7. Single- and Multiple-Electron Removal Processes in Proton-Water Vapor Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Kirchner, Tom; Horbatsch, Marko; Jürgen Lüdde, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Charge-state correlated cross sections for single- and multiple-electron removal processes due to capture and ionization in proton-H2O collisions are calculated by using the non-perturbative basis generator method adapted for ion-molecule collisions [1]. Orbital-specific cross sections for vacancy production are evaluated using this method to predict the yields of charged fragments (H2O^+, OH^+, H^+, O^+) according to branching ratios known to be valid at high impact energies. At intermediate and low energies, we obtain fragmentation results on the basis of predicted multi-electron removal cross sections, and explain most of the available experimental data [2]. The cross sections for charge transfer and for ionization are also compared with recent multi-center classical-trajectory Monte Carlo calculations [3] for impact energies from 20keV to several MeV. [4pt] [1] H.J. L"udde et al, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060702(R) (2009)[0pt] [2] M. Murakami et al, to be submitted to Phys. Rev. A (2012)[0pt] [3] C. Illescas et al, Phys. Rev. A 83, 052704 (2011)

  8. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  9. The impact of electronic cigarettes on the paediatric population

    OpenAIRE

    Durmowicz, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the impact of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) on children. Methods Five electronic databases were searched through 31 December 2013. Studies in English that included data for children younger than 18 years of age were included. In addition, relevant data from articles identified during searches of the e-cigarette literature, relevant state survey data and paediatric voluntary adverse event reports submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed an...

  10. Innovative single-shot diagnostics for electrons from laser wakefield acceleration at FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Cianchi, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Pompili, R.; Zigler, A.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (> 100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeters. Here we present all the plasma related activities currently underway at SPARC_LAB exploiting the high power laser FLAME. In particular, we will give an overview of the single shot diagnostics employed: Electro Optic Sampling (EOS) for temporal measurement and Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) for an innovative one shot emittance measurements. In detail, the EOS technique has been employed to measure for the first time the longitudinal profile of electric field of fast electrons escaping from a solid target, driving the ions and protons acceleration, and to study the impact of using different target shapes. Moreover, a novel scheme for one shot emittance measurements based on OTR, developed and tested at SPARC_LAB LINAC, used in an experiment on electrons from laser wakefield acceleration still undergoing, will be shown.

  11. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion–atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He+ ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne2). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation. PMID:21730184

  12. Electronic components embedded in a single graphene nanoribbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobse, P. H.; Kimouche, A.; Gebraad, T.; Ervasti, M. M.; Thijssen, J.M.; Liljeroth, P; Swart, I.

    2017-01-01

    The use of graphene in electronic devices requires a band gap, which can be achieved by creating nanostructures such as graphene nanoribbons. A wide variety of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons can be prepared through on-surface synthesis, bringing the concept of graphene nanoribbon

  13. Electronic components embedded in a single graphene nanoribbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobse, P H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412769506; Kimouche, A; Gebraad, T; Ervasti, M.; Thijssen, J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073430331; Liljeroth, P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314007423; Swart, I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837652

    2017-01-01

    The use of graphene in electronic devices requires a band gap, which can be achieved by creating nanostructures such as graphene nanoribbons. A wide variety of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons can be prepared through on-surface synthesis, bringing the concept of graphene nanoribbon

  14. Physics colloquium: Single-electron counting in quantum metrology and in statistical mechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    Geneva University

    2011-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92olé   Lundi 17 octobre 2011 17h00 - Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM « Single-electron counting in quantum metrology and in statistical mechanics » Prof. Jukka Pekola Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University Helsinki, Finland   First I discuss the basics of single-electron tunneling and its potential applications in metrology. My main focus is in developing an accurate source of single-electron current for the realization of the unit ampere. I discuss the principle and the present status of the so-called single- electron turnstile. Investigation of errors in transporting electrons one by one has revealed a wealth of observations on fundamental phenomena in mesoscopic superconductivity, including individual Andreev...

  15. Impact of Electronic Signatures and Time Stamping for the Protection of Electronic Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Limba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article e495 valuates the impact of e-signatures and time stamping on electronic contracts and electronic documents for performing e-business opportunities and goals, and analyses e-signature application for business cases. Various electronic services, virtual shopping, electronic cash transactions are becoming increasingly popular as they allow users to quickly perform different actions, operations and functions. It is important not only for convenience, but also to ensure consumer data security and reliability. Security reasons are not enough for security transmitted data, since this method does not allow clarification of information about sender identity.Use of electronic signatures, electronic identities, checgs and ensures a very high level of data security in interchange data processes. E-signature allows e-business companies to transfer the company’s operation business processes and their application to the organization and management in the electronic environment, also automate internal and external compans processes, includinggon-going business processes.The object of paper is .-signature and time stamping application in the theoretical and practical way.The goal of this paper while evaluating and estimating the .-signature and time stamping application, i’s regulation and legal implementation worldwidesand in Lithuania—is to provideluseful recommendations for more efficient impact developing -commerce and -business in situations when -signature and time stamping is used for ensuring electronic contracs security.

  16. Impact of Electronic Signatures and Time Stamping for the Protection of Electronic Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Limba

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article e495 valuates the impact of e-signatures and time stamping on electronic contracts and electronic documents for performing e-business opportunities and goals, and analyses e-signature application for business cases. Various electronic services, virtual shopping, electronic cash transactions are becoming increasingly popular as they allow users to quickly perform different actions, operations and functions. It is important not only for convenience, but also to ensure consumer data security and reliability. Security reasons are not enough for security transmitted data, since this method does not allow clarification of information about sender identity. Use of electronic signatures, electronic identities, checgs and ensures a very high level of data security in interchange data processes. E-signature allows e-business companies to transfer the company’s operation business processes and their application to the organization and management in the electronic environment, also automate internal and external compans processes, includinggon-going business processes. The object of paper is .-signature and time stamping application in the theoretical and practical way. The goal of this paper while evaluating and estimating the .-signature and time stamping application, i’s regulation and legal implementation worldwidesand in Lithuania—is to provideluseful recommendations for more efficient impact developing -commerce and -business in situations when -signature and time stamping is used for ensuring electronic contracs security.

  17. Electron confinement and correlation in double quantum well single charge electrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyure, Mark F.; Caflisch, Russel E.; Anderson, Chris; Robinson, Hans D.; Croke, Edward T.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2002-03-01

    Single electron transistors and other related device concepts have been proposed for use in a variety of quantum information processing applications. Central to the application of these devices is not only single electron confinement and sensitivity, but the ability to discriminate between the singlet and triplet states for indirect measurement of electron spin. In this talk, we will describe theoretical and numerical results for a new device based on InGaAs/InP double quantum well structures (see related talk by H.D. Robinson et al) that demonstrate that single electron confinement is achievable in this structure. In addition, we will discuss properties related to spin readout such as the the singlet-triplet energy splitting of two-electron states as well as the role of electron correlation effects in this device.

  18. Single polymer-based ternary electronic memory material and device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Juan; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Hui-Ying; Wong, Jenlt; Sun, Hui-Bin; Dong, Xiao-Chen; Lin, Wen-Peng; Huang, Wei

    2012-06-05

    A ternary polymer memory device based on a single polymer with on-chain Ir(III) complexes is fabricated by combining multiple memory mechanisms into one system. Excellent ternary memory performances-low reading, writing, and erasing voltages and good stability for all three states-are achieved. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  20. Electron capture dissociation of singly and multiply phosphorylated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, A; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Olsen, J V

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of phosphotyrosine and phosphoserine containing peptides by nano-electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry established electron capture dissociation (ECD) as a viable method for phosphopeptide sequencing. In general, ECD spectra of synthetic...... and native phosphopeptides appeared less complex than conventional collision activated dissociation (CAD) mass spectra of these species. ECD of multiply protonated phosphopeptide ions generated mainly c- and z(.)-type peptide fragment ion series. No loss of water, phosphate groups or phosphoric acid from...

  1. Coulomb blockade in a Si channel gated by an Al single-electron transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, L.; Brown, K. R.; Kane, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    We incorporate an Al-AlO_x-Al single-electron transistor as the gate of a narrow (~100 nm) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Near the MOSFET channel conductance threshold, we observe oscillations in the conductance associated with Coulomb blockade in the channel, revealing the formation of a Si single-electron transistor. Abrupt steps present in sweeps of the Al transistor conductance versus gate voltage are correlated with single-electron charging events in the Si t...

  2. Validation of an "Intelligent Mouthguard" Single Event Head Impact Dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam; Samorezov, Sergey; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Brett, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Dating to Colonel John Paul Stapp MD in 1975, scientists have desired to measure live human head impacts with accuracy and precision. But no instrument exists to accurately and precisely quantify single head impact events. Our goal is to develop a practical single event head impact dosimeter known as "Intelligent Mouthguard" and quantify its performance on the benchtop, in vitro and in vivo. In the Intelligent Mouthguard hardware, limited gyroscope bandwidth requires an algorithm-based correction as a function of impact duration. After we apply gyroscope correction algorithm, Intelligent Mouthguard results at time of CG linear acceleration peak correlate to the Reference Hybrid III within our tested range of pulse durations and impact acceleration profiles in American football and Boxing in vitro tests: American football, IMG=1.00REF-1.1g, R2=0.99; maximum time of peak XYZ component imprecision 3.6g and 370 rad/s2; maximum time of peak azimuth and elevation imprecision 4.8° and 2.9°; maximum average XYZ component temporal imprecision 3.3g and 390 rad/s2. Boxing, IMG=1.00REF-0.9 g, R2=0.99, R2=0.98; maximum time of peak XYZ component imprecision 3.9 g and 390 rad/s2, maximum time of peak azimuth and elevation imprecision 2.9° and 2.1°; average XYZ component temporal imprecision 4.0 g and 440 rad/s2. In vivo Intelligent Mouthguard true positive head impacts from American football players and amateur boxers have temporal characteristics (first harmonic frequency from 35 Hz to 79 Hz) within our tested benchtop (first harmonic frequencyIntelligent Mouthguard qualifies as a single event dosimeter in American football and Boxing.

  3. Modified binary encounter Bethe model for electron-impact ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, M; Indelicato, P; Santos, J P

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical expressions for ionization cross sections by electron impact based on the binary encounter Bethe (BEB) model, valid from ionization threshold up to relativistic energies, are proposed. The new modified BEB (MBEB) and its relativistic counterpart (MRBEB) expressions are simpler than the BEB (nonrelativistic and relativistic) expressions because they require only one atomic parameter, namely the binding energy of the electrons to be ionized, and use only one scaling term for the ionization of all sub-shells. The new models are used to calculate the K-, L- and M-shell ionization cross sections by electron impact for several atoms with Z from 6 to 83. Comparisons with all, to the best of our knowledge, available experimental data show that this model is as good or better than other models, with less complexity.

  4. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis...... for comprehensive later theoretical work and data interpretation in many areas of chemistry, electrochemistry, and biology. We discuss here some new areas of theoretical electrochemical ET science, with focus on nanoscale electrochemical and bioelectrochemical sciences. Particular attention is given to in situ...

  5. Near-Atomic Resolution Using Electron Cryomicroscopy and Single-Particle Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing Zhang; Ethan Settembre; Chen Xu; Philip R. Dormitzer; Richard Bellamy; Stephen C. Harrison; Nikolaus Grigorieff

    2008-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) yields images of macromolecular assemblies and their components, from which 3D structures can be determined, by using an image processing method commonly known as "single-particle reconstruction...

  6. Single and double ionization of gallium by electron impact

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    10] D C Gregory, P F Ditner and D H Crandall, Phys. Rev. A27, 724 (1983). [11] S M Younger, Phys. Rev. A35, 4567 (1987). [12] L K Jha, O P Roy and B N Roy, Pramana – J. Phys. 55, 447 (2000). [13] J Berakdar, Phys. Lett. A220, 237 (1996).

  7. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-16

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  8. Synchronization of impacting mechanical systems with a single constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael; Biemond, J. J. Benjamin; Leine, Remco I.; van de Wouw, Nathan

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the synchronization problem of mechanical systems subjected to a single geometric unilateral constraint. The impacts of the individual systems, induced by the unilateral constraint, generally do not coincide even if the solutions are arbitrarily 'close' to each other. The mismatch in the impact time instants demands a careful choice of the distance function to allow for an intuitively correct comparison of the discontinuous solutions resulting from the impacts. We propose a distance function induced by the quotient metric, which is based on an equivalence relation using the impact map. The distance function obtained in this way is continuous in time when evaluated along jumping solutions. The property of maximal monotonicity, which is fulfilled by most commonly used impact laws, is used to significantly reduce the complexity of the distance function. Based on the simplified distance function, a Lyapunov function is constructed to investigate the synchronization problem for two identical one-dimensional mechanical systems. Sufficient conditions for the uncoupled individual systems are provided under which local synchronization is guaranteed. Furthermore, we present an interaction law which ensures global synchronization, also in the presence of grazing trajectories and accumulation points (Zeno behavior). The results are illustrated using numerical examples of a 1-DOF mechanical impact oscillator which serves as stepping stone in the direction of more general systems.

  9. Limiting factors in single particle cryo electron tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Kudryashev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern methods of cryo electron microscopy and tomography allow visualization of protein nanomachines in their native state at the nanometer scale. Image processing methods including sub-volume averaging applied to repeating macromolecular elements within tomograms allow exploring their structures within the native context of the cell, avoiding the need for protein isolation and purification. Today, many different data acquisition protocols and software solutions are available to researchers to determine average structures of macromolecular complexes and potentially to classify structural intermediates. Here, we list the density maps reported in the literature, and analyze each structure for the chosen instrumental settings, sample conditions, main processing steps, and obtained resolution. We present conclusions that identify factors currently limiting the resolution gained by this approach.

  10. Resistive Detection of Single Electron Motion and Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongwen; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wang, Kang; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Divincenzo, David

    2000-03-01

    For any of the quantum computing proposals involving spin states in solids, the spin orientations of individual qubit has to be measured at the end of the operations. In the design of the spin-resonance-transistors, a conventional field-effect-transistor (FET) channel is used to accomplish this seemingly almost impossible task. Toward this end, we have performed a sequence of exploratory experiments in Si and GaAs based FET devices. Current noise spectrum in a short channel Si FET, known as the random telegraph signal, is measured for different temperatures and gate voltages. Using a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, we have detected electron spin resonance of a spin-split Landau level by a transport measurement in microwave fields. The extension of our results to the actual implementation of the spin-resonance-transistors will be discussed.

  11. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular t...... tunneling theory. The predictions of molecular tunneling theory are benchmarked by ab initio calculations based on the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation....

  12. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  13. Investigations on the optical, thermal and surface modifications of electron irradiated L-threonine single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh Kumar, G.; Gokul Raj, S. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chepauk, Chennai 600005 (India); Bogle, K.A.; Dhole, S.D.; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chepauk, Chennai 600005 (India)], E-mail: professormohan@yahoo.co.in

    2008-06-15

    L-Threonine single crystals have been irradiated by 6 MeV electrons. Irradiated crystals at various electron fluences were subjected to various techniques such as UV-vis-NIR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thermomechanical analyses. Thermal strength of the irradiated crystals has also been studied through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The results have been discussed in detail.

  14. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  15. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szlachetko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s to femtoseconds (10−15 s and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS, we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.

  16. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  17. Electron transfer and redox metalloenzyme catalysis at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    Voltammetry based on single-crystal, atomically-planar metal electrodes is novel in bioelectrochemistry. Together with in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) directly in aqueous buffer, single-crystal voltammetry has disclosed new detail in molecular adsorption and interfacial electron trans...

  18. Research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hoshing

    2014-05-01

    To consider the research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes due to their manufacture, use and disposal. Literature searches were conducted through December 2013. Studies were included in this review if they related to the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes. Scientific information on the environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing, use and disposal is very limited. No studies formally evaluated the environmental impacts of the manufacturing process or disposal of components, including batteries. Four studies evaluated potential exposure to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol, an indication of impacts on indoor air quality. A 2010 survey of six e-cigarette models found that none of the products provided disposal instructions for spent cartridges containing nicotine. Notably, some e-cigarette manufacturers claim their e-cigarettes are 'eco-friendly' or 'green', despite the lack of any supporting data or environmental impact studies. Some authors argue that such advertising may boost sales and increase e-cigarette appeal, especially among adolescents. Little is known about the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes, and a number of topics could be further elucidated by additional investigation. These topics include potential environmental impacts related to manufacturing, use and disposal. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing will depend upon factory size and the nicotine extracting method used. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette use will include chemical and aerosol exposure in the indoor environment. The environmental impacts of disposal of e-cigarette cartridges (which contain residual nicotine) and disposal of e-cigarettes (which contain batteries) represent yet another environmental concern.

  19. Research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hoshing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To consider the research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes due to their manufacture, use and disposal. Methods Literature searches were conducted through December 2013. Studies were included in this review if they related to the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes. Results Scientific information on the environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing, use and disposal is very limited. No studies formally evaluated the environmental impacts of the manufacturing process or disposal of components, including batteries. Four studies evaluated potential exposure to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol, an indication of impacts on indoor air quality. A 2010 survey of six e-cigarette models found that none of the products provided disposal instructions for spent cartridges containing nicotine. Notably, some e-cigarette manufacturers claim their e-cigarettes are ‘eco-friendly’ or ‘green’, despite the lack of any supporting data or environmental impact studies. Some authors argue that such advertising may boost sales and increase e-cigarette appeal, especially among adolescents. Conclusions Little is known about the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes, and a number of topics could be further elucidated by additional investigation. These topics include potential environmental impacts related to manufacturing, use and disposal. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing will depend upon factory size and the nicotine extracting method used. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette use will include chemical and aerosol exposure in the indoor environment. The environmental impacts of disposal of e-cigarette cartridges (which contain residual nicotine) and disposal of e-cigarettes (which contain batteries) represent yet another environmental concern. PMID:24732165

  20. THE HIGH-RESOLUTION EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF N{sub 2} BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heays, A. N. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T., E-mail: heays@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N{sub 2} electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a {sup 1}Π {sub g} , b {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and b'{sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +} excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'{sub n} {sub +1} {sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +}, c{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and o{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  1. Localization of impacted permanent maxillary canine using single panoramic radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : The objective in localization is selection of a suitable technique which has minimal radiation dose, cost and maximum details. Panoramic radiograph, being a screening radiograph, can satisfy the above needs. Taking this into consideration, the present study was done to evaluate the reliability of panoramic radiograph in localization of impacted permanent maxillary canines by applying the criteria suggested by Chaushu et al. and by comparing it with Clark′s rule. Materials and Methods : The study comprised of 114 subjects in the age group of 13-30 years of both the genders with 150 impacted canines visiting Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology during the study period. The study subjects were examined for clinically missing canine, and then confirmed with intra-oral peri-apical radiograph (IOPAR. Panoramic radiographs (for application of Chaushu et al. criteria and IOPAR′s (for application of Clark′s rule of the subjects were made and interpreted for parameters pertaining to the impacted canines. The data obtained was tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS software. Results : Determination of the bucco-palatal position from panoramic radiographs, by applying Chaushu, et al. criteria, showed that localization in bucco-palatal position was possible for 96 of the 102 impacted canines placed in the middle and coronal zones. The remaining six impacted canines, three each in the middle and coronal zones, could not be localized as they showed overlapping in their range. By excluding them, the overall agreement worked out to be 94.11%. Localization was not possible for 48 impacted canines that lied in the apical zone. Conclusion : A single panoramic radiograph can serve as a reliable indicator for determining the bucco-palatal position of the impacted canines when they lie in the middle and coronal zones. When they lie in the apical zone it is

  2. Electronic cigarettes: health impact, nicotine replacement therapy, regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the adverse effects of conventional cigarettes on human health have been thoroughly examined, in the last 15 years we have witnessed the birth of electronic cigarettes. There are many types of these devices available on the market. Studies are still underway to determine their negative impact on the human body. Electronic cigarettes comprise of power supply and a vaporising system. The user inhales the aerosol produced by heating up the liquid containing nicotine. In contrast with conventional cigarettes, the tobacco is not combusted, thus the compositions of the aerosol and cigarette smoke are considerably different. Out of 93 chemical substances present in the e-cigarette smoke, the aerosol contains only acetaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, formaldehyde and nicotine. More toxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, are not present. The amount of evidence suggesting electronic cigarettes’ harmful effects on the human body is constantly increasing. Some reports imply that the electronic cigarettes negatively influence pregnancy, human psyche, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. They might also be involved in oncogenesis. With electronic cigarettes constantly gaining popularity, the question about the adverse effects of passive smoking becomes increasingly more relevant. Although various methods of helping people cease smoking or delivering nicotine to their bodies without burning toxic substances are being explored, electronic cigarettes are not recommended in nicotine substitution therapy. Legal regulations regarding electronic cigarettes are still being worked on. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects electronic cigarettes have on the human’s health.

  3. Polarized Fluorescence from Nitrogen Molecules Excited by Polarized Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseberg, J. W.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    We have measured the optical excitation function and relative Stokes parameters for 388±5 nm fluorescence from spin-polarized electron impact excitation of molecular N2. Specifically, the circular polarization fraction normalized to the incident electron spin, P3/Pe, was found to be +1(5)% at an electron energy of 30eV. This result, even though it contains contributions from 6 different triplet spectral lines, is consistent with the data of the Münster group [1] who measured the N2 337 nm C3πu - B3πg (ν'=0, ν=0) transition and found P3 Mette et al., Verhandl. DPG (VI) 29, 462 (1994). [2] A.S. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 093201 (2004).

  4. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    based on a slab model for the metal surface. The ordered monolayer offers a platform for submolecular scale electronic mapping that is an issue of fundamental interest but remains a challenge in STM imaging science and surface chemistry. Single Cys molecules were mapped as three electronic subunits......We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry...... contributed mainly from three chemical moieties: thiol (-SH), carboxylic (-COOH), and amine (-NH2) groups. The contrasts of the three subunits depend on the environment (e.g., pH), which affects the electronic structure of adsorbed species. From the DFT computations focused on single molecules, rational...

  5. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissolution chemistry and biocompatibility of single-crystalline silicon nanomembranes and associated materials for transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Suk-Won; Park, Gayoung; Edwards, Chris; Corbin, Elise A; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Cheng, Huanyu; Song, Jun-Kyul; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Yu, Sooyoun; Ng, Joanne; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Jiyoung; Yee, Cassian; Bhaduri, Basanta; Su, Yewang; Omennetto, Fiorenzo G; Huang, Yonggang; Bashir, Rashid; Goddard, Lynford; Popescu, Gabriel; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A

    2014-06-24

    Single-crystalline silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) represent a critically important class of material for high-performance forms of electronics that are capable of complete, controlled dissolution when immersed in water and/or biofluids, sometimes referred to as a type of "transient" electronics. The results reported here include the kinetics of hydrolysis of Si NMs in biofluids and various aqueous solutions through a range of relevant pH values, ionic concentrations and temperatures, and dependence on dopant types and concentrations. In vitro and in vivo investigations of Si NMs and other transient electronic materials demonstrate biocompatibility and bioresorption, thereby suggesting potential for envisioned applications in active, biodegradable electronic implants.

  7. Energy loss of the electron system in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Daniel F; Chudow, Joel D; Prober, Daniel E; Purewal, Meninder S; Kim, Philip

    2010-11-10

    We characterize the energy loss of the nonequilibrium electron system in individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperature. Using Johnson noise thermometry, we demonstrate that, for a nanotube with Ohmic contacts, the dc resistance at finite bias current directly reflects the average electron temperature. This enables a straightforward determination of the thermal conductance associated with cooling of the nanotube electron system. In analyzing the temperature- and length-dependence of the thermal conductance, we consider contributions from acoustic phonon emission, optical phonon emission, and hot electron outdiffusion.

  8. R-matrix calculations of electron impact electronic excitation of BeH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby-Lewis, Daniel; Mašín, Zdeněk; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    The R-matrix method is used to perform high-level calculations of electron collisions with beryllium mono-hydride at its equilibrium geometry with a particular emphasis on electron impact electronic excitation. Several target and scattering models are considered. The calculations were performed using (1) the UKRMol suite which relies on the use of Gaussian type orbitals (GTOs) to represent the continuum and (2) using the new UKRMol+ suite which allows the inclusion of B-spline type orbitals in the basis for the continuum. The final close-coupling scattering models used the UKRMol+ code and a frozen core, valence full configuration interaction, method based on a diffuse GTO atomic basis set. The calculated electronic properties of the molecule are in very good agreement with state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations. The use of the UKRMol+ suite proved critical since it allowed the use of a large R-matrix sphere (35 Bohr), necessary to contain the diffuse electronic states of the molecule. The corresponding calculations using UKRMol are not possible due to numerical problems associated with the combination of GTO-only continuum and a large R-matrix sphere. This work provides the first demonstration of the utility and numerical stability of the new UKRMol+ code. The inelastic cross sections obtained here present a significant improvement over the results of earlier studies on BeH.

  9. Fluctuation in Interface and Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Investigated by Current versus Bias Voltage Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-02-22

    Structural and electronic detail at the metal-molecule interface has a significant impact on the charge transport across the molecular junctions, but its precise understanding and control still remain elusive. On the single-molecule scale, the metal-molecule interface structures and relevant charge transport properties are subject to fluctuation, which contains fundamental science of the single-molecule transport and implication for manipulability of the transport properties in the electronic devices. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to investigate the fluctuation in the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements in combination with first-principles simulation. Contrary to conventional molecular conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the molecular orbital-energy level. This statistical approach was employed to study fluctuation in single-molecule junctions of 1,4-butanediamine (DAB), pyrazine (PY), 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), and fullerene (C60). We demonstrate that molecular dependent fluctuation of σ-, π-, and π-plane- type interface can be captured by analyzing molecular orbital-energy (MO) level under mechanical perturbation. While the MO level of DAB with the σ-type interface shows weak distance dependence and fluctuation, the MO level of PY, BPY, and C60 features unique distance dependence and molecular dependent fluctuation against the mechanical perturbation. The MO level of PY and BPY with the σ+π-type interface increases with the increase in the stretch distance. In contrary, the MO level of C60 with the π-plane-type interface decreases with the increase in the stretching perturbation. This study provides an approach to resolve the structural and electronic fluctuation in the single-molecule junctions and insight into the molecular dependent fluctuation in the

  10. Poisson-distributed electron-transfer dynamics from single quantum dots to C60 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nianhui; Zhu, Haiming; Jin, Shengye; Zhan, Wei; Lian, Tianquan

    2011-01-25

    Functional quantum dot (QD)-based nanostructures are often constructed through the self-assembly of QDs with binding partners (molecules or other nanoparticles), a process that leads to a statistical distribution of the number of binding partners. Using single QD fluorescence spectroscopy, we probe this distribution and its effect on the function (electron-transfer dynamics) in QD-C60 complexes. Ensemble-averaged transient absorption and fluorescence decay as well as single QD fluorescence decay measurements show that the QD exciton emission was quenched by electron transfer from the QD to C60 molecules and the electron-transfer rate increases with the C60-to-QD ratio. The electron-transfer rate of single QD-C60 complexes fluctuates with time and varies among different QDs. The standard deviation increases linearly with the average of electron-transfer rates of single QD-C60 complexes, and the distributions of both quantities obey Poisson statistics. The observed distributions of single QD-C60 complexes and ensemble-averaged fluorescence decay kinetics can be described by a model that assumes a Poisson distribution of the number of adsorbed C60 molecules per QD. Our findings suggest that, in self-assembled QD nanostructures, the statistical distribution of the number of adsorbed partners can dominate the distributions of the averages and standard deviation of their interfacial dynamical properties.

  11. Spatiotemporal Observation of Electron-Impact Dynamics in Photovoltaic Materials Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat

    2017-05-17

    Understanding light-triggered charge carrier dynamics near photovoltaic-material surfaces and at interfaces has been a key element and one of the major challenges for the development of real-world energy devices. Visualization of such dynamics information can be obtained using the one-of-a-kind methodology of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM). Here, we address the fundamental issue of how the thickness of the absorber layer may significantly affect the charge carrier dynamics on material surfaces. Time-resolved snapshots indicate that the dynamics of charge carriers generated by electron impact in the electron-photon dynamical probing regime is highly sensitive to the thickness of the absorber layer, as demonstrated using CdSe films of different thicknesses as a model system. This finding not only provides the foundation for potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of devices in the fields of chemical and materials research, but also has impact on the use and interpretation of electron beam-induced current for optimization of photoactive materials in these devices.

  12. Spatiotemporal Observation of Electron-Impact Dynamics in Photovoltaic Materials Using 4D Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Basamat S; Sun, Jingya; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-06-01

    Understanding light-triggered charge carrier dynamics near photovoltaic-material surfaces and at interfaces has been a key element and one of the major challenges for the development of real-world energy devices. Visualization of such dynamics information can be obtained using the one-of-a-kind methodology of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM). Here, we address the fundamental issue of how the thickness of the absorber layer may significantly affect the charge carrier dynamics on material surfaces. Time-resolved snapshots indicate that the dynamics of charge carriers generated by electron impact in the electron-photon dynamical probing regime is highly sensitive to the thickness of the absorber layer, as demonstrated using CdSe films of different thicknesses as a model system. This finding not only provides the foundation for potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of devices in the fields of chemical and materials research, but also has impact on the use and interpretation of electron beam-induced current for optimization of photoactive materials in these devices.

  13. Electron-impact-ionization dynamics of S F6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James N.; Lee, Jason W. L.; Vallance, Claire

    2017-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the dissociative electron ionization dynamics of S F6 is important in the modeling and tuning of dry-etching plasmas used in the semiconductor manufacture industry. This paper reports a crossed-beam electron ionization velocity-map imaging study on the dissociative ionization of cold S F6 molecules, providing complete, unbiased kinetic energy distributions for all significant product ions. Analysis of these distributions suggests that fragmentation following single ionization proceeds via formation of S F5 + or S F3 + ions that then dissociate in a statistical manner through loss of F atoms or F2, until most internal energy has been liberated. Similarly, formation of stable dications is consistent with initial formation of S F4 2 + ions, which then dissociate on a longer time scale. These data allow a comparison between electron ionization and photoionization dynamics, revealing similar dynamical behavior. In parallel with the ion kinetic energy distributions, the velocity-map imaging approach provides a set of partial ionization cross sections for all detected ionic fragments over an electron energy range of 50-100 eV, providing partial cross sections for S2 +, and enables the cross sections for S F4 2 + from S F+ to be resolved.

  14. Addressing Colloidal Stability for Unambiguous Electroanalysis of Single Nanoparticle Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Donald A; Kondajji, Aditya M; Castañeda, Alma D; Dasari, Radhika; Crooks, Richard M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2016-07-07

    Herein the problem of colloidal instability on electrochemically detected nanoparticle (NP) collisions with a Hg ultramicroelectrode (UME) by electrocatalytic amplification is addressed. NP tracking analysis (NTA) shows that rapid aggregation occurs in solution after diluting citrate-stabilized Pt NPs with hydrazine/phosphate buffers of net ionic strength greater than 70 mM. Colloidal stability improves by lowering the ionic strength, indicating that aggregation processes were strongly affected by charge screening of the NP double layer interactions at high cation concentrations. For the system of lowest ionic strength, the overwhelming majority of observed electrocatalytic current signals represent single NP/electrode impacts, as confirmed by NTA kinetic monitoring. NP diffusion coefficients determined by NTA and NP impact electroanalysis are in excellent agreement for the stable colloids, which signifies that the sticking probability of Pt NPs interacting with Hg is unity and that the observed NP impact rate agrees with the expected steady-state diffusive flux expression for the spherical cap Hg UME.

  15. Single-electron pulse-height spectra in thin-gap parallel-plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fonte, Paulo J R; Peskov, Vladimir; Policarpo, Armando

    1999-01-01

    Single-electron pulse-height spectra were measured in 0.6 and 1.2 mm parallel-plate chambers developed for the TOF system of the ALICE /LHC-HI experiment. Mixtures of Ar with ethane, isobutane, and SF/sub 6/ were studied. The observed spectrum shows a clear peak for all gases, suggesting efficient single-electron detection in thin parallel-plate structures. The pulse-height spectrum can be described by the weighted sum of an exponential and a Polya distribution, the Polya contribution becoming more important at higher gains. Additionally, it was found that the maximum gain, above 10/sup 6/, is limited by the appearance of streamers and depends weakly on the gas composition. The suitability of each mixture for single-electron detection is also quantitatively assessed. (8 refs).

  16. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Mašín, Zdeněk [Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Straße 2A, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gorfinkiel, Jimena D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  17. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close...... than 1 μT in water at room temperature. The longitudinal electron spin relaxation rate is calculated from the DNP enhancement curves. The oxygen broadening in water is about 50 μT/mM O2at 37°C. These agents have good properties for oximetry with OMRI....

  18. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, the electrons can tunnel in- elastically from the left to the right electrode. This is the process behind inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS), which is a single-molecule spectroscopic method, where the vibrational ngerprint of a molecule is di- rectly observed by the tunnelling current...... This process has been studied in detail for ordinary conjugated or saturated molecules. Selection rules does not exist in IETS, but some modes are favoured over others, and this is the bases for the propensity rules in IETS that has been rationalised. In this thesis, we study IETS for cross...

  19. Temperature dependence of electron impact ionization coefficient in bulk silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mowfaq Jalil

    2017-09-01

    This work exhibits a modified procedure to compute the electron impact ionization coefficient of silicon for temperatures between 77 and 800K and electric fields ranging from 70 to 400 kV/cm. The ionization coefficients are computed from the electron momentum distribution function through solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The arrangement is acquired by joining Legendre polynomial extension with BTE. The resulting BTE is solved by differences-differential method using MATLAB®. Six (X) equivalent ellipsoidal and non-parabolic valleys of the conduction band of silicon are taken into account. Concerning the scattering mechanisms, the interval acoustic scattering, non-polar optical scattering and II scattering are taken into consideration. This investigation showed that the ionization coefficients decrease with increasing temperature. The overall results are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical reported data predominantly at high electric fields.

  20. Electron Impact Ionization of Stored Highly Charged Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Accurate cross section data for electron impact ionization (EII) are needed in order to interpret the spectra of collisionally ionized plasmas both in astrophysics and in the laboratory. Models and spectroscopic diagnostics of such plasmas rely on accurate ionization balance calculations, which depend, in turn, on the underlying rates for EII and electron-ion recombination. EII measurements have been carried out using the TSR storage ring located at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage ring measurements are largely free of metastable contamination, resulting in unambiguous EII data, unlike what is encountered with other experimental geometries. As it is impractical to perform experiments for every ion, theory must provide the bulk of the necessary EII data. In order to guide theory, TSR experiments have focused on providing at least one measurement for every isoelectronic sequence. EII data have been measured for ions from 13 isoelectronic sequences: Li-like silicon and chlo...

  1. Electron transport and room temperature single-electron charging in 10 nm scale PtC nanostructures formed by electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Z. A. K.; Jones, M. E.; Wang, C.; Scotuzzi, M.; Hagen, C. W.

    2017-11-01

    Nanostructures of platinum-carbon nanocomposite material have been formed by electron-beam induced deposition. These consist of nanodots and nanowires with a minimum size ∼20 nm, integrated within ∼100 nm nanogap n-type silicon-on-insulator transistor structures. The nanodot transistors use ∼20 nm Pt/C nanodots, tunnel-coupled to Pt/C nanowire electrodes, bridging the Si nanogaps. Room-temperature single-electron transistor operation has been measured, and single-electron current oscillations and ‘Coulomb diamonds’ observed. In nanowire transistors, the temperature dependence from 290 to 8 K suggests that the current is a combination of thermally activated and tunnelling transport of carriers across potential barriers along the current path, and that the Pt/C is p-type at low temperature.

  2. Photoionization and electron impact excitation cross sections for Fe I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Manuel A.; Lind, Karin; Bergemann, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Context. Iron is a major contributor to the opacity in the atmospheres of late-type stars, as well as a major contributor to the observed lines in their visible spectrum. Iron lines are commonly used to derive basic stellar parameters from medium/high resolution spectroscopy, that is, spectroscopy which shows metal content, effective temperature, and surface gravity. Aims: Here we present large R-matrix calculations for photoionization cross sections and electron impact collision strengths. Methods: The photoionization calculations included 35 configurations and 134 LS close coupling terms of the target ion. The eigenfunction expansion accounts for the photoionization of the outer nl subshells, with n ≥ 4, as well as the open inner 3d subshell. Our results include total and partial (term-to-term) photoionization cross sections for 936 energy terms of iron with principal quantum number ≤10, and total angular momentum from zero to seven. Our electron impact collision strengths include the lowest 46 LS terms of the atom. Results: The present photoionization cross sections should be considerably more accurate than those currently available in the literature. On the other hand, the electron impact cross sections, which are being reported for the first time, are needed in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) modeling of the solar spectrum and late-type stars in general. Tables 5 and 6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A127

  3. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J. Emyr

    2012-01-01

    of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between...... and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b562 molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role...

  4. Different quantization mechanisms in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, P.; Gloos, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the acoustoelectric current in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves. We have found that in certain parameter ranges two different sets of quantized steps dominate the acoustoelectric current versus gate-voltage characteristics. In some cases, both types of quanti......We have studied the acoustoelectric current in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves. We have found that in certain parameter ranges two different sets of quantized steps dominate the acoustoelectric current versus gate-voltage characteristics. In some cases, both types...

  5. Nanoampere charge pump by single-electron ratchet using silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori

    2008-01-01

    Nanoampere single-electron pumping is presented at 20K using a single-electron ratchet comprising silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The ratchet features an asymmetric potential with a pocket that captures single electrons from the source and ejects them to the drain. Directional single-electron transfer is achieved by applying one ac signal with the frequency up to 2.3GHz. We find anomalous shapes of current steps which can be ascribed to nonadiabatic electron capture.

  6. Dissociative ionization of N2 by fast electron impact: roles of molecular orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhu, L. F.; Lu, D.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Wei, B.

    2017-10-01

    Dissociative single, double and triple ionization of N2 induced by fast electron impact are studied using the cold target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy technique. Kinetic energy releases (KERs) are determined and possible states of parent ions are analyzed for the dissociation channels ({{{{N}}}2}+\\to {{{N}}}++{{N}}, {{{{N}}}2}2+\\to {{{N}}}2++{{N}}) and also Coulomb explosion channels ({{{{N}}}2}2+\\to {{{N}}}++{{{N}}}+, {{{{N}}}2}3+\\to {{{N}}}2++{{{N}}}+). As the electron-impact energy increases, the different dissociation channels behave quite differently. For example, the KER spectra of the channel {{{{N}}}2}+ → N+ + N show that the intensity of the low-KER part increases and that of the high-KER part decrease, while the KER spectra of the channel {{{{N}}}2}2+ → N+ + N+ seem to remain unchanged. Comparing and analyzing the KER distributions (KERDs) of the different dissociation channels, we find that both single and double ionization from different molecular orbitals, i.e. outer or inner valence orbitals can give rise to different decay channels with different electron energy dependence. Therefore, from the perspective of KERD, the present work clearly reveals the important roles of different molecular orbital ionization in the dissociation of molecule.

  7. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  8. Subshell Resolved Measurements of Single Electron Capture in Slow Ne7+-Helium Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D.; Feuerstein, B.; Moshammer, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Draganic, I.; Lörch, H.; Perumal, A. N.; Ullrich, J.; DuBois, R. D.

    Single electron capture in collisions of 9 keV/q Ne7+-ions with He has been studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). With an improved apparatus a longitudinal momentum resolution of 0.07 a.u. has been achieved. This momentum component corresponds to the binding energy of the active electron in the final state. For the first time state-resolved differential cross sections have been determined with respect to the main quantum number, subshell level and spin state of the captured electron.

  9. Subshell Resolved Measurements of Single Electron Capture in Slow Ne{sup 7+}-Helium Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.; Feuerstein, B.; Moshammer, R.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Draganic, I.; Loerch, H.; Perumal, A. N.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); DuBois, R. D. [University of Missouri (United States)

    2003-03-15

    Single electron capture in collisions of 9 keV/q Ne{sup 7+}-ions with He has been studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). With an improved apparatus a longitudinal momentum resolution of 0.07 a.u. has been achieved. This momentum component corresponds to the binding energy of the active electron in the final state. For the first time state-resolved differential cross sections have been determined with respect to the main quantum number, subshell level and spin state of the captured electron.

  10. Electron reconstruction and calibration with single Z and W production in CMS at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Chiara

    2006-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC is building an electromagnetic calorimeter with high performance. Preserving high reconstruction efficiency and best four momentum measurements for electrons is a necessity for optimal discovery prospects in the ZZ(*) and WW(*) Higgs boson decay channels. This is challenging in view of the material budget in front of ECAL and of the presence of a strong magnetic field. A new reconstruction strategy for electrons in CMS is described. The usage of electrons from single Z and W production for the ECAL calibration strategy is also discussed.

  11. Electron irradiation effects on optical properties of semiorganic antimony thiourea bromide monohydrate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesha Upadhya, K., E-mail: mahesh.upadhya@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, P.O. Srinivasnagar, Karnataka 575025 (India); Udayashankar, N.K. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, P.O. Srinivasnagar, Karnataka 575025 (India)

    2010-12-15

    Antimony thiourea bromide monohydrate (ATBM) single crystals were grown by solution growth technique at room temperature for the first time. The UV-vis, FT-IR and fluorescence spectra were recorded and electron irradiation effects on these properties were studied. The optical absorption edge of the UV-vis spectrum shifts towards lower wavelength with the increase of irradiation. The fluorescence quantum yield is increased for electron irradiated ATBM crystals. The FT-IR analysis shows that the water of crystallization is weakly bonded in as-grown and electron irradiated ATBM crystals.

  12. Manipulating low-dimensional materials down to the level of single atoms with electron irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Meyer, Jannik C; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) instrumentation have made it possible to focus electron beams with sub-atomic precision and to identify the chemical structure of materials at the level of individual atoms. Here we discuss the dynamics that are observed in the structure of low-dimensional materials under electron irradiation, and the potential use of electron beams for single-atom manipulation. As a demonstration of the latter capability, we show how momentum transfer from the electrons of a 60-keV Ångström-sized STEM probe can be used to move silicon atoms embedded in the graphene lattice with atomic precision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  14. Coherent electron emission for dissociative ionization of molecular hydrogen by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fojon, O A; Stia, C R; Rivarola, R D, E-mail: ofojon@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET and Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Av. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2011-04-01

    The single ionization of hydrogen molecules is studied theoretically as a function of the molecular alignment. Within the framework of the two-effective center model, multiple differential cross sections as a function of both electron momenta in the final channel of the reaction, and the internuclear orientation, are computed for both non-dissociative and dissociative final H{sup +}{sub 2} states. Preliminary results show that the interference pattern arising from the two-center character of the molecular target changes strongly with the final state of the residual molecular ion.

  15. Infrared single shot diagnostics for the longitudinal profile of the electron bunches at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein

    2008-09-15

    The longitudinal profile of electron bunches plays an important role in the design of single-pass free electron lasers and future linear e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. For the free electron laser FLASH in Hamburg, a longitudinal compression scheme is used which results in an asymmetric longitudinal bunch profile with a 'spike'. This 'spike', which has a very high peak current, is used in a high-gain SASE-FEL process to produce high intensity (about 70 {mu}J) femtosecond photon pulses in the XUV wavelength range. The required high peak current of the electron bunch is realized by confining a large number of electrons in a width, measured in time units, of few tens of femtosecond, making the diagnostics of such bunches a challenge. Furthermore, the operation of facilities such as FLASH shows that single-shot diagnostics is indispensable. It is intuitive to use a time domain method to measure the electron bunch length. However, when the structures present in the bunch profile fall in the femtoseconds range, this is beyond the resolution of time-resolved methods developed so far. In this thesis, a wavelength-domain technique is described that can fulfill both requirements of single shot and high resolution reaching to the femtoseconds range. The amount of charge that is confined in a typical length of several femtoseconds (FWHM of the spike) can be determined by a novel single-shot spectrometer that resolves the coherent radiation (e.g. coherent transition radiation) in the far-infrared and mid-infrared range. Furthermore the extension of this single-shot spectroscopy to shorter wavelengths reaching the near-infrared, makes it possible to investigate the presence of structures in the bunch profile that might correlate or anti-correlate to the SASE intensity. (orig.)

  16. Double-differential cross sections for single ionization of simple polyatomic molecules by proton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, A.; Halder, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical study of double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) for single ionization of CH4andNH3 molecules by collision with proton is presented at 0.25, 1, and 2 MeV, respectively. For the final state, we use a continuum distorted wave that contains the product of three-Coulomb distortion due to pairwise Coulombic interactions for which it is called the three-Coulomb wave model. In the entrance channel, the Coulomb distortion between the incoming projectile and the target is taken. In this model, the ground state of the polyatomic molecule is described by means of an accurate one-center molecular wave function, which is a linear combination of atomic orbitals. The contributions of DDCSs for different molecular orbitals of the polyatomic molecules to the spectrum of angular distributions at different electron emission energies have also been analyzed. Generally the preference for ionization depends on the binding energy of the active electron in molecular orbital in the ascending order of loosely bound electrons to more tightly bound electrons. At large ejected electron and projectile energy, the lesser bound electrons in the molecules dominate the DDCS at extreme forward emission angles. The present DDCS results are compared with available experimental and the theoretical findings. In case of ammonia molecules, good agreement is observed at all projectile energies, showing that the present model is sufficient to explain all the experimental data for double-differential cross sections. However, some degree of discrepancy is observed at 2 MeV proton impact for small electron emission angles when CH4 molecular target is considered.

  17. An ultrafast NbN hot-electron single-photon detector for electronic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatov, A; Smirnov, K V; Chulkova, G; Korneev, A; Kouminov, P; Goltsman, G N; Zhang, J; Slysz, W; Verevkin, A; Sobolewski, R

    2002-01-01

    We present the latest generation of our superconducting single-photon detector (SPD), which can work from ultraviolet to mid-infrared optical radiation wavelengths. The detector combines a high speed of operation and low jitter with high quantum efficiency (QE) and very low dark count level. The technology enhancement allows us to produce ultrathin (3.5 nm thick) structures that demonstrate QE hundreds of times better, at 1.55 mu m, than previous 10 nm thick SPDs. The best, 10x10 mu m sup 2 , SPDs demonstrate QE up to 5% at 1.55 mu m and up to 11% at 0.86 mu m. The intrinsic detector QE, normalized to the film absorption coefficient, reaches 100% at bias currents above 0.9 I sub c for photons with wavelengths shorter than 1.3 mu m.

  18. Interfacial electrochemical electron transfer in biology – Towards the level of the single molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2012-01-01

    with unprecedented resolution, opening a new area of single-molecule bioelectrochemistry. We consider first in situ STM of small redox molecules, followed by in situ STM of thiol-based SAMs as molecular views of bioelectrochemical environments. We then address electron transfer metalloproteins, and multi......Physical electrochemistry has undergone a remarkable evolution over the last few decades, integrating advanced techniques and theory from solid state and surface physics. Single-crystal electrode surfaces have been a core notion, opening for scanning tunnelling microscopy directly in aqueous......-centre metalloenzymes including applied single-biomolecular perspectives based on metalloprotein/metallic nanoparticle hybrids....

  19. Absolute experimental cross sections for the electron impact ionization of rubidium. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.W.; Feeney, R.K.

    1980-03-31

    The absolute cross sections for the double, triple, and quadruple ionization of Rb/sup +/ ions by electron impact have been measured from below their respective thresholds to approximately 3000 eV. This determination has been accomplished using a crossed beam facility in which monoenergetic beams of ions and electrons are caused to intersect at right angles in a well-defined collision volume. Multiply charged, product ions born as a result of the electron impact are deflected into their respective detectors by cascaded electrostatic analyzers. The multiply charged beam current component is measured by means of a vibrating reed electrometer operating in the rate-of-charge mode. The required singly charged rubidium ions are produced in a thermionic ion source and pass through a series of focusing, collimating and deflecting structures before entering the interaction region. A thermionically generated, rectangular electron beam intercepts the target ions in a spatially designated collision volume. Just prior to entering this interaction region the two beams can be made to pass through a movable slit scanner which determines their spatial profiles. The various charged particle currents, energies and beam current density distributions represent the experimental data from which the desired absolute cross sections have been determined. The results obtained with this technique are compared with available theoretical predictions of the appropriate cross sections.

  20. Electron Impact Ionization of SOx, NOx and H2 SO4 - The Aerosol Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnav, B. G.; Patel, U. R.; Joshipura, K. N.; Pandya, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports our theoretical studies on electron impact ionization of reactive molecules SOx, NOx (x = 1-3) and H2 SO4, at incident energies from threshold to 2000 eV. Motivation for this work derives from the relevance of these molecules in connection with atmospheric aerosols analysis through mass spectrometric studies and quantification of mass concentrations amongst the aerosol species. The ionization efficiency of a molecule is directly proportional to ionization cross section, which represents the efficiency on a per-molecule basis. Study of electron impact ionization cross sections of molecules, like H2 SO4, versus number of electrons in the molecule can lead to information about mass concentrations of aerosol species. We have employed in this work, the well-known spherical complex potential formalism (SCOP), which provides total elastic as well as inelastic cross sections, wherein the latter includes ionization cross sections. We have developed a method to extract ionization cross section from calculated inelastic cross section by introducing a ratio function, in a semi-empirical formalism known as CSP-ic method. For SOx and NOx targets single-centre scattering calculations are performed, while for H2 SO4, the additivity rule augmented with overlap or screening corrections, has been employed. The calculated cross sections are examined as functions of incident electron energy along with comparisons (theoretical or experimental) as available.

  1. Integrated Transmission Electron and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Correlates Reactivity with Ultrastructure in a Single Catalyst Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Frank C; Mohammadian, Sajjad; Ristanović, Zoran; Kalirai, Sam; Meirer, Florian; Vogt, Eelco T C; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Gerritsen, Hans C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-01-02

    Establishing structure-activity relationships in complex, hierarchically structured nanomaterials, such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, requires characterization with complementary, correlated analysis techniques. An integrated setup has been developed to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) microscopy on such nanostructured samples. Correlated structure-reactivity information was obtained for 100 nm thin, microtomed sections of a single FCC catalyst particle using this novel SMF-TEM high-resolution combination. High reactivity in a thiophene oligomerization probe reaction correlated well with TEM-derived zeolite locations, while matrix components, such as clay and amorphous binder material, were found not to display activity. Differences in fluorescence intensity were also observed within and between distinct zeolite aggregate domains, indicating that not all zeolite domains are equally active. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Analysis of sex hormones in groundwater using electron impact ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonschorowski, Graciele Pereira da Cruz, E-mail: graci_ju@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste (UNICENTRO), Guarapuava, PR (Brazil); Gonschorowski, Juliano dos Santos, E-mail: jgsantosbr@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal Tecnologica do Parana (UTFPR), Guarapuava, PR (Brazil); Shihomatsu, Helena M.; Bustillos, Jose Oscar Vega, E-mail: hmatsu@ipen.br, E-mail: ovega@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Limeira, Larissa, E-mail: larissa.limeira07@gmail.com [Centro Universitario FIEO (UNIFIEO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A wide range of estrogenic contaminants has been detected in the aquatic environment, both in natural and synthetic forms. Steroid hormones are endocrine-disrupting compounds, which affect the endocrine system at very low concentrations. This work presents the development of an analytical procedure for the determination of five sexual steroid hormones, 17β-estradiol, estrone, progesterone, and the synthetics contraceptives, 17α-ethynylestradiol and norgestrel in groundwater from Sao Paulo University campus, specifically at Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN). The analytical procedure starting with the sample pre-treatment, where the samples were first filtered and then extracted through solid-phase extraction, using Strata-X cartridges, and ending with detection. The separation method used was gas chromatography (GC), and the detection method was mass spectrometry (MS). The ion source used was electron impact ionization which produced an electron beam generated by an incandescent tungsten/thorium filament, which collide with molecules of gas sample. This interaction between the electrons and molecules, produce ions of the sample. The detection limits 0.06μg.L{sup -1} for estrone, 0.13 μg. L{sup -1} for 17β-estradiol, 0.13 μg.L{sup -1} for 17α-ethynylestradiol, 0.49 μg.L{sup -1} for norgestrel and 0.02 μg.L{sup -1} for progesterone were detected in assays matrix. Validating tests were also used in this work. (author)

  3. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  4. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  5. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Pratt, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J EC). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation

  6. Single molecule magnet with an unpaired electron trapped between two lanthanide ions inside a fullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fupin; Krylov, Denis S.; Spree, Lukas; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Samoylova, Nataliya A.; Rosenkranz, Marco; Kostanyan, Aram; Greber, Thomas; Wolter, Anja U. B.; Büchner, Bernd; Popov, Alexey A.

    2017-07-01

    Increasing the temperature at which molecules behave as single-molecule magnets is a serious challenge in molecular magnetism. One of the ways to address this problem is to create the molecules with strongly coupled lanthanide ions. In this work, endohedral metallofullerenes Y2@C80 and Dy2@C80 are obtained in the form of air-stable benzyl monoadducts. Both feature an unpaired electron trapped between metal ions, thus forming a single-electron metal-metal bond. Giant exchange interactions between lanthanide ions and the unpaired electron result in single-molecule magnetism of Dy2@C80(CH2Ph) with a record-high 100 s blocking temperature of 18 K. All magnetic moments in Dy2@C80(CH2Ph) are parallel and couple ferromagnetically to form a single spin unit of 21 μB with a dysprosium-electron exchange constant of 32 cm-1. The barrier of the magnetization reversal of 613 K is assigned to the state in which the spin of one Dy centre is flipped.

  7. Spin Echo of a Single Electron Spin in a Quantum Dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppens, F.H.L.; Nowack, K.C.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2008-01-01

    We report a measurement of the spin-echo decay of a single electron spin confined in a semiconductor quantum dot. When we tip the spin in the transverse plane via a magnetic field burst, it dephases in 37 ns due to the Larmor precession around a random effective field from the nuclear spins in the

  8. Spin Measurements of an Electron Bound to a Single Phosphorous Donor in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, D. R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S. M.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Lilly, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    The spin of an electron bound to a single donor implanted in silicon is potentially useful for quantum information processing. We report on our efforts to measure and manipulate the spin of an electron bound to a single P donor in silicon. A low number of P donors are implanted using a self-aligned process into a silicon substrate in close proximity to a single-electron-transistor (SET) defined by lithographically patterned polysilicon gates. The SET is used to sense the occupancy of the electron on the donor and for spin read-out. An adjacent transmission line allows the application of microwave pulses to rotate the spin of the electron. We will present data from various experiments designed to exploit these capabilities. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. The impact of electronic cigarettes on the paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmowicz, Elizabeth L

    2014-05-01

    To review the impact of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) on children. Five electronic databases were searched through 31 December 2013. Studies in English that included data for children younger than 18 years of age were included. In addition, relevant data from articles identified during searches of the e-cigarette literature, relevant state survey data and paediatric voluntary adverse event reports submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed and included. Use of e-cigarettes by youth is increasing and is not limited to traditional cigarette smokers. Data regarding the reasons for youth e-cigarette initiation and ongoing use are limited. The effects of e-cigarette marketing and the availability of flavoured e-liquids on youth use are unknown. The abuse liability of e-cigarettes in youth is also not known. Unintentional exposures to e-cigarettes and e-liquids have been reported in children. The number of e-cigarette-related reports received by poison centres is increasing. No data are available on secondhand and thirdhand e-cigarette aerosol exposures in children. Data on the impact of e-cigarettes on children are extremely limited. The available data indicate that youth awareness is high and use is increasing rapidly. The extent to which e-cigarette use in youth will result in nicotine dependence and subsequent use of other tobacco products is unknown. e-cigarettes present risks of unintentional nicotine exposure and are potential choking hazards. A greater understanding of the impact of e-cigarettes on children is needed and will be important in the evaluation of the effects of these products on the public health.

  10. One- and two-electron detachment from I- in single rare-gas collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, B.; Rahman, F.

    1984-12-01

    Cross sections for the production of fast I0 and I+ particles from I- negative ions in single collisions with He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe targets are reported. The single-electron-detachment cross sections, which previously have been found to reach roughly constant values in other targets at about 100-eV center-of-mass energy, continue to rise until about 8 keV in neon, supporting the suggestion that the (I-Ne) molecular state does not cross into the continuum. The double-electron-detachment cross sections do not show the inverse target-mass dependence which has been found for F--rare-gas double-electron-detachment collisions.

  11. Single-Crystalline SrRuO3 Nanomembranes: A Platform for Flexible Oxide Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Sichel-Tissot, Rebecca; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Stan, Liliana; Fong, Dillon D

    2016-01-13

    The field of oxide electronics has benefited from the wide spectrum of functionalities available to the ABO3 perovskites, and researchers are now employing defect engineering in single crystalline heterostructures to tailor properties. However, bulk oxide single crystals are not conducive to many types of applications, particularly those requiring mechanical flexibility. Here, we demonstrate the realization of an all-oxide, single-crystalline nanomembrane heterostructure. With a surface-to-volume ratio of 2 × 10(7), the nanomembranes are fully flexible and can be readily transferred to other materials for handling purposes or for new materials integration schemes. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we find that the nanomembranes can bond to other host substrates near room temperature and demonstrate coupling between surface reactivity and electromechanical properties in ferroelectric nanomembrane systems. The synthesis technique described here represents a significant advancement in materials integration and provides a new platform for the development of flexible oxide electronics.

  12. Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xiao; Cady, Jeffrey; Zajac, David; Petta, Jason

    We demonstrate a hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture in which a single electron in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot is dipole-coupled to the electric field of microwave photons in a superconducting cavity. Vacuum Rabi splitting is observed in the cavity transmission when the transition energy of the single-electron charge qubit matches that of a cavity photon, demonstrating that our device is in the strong coupling regime. The achievement of strong coupling is largely facilitated by an exceptionally low charge decoherence rate of 5 MHz and paves the way toward a wide range of cQED experiments with quantum dots, such as non-local qubit interactions, strong spin-cavity coupling and single photon generation . Research sponsored by ARO Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0149, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative through Grant GBMF4535, and the NSF (DMR-1409556 and DMR-1420541).

  13. Single-nanoparticle phase transitions visualized by four-dimensional electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Renske M.; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-05-01

    The advancement of techniques that can probe the behaviour of individual nanoscopic objects is of paramount importance in various disciplines, including photonics and electronics. As it provides images with a spatiotemporal resolution, four-dimensional electron microscopy, in principle, should enable the visualization of single-nanoparticle structural dynamics in real and reciprocal space. Here, we demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the technique by visualizing the spin crossover dynamics of single, isolated metal-organic framework nanocrystals. By introducing a small aperture in the microscope, it was possible to follow the phase transition and the associated structural dynamics within a single particle. Its behaviour was observed to be distinct from that imaged by averaging over ensembles of heterogeneous nanoparticles. The approach reported here has potential applications in other nanosystems and those that undergo (bio)chemical transformations.

  14. Single-nanoparticle phase transitions visualized by four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Renske M; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-05-01

    The advancement of techniques that can probe the behaviour of individual nanoscopic objects is of paramount importance in various disciplines, including photonics and electronics. As it provides images with a spatiotemporal resolution, four-dimensional electron microscopy, in principle, should enable the visualization of single-nanoparticle structural dynamics in real and reciprocal space. Here, we demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the technique by visualizing the spin crossover dynamics of single, isolated metal-organic framework nanocrystals. By introducing a small aperture in the microscope, it was possible to follow the phase transition and the associated structural dynamics within a single particle. Its behaviour was observed to be distinct from that imaged by averaging over ensembles of heterogeneous nanoparticles. The approach reported here has potential applications in other nanosystems and those that undergo (bio)chemical transformations.

  15. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  16. Directed self-assembly of nanoparticle array: A single electron device platform to make novel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason Kee Yang

    The biggest attraction of building nanometer structures is the emergence of novel properties and phenomena at these length scales. In the discipline of electronics particularly, nanoscale bridges the gap between the microscopic quantum world to the macroscopic classical world. The bridge can be tailored to effectively affect the material properties. One of the well-known phenomena that is altered at the nanoscale is the electron transport through a metal, i.e. the Ohm's law. As the size of the metal particle reduces to nanometer, Ohm's law breaks down due to trapping of a single electron charge, i.e. local charging, that prohibits the subsequent steam of electrons to pass through. This phenomenon is referred to as the Coulomb blockade, where the current is blocked below a threshold bias, VT. However, to observe a robust VT, the system has to be cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Here, fabrication and construction of a nano-system using directed self-assembled network of 1D necklace of 10 nm Au particles are described, which exhibits a robust single electron effect with a record high VT of 7.5 V at room temperature and a subsequent current, I rise as ( V/VT -- 1)ζ, where ζ is a critical constant, usually around 2. These physical parameters can be precisely tuned by tailoring the dimension and topology of the ensemble. The finding is important as nanoparticle based Single Electron Devices (SEDs) have become of great interest due to their orders of magnitude high sensitivity to gating. For over six decades of research on SEDs, it is clear that V T > 2 V at room temperature is required to make a robust device to eliminate the omnipresent "quantum noise" in these systems. Our system has not only shown a room temperature VT of well above 2 V but also its easy integrability with microelectronics circuits. Detailed scientific studies have been performed on the formation and structure of necklace array to understand the assembly process. Subsequent modification of the

  17. Current Analysis and Modeling of Fullerene Single-Electron Transistor at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem Hosseini, Vahideh; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Afrang, Saeid; Ismail, Razali

    2017-07-01

    Single-electron transistors (SETs) are interesting electronic devices that have become key elements in modern nanoelectronic systems. SETs operate quickly because they use individual electrons, with the number transferred playing a key role in their switching behavior. However, rapid transmission of electrons can cause their accumulation at the island, affecting the I- V characteristic. Selection of fullerene as a nanoscale zero-dimensional material with high stability, and controllable size in the fabrication process, can overcome this charge accumulation issue and improve the reliability of SETs. Herein, the current in a fullerene SET is modeled and compared with experimental data for a silicon SET. Furthermore, a weaker Coulomb staircase and improved reliability are reported. Moreover, the applied gate voltage and fullerene diameter are found to be directly associated with the I- V curve, enabling the desired current to be achieved by controlling the fullerene diameter.

  18. Line shapes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single-molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierott, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2017-11-01

    Spectroscopic line-shape analyses for single-C60 vibrational modes are presented for two kinds of scanning tunneling microscope experiments. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is performed for C60 molecules with different adsorption geometries on Pb(111). Depending on the C60 adsorption site and rotational orientation, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital exhibits varying degrees of overlap with C60 vibrational energies. Concomitantly, the line shapes of vibrational modes are affected according to expectations for on-resonance inelastic electron tunneling. Inelastic electron transport is further studied for decreasing tip-C60 distances covering tunneling and contact ranges. Line-shape changes signaling a conductance increase rather than the expected decrease upon exciting vibrational quanta are observed. A phenomenological approach is suggested to understand the dissimilar behavior of the junction conductance in the different electron transport ranges.

  19. Clinical impact and value of workstation single sign-on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, George A; Crouch, John F; Gibson, Lynn A; Conklin, George S; Webster, S Luke; Gillean, John A

    2017-05-01

    CHRISTUS Health began implementation of computer workstation single sign-on (SSO) in 2015. SSO technology utilizes a badge reader placed at each workstation where clinicians swipe or "tap" their identification badges. To assess the impact of SSO implementation in reducing clinician time logging in to various clinical software programs, and in financial savings from migrating to a thin client that enabled replacement of traditional hard drive computer workstations. Following implementation of SSO, a total of 65,202 logins were sampled systematically during a 7day period among 2256 active clinical end users for time saved in 6 facilities when compared to pre-implementation. Dollar values were assigned to the time saved by 3 groups of clinical end users: physicians, nurses and ancillary service providers. The reduction of total clinician login time over the 7day period showed a net gain of 168.3h per week of clinician time - 28.1h (2.3 shifts) per facility per week. Annualized, 1461.2h of mixed physician and nursing time is liberated per facility per annum (121.8 shifts of 12h per year). The annual dollar cost savings of this reduction of time expended logging in is $92,146 per hospital per annum and $1,658,745 per annum in the first phase implementation of 18 hospitals. Computer hardware equipment savings due to desktop virtualization increases annual savings to $2,333,745. Qualitative value contributions to clinician satisfaction, reduction in staff turnover, facilitation of adoption of EHR applications, and other benefits of SSO are discussed. SSO had a positive impact on clinician efficiency and productivity in the 6 hospitals evaluated, and is an effective and cost-effective method to liberate clinician time from repetitive and time consuming logins to clinical software applications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Boisen, Anja; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  1. Electron and heat transport in graphene-based single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Jan; Gehring, Pascal; Lau, Chit; Briggs, Andrew

    Graphene nano-electrodes provide a versatile platform for contacting individual molecules. Unlike metal electrodes, graphene is atomically stable at room temperature and screening of the gate electric field is strongly reduced by the two-dimensional nature of the electrodes. Molecules can be anchored to the graphene via π- π stacking bonds. We will present single electron transport measurements of single pyrene-functionalised C60 molecules. Strong electron-phonon coupling in these molecules leads to the observation of Franck-Condon blockade. In addition to spectroscopic transport features arising from the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom of the fullerene molecule, we observe the effect of quantum interference in the graphene leads. Density-of-states fluctuations due to multi-mode Fabry-Perot interference in graphene result in energy dependent coupling between the graphene leads and the molecule. Finally, we will present thermoelectric measurements of our graphene-based nanostructures, and show the energy dependent Seebeck coefficient both in the sequential electron tunnelling and quantum interference regime. Our experiments demonstrate the capability of graphene-based molecular junctions for studying transport in single molecules, and highlight spectroscopic features that cannot readily be observed in metal-molecule junctions.

  2. Strong suppression of shot noise in a feedback-controlled single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Timo; Strasberg, Philipp; Bayer, Johannes C.; Rugeramigabo, Eddy P.; Brandes, Tobias; Haug, Rolf J.

    2017-03-01

    Feedback control of quantum mechanical systems is rapidly attracting attention not only due to fundamental questions about quantum measurements, but also because of its novel applications in many fields in physics. Quantum control has been studied intensively in quantum optics but progress has recently been made in the control of solid-state qubits as well. In quantum transport only a few active and passive feedback experiments have been realized on the level of single electrons, although theoretical proposals exist. Here we demonstrate the suppression of shot noise in a single-electron transistor using an exclusively electronic closed-loop feedback to monitor and adjust the counting statistics. With increasing feedback response we observe a stronger suppression and faster freezing of charge current fluctuations. Our technique is analogous to the generation of squeezed light with in-loop photodetection as used in quantum optics. Sub-Poisson single-electron sources will pave the way for high-precision measurements in quantum transport similar to optical or optomechanical equivalents.

  3. Electron- and photon-impact ionization of furfural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ali, E.; Madison, D. H., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: madison@mst.edu, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY (United Kingdom); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: madison@mst.edu, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Ning, C. G. [State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Colgan, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Murray, A. J. [Photon Science Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-14

    The He(I) photoelectron spectrum of furfural has been investigated, with its vibrational structure assigned for the first time. The ground and excited ionized states are assigned through ab initio calculations performed at the outer-valence Green’s function level. Triple differential cross sections (TDCSs) for electron-impact ionization of the unresolved combination of the 4a″  +  21a′ highest and next-highest occupied molecular orbitals have also been obtained. Experimental TDCSs are recorded in a combination of asymmetric coplanar and doubly symmetric coplanar kinematics. The experimental TDCSs are compared to theoretical calculations, obtained within a molecular 3-body distorted wave framework that employed either an orientation average or proper TDCS average. The proper average calculations suggest that they may resolve some of the discrepancies regarding the angular distributions of the TDCS, when compared to calculations employing the orbital average.

  4. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  5. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  6. Modeling and the analysis of control logic for a digital PWM controller based on a nano electronic single electron transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathnakannan Kailasam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modelling and the analysis of control logic for a Nano-Device- based PWM controller. A comprehensive simple SPICE schematic model for Single Electron transistor has been proposed. The operation of basic Single Electron Transistor logic gates and SET flip flops were successfully designed and their performances analyzed. The proposed design for realizing the logic gates and flip-flops is used in constructing the PWM controller utilized for switching the buck converter circuit. The output of the converter circuit is compared with reference voltage, and when the error voltage and the reference are matched the latch is reset so as to generate the PWM signal. Due to the simplicity and accuracy of the compact model, the simulation time and speed are much faster, which makes it potentially applicable in large-scale circuit simulation. This study confirms that the SET-based PWM controller is small in size, consumes ultra low power and operates at high speeds without compromising any performance. In addition these devices are capable of measuring charges of extremely high sensitivity.

  7. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We report electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron oxide molecules, FexOx and FexOx+1 with x = 1, 2, 3, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV, obtained with the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) methods. The maxima of the EICSs range from 3.10 to 9 . 96 × 10-16 cm2 located at 59-72 eV and 5.06 to 14.32 × 10-16 cm2 located at 85-108 eV for the DM and BEB approaches, respectively. The orbital and kinetic energies required for the BEB method are obtained by employing effective core potentials for the inner core electrons in the quantum chemical calculations. The BEB cross sections are 1.4-1.7 times larger than the DM cross sections which can be related to the decreasing population of the Fe 4s orbitals upon addition of oxygen atoms, together with the different methodological foundations of the two methods. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted excellently to a simple analytical expression used in modelling and simulation codes employed in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80308-2.

  8. Electron impact ionization of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K L

    1992-10-01

    Electron impact ionization cross sections can provide valuable information about the charge-state and power balance of highly charged ions in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the present work, a novel technique based on x-ray measurements has been used to infer the ionization cross section of highly charged lithiumlike ions on the Livermore electron beam ion trap. In particular, a correspondence is established between an observed x ray and an ionization event. The measurements are made at one energy corresponding to approximately 2.3 times the threshold energy for ionization of lithiumlike ions. The technique is applied to the transition metals between Z=22 (titanium, Ti[sup 19+]) and Z=26 (iron, Fe[sup 23+]) and to Z=56 (barium, Ba[sup 53+]). The results for the transition metals, which have an estimated 17-33% uncertainty, are in good overall agreement with a relativistic distorted-wave calculation. However, less good agreement is found for barium, which has a larger uncertainty. Methods for properly accounting for the polarization in the x-ray intensities and for inferring the charge-state abundances from x-ray observations, which were developed for the ionization measurements, as well as an x-ray model that assists in the proper interpretation of the data are also presented.

  9. Anomalously large reactivity of single graphene layers and edges toward electron transfer chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Baik, Joon Hyun; Perera, Chrisantha J; Strano, Michael S

    2010-02-10

    The reactivity of graphene and its various multilayers toward electron transfer chemistries with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is probed by Raman spectroscopy after reaction on-chip. Single graphene sheets are found to be almost 10 times more reactive than bi- or multilayers of graphene according to the relative disorder (D) peak in the Raman spectrum examined before and after chemical reaction in water. A model whereby electron puddles that shift the Dirac point locally to values below the Fermi level is consistent with the reactivity difference. Because the chemistry at the graphene edge is important for controlling its electronic properties, particularly in ribbon form, we have developed a spectroscopic test to examine the relative reactivity of graphene edges versus the bulk. We show, for the first time, that the reactivity of edges is at least two times higher than the reactivity of the bulk single graphene sheet, as supported by electron transfer theory. These differences in electron transfer rates may be important for selecting and manipulating graphitic materials on-chip.

  10. Break junction under electrochemical gating: testbed for single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Rudnev, Alexander V; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-02-21

    Molecular electronics aims to construct functional molecular devices at the single-molecule scale. One of the major challenges is to construct a single-molecule junction and to further manipulate the charge transport through the molecular junction. Break junction techniques, including STM break junctions and mechanically controllable break junctions are considered as testbed to investigate and control the charge transport on a single-molecule scale. Moreover, additional electrochemical gating provides a unique opportunity to manipulate the energy alignment and molecular redox processes for a single-molecule junction. In this review, we start from the technical aspects of the break junction technique, then discuss the molecular structure-conductance correlation derived from break junction studies, and, finally, emphasize electrochemical gating as a promising method for the functional molecular devices.

  11. Impact and user satisfaction of a clinical information portal embedded in an electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development.

  12. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  13. Advances in the field of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy over the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    In single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), molecules suspended in a thin aqueous layer are rapidly frozen and imaged at cryogenic temperature in the transmission electron microscope. From the random projection views, a three-dimensional image is reconstructed, enabling the structure of the molecule to be obtained. In this article I discuss technological progress over the past decade, which has, in my own field of study, culminated in the determination of ribosome structure at 2.5-Å resolution. I also discuss likely future improvements in methodology.

  14. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  15. Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Wei, Yu-Jia; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Kai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2017-08-11

    Quantum state transfer from flying photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of 0.796±0.020. Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path, and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 m. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axes on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of 78.5%.

  16. Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Wei, Yu-Jia; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Kai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2017-08-01

    Quantum state transfer from flying photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of 0.796 ±0.020 . Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path, and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 m. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axes on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of 78.5%.

  17. Orthogonal sequencing multiplexer for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with RSFQ electronics readout circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, Matthias; Wetzstein, Olaf; Engert, Sonja; Ortlepp, Thomas; Berg, Benjamin; Ilin, Konstantin; Henrich, Dagmar; Stolz, Ronny; Toepfer, Hannes; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Siegel, Michael

    2012-12-17

    We propose an efficient multiplexing technique for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on an orthogonal detector bias switching method enabling the extraction of the average count rate of a set of detectors by one readout line. We implemented a system prototype where the SNSPDs are connected to an integrated cryogenic readout and a pulse merger system based on rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) electronics. We discuss the general scalability of this concept, analyze the environmental requirements which define the resolvability and the accuracy and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with experimental results for a SNSPD array with four pixels.

  18. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eendebak, P. T. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the double quantum dots into the single-electron regime. The algorithm only requires (1) prior knowledge of the gate design and (2) the pinch-off value of the single gate T that is shared by all the quantum dots. This work significantly alleviates the user effort required to tune multiple quantum dot devices.

  19. Laser-induced non-sequential double ionization investigated at and below the threshold for electron impact ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremina, E [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Liu, X [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Rottke, H [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Sandner, W [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Dreischuh, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lindner, F [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grasbon, F [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Paulus, G G [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Walther, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Moshammer, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Feuerstein, B [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-08-14

    We use correlated electron-ion momentum measurements to investigate laser-induced non-sequential double ionization of Ar and Ne. Light intensities are chosen in a regime at and below the threshold where, within the rescattering model, electron impact ionization of the singly charged ion core is expected to become energetically forbidden. Yet we find Ar{sup 2+} ion momentum distributions and an electron-electron momentum correlation indicative of direct impact ionization. Within the quasistatic model this may be understood by assuming that the electric field of the light wave reduces the ionization potential of the singly charged ion core at the instant of scattering. The width of the projection of the ion momentum distribution onto an axis perpendicular to the light beam polarization vector is found to scale with the square root of the peak electric field strength in the light pulse. A scaling like this is not expected from the phase space available after electron impact ionization. It may indicate that the electric field at the instant of scattering is usually different from zero and determines the transverse momentum distribution. A comparison of our experimental results with several theoretical results is given.

  20. The Impact of Single-Sided Deafness upon Music Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sarah; Hough, Elizabeth A; Crundwell, Gemma; Knappett, Rachel; Smith, Mark; Baguley, David M

    2017-05-01

    Many of the world's population have hearing loss in one ear; current statistics indicate that up to 10% of the population may be affected. Although the detrimental impact of bilateral hearing loss, hearing aids, and cochlear implants upon music appreciation is well recognized, studies on the influence of single-sided deafness (SSD) are sparse. We sought to investigate whether a single-sided hearing loss can cause problems with music appreciation, despite normal hearing in the other ear. A tailored questionnaire was used to investigate music appreciation for those with SSD. We performed a retrospective survey of a population of 51 adults from a University Hospital Audiology Department SSD clinic. SSD was predominantly adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss, caused by a variety of etiologies. Analyses were performed to assess for statistical differences between groups, for example, comparing music appreciation before and after the onset of SSD, or before and after receiving hearing aid(s). Results demonstrated that a proportion of the population experienced significant changes to the way music sounded; music was found to sound more unnatural (75%), unpleasant (71%), and indistinct (81%) than before hearing loss. Music was reported to lack the perceptual qualities of stereo sound, and to be confounded by distortion effects and tinnitus. Such changes manifested in an altered music appreciation, with 44% of participants listening to music less often, 71% of participants enjoying music less, and 46% of participants reporting that music played a lesser role in their lives than pre-SSD. Negative effects surrounding social occasions with music were revealed, along with a strong preference for limiting background music. Hearing aids were not found to significantly ameliorate these effects. Results could be explained in part through considerations of psychoacoustic changes intrinsic to an asymmetric hearing loss and impaired auditory scene analysis. Given the prevalence of

  1. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of difurylethene-based photochromic single-molecule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsang; Bahoosh, Safa G; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Huhn, Thomas; Pauly, Fabian; Scheer, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Diarylethene-derived molecules alter their electronic structure upon transformation between the open and closed forms of the diarylethene core, when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) or visible light. This transformation results in a significant variation of electrical conductance and vibrational properties of corresponding molecular junctions. We report here a combined experimental and theoretical analysis of charge transport through diarylethene-derived single-molecule devices, which are created using the mechanically controlled break-junction technique. Inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectroscopy measurements performed at 4.2 K are compared with first-principles calculations in the two distinct forms of diarylethenes connected to gold electrodes. The combined approach clearly demonstrates that the IET spectra of single-molecule junctions show specific vibrational features that can be used to identify different isomeric molecular states by transport experiments.

  2. Single photoelectron trapping, storage, and detection in a one-electron quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Deepak Sethu; Szkopek, Thomas; Robinson, Hans Daniel; Yablonovitch, Eli; Jiang, Hong-Wen

    2005-12-01

    There has been considerable progress in electrostatically emptying, and refilling, quantum dots with individual electrons. Typically the quantum dot is defined by electrostatic gates on a GaAs /AlyGa1-yAs modulation-doped heterostructure. We report the filling of such a quantum dot by a single photoelectron, originating from an individual photon. The electrostatic dot can be emptied and reset in a controlled fashion before the arrival of each photon. The trapped photoelectron is detected by a point contact transistor integrated adjacent to the electrostatic potential trap. Each stored photoelectron causes a persistent negative step in the transistor channel current. Such a controllable, benign, single photoelectron detector could allow for information transfer between flying photon qubits and stored electron qubits.

  3. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Aprà, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  4. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  5. Single-Cell Resolution of Uncultured Magnetotactic Bacteria via Fluorescence-Coupled Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Heng; Menguy, Nicolas; Benzerara, Karim; Wang, Fuxian; Lin, Xiaoting; Chen, Zhibao; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-06-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form intracellular chain-assembled nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite termed magnetosomes. The characterization of magnetosome crystals requires electron microscopy due to their nanoscopic sizes. However, electron microscopy does not provide phylogenetic information for MTB. We have developed a strategy for the simultaneous and rapid phylogenetic and biomineralogical characterization of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level. It consists of four steps: (i) enrichment of MTB cells from an environmental sample, (ii) 16S rRNA gene sequencing of MTB, and (iii) fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses coordinated with (iv) transmission or scanning electron microscopy of the probe-hybridized cells. The application of this strategy identified a magnetotactic Gammaproteobacteria strain, SHHR-1, from brackish sediments collected from the Shihe River estuary in Qinhuangdao City, China. SHHR-1 magnetosomes are elongated prismatic magnetites which can be idealized as hexagonal prisms. Taxonomic groups of uncultured MTB were also identified in freshwater sediments from Lake Miyun in northern Beijing via this novel coordinated fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy method based on four group-specific rRNA-targeted probes. Our analyses revealed that major magnetotactic taxonomic groups can be accurately determined only with coordinated scanning electron microscopy observations on fluorescently labeled single cells due to limited group coverage and specificity for existing group-specific MTB fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our reported strategy is simple and efficient, offers great promise toward investigating the diversity and biomineralization of MTB, and may also be applied to other functional groups of microorganisms.IMPORTANCE Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and biomineralize morphologically diverse magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed

  6. Enhanced single-stage laser-driven electron acceleration by self-controlled ionization injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A M; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    We report on overall enhancement of a single-stage laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the ionization injection in a mixture of 0.3% nitrogen gas in 99.7% helium gas. Upon the interaction of 30-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a gas jet of the above gas mixture, >300 MeV electron beams were generated at a helium plasma densities of 3.3-8.5 × 10(18) cm(-3). Compared with the uncontrolled electron self-injection in pure helium gas jet, the ionization injection process due to the presence of ultra-low nitrogen concentrations appears to be self-controlled; it has led to the generation of electron beams with higher energies, higher charge, lower density threshold for trapping, and a narrower energy spread without dark current (low energy electrons) or multiple bunches. It is foreseen that further optimization of such a scheme is expected to bring the electron beam energy-spread down to 1%, making them suitable for driving ultra-compact free-electron lasers.

  7. Differential electron emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules under fast ion impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shubhadeep; Champion, Christophe; Weck, P F; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2017-07-17

    Interaction between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecule and energetic ion is a subject of interest in different areas of modern physics. Here, we present measurements of energy and angular distributions of absolute double differential electron emission cross section for coronene (C24H12) and fluorene (C13H10) molecules under fast bare oxygen ion impact. For coronene, the angular distributions of the low energy electrons are quite different from that of simpler targets like Ne or CH4, which is not the case for fluorene. The behaviour of the higher electron energy distributions for both the targets are similar to that for simple targets. In case of coronene, a clear signature of plasmon resonance is observed in the analysis of forward-backward angular asymmetry of low energy electron emission. For fluorene, such signature is not identified probably due to lower oscillator strength of plasmon compared to the coronene. The theoretical calculation based on the first-order Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1), in general, reproduced the experimental observations qualitatively, for both the molecules, except in the low energy region for coronene, which again indicates the role of collective excitation. Single differential and total cross sections are also deduced. An overall comparative study is presented.

  8. Vibrational Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Single Molecules at Sub-Kelvin Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chi-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With a 600mk homebuilt UHV STM system, we studied molecular vibration at the solid surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of Acetylene single molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface and revealed five new vibrational modes that were previously inaccessible to STM-IETS at 8K temperature. The identification of vibrational IETS features with normalized conductance change (Δσ/σ) as low as 0.24% was demonstrated. Facilitated by the high energy resolution, we also revealed the a...

  9. GraFix: sample preparation for single-particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Berthold; Fischer, Niels; Golas, Monika Mariola; Sander, Bjoern; Dube, Prakash; Boehringer, Daniel; Hartmuth, Klaus; Deckert, Jochen; Hauer, Florian; Wolf, Elmar; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Urlaub, Henning; Herzog, Franz; Peters, Jan Michael; Poerschke, Dietmar; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stark, Holger

    2008-01-01

    We developed a method, named GraFix, that considerably improves sample quality for structure determination by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). GraFix uses a glycerol gradient centrifugation step in which the complexes are centrifuged into an increasing concentration of a chemical fixation reagent to prevent aggregation and to stabilize individual macromolecules. The method can be used to prepare samples for negative-stain, cryo-negative-stain and, particularly, unstained cryo-EM.

  10. Guided immobilisation of single gold nanoparticles by chemical electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Schaal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of periodic arrays of single metal nanoparticles is of great current interest. In this paper we present a straight-forward three-step procedure based on chemical electron beam lithography, which is capable of producing such arrays with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Preformed 6 nm AuNPs are immobilised on thiol patterns with a pitch of 100 nm by guided self-assembly. Afterwards, these arrays are characterised by using atomic force microscopy.

  11. Defect-tolerant single-electron charging at room temperature in metal nanoparticle decorated biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berven, C.A.; Clarke, L.; Wybourne, M.N. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mooster, J.L.; Hutchison, J.E. [Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-01-16

    Gold nanoparticles assembled on a biopolymer template between metal electrodes on an insulating substrate are shown to exhibit unambiguous single electron charging effects that are found to depend on the nanoparticle properties and the geometrical contraints imposed by the biopolymer. The results support the idea of using nanoparticles in conjunction with biomolecular organization to produce nanoscale systems with defect-tolerant current-voltage behavior. (orig.)

  12. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins...... electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards...

  13. Electron cryomicroscopy of membrane proteins: specimen preparation for two-dimensional crystals and single particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg; Rubinstein, John L

    2011-02-01

    Membrane protein structure and function can be studied by two powerful and highly complementary electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) methods: electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and single particle analysis of detergent-solubilized protein complexes. To obtain the highest-possible resolution data from membrane proteins, whether prepared as 2D crystals or single particles, cryo-EM samples must be vitrified with great care. Grid preparation for cryo-EM of 2D crystals is possible by back-injection, the carbon sandwich technique, drying in sugars before cooling in the electron microscope, or plunge-freezing. Specimen grids for single particle cryo-EM studies of membrane proteins are usually produced by plunge-freezing protein solutions, supported either by perforated or a continuous carbon film substrate. This review outlines the different techniques available and the suitability of each method for particular samples and studies. Experimental considerations in sample preparation and preservation include the protein itself and the presence of lipid or detergent. The appearance of cryo-EM samples in different conditions is also discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Advances in Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy Structure Determination applied to Sub-tomogram Averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Russo, Christopher J; Löwe, Jan; Passmore, Lori A; Scheres, Sjors H W

    2015-09-01

    Recent innovations in specimen preparation, data collection, and image processing have led to improved structure determination using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Here we explore some of these advances to improve structures determined using electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) and sub-tomogram averaging. We implement a new three-dimensional model for the contrast transfer function, and use this in a regularized likelihood optimization algorithm as implemented in the RELION program. Using direct electron detector data, we apply both single-particle analysis and sub-tomogram averaging to analyze radiation-induced movements of the specimen. As in single-particle cryo-EM, we find that significant sample movements occur during tomographic data acquisition, and that these movements are substantially reduced through the use of ultrastable gold substrates. We obtain a sub-nanometer resolution structure of the hepatitis B capsid, and show that reducing radiation-induced specimen movement may be central to attempts at further improving tomogram quality and resolution. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Bottom Quark Jet Quenching on Single ElectronTomography of Au+Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djordjevic, Magdalena; Gyulassy, Miklos; Vogt, Ramona; Wicks, Simon

    2005-07-12

    High transverse momentum single (non-photonic) electrons are shown to be sensitive to the stopping power of both bottom, b, and charm, c, quarks in AA collisions. We apply the DGLV theory of radiative energy loss to predict c and b quark jet quenching and compare the FONLL and PYTHIA heavy flavor fragmentation and decay schemes. We show that single electrons in the p{sub T} = 5-10 GeV range are dominated by the decay of b quarks rather than the more strongly quenched c quarks in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s = 200 AGeV. The smaller b quark energy loss, even for extreme opacities with gluon rapidity densities up to 3500, is predicted to limit the nuclear modification factor, R{sub AA}, of single electrons to the range R{sub AA} {approx} 0.5-0.6, in contrast to previous predictions of R{sub AA} {le} 0.2-0.3 based on taking only c quark jet fragmentation into account.

  16. The Gate Hysteresis in Single Electron Transport Driven by Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW/SET) Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Chen, Shuwei

    2017-11-01

    We study the gate hysteresis behavior in single electron transport driven by surface acoustic wave (SAW/SET) devices over a wide temperature range from 1.7 to 200 K. From the temperature dependence, we come to the conclusion that the gate hysteresis in SAW/SET devices arises from a combination of the screening effect of the surface state and the electron tunneling between the moving quantum dot and the impurity quantum dot. In addition, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied to the sample, the behavior of the gate hysteresis changes substantially. A competition between the magnetic field and the gate voltage on determining the electronic wave function is considered as the reason for the experimental results.

  17. Signature of f -electron conductance in α -Ce single-atom contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Sürgers, Christoph; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2017-08-01

    Cerium is a fascinating element exhibiting, with its different phases, long-range magnetic order and superconductivity in bulk form. The coupling of the 4 f electron to s d conduction electrons and to the lattice is responsible for unique structural and electronic properties like the isostructural first-order solid-solid transition from the cubic γ phase to the cubic α phase, which is accompanied by a huge volume collapse of 14%. We report experiments aiming at disentangling the 4 f contribution to the electric conductance of the different phases. On single-atom Ce contacts we observe a strongly enhanced conductance G . By controlling the content of α -Ce employing different rates of cooling, we find a strong correlation between the fraction of α -Ce and the magnitude of G at the last conductance plateau before the contact breaks. We attribute the enhanced conductance of α -Ce to the additional contribution of the 4 f level.

  18. Resonance estimates for single spin asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara Pasquini; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2004-07-01

    We discuss the target and beam normal spin asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering which depend on the imaginary part of two-photon exchange processes between electron and nucleon. We express this imaginary part as a phase space integral over the doubly virtual Compton scattering tensor on the nucleon. We use unitarity to model the doubly virtual Compton scattering tensor in the resonance region in terms of {gamma}* N {yields} {pi} N electroabsorption amplitudes. Taking those amplitudes from a phenomenological analysis of pion electroproduction observables, we present results for beam and target normal single spin asymmetries for elastic electron-nucleon scattering for beam energies below 1 GeV and in the 1-3 GeV region, where several experiments are performed or are in progress.

  19. Single-photon emission associated with double electron capture in F9+ + C collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Elkafrawy, Tamer; Tanis, John A; Warczak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC), the one-step process occurring in ion-atom collisions, has been investigated for bare fluorine ions colliding with carbon. RDEC is completed when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of a projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. This work is a follow-up to our earlier measurement of RDEC for bare oxygen projectiles, thus providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields in both cases and allowing for the comparison between the two collision systems as well as with available theoretical studies. The most significant mechanisms of x-ray emission that may contribute to the RDEC energy region as background processes are also addressed.

  20. Projected thickness reconstruction from a single defocused transmission electron microscope image of an amorphous object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.C.Y., E-mail: amelia.liu@sci.monash.edu.au [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Paganin, D.M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Bourgeois, L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Nakashima, P.N.H. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Single defocused transmission electron microscope phase contrast images are used to reconstruct the projected thickness map of a single-material object. The algorithm is non-iterative and stable, and we extend it to account for the presence of spherical aberration in the objective optics. The technique can reconstruct the projected thickness map of general single-material objects in the strong phase/weak amplitude regime. It is sensitive to any excursions in the projected thickness from the average, and ideal for examining voids and free volume accumulation in amorphous/glassy materials at the nanometer scale. The resolution of the technique depends on the choice of defocus and the thickness of the specimen. In a certain regime, we demonstrate that variations in the transverse projected thickness with a lateral diameter of {approx}0.25nm may be detected. We use our algorithm to quantitatively reconstruct the projected thickness of latex sphere test specimens from single defocused electron micrographs. We demonstrate that the reconstruction has a large tolerance for error in the input parameters. Simulations confirm that the technique is quantitative, and demonstrate that the origin of low-frequency artifacts is an instability due to noise. We show that the autocorrelation of the projected thickness map may be used to measure the size of open structures in the object using both simulation and latex sphere data. -- Highlights: {yields} We reconstruct the projected thickness of a specimen using a phase retrieval technique. {yields} The technique requires a single out-of-focus phase contrast transmission electron micrograph. {yields} We demonstrate this technique is quantitative using simulation and experiment. {yields} We discuss the technique's realm of application and its nominal resolution. {yields} We employ this technique to measure the size of voids in latex sphere test objects.

  1. A nanocryotron comparator can connect single-flux-quantum circuits to conventional electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Yuan; McCaughan, Adam N.; Dane, Andrew E.; Berggren, Karl K.; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Integration with conventional electronics offers a straightforward and economical approach to upgrading existing superconducting technologies, such as scaling up superconducting detectors into large arrays and combining single flux quantum (SFQ) digital circuits with semiconductor logic gates and memories. However, direct output signals from superconducting devices (e.g., Josephson junctions) are usually not compatible with the input requirements of conventional devices (e.g., transistors). Here, we demonstrate the use of a single three-terminal superconducting-nanowire device, called the nanocryotron (nTron), as a digital comparator to combine SFQ circuits with mature semiconductor circuits such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Since SFQ circuits can digitize output signals from general superconducting devices and CMOS circuits can interface existing CMOS-compatible electronics, our results demonstrate the feasibility of a general architecture that uses an nTron as an interface to realize a ‘super-hybrid’ system consisting of superconducting detectors, superconducting quantum electronics, CMOS logic gates and memories, and other conventional electronics.

  2. Electronic and optical properties of single excitons and biexcitons in type-II quantum dot nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Fatih, E-mail: fatih.koc@msn.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Selcuk University, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Sahin, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmet.sahin@agu.edu.tr, E-mail: mehsahin@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Selcuk University, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Department of Material Science and Nanotechnology Engineering, Abdullah Gül University, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2014-05-21

    In this study, a detailed investigation of the electronic and optical properties (i.e., binding energies, absorption wavelength, overlap of the electron-hole wave functions, recombination oscillator strength, etc.) of an exciton and a biexciton in CdTe/CdSe core/shell type-II quantum dot heterostructures has been carried out in the frame of the single band effective mass approximation. In order to determine the electronic properties, we have self-consistently solved the Poisson-Schrödinger equations in the Hartree approximation. We have considered all probable Coulomb interaction effects on both energy levels and also on the corresponding wave functions for both single exciton and biexciton. In addition, we have taken into account the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation effects in the local density approximation between same kinds of particles for biexciton. Also, we have examined the effect of the ligands and dielectric mismatch on the electronic and optical properties. We have used a different approximation proposed by Sahin and Koc [Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 183103 (2013)] for the recombination oscillator strength of the biexciton for bound and unbound cases. The results obtained have been presented comparatively as a function of the shell thicknesses and probable physical reasons in behind of the results have been discussed in a detail.

  3. High resolution surface scanning of Thick-GEM for single photo-electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, G.; Varga, D.

    2012-12-01

    An optical system for high resolution scanning of TGEM UV photon detection systems is introduced. The structure exploits the combination of a single Au-coated TGEM under study, and an asymmetric MWPC (Close Cathode Chamber) as post-amplification stage. A pulsed UV LED source with emission down to 240 nm has been focused to a spot of 0.07 mm on the TGEM surface, and single photo-electron charge spectra has been recorded over selected two dimensional regions. This way, the TGEM gain (order of 10-100) and TGEM photo-electron detection efficiency is clearly separated, unlike in case of continuous illumination. The surface structure connected to the TGEM photon detection is well observable, including inefficiencies in the holes and at the symmetry points between holes. The detection efficiency as well as the gas gain are fluctuating from hole to hole. The gain is constant in the hexagon around any hole, pointing to the fact that the gain depends on hole geometry, and less on the position where the electron enters. The detection probability map strongly changes with the field strength above the TGEM surface, in relation to the change of the actual surface field configuration. The results can be confronted with position-dependent simulations of TGEM electron transfer and gas multiplication.

  4. Single-Molecule Measurements of T4 Lysozyme using Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Because of their unique electronic and chemical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for label-free, single-molecule sensing and detection applications. In this work, a field-effect transistor (FET) architecture comprised of an individual SWNT is used to transduce the conformational motion of a single T4 lysozyme protein, conjugated to the SWNT side wall, into a corresponding electrical current signal. The SWNTs are grown using chemical vapor deposition, and metal electrical contacts are formed using electron beam evaporation. Using N-(1-Pyrene)maleimide, the protein is conjugated to the SWNT side wall. After conjugation, the sensing area of the device is submerged in an electrolyte solution, and the source-drain current is measured while applying an electrolyte-gate. Analysis of the signal provided single-molecule resolution of the dynamical activity of lysozyme as it hydrolyzes macromolecular peptidoglycan, a component of bacterial cell walls. This analysis revealed seven different independent time scales that govern the activity of lysozyme, the pH dependence of these time scales, and a lower limit on the number rate-limiting steps in lysozyme's hinge opening and closing motions. Furthermore, the signals elucidated differences in how lysozyme traverses and catalyzes structurally varying peptidoglycan constructs.

  5. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-07-19

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  7. Direct single to two/three phase power electronic conversion for AC traction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucky, B.; Pavlanin, R.; Pokorny, M. [Zilina Univ. (Slovakia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed single to 3-phase power electronic converters. Conversion rates were evaluated using a middle frequency transformer with matrix converters. The use of a matrix converter subsystem with a 2-phase orthogonal induction motor was compared with conventional drives as a means of reducing the number of converter power switching elements. The converter was a high voltage modular multilevel converter where the transformer was fed directly by the single phase converter system operating on an AC line voltage. The converter offered sinusoidal input and output harmonics, eliminated the need for a DC link circuit, and decreased the number of switching elements for converters in AC-AC drives. A power active filter was used to improve the harmonic content of the input and output currents. Simulations of the 2-phase matrix converter orthogonal driving concept indicated that the converter can be used to provide solutions for single phase electric traction applications. 21 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Positive and Negative Ion Formation Following Electron Impact on Uracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Feil, S.; Gluch, K.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Probst, M.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T. D.; Stamatovic, A.; Deutsch, H.; Limtrakul, J.

    2004-05-01

    We report absolute partial cross sections for the formation of selected positive and negative ions resulting from electron interactions with the biologically important molecule uracil. Absolute calibration of the measured partial cross sections for the formation of the three most intense positive ions, the parent C_4H_4N_2O_2^+ ion and the C_3H_2NO^+ and OCN^+ fragment ions, was achieved by normalization of the total single uracil ionization cross section to a calculated cross section based on the semi-classical Deutsch-Märk (DM) formalism at 100 eV. Subsequently, we used the OCN^+ cross section in conjunction with the known sensitivity ratio for positive and negative ion detection in our apparatus (obtained from the well-known cross sections for SF_4^+ and SF_4^- formation from SF_6) to determine the dissociative attachment cross section for OCN^- formation from uracil. This work was partially supported by the FWF, ÖNB, and ÖAW, Wien, Austria and the EU Commission, Brussels. We acknowledge financial support from the US Department of Energy to KB.

  9. Impact of electronic-cigarette refill liquid on rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Golli, N; Rahali, D; Jrad-Lamine, A; Dallagi, Y; Jallouli, M; Bdiri, Y; Ba, N; Lebret, M; Rosa, J P; El May, M; El Fazaa, S

    2016-07-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are becoming the fashionable alternative to decrease tobacco smoking, although their impact on health has not been fully assessed yet. The present study was designed to compare the impact of e-cigarette refill liquid (e-liquid) without nicotine to e-liquid with nicotine on rat testis. For this purpose, e-liquid with nicotine and e-liquid without nicotine (0.5 mg/kg of body weight) were administered to adult male Wistar rats via the intraperitoneally route during four weeks. Results showed that e-liquid with or without nicotine leads to diminished sperm density and viability, such as a decrease in testicular lactate dehydrogenase activity and testosterone level. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis identified a reduction in cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450 scc) and 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17βHSD) mRNA level, two key enzymes of steroidogenesis. Following e-liquid exposure, histopathological examination showed alterations in testis tissue marked by germ cells desquamation, disorganization of the tubular contents of testis and cell deposits in seminiferous tubules. Finally, analysis of oxidative stress status pointed an outbreak of antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and gluthatione-S-transferase, as well as an important increase in sulfhydril group content. Taken together, these results indicate that e-liquid per se induces toxicity in Wistar rat testis, similar to e-liquid with nicotine, by disrupting oxidative balance and steroidogenesis.

  10. Application of relativistic coupled-cluster theory to electron impact excitation of Mg+ in the plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lalita; Sahoo, Bijaya Kumar; Malkar, Pooja; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    A relativistic coupled-cluster theory is implemented to study electron impact excitations of atomic species. As a test case, the electron impact excitations of the 3 s 2 S 1/2-3 p 2 P 1/2;3/2 resonance transitions are investigated in the singly charged magnesium (Mg+) ion using this theory. Accuracies of wave functions of Mg+ are justified by evaluating its attachment energies of the relevant states and compared with the experimental values. The continuum wave function of the projectile electron are obtained by solving Dirac equations assuming distortion potential as static potential of the ground state of Mg+. Comparison of the calculated electron impact excitation differential and total cross-sections with the available measurements are found to be in very good agreements at various incident electron energies. Further, calculations are carried out in the plasma environment in the Debye-Hückel model framework, which could be useful in the astrophysics. Influence of plasma strength on the cross-sections as well as linear polarization of the photon emission in the 3 p 2 P 3/2-3 s 2 S 1/2 transition is investigated for different incident electron energies.

  11. Formation of dislocation loops and voids in electron irradiated zinc selenide single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Y. Y.; Brown, P. D.; Kovalev, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    The formation of small dislocation loops in size of 2.5 - 45 nm and a density of 1.4·1011 cm‑2, as well as voids in size ≤10 nm in ZnS crystals were found by the transmission electron microscopy method (TEM). Samples were examined and irradiated in situ in a JEOL 4000EX-II electron microscope operated at energy of 400 keV and intensity of (1 - 4)·1019 e/cm2·s. Fine particles of a new phase in size ≤10 nm are formed also. These features can be identified from an analysis of moiré fringe contrast as phase of ZnO2. Similar defects in single crystals of ZnS formed in situ after irradiation in a transmission electron microscope JEM-100CX operated at energy of 100 keV and intensity of 3,5·1017 e/cm2·s. It was found that the formation of structural defects in ZnS under electron irradiation with above-threshold energy of defect formation (400 keV) is similar to the formation of structural defects in these crystals under electron irradiation with sub-threshold defect formation energy (100 keV).

  12. Relativistic electron beams driven by kHz single-cycle light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Guénot, D; Vernier, A; Beaurepaire, B; Böhle, F; Bocoum, M; Lozano, M; Jullien, A; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-plasma acceleration is an emerging technique for accelerating electrons to high energies over very short distances. The accelerated electron bunches have femtosecond duration, making them particularly relevant for applications such as ultrafast imaging or femtosecond X-ray generation. Current laser-plasma accelerators are typically driven by Joule-class laser systems that have two main drawbacks: their relatively large scale and their low repetition-rate, with a few shots per second at best. The accelerated electron beams have energies ranging from 100 MeV to multi-GeV, however a MeV electron source would be more suited to many societal and scientific applications. Here, we demonstrate a compact and reliable laser-plasma accelerator producing high-quality few-MeV electron beams at kilohertz repetition rate. This breakthrough was made possible by using near-single-cycle light pulses, which lowered the required laser energy for driving the accelerator by three orders of magnitude, thus enabling high repet...

  13. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Aznar, R [nanoNMRI group, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II, Place E Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Nitze, F; Waagberg, T [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Schmid, M; Mehring, M, E-mail: Thomas.wagberg@physics.umu.se [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the {sup 13}C and {sup 133}Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of Cs{sub x}C materials where x=0-0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(E{sub F}) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin-lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called {alpha} and {beta} and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 ({alpha}-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05{<=}x{<=}0.143 at high intercalation levels ({beta}-phase). The new {beta}-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp{sup 2}) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(E{sub F}), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  14. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  15. Electronic properties of prismatic modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Muryumin, E. E.; Rodionova, E. V.; Ryskina, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The article shows the possibility of target modifying the prismatic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by regular chemisorption of fluorine atoms in the graphene surface. It is shown that the electronic properties of prismatic SWCNT modifications are determined by the interaction of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation in the carbon-conjugated subsystems (tracks) formed in the faces. The contributions of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation depend on the structural characteristics of the tracks. It was found that the minimum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of the track width ensure the maximum contribution of the π-electron conjugation, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the hydrocarbon analog of the carbon track. It is established that the maximum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of track width ensure the maximum contribution of the ρ(in-plane) electron interface, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the unmodified carbon nanotube. The calculation of the model systems has been carried out using an ab initio Hartree-Fock method in the 3-21G basis.

  16. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  17. Electron-phonon coupling in bilayer and single-layer graphene at sub-Kelvin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKitterick, Chris; Vora, Heli; Du, Xu; Rooks, Michael; Prober, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Graphene has been proposed by many groups as a detector of terahertz photons1 , 2 , 3, due to its very small heat capacity and predicted low thermal conductance. We present Johnson noise thermometry measurements of single and bilayer graphene samples fabricated at Stony Brook University and at Yale University. These measurements probe the graphene electron-phonon coupling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The devices are fabricated with superconducting contacts (NbN at Stony Brook, Al and Nb at Yale) to confine the hot electrons in the graphene device, diminishing the contribution of electron out-diffusion in cooling the electron system. By using commercially-available CVD-grown graphene for some samples, we can define large area sections, allowing us to emphasize the thermal conductance due to electron-phonon coupling. These measurements allow for performance estimates for using similar graphene devices to detect terahertz photons. 1C. B. McKitterick, D. E. Prober, B. S. Karasik, Journal of Applied Physics 113, 044512 (2013). 2H. Vora, P. Kumaravadivel, B. Nielsen, X. Du, Applied Physics Letters 100, 153507 (2012). 3K. Fong, K. Schwab, Physical Review X 2, 1 (2012). This work supported by NSF-DMR 0907082.

  18. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  19. Image charge effects in single-molecule junctions: Breaking of symmetries and negative-differential resistance in a benzene single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Flensberg, K.

    2011-01-01

    and molecular symmetries remain unclear. Using a theoretical framework developed for semiconductor-nanostructure-based single-electron transistors (SETs), we demonstrate that the image charge interaction breaks the molecular symmetries in a benzene-based single-molecule transistor operating in the Coulomb...

  20. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  1. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  2. Preresonance Raman single-crystal measurements of electronic transition moment orientations in N-acetylglycinamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajcini, V.; Asher, S.A.

    1999-12-01

    The authors have examined electronic coupling between the two amide electronic transitions in a dipeptide and have found strong excitonic interactions in a case where the amide planes are almost perpendicular. The absorption and resonance Raman spectra of N-methylacetamide (NMA) and acetamide (AM) are compared to that of the dipeptide N-acetylglycinamide (NAGA), which is composed of linked primary and secondary amides. The authors measured the transition moment magnitudes of each of these species and also determined the orientation of the preresonance Raman tensor of NAGA in a single crystal. From these single-crystal tensor values, the NAGA diagonal Raman tensor orientations were calculated and compared to those expected for unperturbed primary and secondary amides oriented as in the NAGA crystal. Because the primary and secondary amide III vibrations are vibrationally uncoupled and nonoverlapping, their intensities can be used to determine the contributions to their resonance enhancement from the coupled NAGA electronic transitions. The Raman tensor major axes of the primary and secondary amide III and amide I vibrations do not lie in their corresponding amide planes, indicating excitonically coupled states which mix the primary and secondary amide transitions. These results are relevant to the understanding of amide coupling in peptides and proteins; the NAGA crystal conformation is similar to that of a type I {beta}-turn in peptides and proteins, with the amide planes nearly perpendicular to each other (dihedral angle 85{degree}).

  3. Low cost, high performance processing of single particle cryo-electron microscopy data in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfrocco, Michael A; Leschziner, Andres E

    2015-05-08

    The advent of a new generation of electron microscopes and direct electron detectors has realized the potential of single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) as a technique to generate high-resolution structures. Calculating these structures requires high performance computing clusters, a resource that may be limiting to many likely cryo-EM users. To address this limitation and facilitate the spread of cryo-EM, we developed a publicly available 'off-the-shelf' computing environment on Amazon's elastic cloud computing infrastructure. This environment provides users with single particle cryo-EM software packages and the ability to create computing clusters with 16-480+ CPUs. We tested our computing environment using a publicly available 80S yeast ribosome dataset and estimate that laboratories could determine high-resolution cryo-EM structures for $50 to $1500 per structure within a timeframe comparable to local clusters. Our analysis shows that Amazon's cloud computing environment may offer a viable computing environment for cryo-EM.

  4. Novel Single-Shot Diagnostics for Electrons from Laser-Plasma Interaction at SPARC_LAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bisesto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique for compact and cheap accelerators, needed in several fields, e.g., novel compact light sources for industrial and medical applications. Indeed, the high electric field available in plasma structures (>100 GV/m allows for accelerating electrons at the GeV energy scale in a few centimeters. Nevertheless, this approach still suffers from shot-to-shot instabilities, mostly related to experimental parameter fluctuations, e.g., laser intensity and plasma density. Therefore, single shot diagnostics are crucial in order to properly understand the acceleration mechanism. In this regard, at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility, we have developed two diagnostic tools to investigate properties of electrons coming from high intensity laser–matter interaction: one relying on Electro Optical Sampling (EOS for the measurement of the temporal profile of the electric field carried by fast electrons generated by a high intensity laser hitting a solid target, the other one based on Optical Transition Radiation (OTR for single shot measurements of the transverse emittance. In this work, the basic principles of both diagnostics will be presented as well as the experimental results achieved by means of the SPARC high brightness photo-injector and the high power laser FLAME.

  5. Electronic origin of high-temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Defa; Zhang, Wenhao; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Ou, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qing-Yan; Li, Zhi; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; Peng, Yingying; Liu, Xu; Chen, Chaoyu; Yu, Li; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Hu, Jiangping; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Zhou, X J

    2012-07-03

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based compounds has attracted much attention. How to further increase the superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) and how to understand the superconductivity mechanism are two prominent issues facing the current study of iron-based superconductors. The latest report of high-T(c) superconductivity in a single-layer FeSe is therefore both surprising and significant. Here we present investigations of the electronic structure and superconducting gap of the single-layer FeSe superconductor. Its Fermi surface is distinct from other iron-based superconductors, consisting only of electron-like pockets near the zone corner without indication of any Fermi surface around the zone centre. Nearly isotropic superconducting gap is observed in this strictly two-dimensional system. The temperature dependence of the superconducting gap gives a transition temperature T(c)~ 55 K. These results have established a clear case that such a simple electronic structure is compatible with high-T(c) superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of single-electron multiple-trapping transport in disordered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-12-01

    The conventional single-particle Monte Carlo simulation of charge transport in disordered media is based on the truncated density of localized states (DOLS) which benefits from very short time execution. Although this model successfully clarifies the properties of electron transport in moderately disordered media, it overestimates the electron diffusion coefficient for strongly disordered media. The origin of this deviation is discussed in terms of zero-temperature approximation in the truncated DOLS and the ignorance of spatial occupation of localized states. Here, based on the multiple-trapping regime we introduce a modified single-particle kinetic Monte Carlo model that can be used to investigate the electron transport in any disordered media independent from the value of disorder parameter. In the proposed model, instead of using a truncated DOLS we imply the raw DOLS. In addition, we have introduced an occupation index for localized states to consider the effect of spatial occupation of trap sites. The proposed model is justified in a simple cubic lattice of trap sites for broad interval of disorder parameters, Fermi levels, and temperatures.

  7. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H.; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H.; Davies, Mike E.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  8. Large-scale 2D Electronics based on Single-layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Yu, Lili; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Fang, Wenjing; Hsu, Allen; Herring, Patrick; Chin, Matthew; Dubey, Madan; Li, Lain-Jong; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    2D nanoelectronics based on MoS2 and other transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) materials are attractive as high-mobility options in the emerging field of large-area low-cost electronics that is currently dominated by low-mobility amorphous silicon and organic semiconductors. Single-layer MoS2 can also complement graphene to build flexible digital and mixed-signal circuits, overcoming its lack of bandgap while still sharing many of graphene's excellent mechanical and thermal properties. This paper addresses several key challenges in the development of 2D nanoelectronics on MoS2 and TMD materials in general. First, large-area single-layer MoS2 material is grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) that makes the wafer-scale fabrication of MoS2 devices and circuits possible for the first time. Second, the top-gated transistors, fabricated for the first time on single-layer MoS2 grown by CVD, show multiple state-of-the-art characteristics, such as high mobility, ultra-high on/off current ratio, record current density and current saturation. Finally, key circuit building blocks for digital and analog electronics such as inverter, NAND gate, memory and ring oscillator are demonstrated for the first time. This work has been partially funded by the ONR Young Investigator Program and the Army Research Laboratory.

  9. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  10. Area efficient digital logic NOT gate using single electron box (SEB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahrepour Davoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuing scaling down of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS has led researchers to build new devices with nano dimensions, whose behavior will be interpreted based on quantum mechanics. Single-electron devices (SEDs are promising candidates for future VLSI applications, due to their ultra small dimensions and lower power consumption. In most SED based digital logic designs, a single gate is introduced and its performance discussed. While in the SED based circuits the fan out of designed gate circuit should be considered and measured. In the other words, cascaded SED based designs must work properly so that the next stage(s should be driven by the previous stage. In this paper, previously NOT gate based on single electron box (SEB which is an important structure in SED technology, is reviewed in order to obtain correct operation in series connections. The correct operation of the NOT gate is investigated in a buffer circuit which uses two connected NOT gate in series. Then, for achieving better performance the designed buffer circuit is improved by the use of scaling process.

  11. Emergence of the Dirac Electron System in a Single-Component Molecular Conductor under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Reizo; Cui, HengBo; Tsumuraya, Takao; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-08

    Single-component molecular conductors can provide a variety of electronic states. We demonstrate here that the Dirac electron system emerges in a single-component molecular conductor under high pressure. First-principles density functional theory calculations revealed that Dirac cones are formed in the single-component molecular conductor [Pd(dddt)2] (dddt = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithiin-2,3-dithiolate), which shows temperature-independent resistivity (zero-gap behavior) at 12.6 GPa. The Dirac cone formation in [Pd(dddt)2] can be understood by a tight-binding model. The Dirac points originate from the HOMO and LUMO bands, each of which is associated with different molecular layers. Overlap of these two bands provides a closed intersection at the Fermi level (Fermi line) if there is no HOMO-LUMO coupling. Two-step HOMO-LUMO couplings remove the degeneracy on the Fermi line, resulting in gap formation. The Dirac cones emerge at the points where the Fermi line intersects with a line on which the HOMO-LUMO coupling is zero.

  12. AC signal characterization for optimization of a CMOS single-electron pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Roy; Perron, Justin K.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2018-02-01

    Pumping single electrons at a set rate is being widely pursued as an electrical current standard. Semiconductor charge pumps have been pursued in a variety of modes, including single gate ratchet, a variety of 2-gate ratchet pumps, and 2-gate turnstiles. Whether pumping with one or two AC signals, lower error rates can result from better knowledge of the properties of the AC signal at the device. In this work, we operated a CMOS single-electron pump with a 2-gate ratchet style measurement and used the results to characterize and optimize our two AC signals. Fitting this data at various frequencies revealed both a difference in signal path length and attenuation between our two AC lines. Using this data, we corrected for the difference in signal path length and attenuation by applying an offset in both the phase and the amplitude at the signal generator. Operating the device as a turnstile while using the optimized parameters determined from the 2-gate ratchet measurement led to much flatter, more robust charge pumping plateaus. This method was useful in tuning our device up for optimal charge pumping, and may prove useful to the semiconductor quantum dot community to determine signal attenuation and path differences at the device.

  13. Weather impacts on single-vehicle truck crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Bhaven; Tung, Li-Wei; Zhao, Shanshan; Khattak, Aemal J

    2016-09-01

    The focus of this paper is on illustrating the feasibility of aggregating data from disparate sources to investigate the relationship between single-vehicle truck crash injury severity and detailed weather conditions. Specifically, this paper presents: (a) a methodology that combines detailed 15-min weather station data with crash and roadway data, and (b) an empirical investigation of the effects of weather on crash-related injury severities of single-vehicle truck crashes. Random parameters ordinal and multinomial regression models were used to investigate crash injury severity under different weather conditions, taking into account the individual unobserved heterogeneity. The adopted methodology allowed consideration of environmental, roadway, and climate-related variables in single-vehicle truck crash injury severity. Results showed that wind speed, rain, humidity, and air temperature were linked with single-vehicle truck crash injury severity. Greater recorded wind speed added to the severity of injuries in single-vehicle truck crashes in general. Rain and warmer air temperatures were linked to more severe crash injuries in single-vehicle truck crashes while higher levels of humidity were linked to less severe injuries. Random parameters ordered logit and multinomial logit, respectively, revealed some individual heterogeneity in the data and showed that integrating comprehensive weather data with crash data provided useful insights into factors associated with single-vehicle truck crash injury severity. The research provided a practical method that combined comprehensive 15-min weather station data with crash and roadway data, thereby providing useful insights into crash injury severity of single-vehicle trucks. Those insights are useful for future truck driver educational programs and for truck safety in different weather conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J; Bryce, Martin R; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for -OH and -CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  15. Electronic bisection of a single-wall carbon nanotube by controlled chemisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Dragan; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H

    2007-07-13

    Conversion of two diametrically opposed atomic rows on a carbon nanotube to sp(3) hybridization produces two identical weakly coupled one-dimensional electronic systems within a single robust covalently bonded package: a biribbon. Arm-chair tubes, when so divided, acquire a pair of narrow spin-polarized bands at the Fermi energy; interaction across the sp(3) dividers produces a tunable band splitting in the THz range. For semiconducting tubes, the eigenvalues of the low-energy electronic states are surprisingly unaffected by the bifurcation; however, the tubes' response functions to external electric fields are dramatically altered. These modified tubes could be produced by uniaxial compression transverse to the tube axis followed by site-selective chemisorption.

  16. Electronic Bisection of a Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube by Controlled Chemisorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Dragan; Lammert, Paul E.; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2007-07-01

    Conversion of two diametrically opposed atomic rows on a carbon nanotube to sp3 hybridization produces two identical weakly coupled one-dimensional electronic systems within a single robust covalently bonded package: a biribbon. Arm-chair tubes, when so divided, acquire a pair of narrow spin-polarized bands at the Fermi energy; interaction across the sp3 dividers produces a tunable band splitting in the THz range. For semiconducting tubes, the eigenvalues of the low-energy electronic states are surprisingly unaffected by the bifurcation; however, the tubes’ response functions to external electric fields are dramatically altered. These modified tubes could be produced by uniaxial compression transverse to the tube axis followed by site-selective chemisorption.

  17. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Bernardo, Angelo; Millo, Oded; Barbone, Matteo; Alpern, Hen; Kalcheim, Yoav; Sassi, Ugo; Ott, Anna; de Fazio, Domenico; Yoon, Duhee; Amado, Mario; Ferrari, Andrea; Linder, Jacob; Robinson, Jason

    Physical systems supporting unconventional superconducting states, where electrons pair up in a parallel spin (spin-triplet) state other than in a conventional antiparallel spin (spin-singlet) state, have been extensively investigated over the past few years due to their potential application in spintronics devices operating in the superconducting regime. These systems include p-wave superconductors, where pairing correlations are intrinsically in a spin-triplet state, and magnetically inhomogeneous ferromagnet/ s-wave superconductor heterostructures. In this talk, I will discuss our low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy results, which demonstrate evidence for the emergence of a p-wave superconducting state in single-layer graphene (SLG) proximity-coupled to the electron-doped high-temperature superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4.

  18. GaMnAs Ferromagnetic Single Electron Transistor Nano-devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Bhim; Ocola, Leonidas; Otieno, Calford; Opondo, Noah; Riley, Grant; Liu, Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek; Eid, Khalid

    2010-10-01

    Mn-doped GaAs (or GaMnAs) offers opportunities to demonstrate both new device concepts with added functionality and new phenomena in condensed matter physics, since it is both a ferromagnet and a semiconductor. We will present our recent results on fabricating and characterizing GaMnAs-based single electron transistor (SET) devices. The resistance of these deep-nanoscale devices can be manipulated either by varying the applied voltage or via an external magnetic field. The nano-devices were prepared using electron-beam lithography and wet chemical etching. The magnetoresistance of the devices was as high as 40% at 4.2 K and the behavior was strikingly different from previous results reported in literature.

  19. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  20. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high-resolution electron imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A; Craighead, Harold G

    2011-10-12

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high-resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step toward the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information.

  1. Electron impact ionization cross sections of beryllium-tungsten clusters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukuba, Ivan; Kaiser, Alexander; Huber, Stefan E.; Urban, Jan; Probst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report calculated electron impact ionization cross sections (EICSs) of beryllium-tungsten clusters, BenW with n = 1,...,12, from the ionization threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The positions of the maxima of DM and BEB cross sections are mostly close to each other. The DM cross sections are more sensitive with respect to the cluster size. For the clusters smaller than Be4W they yield smaller cross sections than BEB and vice versa larger cross sections than BEB for clusters larger than Be6W. The maximum cross section values for the singlet-spin groundstate clusters range from 7.0 × 10-16 cm2 at 28 eV (BeW) to 54.2 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the DM cross sections and from 13.5 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (BeW) to 38.9 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the BEB cross sections. Differences of the EICSs in different isomers and between singlet and triplet states are also explored. Both the DM and BEB cross sections could be fitted perfectly to a simple expression used in modeling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60583-7

  2. Microwave-induced co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, M.; Savolainen, M.; Manscher, M.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of microwaves on the co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors has been investigated as function of frequency and power in the temperature range from 150 to 500 mK. All 20 low frequency connections and the RF line were filtered, and the whole cryostat was suspended...... fixed at maximum Coulomb blockade. With the microwave signal applied to one side of the transistor, we find that the conductance increases linearly with T-2 and microwave power. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  3. Quantum criticality out of equilibrium: steady state in a magnetic single-electron transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Stefan; Si, Qimiao

    2009-11-13

    Quantum critical systems out of equilibrium are of extensive interest, but are difficult to study theoretically. We consider here the steady-state limit of a single-electron transistor with ferromagnetic leads. In equilibrium (i.e., bias voltage V = 0), this system features a continuous quantum phase transition with a critical destruction of the Kondo effect. We construct an exact quantum Boltzmann treatment in a dynamical large-N limit, and determine the universal scaling functions of both the nonlinear conductance and fluctuation-dissipation ratios. We also elucidate the decoherence properties as encoded in the local spin response.

  4. Coherent X-radiation of relativistic electrons in a single crystal under asymmetric reflection conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V.

    2008-09-01

    Coherent X-radiation of a relativistic electron crossing a single crystal plate with constant speed is considered in the two-wave approximation of the dynamic diffraction theory [Z. Pinsker, Dynamical Scattering of X-rays in Crystals, Springer, Berlin, 1984] in a Laue geometry. Analytical expressions describing the spectral-angular distribution of parametric X-radiation (PXR) and diffracted transition radiation (DTR) formed on a system of parallel atomic planes situated at an arbitrary angle δ to the surface of the crystal plate (asymmetric reflection) are derived. The dependences of the PXR and DTR spectral-angular density and their interference with angle δ are studied.

  5. Single bunch longitudinal measurements at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holtzapple

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the beam's bunch length in the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR have been made using a streak camera. The streak camera uses visible synchrotron radiation produced by the beam to measure its longitudinal distribution. A description of CESR, the experimental setup, the streak camera used, and systematic errors and analysis techniques of the streak camera are described in this paper. The dependence of the bunch distribution on the current and accelerating rf voltage for a single bunch CESR was measured and compared with a theoretical model of CESR. The CESR vacuum chamber impedance is determined from the measured bunch distributions and is presented in this paper.

  6. Empirical laws of particle extraction from single-grid source of bipolar ion-electron flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, S. V.; Rafalskyi, D. V.

    2012-11-01

    The present research is devoted to the problem of extraction grid choice for a single-grid source of bipolar ion-electron flow. The paper contains detailed reference information on ion and electron extraction characteristics of 10 different grids with broad range of parameters: aperture width (0.09-0.6 mm), grid transparency (0.19-0.51), thickness (0.036-0.5 mm), and with different aperture geometry. The grids with square, circular, and slit apertures were made with different technologies: laser cutting, welding, weaving, and electrolytic erosion. The general regularities of the ion and electron extraction from the single-grid source are experimentally researched for the cases of dc and RF extraction grid biasing. A conclusion has been made that the maximum extracted ion current at low ion energy (0-200 eV) does not significantly vary for all the grids and does not exceed half of the primary ion current from plasma multiplied by the optical grid transparency. The low-energy limit of efficient ion extraction has been discovered which cannot be overcome by the aperture narrowing. A conclusion is made that the RF extraction mode is superior for all the researched grids since it is characterized by higher extracted ion current at any acceleration voltage for any grid with much more simple and smooth extraction curves behavior in comparison to the dc case as well as absence of arcing, jumps, and hysteresis of the measured curves at any RF voltages. The unique ability of the RF biased single-grid source of simultaneous ion/electron emission has been studied. The measured maximal attainable ion beam current compensation ratio is always sufficiently higher than 1 and typically varies in the range 2-6. The results obtained in the present paper demonstrate prospective of the single-grid source in space thruster applications and in modern technologies, particularly for ion beam processing of wide bandgap semiconductor devices such as GaN and SiC transistors due to inherent

  7. Single electrons from heavy-flavor mesons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taesoo; Berrehrah, Hamza; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Tolos, Laura; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2017-07-01

    We study the single electron spectra from D - and B - meson semileptonic decays in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 , 62.4, and 19.2 GeV by employing the parton-hadron-string dynamics (PHSD) transport approach that has been shown to reasonably describe the charm dynamics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider energies on a microscopic level. In this approach the initial charm and bottom quarks are produced by using the PYTHIA event generator which is tuned to reproduce the fixed-order next-to-leading logarithm calculations for charm and bottom production. The produced charm and bottom quarks interact with off-shell (massive) partons in the quark-gluon plasma with scattering cross sections which are calculated in the dynamical quasiparticle model that is matched to reproduce the equation of state of the partonic system above the deconfinement temperature Tc. At energy densities close to the critical energy density (≈0.5 GeV /fm3 ) the charm and bottom quarks are hadronized into D and B mesons through either coalescence or fragmentation. After hadronization the D and B mesons interact with the light hadrons by employing the scattering cross sections from an effective Lagrangian. The final D and B mesons then produce single electrons through semileptonic decay. We find that the PHSD approach well describes the nuclear modification factor RAA and elliptic flow v2 of single electrons in d +Au and Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV and the elliptic flow in Au+Au reactions at √{sNN}=62.4 GeV from the PHENIX Collaboration, however, the large RAA at √{sNN}=62.4 GeV is not described at all. Furthermore, we make predictions for the RAA of D mesons and of single electrons at the lower energy of √{sNN}=19.2 GeV . Additionally, the medium modification of the azimuthal angle ϕ between a heavy quark and a heavy antiquark is studied. We find that the transverse flow enhances the azimuthal angular distributions close to ϕ =0 because the heavy

  8. A Sepic-Type Single-Stage Electronic Ballast for High Line Voltage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Chen, Kuo-Kuang

    In this paper, a sepic-type single-stage electronic ballast (STSSEB) is proposed, which is derived from the combination of a sepic converter and a half-bridge inverter. The ballast can not only step down input voltage directly but achieve high power factor, reduce voltage stress, improve efficiency and lower cost. Since component stress is reduced significantly, the presented ballast can be applied to high voltage mains. Derivation of the STSSEB is first presented. Then, analysis, design and practical consideration for the STSSEB are discussed. A 347Vac 60W prototype has been simulated and implemented. Simulations and experimental results have verified the feasibility of the proposed STSSEB.

  9. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, Ole; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximately 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative information......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...

  10. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Eskay, T.P.

    1992-12-31

    Radical cation generation in coal may make possible depolymerization at low temperature. This possibility was investigated using single molecules containing functional groups common in coals. Single- electron oxidations of 4,4{prime}-dimethoxybibenzyl (DMBB) by Fe(III) (1,10-phenanthroline){sub 3}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, in refluxing CH{sub 3}CN, gave incomplete mass balances; an attempt was made to identify the additional products. Part of these products were deduced to be dimer, p-methoxybenzylated dimer of DMBB; mono, di, and tri-p- methoxybenzylated DMBB. Similar oxidations in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and sulfolane solvents gave similar results. Attempts to use other solvents were unsuccessful.

  11. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylenedithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS. The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule–electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  12. Comment on "Magnetotransport signatures of a single nodal electron pocket constructed from Fermi arcs"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2017-10-01

    We comment on the recent work [N. Harrison et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 224505 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.224505] which attempts to explain the sign reversal and quantum oscillations of the Hall coefficient observed in cuprates from a single-nodal diamond-shaped electron pocket with concave arc segments. Given the importance of this work, it calls for closer scrutiny. Their conclusion of sign reversal of the Hall coefficient depends on a nongeneric rounding of the sharp vertices. Moreover, their demonstration of quantum oscillation in the Hall coefficient from a single pocket is unconvincing. We maintain that at least two pockets with different scattering rates is necessary to explain the observed quantum oscillations of the Hall coefficient.

  13. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V. A., E-mail: vishal.shah@warwick.ac.uk; Gammon, P. M. [Department of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chávez-Ángel, E. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Department of Physics, UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); and others

    2014-04-14

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm{sup 2}. We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials.

  14. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  15. Web server for tilt-pair validation of single particle maps from electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Sebastian; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional structures of biological assemblies may be calculated from images of single particles obtained by electron cryomicroscopy. A key step is the correct determination of the orientation of the particle in individual image projections. A useful tool for validation of the quality of a 3D map and its consistency with images is tilt-pair analysis. In a successful tilt-pair test, the relative angle between orientations assigned to each image of a tilt-pair agrees with the known relative rotation angle of the microscope specimen holder during the experiment. To make the procedure easy to apply to the increasing number of single particle maps, we have developed software and a web server for tilt-pair analysis. The tilt-pair analysis program reports the overall agreement of the assigned orientations with the known tilt angle and axis of the experiment and the distribution of tilt transformations for individual particles recorded in a single image field. We illustrate application of the validation tool to several single particle specimens and describe how to interpret the scores. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Photoionisation detection of single {sup 87}Rb-atoms using channel electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Florian Alexander

    2011-09-02

    Fast and efficient detection of single atoms is a universal requirement concerning modern experiments in atom physics, quantum optics, and precision spectroscopy. In particular for future quantum information and quantum communication technologies, the efficient readout of qubit states encoded in single atoms or ions is an elementary prerequisite. The rapid development in the field of quantum optics and atom optics in the recent years has enabled to prepare individual atoms as quantum memories or arrays of single atoms as qubit registers. With such systems, the implementation of quantum computation or quantum communication protocols seems feasible. This thesis describes a novel detection scheme which enables fast and efficient state analysis of single neutral atoms. The detection scheme is based on photoionisation and consists of two parts: the hyperfine-state selective photoionisation of single atoms and the registration of the generated photoion-electron pairs via two channel electron multipliers (CEMs). In this work, both parts were investigated in two separate experiments. For the first step, a photoionisation probability of p{sub ion}=0.991 within an ionisation time of t{sub ion}=386 ns is achieved for a single {sup 87}Rb-atom in an optical dipole trap. For the second part, a compact detection system for the ionisation fragments was developed consisting of two opposing CEM detectors. Measurements show that single neutral atoms can be detected via their ionisation fragments with a detection efficiency of {eta}{sub atom}=0.991 within a detection time of t{sub det}=415.5 ns. In a future combined setup, this will allow the state-selective readout of optically trapped, single neutral {sup 87}Rb-atoms via photoionisation detection with an estimated detection efficiency {eta}=0.982 and a detection time of t{sub tot} = 802 ns. Although initially developed for single {sup 87}Rb-atoms, the concept of photoionisation detection is in principle generally applicable to any

  17. Single particle electron microscopy reconstruction of the exosome complex using the random conical tilt method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqi; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2011-03-28

    Single particle electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction has recently become a popular tool to get the three-dimensional (3D) structure of large macromolecular complexes. Compared to X-ray crystallography, it has some unique advantages. First, single particle EM reconstruction does not need to crystallize the protein sample, which is the bottleneck in X-ray crystallography, especially for large macromolecular complexes. Secondly, it does not need large amounts of protein samples. Compared with milligrams of proteins necessary for crystallization, single particle EM reconstruction only needs several micro-liters of protein solution at nano-molar concentrations, using the negative staining EM method. However, despite a few macromolecular assemblies with high symmetry, single particle EM is limited at relatively low resolution (lower than 1 nm resolution) for many specimens especially those without symmetry. This technique is also limited by the size of the molecules under study, i.e. 100 kDa for negatively stained specimens and 300 kDa for frozen-hydrated specimens in general. For a new sample of unknown structure, we generally use a heavy metal solution to embed the molecules by negative staining. The specimen is then examined in a transmission electron microscope to take two-dimensional (2D) micrographs of the molecules. Ideally, the protein molecules have a homogeneous 3D structure but exhibit different orientations in the micrographs. These micrographs are digitized and processed in computers as "single particles". Using two-dimensional alignment and classification techniques, homogenous molecules in the same views are clustered into classes. Their averages enhance the signal of the molecule's 2D shapes. After we assign the particles with the proper relative orientation (Euler angles), we will be able to reconstruct the 2D particle images into a 3D virtual volume. In single particle 3D reconstruction, an essential step is to correctly assign the proper orientation

  18. Single electron capture measurements in collisions of K{sup +} on N{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcón, F.B. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Fuentes, B.E., E-mail: beatriz.fuentes@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Cd. Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Martínez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Yousif, F.B. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad #1000, Col. Chamilpa, C.P. 62210, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    Absolute total charge transfer cross sections have been measured for K{sup +}–N{sub 2} collisions, at impact energies between 1.0 and 3.5 keV. The charge transfer cross sections show a monotonic increasing behaviour as a function of the incident energy. Agreement with other groups is observed as the present measurements extend to lower energies. A semi-empirical calculation shows a similar behaviour to the present data with respect to the electron capture cross sections as a function of energy.

  19. Single crystal growth and electronic structure of TlPbI{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khyzhun, O.Y., E-mail: khyzhun@ipms.kiev.ua [Frantsevych Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Street, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Fochuk, P.M. [Yuriy Fedkovich Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynskogo Street, 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Kityk, I.V. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University of Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, PL-42-217 Czestochowa (Poland); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, J.Dlugosz University Częstochowa, Armii Krajowej 13/15, Częstochowa (Poland); Levkovets, S.I. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Eastern European National University, 13 Voli Avenue, 43025 Lutsk (Ukraine); Fedorchuk, A.O. [Department of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, Lviv National University of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnologies, 50 Pekarska Street, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine); Parasyuk, O.V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Eastern European National University, 13 Voli Avenue, 43025 Lutsk (Ukraine)

    2016-04-01

    High-quality inclusion-free TlPbI{sub 3} single crystals have been grown using Bridgman–Stockbarger method. The electronic structure of TlPbI{sub 3} is studied by using the possibilities of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the TlPbI{sub 3} crystal, XPS core-level and valence-band spectra for both pristine and Ar{sup +} ion-bombarded surfaces are recorded. The present XPS data indicate that the TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface is somewhat sensitive with respect to Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment. In particular, the XPS measurements reveal that thallium and lead atoms are in the formal valence +1 and +2, respectively, on the pristine TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface. Further, the 3.0 keV Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment of the surface induces partial transformation of lead ions to lower valence state, namely Pb{sup 0}; however, no partial loss of iodine atoms belonging to TlI{sub 8} polyhedra occurs due to the Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment of the TlPbI{sub 3} surface because after such a treatment thallium remains exclusively in the formal valence +1. The present XPS results indicate that low hygroscopicity is characteristic of the TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface. Photoinduced birefringence profiles in TlPbI{sub 3} are explored. - Highlights: • High-quality TlPbI{sub 3} single crystals have been grown by Bridgman–Stockbarger method. • Electronic structure of TlPbI{sub 3} is studied by the XPS method. • XPS data reveal low hygroscopicity of TlPbI{sub 3} surface. • TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface is sensitive with respect to Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment. • Photoinduced birefringence profiles in TlPbI{sub 3} are explored.

  20. Single Parenthood Impact on Street Children in Ibadan Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Key words: Single Parenthood, Street Children, Anti-Social Behaviour,. Aggression, Nigeria. Introduction. The socialization of children is very important for the continuity of any culture; basically, parenting is one of the challenging social roles in Nigeria today. The family is said to be the most important agent of socialization,.

  1. The Impact of Multiple Fluency Interventions on a Single Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Jennifer; Tracey, Dianne H.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of multiple fluency interventions on a single subject in grade three. Fluency interventions, including choral reading, echo reading, repeated reading, audio book modeling, and teacher modeling were implemented over a period of eight weeks. Results indicated that using multiple fluency strategies, rather…

  2. General Impact Of A Single Market - Albania Goes Digital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikollaq Pano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Brexit did trigger some discussion about the European Single Market future The Commission strategy for an area without internal frontiers in which the free movement of goods persons services and capital is ensured remains the same and increasingly attracts the attention and interest of policy makers and researchers. The digital single market a recent concept developed in the context of the European Union goes beyond the Cloud computing IoT and Big Data that are present-day words frequently mentioned in country strategies. The aim of coming together into a single market is to maximise the benefits of technology while simultaneously preserving values we hold timeless. Expanding this concept and considering the configuration of a digital market in Albania is the underpinning of this paper. Goods and services provided on-line will grant a better access and improved service to the benefit of customers under conditions of fair competition and a high level of consumer and personal data protection. A single platform necessarily digital can incorporate the banking industrial education investment markets and contribute to their unification. This first step of placing the idea should be followed by considering components like digital infrastructure development digitally educated people collaborative economy and others. There is a vision for the country development with no timeline yet above and beyond the brainstorming approach.

  3. InAs nanowire with epitaxial aluminium as a single-electron transistor with fixed tunnel barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taupin, M.; Mannila, E.; Krogstrup, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabrication of single-electron transistors using InAs nanowires with epitaxial aluminium with fixed tunnel barriers made of aluminium oxide. The devices exhibit a hard superconducting gap induced by the proximized aluminium cover shell and they behave as metallic single-electron tran......We report on fabrication of single-electron transistors using InAs nanowires with epitaxial aluminium with fixed tunnel barriers made of aluminium oxide. The devices exhibit a hard superconducting gap induced by the proximized aluminium cover shell and they behave as metallic single......-electron transistors. In contrast to the typical few channel contacts in semiconducting devices, our approach forms opaque multichannel contacts to a semiconducting wire and thus provides a complementary way to study them. In addition, we confirm that unwanted extra quantum dots can appear at the surface...

  4. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  5. Information Impact Vol. 6 (2) 2015 Utilization of Electronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of electronic information Resource skills training for lecturers on pedagogical practices and research productivity. International journal of Education and Development using information and communication. Technology. 8(1), 16-28. Deng, H. (2010). Emerging Patterns and. Trends in Utilizing Electronic Resources in.

  6. The Impact of Electronic Communication Technology on Written Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Mohd. Sahandri Gani B.; Ghorbani, Mohd. Reza; Abdullah, Saifuddin Kumar B.

    2009-01-01

    Communication technology is changing things. Language is no exception. Some language researchers argue that language is deteriorating due to increased use in electronic communication. The present paper investigated 100 randomly selected electronic mails (e-mails) and 50 short messaging system (SMS) messages of a representative sample of…

  7. Understanding avalanches in a Micromegas from single-electron response measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerguerras, T., E-mail: zerguer@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Genolini, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Kuger, F. [University of Würzburg, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Josselin, M.; Maroni, A.; Nguyen-Trung, T.; Pouthas, J.; Rosier, P. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Şahin, Ö. [Department of Physics, Uludağ University, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Suzuki, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Veenhof, R. [Department of Physics, Uludağ University, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); RD51 Collaboration, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-02-01

    Avalanche fluctuations set a limit to the energy and position resolutions that can be reached by gaseous detectors. This paper presents a method based on a laser test-bench to measure the absolute gain and the relative gain variance of a Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector from its single-electron response. A Micromegas detector was operated with three binary gas mixtures, composed of 5% isobutane as a quencher, with argon, neon or helium, at atmospheric pressure. The anode signals were read out by low-noise, high-gain Cremat CR-110 charge preamplifiers to enable single-electron detection down to gain of 5× 10{sup 3} for the first time. The argon mixture shows the lowest gain at a given amplification field together with the lowest breakdown limit, which is at a gain of 2×10{sup 4} an order of magnitude lower than that of neon or helium. For each gas, the relative gain variance f is almost unchanged in the range of amplification field studied. It was found that f is twice higher (f∼0.6) in argon than in the two other mixtures. This hierarchy of gain and relative gain variance agrees with predictions of analytic models, based on gas ionisation yields, and a Monte-Carlo model included in the simulation software Magboltz version 10.1.

  8. Electronic phase diagram of LixCoO2 revisited with potentiostatically deintercalated single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, T. Y.; Huang, F.-T.; Shu, G. J.; Lee, W. L.; Chu, M.-W.; Liu, H. L.; Chou, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Electronic phase diagram of LixCoO2 has been reexamined using potentiostatically de-intercalated single-crystal samples. Stable phases of x˜0.87, 0.72, 0.53, 0.50, 0.43, and 0.33 were found and isolated for physical property studies. A-type and chain-type antiferromagnetic orderings have been suggested from magnetic susceptibility measurement results in x˜0.87 and 0.50 below approximately 10 and 200 K, respectively, similar to those found in NaxCoO2 system. There is no Li vacancy superlattice ordering observed at room temperature for the electronically stable phase Li0.72CoO2 as revealed by synchrotron x-ray Laue diffraction. The peculiar magnetic anomaly near ˜175 K as often found in powder samples of x˜0.46-0.78 cannot be isolated through this single-crystal potentiostatic method, which supports the previously proposed explanation to be a surface stabilized phase of significant thermal hysteresis and aging character.

  9. Electronic modes in carbon nanotubes with single and double impurity sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, P. G.; Cottam, M. G.

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical study of isolated and doubly-clustered impurities is presented for the electronic excitations in a carbon nanotube lattice. Using a matrix operator formalism and a tight-binding model where the interactions between atoms take place via nearest-neighbor hopping, the properties of the excitations are deduced. A geometry consisting of long, single-walled carbon nanotubes is assumed with the defects introduced in the form of substitutional impurity atoms, giving rise to the localized electronic modes of the nanotube as well as the propagating modes of the pure (host) material. The impurities are assumed to be in a low concentration, having the form of either a single, isolated defect or a small cluster of two defects close together. A tridiagonal matrix technique is employed within a Green’s function formalism to obtain the properties of the discrete modes of the system, including their frequencies and localization. The numerical examples show a dependence on the nanotube diameters and on the relative spatial configurations of the impurities. The results contrast with the previous studies of line impurities since there is no translational symmetry along the longitudinal axis of the nanotubes in the present case.

  10. Mesoporous SnO₂ single crystals as an effective electron collector for perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zonglong; Zheng, Xiaoli; Bai, Yang; Zhang, Teng; Wang, Zilong; Xiao, Shuang; Yang, Shihe

    2015-07-28

    Mesoporous single crystals are prized for their fast electron transport and high surface area. Here we report the first synthesis of mesoporous SnO2 single crystals (SnO2 MSCs) by a simple silica-templated hydrothermal method, and its application in solution-processed perovskite solar cells (PSCs). A relatively low efficiency (3.76%) was obtained due to the strong charge recombination at the SnO2/perovskite interface. However, by coating a thin TiO2 barrier layer on SnO2via TiCl4 treatment, we were able to achieve an 8.54% power conversion efficiency (PCE). A dynamics study using impedance spectroscopy revealed a much lower transport resistance for the SnO2 MSC-based solar cells than for the TiO2 nanocrystal PSCs, but a stronger recombination. Significantly, the thin TiO2 coating layer on SnO2 considerably reduced the recombination while largely maintaining the superior electron-transport properties.

  11. Single and Multisite Impact Response of S2-Glass/Epoxy Balsa Wood Core Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Uday K.; Deka, Lakshya J.

    Impact damage reduces the structural integrity and load bearing capacity of a composite structure. Most studies on high velocity impact damage have been limited to single-site impacts, with little consideration given to the effect of cumulative damage from multiple impacts. In this study, the impact damage response of S2-glass/epoxy balsa wood core sandwich composite is evaluated experimentally and supported by finite element modeling for single-site and multi-site impacts from 0.30 and 0.50 caliber spherical projectiles. During high velocity impact, a composite laminate undergoes progressive damage;hence a progressive failure model based on Hashin's criteria is used to predict failure. When subjected to multi-site impact loading, a sandwich composite structure exhibits synergistic and cumulative damage causing extensive fiber breakage, matrix cracking and delamination. An excellent correlation between experimental and numerical results is obtained.

  12. Thermal conductance and thermoelectric figure of merit of C60-based single-molecule junctions: Electrons, phonons, and photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, J. C.; Siebler, R.; Cuevas, J. C.; Pauly, F.

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here an ab initio study of the impact of the phonon transport on the thermal conductance and thermoelectric figure of merit of C60-based single-molecule junctions. To be precise, we combine density functional theory with nonequilibrium Green's-function techniques to compute these two quantities in junctions with either a C60 monomer or a C60 dimer connected to gold electrodes, taking into account the contributions of both electrons and phonons. Our results show that for C60 monomer junctions phonon transport plays a minor role in the thermal conductance and, in turn, in the figure of merit, which can reach values on the order of 0.1, depending on the contact geometry. In C60 dimer junctions, phonons are transported less efficiently, but they completely dominate the thermal conductance and reduce the figure of merit as compared to monomer junctions. Thus, claims that by stacking C60 molecules one could achieve high thermoelectric performance, which have been made without considering the phonon contribution, are not justified. Moreover, we analyze the relevance of near-field thermal radiation for the figure of merit of these junctions within the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics. We conclude that photon tunneling can be another detrimental factor for the thermoelectric performance, which has been overlooked so far in the field of molecular electronics. Our study illustrates the crucial roles that phonon transport and photon tunneling can play, when critically assessing the performance of molecular junctions as potential nanoscale thermoelectric devices.

  13. Single-chip electron spin resonance detectors operating at 50GHz, 92GHz, and 146GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, Alessandro V; Gualco, Gabriele; Jeong, Minki; Zivkovic, Ivica; Brugger, Jürgen; Rønnow, Henrik M; Anders, Jens; Boero, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    We report on the design and characterization of single-chip electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors operating at 50GHz, 92GHz, and 146GHz. The core of the single-chip ESR detectors is an integrated LC-oscillator, formed by a single turn aluminum planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. On the same chip, a second, nominally identical, LC-oscillator together with a mixer and an output buffer are also integrated. Thanks to the slightly asymmetric capacitance of the mixer inputs, a signal at a few hundreds of MHz is obtained at the output of the mixer. The mixer is used for frequency down-conversion, with the aim to obtain an output signal at a frequency easily manageable off-chip. The coil diameters are 120μm, 70μm, and 45μm for the U-band, W-band, and the D-band oscillators, respectively. The experimental frequency noises at 100kHz offset from the carrier are 90Hz/Hz 1/2 , 300Hz/Hz 1/2 , and 700Hz/Hz 1/2 at 300K, respectively. The ESR spectra are obtained by measuring the frequency variations of the single-chip oscillators as a function of the applied magnetic field. The experimental spin sensitivities, as measured with a sample of α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl (BDPA)/benzene complex, are 1×10 8 spins/Hz 1/2 , 4×10 7 spins/Hz 1/2 , 2×10 7 spins/Hz 1/2 at 300K, respectively. We also show the possibility to perform experiments up to 360GHz by means of the higher harmonics in the microwave field produced by the integrated single-chip LC-oscillators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High Quality Nanogap Electrodes for Electronic Transport Measurements of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Danvers E.; Strachan, Douglas R.; Guiton, Beth S.; Davies, Peter K.; Park, Tae Hong; Therien, Michael J.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2007-03-01

    Electromigrated metal electrodes and resulting devices have shown great promise in moving towards the realization of single molecule-based electronic devices holding the potential for a wide range of electronic applications. At present, a major concern is that the electronic behavior of such devices may be greatly influenced by residual nanoscale metal particles. We have developed a computer controlled electromigration (CCE) process for creating nanogaps at room temperature which allows us to characterize a bare nanogap before putting a molecule into the nanogap.^1 This is very different from other approaches used in the field where nanogaps are formed at low temperature with molecules already attached to the nanowire by employing a simple ramp up in voltage. Among the bare nanogaps we produced using CCE, tunneling behavior is observed with no indication of transport signatures associated with metal particle formation. Details of molecular measurements utilizing these clean gaps will be discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NIRT Grant No. 0304531 and MRSEC award DMR05-20020). ^1D. R. Strachan, D. E. Smith, D. E. Johnston et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86 043109 (2005).

  15. Sub-cycle optical phase control of nanotunnelling in the single-electron regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Tobias; Ludwig, Markus; Schmalz, Michael F.; Knittel, Vanessa; Brida, Daniele; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2016-10-01

    The high peak electric fields provided by single-cycle light pulses can be harnessed to manipulate and control charge motion in solid-state systems, resulting in electron emission out of metals and semiconductors or high harmonics generation in dielectrics. These processes are of a non-perturbative character and require precise reproducibility of the electric-field profile. Here, we vary the carrier-envelope phase of 6-fs-long near-infrared pulses with pJ-level energy to control electronic transport in a laterally confined nanoantenna with an 8 nm gap. Peak current densities of 50 MA cm-2 are achieved, corresponding to the transfer of individual electrons in a half-cycle period of 2 fs. The observed behaviours are made possible by the strong distortion of the effective tunnelling barrier due to the extreme electric fields that the nanostructure provides and sustains under sub-cycle optical biasing. Operating at room temperature and in a standard atmosphere, the performed experiments demonstrate a robust class of nanoelectronic switches gated by phase-locked optical transients of minute energy content.

  16. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  17. Atomistic calculation of electronic and optical properties of a single InAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, M.; Korkusinski, M.; Sheng, W.; Hawrylak, P.

    2008-03-01

    We present an atomistic tight-binding (TB) theory of electronic structure and optical properties of a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot (SAD). In previous work an effective-bond-orbital model (EBOM) was used to calculate electron and hole states of the SAD. The strain distribution was calculated using the continuum elasticity theory and EBOM was coupled to the strain via the Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian. However, the properties of these multimillion-atom systems are influenced by the presence of crystal facets and the symmetry of underlying zinc-blende lattice. In current work we present a fully atomistic TB model, accounting for the atomistic symmetry, and extended to include d-orbitals for proper treatment of interband/intervalley couplings. Strain is included in the Hamiltonian via Slater-Koster rules and a generalized Harrison law, with the equilibrium positions of atoms calculated using the valence force field method. Coulomb matrix elements are found using the TB functions, and electronic properties of N confined excitons (N=1-6) are determined in the CI approach. Emission spectra of multiexcitons are also obtained. Comparison with the previous approach and the experimental results is presented.

  18. Dynamic material behavior determination using single fiber impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heru Utomo, B.D.; Broos, J.P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of fiber materials are used as input data for amongst others impact simulations on fiber based structures to predict their behavior. Accurate predictions for such materials are still not possible, because the mechanical properties are usually determined (quasi-)statically or

  19. Acute Impact of Tobacco vs Electronic Cigarette Smoking on Oxidative Stress and Vascular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Roberto; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Violi, Francesco; Nocella, Cristina; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Perri, Ludovica; Peruzzi, Mariangela; Marullo, Antonino G M; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Valenti, Valentina; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The vascular safety of electronic cigarettes (e-Cigarettes) must still be clarified. We compared the impact of e-Cigarettes vs traditional tobacco cigarettes on oxidative stress and endothelial function in healthy smokers and nonsmoker adults. A crossover, single-blind study was performed in 40 healthy subjects (20 smokers and 20 nonsmokers, matched for age and sex). First, all subjects smoked traditional tobacco cigarettes. One week later, the same subjects smoked an e-Cigarette with the same nominal nicotine content. Blood samples were drawn just before and after smoking, and markers of oxidative stress, nitric oxide bioavailability, and vitamin E levels were measured. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was also measured. Smoking both e-Cigarettes and traditional cigarettes led to a significant increase in the levels of soluble NOX2-derived peptide and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α and a significant decrease in nitric oxide bioavailability, vitamin E levels, and FMD. Generalized estimating equation analysis confirmed that all markers of oxidative stress and FMD were significantly affected by smoking and showed that the biologic effects of e-Cigarettes vstraditional cigarettes on vitamin E levels (P = .413) and FMD (P = .311) were not statistically different. However, e-Cigarettes seemed to have a lesser impact than traditional cigarettes on levels of soluble NOX2-derived peptide (P = .001), 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (P = .046), and nitric oxide bioavailability (P = .001). Our study showed that both cigarettes have unfavorable effects on markers of oxidative stress and FMD after single use, although e-Cigarettes seemed to have a lesser impact. Future studies are warranted to clarify the chronic vascular effects of e-Cigarette smoking. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy and Stone-Wales defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil [Physics Group, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Mohsen Emami, E-mail: razavi246@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nayebi, Payman [Department of Physics, College of Technical and Engineering, Saveh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The electronic properties of graphene device with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect have been studied. • The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding. • The density of state, current voltage curves of pure graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects have been investigated. • Transmission spectrum of pristine graphene device and graphene with SV and SW defects has been examined. - Abstract: The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding in order to examine the electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defects. We have optimized structures of pristine graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects. The bond lengths, current-voltage curve and transmission probability have been calculated. We found that the bond length for relaxed graphene is 1.43 Å while for graphene with SV and SW defects the bond lengths are 1.41 Å and 1.33 Å, respectively. For the SV defect, the arrangement of atoms with three nearest neighbors indicates sp{sub 2} bonding. While for SW defect, the arrangement of atoms suggests nearly sp bonding. From the current-voltage curve for graphene with defects we have determined that the behavior of the I–V curves is nonlinear. It is also found that the SV and SW defects cause to decrease the current compared to the pristine graphene case. Furthermore, the single vacancy defect reduces the current more than the Stone-Wales defect. Moreover, we observed that by increasing the voltage from zero to 1 V new peaks near Fermi level in the transmission probability curves have been created.

  1. Impact of single parameter changes on Ceph cloud storage performance

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Stefan; Morrison, John P.

    2016-01-01

    In a general purpose cloud system efficiencies are yet to be had from supporting diverse applications and their requirements within a storage system used for a private cloud. Supporting such diverse requirements poses a significant challenge in a storage system that supports fine grained configuration on a variety of parameters. This paper uses the Ceph distributed file system, and in particular its global parameters, to show how a single changed parameter can effect the performance for a ran...

  2. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  3. Near-atomic resolution using electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Settembre, Ethan; Xu, Chen; Dormitzer, Philip R; Bellamy, Richard; Harrison, Stephen C; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2008-02-12

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) yields images of macromolecular assemblies and their components, from which 3D structures can be determined, by using an image processing method commonly known as "single-particle reconstruction." During the past two decades, this technique has become an important tool for 3D structure determination, but it generally has not been possible to determine atomic models. In principle, individual molecular images contain high-resolution information contaminated by a much higher level of noise. In practice, it has been unclear whether current averaging methods are adequate to extract this information from the background. We present here a reconstruction, obtained by using recently developed image processing methods, of the rotavirus inner capsid particle ("double-layer particle" or DLP) at a resolution suitable for interpretation by an atomic model. The result establishes single-particle reconstruction as a high-resolution technique. We show by direct comparison that the cryo-EM reconstruction of viral protein 6 (VP6) of the rotavirus DLP is similar in clarity to a 3.8-A resolution map obtained from x-ray crystallography. At this resolution, most of the amino acid side chains produce recognizable density. The icosahedral symmetry of the particle was an important factor in achieving this resolution in the cryo-EM analysis, but as the size of recordable datasets increases, single-particle reconstruction also is likely to yield structures at comparable resolution from samples of much lower symmetry. This potential has broad implications for structural cell biology.

  4. Single-shot electron bunch length measurements using a spatial electro-optical autocorrelation interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, Daniel; Erni, Daniel; Schlott, Volker; Sigg, Hans; Jäckel, Heinz; Murk, Axel

    2010-10-01

    A spatial, electro-optical autocorrelation (EOA) interferometer using the vertically polarized lobes of coherent transition radiation (CTR) has been developed as a single-shot electron bunch length monitor at an optical beam port downstream the 100 MeV preinjector LINAC of the Swiss Light Source. This EOA monitor combines the advantages of step-scan interferometers (high temporal resolution) [D. Mihalcea et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 9, 082801 (2006) and T. Takahashi and K. Takami, Infrared Phys. Technol. 51, 363 (2008)] and terahertz-gating technologies [U. Schmidhammer et al., Appl. Phys. B: Lasers Opt. 94, 95 (2009) and B. Steffen et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 032802 (2009)] (fast response), providing the possibility to tune the accelerator with an online bunch length diagnostics. While a proof of principle of the spatial interferometer was achieved by step-scan measurements with far-infrared detectors, the single-shot capability of the monitor has been demonstrated by electro-optical correlation of the spatial CTR interference pattern with fairly long (500 ps) neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser pulses in a ZnTe crystal. In single-shot operation, variations of the bunch length between 1.5 and 4 ps due to different phase settings of the LINAC bunching cavities have been measured with subpicosecond time resolution.

  5. Single-grain Si thin-film transistors for monolithic 3D-ICs and flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishihara, R.; Zhang, J.; Trifunovic, M.; Derakhshandeh Kheljani, J.; Golshani, N.; Tajari Mofrad, M.R.; Chen, T.; Beenakker, C.I.M.; Shimoda, T.

    2014-01-01

    We review our recent achievements in monolithic 3D-ICs and flexible electronics based on single-grain Si TFTs that are fabricated inside a single-grain with a low-temperature process. Based on pulsed-laser crystallization and submicron sized cavities made in the substrate, amorphous-Si precursor

  6. The impact of single substitutions on multiple sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaere, Steffen; Gesell, Tanja; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2008-12-27

    We introduce another view of sequence evolution. Contrary to other approaches, we model the substitution process in two steps. First we assume (arbitrary) scaled branch lengths on a given phylogenetic tree. Second we allocate a Poisson distributed number of substitutions on the branches. The probability to place a mutation on a branch is proportional to its relative branch length. More importantly, the action of a single mutation on an alignment column is described by a doubly stochastic matrix, the so-called one-step mutation matrix. This matrix leads to analytical formulae for the posterior probability distribution of the number of substitutions for an alignment column.

  7. Molecular electronic devices based on single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Alina K; Steigerwald, Michael L; Guo, Xuefeng; Nuckolls, Colin

    2008-12-01

    As the top-down fabrication techniques for silicon-based electronic materials have reached the scale of molecular lengths, researchers have been investigating nanostructured materials to build electronics from individual molecules. Researchers have directed extensive experimental and theoretical efforts toward building functional optoelectronic devices using individual organic molecules and fabricating metal-molecule junctions. Although this method has many advantages, its limitations lead to large disagreement between experimental and theoretical results. This Account describes a new method to create molecular electronic devices, covalently bridging a gap in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with an electrically functional molecule. First, we introduce a molecular-scale gap into a nanotube by precise oxidative cutting through a lithographic mask. Now functionalized with carboxylic acids, the ends of the cleaved carbon nanotubes are reconnected with conjugated diamines to give robust diamides. The molecular electronic devices prepared in this fashion can withstand and respond to large environmental changes based on the functional groups in the molecules. For example, with oligoanilines as the molecular bridge, the conductance of the device is sensitive to pH. Similarly, using diarylethylenes as the bridge provides devices that can reversibly switch between conjugated and nonconjugated states. The molecular bridge can perform the dual task of carrying electrical current and sensing/recognition through biological events such as protein/substrate binding and DNA hybridization. The devices based on DNA can measure the difference in electrical properties of complementary and mismatched strands. A well-matched duplex DNA 15-mer in the gap exhibits a 300-fold lower resistance than a duplex with a GT or CA mismatch. This system provides an ultrasensitive way to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the individual molecule level. Restriction enzymes can cleave

  8. A deep convolutional neural network approach to single-particle recognition in cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Ouyang, Qi; Mao, Youdong

    2017-07-21

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a mainstream tool for the structural determination of biological macromolecular complexes. However, high-resolution cryo-EM reconstruction often requires hundreds of thousands of single-particle images. Particle extraction from experimental micrographs thus can be laborious and presents a major practical bottleneck in cryo-EM structural determination. Existing computational methods for particle picking often use low-resolution templates for particle matching, making them susceptible to reference-dependent bias. It is critical to develop a highly efficient template-free method for the automatic recognition of particle images from cryo-EM micrographs. We developed a deep learning-based algorithmic framework, DeepEM, for single-particle recognition from noisy cryo-EM micrographs, enabling automated particle picking, selection and verification in an integrated fashion. The kernel of DeepEM is built upon a convolutional neural network (CNN) composed of eight layers, which can be recursively trained to be highly "knowledgeable". Our approach exhibits an improved performance and accuracy when tested on the standard KLH dataset. Application of DeepEM to several challenging experimental cryo-EM datasets demonstrated its ability to avoid the selection of un-wanted particles and non-particles even when true particles contain fewer features. The DeepEM methodology, derived from a deep CNN, allows automated particle extraction from raw cryo-EM micrographs in the absence of a template. It demonstrates an improved performance, objectivity and accuracy. Application of this novel method is expected to free the labor involved in single-particle verification, significantly improving the efficiency of cryo-EM data processing.

  9. High performance electronics based on aligned arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Coskun

    This dissertation describes a new approach for generating large area homogenous parallel array of single walled carbon nanotubes. The approach uses guided growth, by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), of SWNTs on single crystal quartz substrates. The anisotropic interaction associated with lattice structure of the quartz between SWNT and quartz surface guides SWNT during the deposition process. We have optimized CVD conditions that can produce arrays of individual single walled carbon nanotubes in horizontal configurations with perfect linear shapes, to within experimental uncertainties, and with levels of alignment >99.9%. We took the method one step further by printing these SWNT arrays on unusual substrate such as plastic. Using the developed printing technique, we can fabricate multilayer superstructures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a wide range of substrates. In order to understand charge transport through SWNT networks, we studied the scaling behaviours SWNT transistors by systematically varying degrees of alignment and coverage in transistors with a range of channel lengths and orientations perpendicular and parallel to the direction of alignment. We have modelled our experimental results using a first principles stick-percolation based transport model which provides a simple framework to interpret the sometimes counter-intuitive transport parameters measured in these devices. We have used dense, perfectly aligned arrays of long, perfectly linear SWNTs as an effective thin film semiconductor suitable for integration into transistors and other classes of electronic devices. These types of devices show excellent electric performance with mobilities and scaled transconductances approaching ˜2,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 and ˜3,000 S m-1, respectively. MOS and CMOS logic gates and mechanically flexible transistors on plastic were also demonstrated. Finally we have studied the high frequency performance of transistors that use aligned SWNT arrays. For the

  10. Electrical detection of the spin resonance of a single electron in a silicon field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, M.; Martin, I.; Yablonovitch, E.; Jiang, H. W.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to manipulate and monitor a single-electron spin using electron spin resonance is a long-sought goal. Such control would be invaluable for nanoscopic spin electronics, quantum information processing using individual electron spin qubits and magnetic resonance imaging of single molecules. There have been several examples of magnetic resonance detection of a single-electron spin in solids. Spin resonance of a nitrogen-vacancy defect centre in diamond has been detected optically, and spin precession of a localized electron spin on a surface was detected using scanning tunnelling microscopy. Spins in semiconductors are particularly attractive for study because of their very long decoherence times. Here we demonstrate electrical sensing of the magnetic resonance spin-flips of a single electron paramagnetic spin centre, formed by a defect in the gate oxide of a standard silicon transistor. The spin orientation is converted to electric charge, which we measure as a change in the source/drain channel current. Our set-up may facilitate the direct study of the physics of spin decoherence, and has the practical advantage of being composed of test transistors in a conventional, commercial, silicon integrated circuit. It is well known from the rich literature of magnetic resonance studies that there sometimes exist structural paramagnetic defects near the Si/SiO2 interface. For a small transistor, there might be only one isolated trap state that is within a tunnelling distance of the channel, and that has a charging energy close to the Fermi level.

  11. Vibrational Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Single Acetylene Molecules Adsorbed on Copper (100) Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chi-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With a 600mk homebuilt UHV STM system, we studied molecular vibration at the solid surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of Acetylene single molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface. The identification of vibrational IETS features with normalized conductance change (Δσ/σ) as low as 0.24% in dI2/d2V spectra was demonstrated. Five vibrational modes with energy level at 117.70meV (Δσ/σ =0.42%), 84.07meV (Δσ/σ =0.24%), 58.46meV (Δσ/σ =1.18%), 34.80meV (Δσ/σ =0.65% ) and 22.1...

  12. A Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap with Electron Ionization and Single Photon Ionization Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Tian, Yuan; Li, Ailin; Andrews, Derek; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-05-01

    A linear wire ion trap (LWIT) with both electron ionization (EI) and single photon ionization (SPI) sources was built. The SPI was provided by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with the ability to softly ionize organic compounds. The VUV lamp was driven by a pulse amplifier, which was controlled by a pulse generator, to avoid the detection of photons during ion detection. Sample gas was introduced through a leak valve, and the pressure in the system is shown to affect the signal-to-noise ratio and resolving power. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for benzene was 80 ppbv using SPI, better than the LOD using EI (137 ppbv). System performance was demonstrated by distinguishing compounds in different classes from gasoline.

  13. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-28

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  14. Study of single-electron information-processing circuit mimicking foraging behavior of honeybee swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Toshihiko; Oya, Takahide

    2017-06-01

    A new single-electron (SE) circuit mimicking the foraging behavior of a honeybee swarm is proposed. Recently, a “nature-inspired” or “biomimetic” technology has been attracting attention for developing innovative functional systems applying emerging nanoscale devices. In particular, the foraging behavior of honeybees is focused on as an architecture for a SE circuit. Honeybees show two foraging behaviors, namely, a probability search and a “waggle dance” (sharing information). By combining these behaviors, it can be considered that the foraging behavior is a unique information-processing act. For constructing a new system, a SE circuit mimicking the behavior was designed, constructed, and simulated. The SE circuit was constructed by assuming that the information that honeybees share corresponds to the operation of the circuit. The results of the simulation confirmed that the SE circuit mimics the information-sharing behavior of honeybees. Namely, the proposed honeybee-inspired SE circuit can perform functional information processing.

  15. Optically driven Rabi oscillations and adiabatic passage of single electron spins in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golter, D Andrew; Wang, Hailin

    2014-03-21

    Rabi oscillations and adiabatic passage of single electron spins in a diamond nitrogen vacancy center are demonstrated with two Raman-resonant optical pulses that are detuned from the respective dipole optical transitions. We show that the optical spin control is nuclear-spin selective and can be robust against rapid decoherence, including radiative decay and spectral diffusion, of the underlying optical transitions. A direct comparison between the Rabi oscillation and the adiabatic passage, along with a detailed theoretical analysis, provides significant physical insights into the connections and differences between these coherent spin processes and also elucidates the role of spectral diffusion in these processes. The optically driven coherent spin processes enable the use of nitrogen vacancy excited states to mediate coherent spin-phonon coupling, opening the door to combining optical control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom.

  16. Conditioned spin and charge dynamics of a single-electron quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greplova, Eliska; Laird, Edward A.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    In this article we describe the incoherent and coherent spin and charge dynamics of a single-electron quantum dot. We use a stochastic master equation to model the state of the system, as inferred by an observer with access to only the current signal through a quantum point contact, acting as a charge sensor. Measurements obtained during an interval of time contribute, by a past quantum state analysis, to our knowledge about the system at any time t within that interval. Such analysis permits precise estimation of physical parameters and we propose and test a modification of the classical Baum-Welch parameter reestimation method to systems driven by both coherent and incoherent processes.

  17. Single electron phenomena in InP /InGaAs quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaru, Prabhakar; Robinson, Hans; Kosaka, Hideo; Yablonovitch, Eli; Jiang, Hong-Wen

    2002-03-01

    InP based heterostructures have the advantages over those based on GaAs, in that (a) the bandgap wavelengths are in the range 1.3-1.55 microns, suitable for light transmission through fibers, (b) there is a greater tunability range of the electromagnetic Lande g-factors, important for spintronic applications, and (c) growth on InP substrates is more flexible as InP is lattice matched both to InGaAs and AlInAs. We report here on our results in Quantum Point Contacts (QPCs) fabricated in InP/InGaAs heterostructures, of relevance to single electron phenomena. Several features of the conductance quantization in QPCs such as the Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) noise and resonant tunneling peaks are analyzed with respect to the (a) the length and width of the channel, (b) the nature of the impurities, (d) magnetic field, (e) bias voltage, and (f) temperature.

  18. Effect of crystal orientation on conductivity and electron mobility in single-crystal alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of high-purity, single-crystal alumina is determined parallel to and perpendicular to the c-axis. The mean conductivity of four samples of each orientation is a factor 3.3 higher parallel to the c-axis than perpendicular to it. The conductivity as a function of temperature is attributed to extrinsic electron conduction at temperatures from 400 to 900 C, and intrinsic semiconduction at temperatures from 900 to 1300 C. In the high-temperature regime, the slope on all eight specimens is 4.7 +/- 0.1 eV. Hence, the thermal bandgap at O K is 9.4 +/- 0.2 eV.

  19. Single-Molecule Electronic Measurements of the Dynamic Flexibility of Histone Deacetylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froberg, James; You, Seungyong; Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Sedigh, Abbas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D. K.; Choi, Yongki

    Due to their involvement in epigenetic regulation, histone deacetylases (HDACs) have gained considerable interest in designing drugs for treatment of a variety of human diseases including cancers. Recently, we applied a label-free, electronic single-molecule nano-circuit technique to gain insight into the contribution of the dynamic flexibility in HDACs structure during the course of substrates/ ligands binding and catalysis. We observed that HDAC8 has two major (dynamically interconvertible) conformational states, ``ground (catalytically unfavorable)'' and ``transition (catalytically favorable)''. In addition, we found that its cognate substrates/ligands reciprocally catalyze the transition of the ground to the transition state conformation of HDAC8. Thus, we propose that both enzymes and their substrates/ligands serve as ``catalysts'' in facilitating the structural changes of each other and promoting the overall chemical transformation reaction. Such new information provides the potential for designing a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors and activators of HDAC8 for treating human diseases.

  20. Simple and controlled single electron transistor based on doping modulation in silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, M.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Molas, G.; Vinet, M.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-10-01

    A simple and highly reproducible single electron transistor (SET) has been fabricated using gated silicon nanowires. The structure is a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor made on silicon-on-insulator thin films. The channel of the transistor is the Coulomb island at low temperature. Two silicon nitride spacers deposited on each side of the gate create a modulation of doping along the nanowire that creates tunnel barriers. Such barriers are fixed and controlled, like in metallic SETs. The period of the Coulomb oscillations is set by the gate capacitance of the transistor and therefore controlled by lithography. The source and drain capacitances have also been characterized. This design could be used to build more complex SET devices.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of chiral single-wall copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, YingNi; Zhang, JianMin; Xu, KeWei

    2014-04-01

    The structural, energetic and electronic properties of chiral ( n, m) (3⩽ n⩽6, n/2⩽ m⩽ n) single-wall copper nanotubes (CuNTs) have been investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. The (4, 3) CuNT is energetically stable and should be observed experimentally in both free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, whereas the (5, 5) and (6, 4) CuNTs should be observed in free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, respectively. The number of conductance channels in the CuNTs does not always correspond to the number of atomic strands comprising the nanotube. Charge density contours show that there is an enhanced interatomic interaction in CuNTs compared with Cu bulk. Current transporting states display different periods and chirality, the combined effects of which lead to weaker chiral currents on CuNTs.

  2. Single-active-electron analysis of laser-polarization effects on atomic/molecular multiphoton excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Inada, Nobuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko

    2017-10-21

    We theoretically explore the effects of optical ellipticity on single-active-electron multiphoton excitation in atoms and (nearly) spherical molecules irradiated by intense polarized laser fields. This work was motivated by the experimental and theoretical studies of Hertel et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 023003 (2009) and Phys. Rev. A 79, 053414 (2009)], who reported pronounced changes in the near-infrared-induced ion yields of xenon and C60 as a function of ellipticity (in particular, yield reduction for circular polarization) at low light intensities and derived a perturbative cross section formula to describe such polarization effects by assuming that the excited-state energies and radial transition electric dipole moments of the system are independent of the azimuthal quantum number l. First, by reformulating the N-photon absorption cross section of a single active electron, we prove that their assumptions reduce the network of optically allowed transition pathways into what we call the "Pascal triangle" consisting of (N + 1) (N + 2)/2 states only. Next, nonperturbative analytical and numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a simple model of two-photon excitation are presented not only in the low-intensity regime but also in the high-intensity regime. The results show that the determining factor of ellipticity-dependent multiphoton excitation probability is transition moment magnitudes and that the detailed energetic structure of the system also becomes important at high intensities. The experimentally observed flattening of the ion yields of xenon and C60 with increasing intensity can be explained without a saturation effect, which was previously deemed to be responsible for it. We also argue the applicability range of the cross section formula by Hertel et al. and the identity of the "doorway state" for ionization of C60.

  3. Single-active-electron analysis of laser-polarization effects on atomic/molecular multiphoton excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Inada, Nobuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically explore the effects of optical ellipticity on single-active-electron multiphoton excitation in atoms and (nearly) spherical molecules irradiated by intense polarized laser fields. This work was motivated by the experimental and theoretical studies of Hertel et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 023003 (2009) and Phys. Rev. A 79, 053414 (2009)], who reported pronounced changes in the near-infrared-induced ion yields of xenon and C60 as a function of ellipticity (in particular, yield reduction for circular polarization) at low light intensities and derived a perturbative cross section formula to describe such polarization effects by assuming that the excited-state energies and radial transition electric dipole moments of the system are independent of the azimuthal quantum number l. First, by reformulating the N-photon absorption cross section of a single active electron, we prove that their assumptions reduce the network of optically allowed transition pathways into what we call the "Pascal triangle" consisting of (N + 1) (N + 2)/2 states only. Next, nonperturbative analytical and numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a simple model of two-photon excitation are presented not only in the low-intensity regime but also in the high-intensity regime. The results show that the determining factor of ellipticity-dependent multiphoton excitation probability is transition moment magnitudes and that the detailed energetic structure of the system also becomes important at high intensities. The experimentally observed flattening of the ion yields of xenon and C60 with increasing intensity can be explained without a saturation effect, which was previously deemed to be responsible for it. We also argue the applicability range of the cross section formula by Hertel et al. and the identity of the "doorway state" for ionization of C60.

  4. Compendium of Single Event Effects, Total Ionizing Dose, and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; OBryan, Martha V.; Chen, Dakai; Campola, Michael J.; Casey, Megan C.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present results and analysis investigating the effects of radiation on a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to proton and heavy ion induced single event effects (SEE), proton-induced displacement damage (DD), and total ionizing dose (TID). Introduction: This paper is a summary of test results.NASA spacecraft are subjected to a harsh space environment that includes exposure to various types of ionizing radiation. The performance of electronic devices in a space radiation environment is often limited by its susceptibility to single event effects (SEE), total ionizing dose (TID), and displacement damage (DD). Ground-based testing is used to evaluate candidate spacecraft electronics to determine risk to spaceflight applications. Interpreting the results of radiation testing of complex devices is quite difficult. Given the rapidly changing nature of technology, radiation test data are most often application-specific and adequate understanding of the test conditions is critical. Studies discussed herein were undertaken to establish the application-specific sensitivities of candidate spacecraft and emerging electronic devices to single-event upset (SEU), single-event latchup (SEL), single-event gate rupture (SEGR), single-event burnout (SEB), single-event transient (SET), TID, enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS), and DD effects.

  5. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  6. R-matrix study of electron impact excitation and dissociation of CH+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, K.; Dora, A.; Ghosh, R.; Choudhury, B. S.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Electron impact excitation and electron impact dissociation of CH+ ions are studied in the framework of the R-matrix method using the diatomic version of the UK molecular R-matrix codes. A configuration interaction calculation is first performed to yield the potential energy curves of the lowest eight singlet and triplet states of CH+. Scattering calculations are then performed to yield vibrationally-resolved electronic excitations to the lowest three bound states, namely the a {}3{{\\Pi }}, A {}1{{\\Pi }} and the b {}3{{{Σ }}}-. Electron impact dissociation cross sections are obtained from the assumption that all electronic excitations above the dissociation threshold result in dissociation. Bound states of CH and resonance positions and widths of Feshbach resonances in the e-CH+ system are also calculated at the CH+ equilibrium bond length 2.137 a0.

  7. Efficient elastic imaging of single atoms on ultrathin supports in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Mono-atomic-layer membranes such as graphene offer new opportunities for imaging and detecting individual light atoms in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). For such applications where multiple scattering and diffraction effects are weak, we evaluate the detection efficiency and interpretability of single atom images for the most common detector geometries using quantitative quantum mechanical simulations. For well-resolved and atomically-thin specimens, the low angle annular dark field (LAADF) detector can provide a significant increase in signal-to-noise over other common detector geometries including annular bright field and incoherent bright field. This dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Simulations of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) imaged under ideal conditions indicate the minimal dose requirements for elastic imaging by STEM or conventional TEM still exceed previously reported dose limits. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene offers new opportunities for imaging individual light atoms in electron microscopes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For ultrathin materials, a low angle annular dark field detector can provide a SNR comparable to TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LAADF dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulations for atomic imaging of ATP nucleotides exceed the molecules' dose limits.

  8. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  9. Reply to "Comment on `Magnetotransport signatures of a single nodal electron pocket constructed from Fermi arcs' "

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N.; Sebastian, S. E.

    2017-10-01

    We provide arguments relating to those recently made in a comment by Chakravarty and Wang, who question the validity of our proposed charge-density wave Fermi surface reconstruction model and its relation to sign changes in the Hall effect. First, we show that the form of rounding of the vertices (i.e. sharp corners) of the reconstructed electron pocket, as used in our model calculations of the Hall coefficient, is consistent with Bragg reflection from the periodic potential of a charge-density wave, rather than being arbitrarily chosen. Second, we provide further justifications for why an oscillatory transport scattering time provides a useful means for modeling Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the Hall effect, in the situation where a Fermi surface pocket departs from the ideal circular form. Third, we discuss recent experimental evidence gathered from two different families of underdoped cuprates supporting the existence of a single electron pocket produced by biaxial charge-density wave order as a universal phenomena.

  10. Local Electronic Structure of a Single-Layer Porphyrin-Containing Covalent Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Chen

    2017-12-20

    We have characterized the local electronic structure of a porphyrin-containing single-layer covalent organic framework (COF) exhibiting a square lattice. The COF monolayer was obtained by the deposition of 2,5-dimethoxybenzene-1,4-dicarboxaldehyde (DMA) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) onto a Au(111) surface in ultrahigh vacuum followed by annealing to facilitate Schiff-base condensations between monomers. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments conducted on isolated TAPP precursor molecules and the covalently linked COF networks yield similar transport (HOMO-LUMO) gaps of 1.85 ± 0.05 eV and 1.98 ± 0.04 eV, respectively. The COF orbital energy alignment, however, undergoes a significant downward shift compared to isolated TAPP molecules due to the electron-withdrawing nature of the imine bond formed during COF synthesis. Direct imaging of the COF local density of states (LDOS) via dI/dV mapping reveals that the COF HOMO and LUMO states are localized mainly on the porphyrin cores and that the HOMO displays reduced symmetry. DFT calculations reproduce the imine-induced negative shift in orbital energies and reveal that the origin of the reduced COF wave function symmetry is a saddle-like structure adopted by the porphyrin macrocycle due to its interactions with the Au(111) substrate.

  11. Direct exchange between silicon nanocrystals and tunnel oxide traps under illumination on single electron photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatbouri, S., E-mail: Samir.chatbouri@yahoo.com; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Aimez, V. [Université de Sherbrooke, Laboratoire Nanotechnologies et Nanosystémes (UMI-LN2 3463), Université de Sherbrooke—CNRS—INSA de Lyon-ECL-UJF-CPE Lyon, Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (Canada); Drouin, D. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Souifi, A. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon—site INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270 (France)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present the trapping of photogenerated charge carriers for 300 s resulted by their direct exchange under illumination between a few silicon nanocrystals (ncs-Si) embedded in an oxide tunnel layer (SiO{sub x} = 1.5) and the tunnel oxide traps levels for a single electron photodetector (photo-SET or nanopixel). At first place, the presence of a photocurrent limited in the inversion zone under illumination in the I–V curves confirms the creation of a pair electron/hole (e–h) at high energy. This photogenerated charge carriers can be trapped in the oxide. Using the capacitance-voltage under illumination (the photo-CV measurements) we show a hysteresis chargement limited in the inversion area, indicating that the photo-generated charge carriers are stored at traps levels at the interface and within ncs-Si. The direct exchange of the photogenerated charge carriers between the interface traps levels and the ncs-Si contributed on the photomemory effect for 300 s for our nanopixel at room temperature.

  12. Growth, dispersion, and electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Antonios [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I. [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, PO Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Vijayaraghavan, Aravind [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the complete processes from growth to electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes (N-SWCNTs). The N-SWCNTs were synthesized using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method. The dry-deposited N-SWCNT films were dispersed in N-methylpyrolidone followed by sonication and centrifugation steps to yield a stable dispersion of N-SWCNTs in solution. The length and diameter distribution as well as concentration of N-SWCNTs in solution were measured by atomic force microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The N-SWCNTs were then assembled into electronic devices using bottom-up dielectrophoresis and characterized as field-effect transistors. Finally, the potential for application of N-SWCNTs in sensors is discussed. The three stages of N-doped SWCNT processing: (a) growth and collection on filter, (b) dispersion in NMP, and (c) dielectrophoretic assembly into transistor device. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  14. Electronic and optical properties of vacancy defects in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Hendrickson, Joshua; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2017-06-01

    A detailed first-principles study has been performed to evaluate the electronic and optical properties of single-layer (SL) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) (M X 2 ; M = transition metal such as Mo, W, and X = S, Se, Te), in the presence of vacancy defects (VDs). Defects usually play an important role in tailoring electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of semiconductors. We consider three types of VDs in SL TMDCs: (i) X vacancy, (ii) X2 vacancy, and (iii) M vacancy. We show that VDs lead to localized defect states (LDS) in the band structure, which in turn gives rise to sharp transitions in in-plane and out-of-plane optical susceptibilities, χ∥ and χ⊥. The effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) are also considered. We find that SOC splitting in LDS is directly related to the atomic number of the transition metal atoms. Apart from electronic and optical properties we also find magnetic signatures (local magnetic moment of ˜μB ) in MoSe2 in the presence of the Mo vacancy, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and therefore lifts the Kramers degeneracy. We show that a simple qualitative tight-binding model (TBM), involving only the hopping between atoms surrounding the vacancy with an on-site SOC term, is sufficient to capture the essential features of LDS. In addition, the existence of the LDS can be understood from the solution of the two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian by employing infinite mass boundary conditions. In order to provide a clear description of the optical absorption spectra, we use group theory to derive the optical selection rules between LDS for both χ∥ and χ⊥.

  15. BEHAVIOUR OF ELECTRONIC BLOCKS AND DEVICES UNDER ACTION OF IMPACT LOADS AT ROAD ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Torlin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of impact loads action on vehicle’s design elements that contain electronic devices intended for maintenance of its passive safety is considered. The action time is compared to the speed of shock wave propagation.

  16. In Silico Modeling of Indigo and Tyrian Purple Single-Electron Nano-Transistors Using Density Functional Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement an in silico model of indigoid-based single-electron transistor (SET) nanodevices, which consist of indigoid molecules from natural dye weakly coupled to gold electrodes that function in a Coulomb blockade regime. The electronic properties of the indigoid molecules were investigated using the optimized density-functional theory (DFT) with a continuum model. Higher electron transport characteristics were determined for Tyrian purple, consistent with experimentally derived data. Overall, these results can be used to correctly predict and emphasize the electron transport functions of organic SETs, demonstrating their potential for sustainable nanoelectronics comprising the biodegradable and biocompatible materials.

  17. Electron energy distributions and electron impact source functions in Ar/N{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas using pulsed power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Michael D., E-mail: mdlogue@umich.edu; Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    In plasma materials processing, such as plasma etching, control of the time-averaged electron energy distributions (EEDs) in the plasma allows for control of the time-averaged electron impact source functions of reactive species in the plasma and their fluxes to surfaces. One potential method for refining the control of EEDs is through the use of pulsed power. Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are attractive for using pulsed power in this manner because the EEDs are dominantly controlled by the ICP power as opposed to the bias power applied to the substrate. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of EEDs and electron impact source functions in low pressure (5–50 mTorr) ICPs sustained in Ar/N{sub 2} for various duty cycles. We find there is an ability to control EEDs, and thus source functions, by pulsing the ICP power, with the greatest variability of the EEDs located within the skin depth of the electromagnetic field. The transit time of hot electrons produced in the skin depth at the onset of pulse power produces a delay in the response of the EEDs as a function of distance from the coils. The choice of ICP pressure has a large impact on the dynamics of the EEDs, whereas duty cycle has a small influence on time-averaged EEDs and source functions.

  18. Low energy electron impact vibrational excitation of acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sigma; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Experimental differential cross sections for the vibration excitation of the four fundamental modes of acetylene at low incident electron energies from 1 eV to 20 eV and scattering angles of 10o to 130o will be presented. The results will be compared to results available in the literature. Funded by NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  19. The impact of electronic information resource use on research output

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selection of the sample universities was purposive. ... This was demonstrated in the increased number of proposals prepared, submitted and funded, research reports submitted, journal articles published and chapters in books and books published with increased access to and use of electronic information resources.

  20. Nitrogen oxide decomposition by means of electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronski, M.; Pollo, I. (Politechnika Lubelska, Lublin (Poland))

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of application of low energy electrons emitted in electrical discharges for SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] removal from flue gas has been discussed. Different types of electrical discharges have been taken into account. Experimental results of nitrogen oxide decomposition in high voltage electrical discharges have been shown. 11 refs, 5 figs.

  1. The impact of an electronic clinical decision support for pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is sensitive and specific for PE and is the investigation of choice. Inappropriate CTPA utilisation results in unnecessary high radiation exposure and is costly. State-of-the-art electronic radiology workflow can provide clinical decision support (CDS) for specialised ...

  2. Comment II on ``Topological angular momentum in electron exchange excitation of a single atom''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    A recent article by Williams [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.85.022701 85, 022701 (2012)] highlights a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the linear light polarization P2 measured after impact excitation of zinc atoms by a spin-polarized electron beam. The claim is made that current collision theories must be modified by including a geometric (Berry) phase in the calculations in order to reproduce the experimental data for Zn and similar data from the Münster group for Hg. We show that the e-Hg data can be qualitatively reproduced by our fully relativistic B-spline R-matrix approach without any further modification.

  3. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules. PMID:27448887

  4. Electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy and Stone-Wales defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil; Razavi, Mohsen Emami; Nayebi, Payman

    2017-08-01

    The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding in order to examine the electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defects. We have optimized structures of pristine graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects. The bond lengths, current-voltage curve and transmission probability have been calculated. We found that the bond length for relaxed graphene is 1.43 Å while for graphene with SV and SW defects the bond lengths are 1.41 Å and 1.33 Å, respectively. For the SV defect, the arrangement of atoms with three nearest neighbors indicates sp2 bonding. While for SW defect, the arrangement of atoms suggests nearly sp bonding. From the current-voltage curve for graphene with defects we have determined that the behavior of the I-V curves is nonlinear. It is also found that the SV and SW defects cause to decrease the current compared to the pristine graphene case. Furthermore, the single vacancy defect reduces the current more than the Stone-Wales defect. Moreover, we observed that by increasing the voltage from zero to 1 V new peaks near Fermi level in the transmission probability curves have been created.

  5. Direct Nanoscale Sensing of the Internal Electric Field in Operating Semiconductor Devices Using Single Electron Spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Takayuki; Naruki, Wataru; Tahara, Kosuke; Makino, Toshiharu; Kato, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Hatano, Mutsuko

    2017-02-28

    The electric field inside semiconductor devices is a key physical parameter that determines the properties of the devices. However, techniques based on scanning probe microscopy are limited to sensing at the surface only. Here, we demonstrate the direct sensing of the internal electric field in diamond power devices using single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. The NV center embedded inside the device acts as a nanoscale electric field sensor. We fabricated vertical diamond p-i-n diodes containing the single NV centers. By performing optically detected magnetic resonance measurements under reverse-biased conditions with an applied voltage of up to 150 V, we found a large splitting in the magnetic resonance frequencies. This indicated that the NV center senses the transverse electric field in the space-charge region formed in the i-layer. The experimentally obtained electric field values are in good agreement with those calculated by a device simulator. Furthermore, we demonstrate the sensing of the electric field in different directions by utilizing NV centers with different N-V axes. This direct and quantitative sensing method using an electron spin in a wide-band-gap material provides a way to monitor the electric field in operating semiconductor devices.

  6. 2D Single-Crystalline Copper Nanoplates as a Conductive Filler for Electronic Ink Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Han, Jiyoon; Lee, Dong Su; Bae, Sukang; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Moon, Byung Joon; Choi, Chel-Jong; Wang, Gunuk; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2017-12-20

    Large-scale 2D single-crystalline copper nanoplates (Cu NPLs) are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The combination of a mild reductant, stabilizer, and shape modifier allows the dimensional control of the Cu nanocrystals from 1D nanowires (NWs) to 2D nanoplates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) reveals that the prepared Cu NPLs have a single-crystalline structure. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, it is found that iodine plays an important role in the modification of the copper nanocrystals through the formation of an adlayer on the basal plane of the nanoplates. Cu NPLs with an average edge length of 10 μm are successfully synthesized, and these Cu NPLs are the largest copper 2D crystals synthesized by a solution-based process so far. The application of the metallic 2D crystals as a semitransparent electrode proves their feasibility as a conductive filler, exhibiting very low sheet resistance (0.4 Ω ▫-1 ) compared to Cu NWs and a transmittance near 75%. The efficient charge transport is due to the increased contact area between each Cu NPL, i.e., so-called plane contact (2D electrical contact). In addition, this type of contact enhances the current-carrying capability of the Cu NPL electrodes, implying that the large-size Cu NPLs are promising conductive fillers for printable electrode applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-04-27

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e{sup +}e{sup -} dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  8. Dopant induced single electron tunneling within the sub-bands of single silicon NW tri-gate junctionless n-MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Wasi; Georgiev, Yordan M.; Maity, Sarmistha; Das, Samaresh

    2017-09-01

    We report 1D electron transport of silicon junctionless tri-gate n-type transistor at 4.2 K. The step like curve observed in the current voltage characteristic suggests 1D transport. Besides the current steps for 1D transport, we found multiple spikes within individual steps, which we relate to inter-band single electron tunneling, mediated by the charged dopants available in the channel region. Clear Coulomb diamonds were observed in the stability diagram of the device. It is shown that a uniformly doped silicon nanowire can provide us the window for the single electron tunnelling. Back-gate versus front-gate color plot, where current is in a color scale, shows a crossover of the increased conduction region. This is a clear indication of the dopant-dopant interaction. It has been shown that back-gate biasing can be used to tune the coupling strength between the dopants.

  9. Impact of a new electronic handover system in surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, S

    2011-01-01

    Accurate handover of clinical information is imperative to ensure continuity of patient care, patient safety and reduction in clinical errors. Verbal and paper-based handovers are common practice in many institutions but the potential for clinical errors and inefficiency is significant. We have recently introduced an electronic templated signout to improve clarity of transfer of patient details post-surgical take. The aim of this study was to prospectively audit the introduction of this new electronic handover in our hospital with particular emphasis regarding efficacy and efficiency. The primary surrogate chosen to assess efficacy and efficiency was length of stay for those patients admitted through the emergency department. To do this we compared two separate, two-week periods before and after the introduction of this new electronic signout format. Users were not informed of the study. Information recorded on the signout included details of the emergency admissions, consults received on call and any issues with regard to inpatients. ASA grade, time to first intervention and admission diagnosis were also recorded. Our results show that introduction of this electronic signout significantly reduced median length of stay from five to four days (P=0.047). No significant difference in ASA grades, time to first intervention or overall admission diagnosis was obtained between the two time periods. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the introduction of electronic signout post-call was associated with a significant reduction in patient length of stay and provided better continuity of care than the previously used paper-based handover.

  10. Realization of a Cascaded Quantum System: Heralded Absorption of a Single Photon Qubit by a Single-Electron Charged Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Sun, Zhe; Fält, Stefan; Imamoğlu, Atac

    2017-04-28

    Photonic losses pose a major limitation for the implementation of a quantum state transfer between nodes of a quantum network. A measurement that heralds a successful transfer without revealing any information about the qubit may alleviate this limitation. Here, we demonstrate the heralded absorption of a single photonic qubit, generated by a single neutral quantum dot, by a single-electron charged quantum dot that is located 5 m away. The transfer of quantum information to the spin degree of freedom takes place upon the emission of a photon; for a properly chosen or prepared quantum dot, the detection of this photon yields no information about the qubit. We show that this process can be combined with local operations optically performed on the destination node by measuring classical correlations between the absorbed photon color and the final state of the electron spin. Our work suggests alternative avenues for the realization of quantum information protocols based on cascaded quantum systems.

  11. Low-energy electron impact cross-sections and rate constants of NH2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This systematic study reports various electron impact cross-sections, rate constants and transport properties of N H 2 radical in the low-energy limit. The collision study is based on R -matrix formalism and involves the use of various scattering models employing different active spaces. Both electron excited ...

  12. Impact of Electronic Portfolios on Prospective Teachers' Participation, Motivation, and Autonomous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz-Sánchez, Vanesa-María; Gallego-Arrufat, María-Jesús; Crisol-Moya, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the impact of electronic portfolios on undergraduate learning in higher education. Based on a descriptive study, it analyses the prospective teacher's perception of use of these tools (electronic portfolio in Moodle-Mahara, in the institutional environment of a university in southern Europe), examining the variables…

  13. Effect of vacuum polarization on the excitation of hydrogen atom by electron impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Bhattacharyya

    1981-01-01

    for 1S−2S excitation of the hydrogen atom by electron impact. The excitation amplitude calculated field theoretically is found to be lowered by 0.47t2/(t2+93 where t2=4|P−Q|2, P and Q being the momenta of the incident and scattered electrons respectively.

  14. Impact of electron beam irradiation on fish gelatin film properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbettaïeb, Nasreddine; Karbowiak, Thomas; Brachais, Claire-Hélène; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this work was to display the effect of electron beam accelerator doses on properties of plasticized fish gelatin film. Electron spin resonance indicates free radical formation during irradiation, which might induce intermolecular cross-linking. Tensile strength for gelatin film significantly increases after irradiation (improved by 30% for 60 kGy). The vapour permeability is weakly affected by irradiation. Surface tension and its polar component increase significantly and are in accordance with the increase of wettability. So, irradiation may change the orientation of polar groups of gelatin at the film surface and crosslink the hydrophobic amino acids. No modification of the crystallinity of the film is observed. These findings suggest that if structure changes, it only occurs in the amorphous phase of the gelatin matrix. It is also observed that irradiation enhances the thermal stability of the gelatin film, by increasing the glass transition temperature and the degradation temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-Time, Single-Shot Temporal Measurements of Short Electron Bunches, Terahertz CSR and FEL Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Berden, G; Van der Meer, A F G

    2005-01-01

    Electro-optic detection of the Coulomb field of electron bunches is a promising technique for single-shot measurements of the bunch length and shape in the sub-picosecond time domain. This technique has been applied to the measurement of 50 MeV electron bunches in the FELIX free electron laser, showing the longitudinal profile of single bunches of around 650 fs FWHM [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 114802 (2004)]. The method is non-destructive and real-time, and therefore ideal for online monitoring of the longitudinal shape of single electron bunches. At FELIX we have used it for real-time optimization of sub-picosecond electron bunches. Electro-optic detection has also been used to measure the electric field profiles of far-infrared (or terahertz) optical pulses generated by the relativistic electrons. We have characterised the far-infrared output of the free electron laser, and more recently, we have measured the temporal profile of terahertz optical pulses generated at one of the bending magnets.

  16. Radiolytic Impacts of Energetic Electron Irradiation on Enceladus and Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Sturner, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic overturn of the south polar terrain on Enceladus would convey radio lytic oxidants from surface irradiation by Saturn's inner magnetospheric electrons to the putative underlying polar sea and contribute to CO2 and other gas production driving the visibly active cryovolcanism. Low duty cycle of active episodes below 1 - 10 percent would raise the relative importance of the continuous radiolytic chemical energy input for mass and heat outflow, e.g. as compared to heating by gravitational tides. The "Pac-Man" thermal anomaly on Mimas most likely arises from leading-trailing asymmetry of electron irradiation and resultant radio lytic processing of the moon ice to a few centimeters of depth. The Mimas thermal anomaly distribution suggests a relatively stable surface unmodified by Enceladus-like geologic overturn or cryovolcanic activity. In both cases, the heavily irradiated skin depth corresponds to the sensible thermal layer probed by Cassini infrared measurements. Neutral gas and dust emissions from Enceladus limit energetic ion and plasma electron fluxes in the inner magnetosphere, thereby governing the irradiation of Mimas and other Saturn moons.

  17. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of single-sided and single-mass crushing system under impact and vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhuan NI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To research and develop efficient vibrating type crusher, a single-sided dynamic model is established for the impact and vibration crushing system, and the differential equation of vibration is set up with Newton's law for dynamic analysis. By making amplitude frequency curve, hysteretic impact force curve and energy absorption curve, the influence of which on the system response is analyzed. Based on the conclusion and using numerical method, the primary forced resonance of the system is calculated, and the time history of displacement, velocity and acceleration is obtained, showing that the motion mass movement is not a simple harmonic motion, the nonlinear impact force is one of the factors that influences the vibration system, and the influence rules of clearance, vibration frequency on the amplitude frequency curve, impact force and energy absorption are also obtained. The gap between the material and the broken head should be kept as small as possible so as to achieve a better crushing effect with a smaller excitation force, and the system is best to work in the main resonant area to get a big impact. The research result provides reference for further study of rules and mechanism of the vibration systems.

  18. Electron-Impact Vibrational Excitation of Polyatomic Gases: Exploratory Caculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cascella, M.; Čurík, Roman; Gianturco, F. A.; Sanna, N.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 5 (2001), s. 1989-2000 ISSN 0021-9606 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : molecule-scattering * separable approximation * collisions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2001

  19. Technology Trumping Sleep: Impact of Electronic Media and Sleep in Late Adolescent Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Kerry L.; Chung, Chia-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore with what impact evening media use interfered with either schoolwork and/or sufficient healthy sleep. In addition, the study examined with what impact there may be a compromise in students' ability or aptitude for positive academic success, related to either lack of sleep or electronic media use.…

  20. Impacts of single and recurrent wildfires on topsoil moisture regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pelayo, Oscar; Malvar, Maruxa; van den Elsen, Erik; Hosseini, Mohammadreza; Coelho, Celeste; Ritsema, Coen; Bautista, Susana; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    The increasing fire recurrence on forest in the Mediterranean basin is well-established by future climate scenarios due to land use changes and climate predictions. By this, shifts on mature pine woodlands to shrub rangelands are of major importance on forest ecosystems buffer functions, since historical patterns of established vegetation help to recover from fire disturbances. This fact, together with the predicted expansion of the drought periods, will affect feedback processes of vegetation patterns since water availability on these seasons are driven by post-fire local soil properties. Although fire impacts of soil properties and water availability has been widely studied using the fire severity as the main factor, little research is developed on post-fire soil moisture patterns, including the fire recurrence as a key explanatory variable. The following research investigated, in pine woodlands of north central Portugal, the short-term consequences (one year after a fire) of wildfire recurrence on the surface soil moisture content (SMC) and on effective soil water (SWEFF, parameter that includes actual daily soil moisture, soil field capacity-FC and permanent wilting point-PWP). The study set-up includes analyses at two fire recurrence scenarios (1x- and 4x-burnt since 1975), at a patch level (shrub patch/interpatch) and at two soil depths (2.5 and 7.5 cm) in a nested approach. Understanding how fire recurrence affects water in soil over space and time is the main goal of this research. The use of soil moisture sensors in a nested approach, the rainfall features and analyses on basic soil properties as soil organic matter, texture, bulk density, pF curves, soil water repellency and soil surface components will establish which factors has the largest role in controlling soil moisture behavior. Main results displayed, in a seasonal and yearly basis, no differences on SMC as increasing fire recurrence (1x- vs 4x-burnt) neither between patch/interpatch microsites at

  1. A First-Principle Theoretical Study of Mechanical and Electronic Properties in Graphene Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The new three-dimensional structure that the graphene connected with SWCNTs (G-CNTs, Graphene Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes can solve graphene and CNTs′ problems. A comprehensive study of the mechanical and electrical performance of the junctions was performed by first-principles theory. There were eight types of junctions that were constituted by armchair and zigzag graphene and (3,3, (4,0, (4,4, and (6,0 CNTs. First, the junction strength was investigated. Generally, the binding energy of armchair G-CNTs was stronger than that of zigzag G-CNTs, and it was the biggest in the armchair G-CNTs (6,0. Likewise, the electrical performance of armchair G-CNTs was better than that of zigzag G-CNTs. Charge density distribution of G-CNTs (6,0 was the most homogeneous. Next, the impact factors of the electronic properties of armchair G-CNTs were investigated. We suggest that the band gap is increased with the length of CNTs, and its value should be dependent on the combined effect of both the graphene’s width and the CNTs’ length. Last, the relationship between voltage and current (U/I were studied. The U/I curve of armchair G-CNTs (6,0 possessed a good linearity and symmetry. These discoveries will contribute to the design and production of G-CNT-based devices.

  2. IMPACT OF MODERN INFORMATION SOCIETY ON THE UNIVERSITY ELECTRONIC BRANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov L. Skovorodina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necessity to develop of electronic information model for the formation of a virtual image of the University connected first with the dynamic trends of the modern society. Internet branding as an element of market sustainability of the University gives him an advantage over competitors and by that increases its competitiveness, оптимизация и продвижение сайта. 

  3. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  4. Electronic Structure and Spin Configuration Trends of Single Transition Metal Impurity in Phase Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Pei, J.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-10-01

    Fe doped phase change material GexSbyTez has shown experimentally the ability to alter its magnetic properties by phase change. This engineered spin degree of freedom into the phase change material offers the possibility of logic devices or spintronic devices where they may enable fast manipulation of ferromagnetism by a phase change mechanism. The electronic structures and spin configurations of isolated transition metal dopant in phase change material (iTM-PCM) is important to understand the interaction between localized metal d states and the unique delocalized host states of phase change material. Identifying an impurity center that has, in isolation, a nonvanishing magnetic moment is the first step to study the collective magnetic ordering, which originates from the interaction among close enough individual impurities. Theoretical description of iTM-PCM is challenging. In this work, we use a screened exchange hybrid functional to study the single 3d transition metal impurity in crystalline GeTe and GeSb2Te4. By curing the problem of local density functional (LDA) such as over-delocalization of the 3d states, we find that Fe on the Ge/Sb site has its majority d states fully occupied while its minority d states are empty, which is different from the previously predicted electronic configuration by LDA. From early transition metal Cr to heavier Ni, the majority 3d states are gradually populated until fully occupied and then the minority 3d states begin to be filled. Interpretive orbital interaction pictures are presented for understanding the local and total magnetic moments.

  5. Observation of reduction of secondary electron emission from helium ion impact due to plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Pigarov, A. Yu

    2017-11-01

    Growth of nanostructured fuzz on a tungsten target in a helium plasma is found to cause a significant (~3×) reduction in ion impact secondary electron emission in a linear plasma device. The ion impact secondary electron emission is separated from the electron impact secondary electron emission by varying the target bias voltage and fitting to expected contributions from electron impact, both thermal and non-thermal; with the non-thermal electron contribution being modeled using Monte-Carlo simulations. The observed (~3×) reduction is similar in magnitude to the (~2×) reduction observed in previous work for the effect of tungsten fuzz formation on secondary electron emission due to electron impact. It is hypothesized that the observed reduction results from re-absorption of secondary electrons in the tungsten fuzz.

  6. Single-crystal-conjugated polymers with extremely high electron sensitivity through template-assisted in situ polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqi; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xiaowei; Huang, Xiaochun; Ji, Junhui

    2015-10-21

    Single-crystal-conjugated polymer (SCCP) arrays are prepared successfully via a simple method, which is a combination of the contact thermochemical reaction and solvent-free in situ polymerization. The dramatic X-ray diffraction and selective-area electron diffraction results show the high crystallinity of the SCCP arrays. These SCCP arrays display unique physical properties and show great potential in flexible electronics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Analysis of Excitation and Ionization of Atoms and Molecules by Electron Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, Afzal

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of Excitation and Ionization of Atoms and Molecules by Electron Impact, by Afzal Chaudhry and Hans Kleinpoppen, describes in detail the measurements of the partial and total doubly differential cross sections for the multiple-ionization of rare gas atoms by electron impact. These measurements show, among other trends, the role of Auger transitions in the production of multiply ionized atoms in the region where the incident electron energy is sufficient to produce inner shell ionization. Other processes like Coster-Kronig transitions and shake off also contribute towards increasing the charge of the ions. As discussed in the book, an incident electron having energy of 6 keV, for example, in a collision with xenon atom can remove up to nine electrons! The measurements of doubly differential cross sections for the dissociative and non-dissociative ionization of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide and sulfur hexa fluoride molecular gases are also explored. The results of the measurements for the sulfur dioxide mole...

  8. Impact of electronic messaging on the patient-physician interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwiener, Markus; Wallwiener, Christian Wilhelm; Kansy, Julia Katharina; Seeger, Harald; Rajab, Taufiek Konrad

    2009-01-01

    Patients are interested in secure electronic communication with their health-care providers, but physicians have been slow to adopt the technique into their practice. We have therefore reviewed the literature on secure patient messaging. Relevant studies were identified by Medline search which produced 1065 publications. Of these, 71 relevant articles were read independently by two reviewers. Currently available messaging systems allow for asynchronous communication, physician reimbursement and automated supporting functions such as triaging of patient messages and integration of messaging into medical records. The review showed that patients are satisfied with the use of secure physician messaging systems and find such services to be convenient, time-saving and useful. Physicians do not report adverse effects from their use. Legal concerns with electronic messaging include compliance with privacy standards. The economic benefits of secure messaging systems are most immediately apparent for larger health-care groups and hospitals, although smaller practices will also benefit in the long run. Secure patient-physician messaging is a convenient and useful addition to the health-care infrastructure. It can be expected that the identification of secure providers, integration with reimbursement systems and initial uptake by larger health-care organizations will speed up the adoption into routine health care.

  9. Mechanical energy losses in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada, Griselda I. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, Osvaldo Agustin [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario - CONICET, Member of the CONICET& #x27; s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Bozzano, Patricia B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, Jose Angel [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy (MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have been performed in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum, oriented for single slip, in order to study the dislocation dynamics in the temperature range within one third of the melting temperature. A damping peak related to the interaction of dislocation lines with both prismatic loops and tangles of dislocations was found. The peak temperature ranges between 900 and 1050 K, for an oscillating frequency of about 1 Hz. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. A study of transport suppression in an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs quantum dot single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, A. M.; Klochan, O.; Micolich, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of transport blockade features in a quantum dot single-electron transistor, based on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. We observe suppression of transport through the ground state of the dot, as well as negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias. The tem......We report a study of transport blockade features in a quantum dot single-electron transistor, based on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. We observe suppression of transport through the ground state of the dot, as well as negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias...

  11. Nanoelectronics «bottom – up»: coulomb blocade and single-electron nanotransistor on benzene molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрій Олексійович Кругляк

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coulomb blocade in singlelectronics is discussed under the «bottom – up» approach of modern nanoelectronics. The first-principle methods for calculating the charging molecular energies and charge stability diagram of the benzene molecule single-electron transistor under the Coulomb blockade regime were applied using the density-functional theory for modeling molecular properties and continuum model to describe single-electron transistor environment as well as a self-consistent approach to treat the interaction between the molecule and the environment

  12. Single Event Upsets in SRAM FPGA based readout electronics for the Time Projection Chamber in the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Røed, K; Helstrup, H; Natås, T

    2009-01-01

    Single Event Upsets in SRAM FPGA based readout electronics for the Time Projection Chamber in the ALICE experiment irradiation test results have been used to predict the single event upset rate expected during operation in the ALICE experiment. Due to the number of FPGAs utilized in the TPC front-end electronics, single event upsets can be a reliability concern. In order to reduce the probability of system malfunction, a reconfiguration solution was developed that enables the possibility to clear single event upsets in the configuration memory of the FPGA. Irradiation test results show that combined with additional system level mitigation techniques, this reconfiguration solution can be used to finally reduce the functional failure rate of the FPGA. Because irradiation testing can be time consuming, costly and sometimes even technically difficult, a software based fault injection solution has been implemented without any modification to the existing hardware setup. It provides an alternative and possibly syst...

  13. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  15. The Structures of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films of Organosulfur Compounds Adsorbed on Gold Single Crystals: Electron Diffraction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    AD-M193 125 THE STRUCTURES OF SELF-RSSENSLED MOMOLAYER FILMS OF 1/1 ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUND..(U) HRlYARD UNJY CAMBRIDGE MASS DEPT OF CHEMISTRY L STRONG...VV L- ___ THE STRUCTURES OF SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER FILMS OF ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOLD SINGLE CRYSTALS: ELECTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES...true sulfide phase. V V ’A. LA8700876 REVISED The Structures of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films of Organosulfur Compounds Adsorbed on Gold Single

  16. De novo backbone trace of GroEL from single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtke, Steven J; Baker, Matthew L; Chen, Dong-Hua; Song, Jiu-Li; Chuang, David T; Chiu, Wah

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we employ single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to reconstruct GroEL to approximately 4 A resolution with both D7 and C7 symmetry. Using a newly developed skeletonization algorithm and secondary structure element identification in combination with sequence-based secondary structure prediction, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve a de novo Calpha trace directly from a cryo-EM reconstruction. The topology of our backbone trace is completely accurate, though subtle alterations illustrate significant differences from existing crystal structures. In the map with C7 symmetry, the seven monomers in each ring are identical; however, the subunits have a subtly different structure in each ring, particularly in the equatorial domain. These differences include an asymmetric salt bridge, density in the nucleotide-binding pocket of only one ring, and small shifts in alpha helix positions. This asymmetric conformation is different from previous asymmetric structures, including GroES-bound GroEL, and may represent a "primed state" in the chaperonin pathway.

  17. Correlation between modulation structure and electronic inhomogeneity on Pb-doped Bi-2212 single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, A. [Low Temperature Physics Group, Nano-electronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: a.sugimoto@aist.go.jp; Kashiwaya, S. [Low Temperature Physics Group, Nano-electronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Eisaki, H. [Low Temperature Physics Group, Nano-electronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamaguchi, H. [Low Temperature Physics Group, Nano-electronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Oka, K. [Low Temperature Physics Group, Nano-electronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kashiwaya, H. [Low Temperature Physics Group, Nano-electronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tsuchiura, H. [Department of Applied Physics, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Tanaka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho Chikusa-ku Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    The correlation between nanometer-size electronic states and surface structure is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) on Pb-doped Bi{sub 2-x}Pb {sub x}Sr{sub 2}CaCu2O{sub 8+y} (Pb-Bi-2212) single crystals. The advantage of the Pb-Bi-2212 samples is that the modulation structure can be totally or locally suppressed depending on the Pb contents and annealing conditions. The superconducting gap ({delta}) distribution on modulated Pb-Bi-2212 samples showed the lack of correlation with modulation structure except a slight reduction of superconducting island size for the b-axis direction. On the other hand, the optimal doped Pb-Bi-2212 (x = 0.6) samples obtained by reduced-annealing showed totally non-modulated structure in topography, however, the spatial distribution of {delta} still showed inhomogeneity of which features were quite similar to those of modulated samples. These results suggest that the modulation structure is not the dominant origin of inhomogeneity although it modifies the streaky {delta} structure sub-dominantly. From the gap structure variation around the border of narrow gap and broad gap regions, a trend of the coexistence of two separated phases i.e., superconducting phase and pseudogap like phase, is detected.

  18. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-05-30

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  19. Low-energy electron irradiation of preheated and gas-exposed single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecton, P.A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Beatty, J.; Verbeck, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Lakshantha, W.; Rout, B. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Perez, J.M., E-mail: jperez@unt.edu [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Preheating SWCNTs in situ before irradiation prevents an increase in the D peak. • Preheated SWCNTs exposed to air or gases before irradiation show an increase in D peak. • The increase in D peak is not due to irradiation-induced chemisorption of adsorbates. • The effects are more significant for small diameter SWCNTs. • The increase in D peak is attributed to defects that increase inter-tube interactions. - Abstract: We investigate the conditions under which electron irradiation at 2 keV of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles produces an increase in the Raman D peak. We find that irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in situ at 600 °C for 1 h in ultrahigh vacuum before irradiation does not result in an increase in the D peak. Irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in vacuum and then exposed to air or gases results in an increase in the D peak, suggesting that adsorbates play a role in the increase in the D peak. Small diameter SWCNTs that are not preheated or preheated and then exposed to air show a significant increase in the D and G bands after irradiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows no chemical shifts in the C 1s peak of SWCNTs that have been irradiated versus SWCNTs that have not been irradiated, suggesting that chemisorption of adsorbates is not responsible for the increase in the D peak.

  20. Program WALKMAN: A code designed to perform electron single collision elastic scattering Monte Carlo calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-08-01

    The computer code WALKMAN performs electron single collision elastic scattering Monte Carlo calculations in spherical or planar geometry. It is intended as a research tool to obtain results that can be compared to the results of condensed history calculations. This code is designed to be self documenting, in the sense that the latest documentation is included as comment lines at the beginning of the code. Printed documentation, such as this document, is periodically published and consists mostly of a copy of the comment lines from the code. The user should be aware that the comment lines within the code are continually updated to reflect the most recent status of the code and these comments should always be considered to be the most recent documentation for the code and may supersede published documentation, such as this document. Therefore, the user is advised to always read the documentation within the actual code. The remainder of this report consists of example results and a listing of the documentation which appears at the beginning of the code.

  1. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. The Impact of Electronic Reading Devices on Reading Speed and Comfort in Patients with Decreased Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Henry L; Roth, Daniel B; Fine, Howard F; Prenner, Jonathan L; Modi, Kunjal K; Feuer, William J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims . To evaluate the impact of back-illuminated and nonilluminated electronic reading devices on reading speed and comfort in patients with decreased vision. Methods . A prospective study involving a convenience sample of 167 patients at a single retina practice from January 2011 to December 2012. Participants were asked to read five different excerpts on five different media in a randomly assigned order. Media included a printed book at 12-point font (12PF), iPad2 at 12PF, iPad2 at 18-point font (18PF), Kindle2 at 12PF, and Kindle2 at 18PF. Reading speed in words per minute (WPM) and medium preference were recorded and stratified by visual acuity (VA). Results . Mean reading speeds in WPM: iPad2 at 18PF (217.0), iPad2 at 12PF (209.1), Kindle2 at 18PF (183.3), Kindle2 at 12PF (177.7), and printed book at 12PF (176.8). Reading speed was faster on back-illuminated media compared to nonilluminated media. Text magnification minimized losses in reading performance with worsening patient VA. The majority of participants preferred reading on the iPad2 at 18PF. Conclusions . Back-illuminated devices may increase reading speed and comfort relative to nonilluminated devices and printed text, particularly in patients with decreased VA.

  3. The Impact of Electronic Reading Devices on Reading Speed and Comfort in Patients with Decreased Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry L. Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. To evaluate the impact of back-illuminated and nonilluminated electronic reading devices on reading speed and comfort in patients with decreased vision. Methods. A prospective study involving a convenience sample of 167 patients at a single retina practice from January 2011 to December 2012. Participants were asked to read five different excerpts on five different media in a randomly assigned order. Media included a printed book at 12-point font (12PF, iPad2 at 12PF, iPad2 at 18-point font (18PF, Kindle2 at 12PF, and Kindle2 at 18PF. Reading speed in words per minute (WPM and medium preference were recorded and stratified by visual acuity (VA. Results. Mean reading speeds in WPM: iPad2 at 18PF (217.0, iPad2 at 12PF (209.1, Kindle2 at 18PF (183.3, Kindle2 at 12PF (177.7, and printed book at 12PF (176.8. Reading speed was faster on back-illuminated media compared to nonilluminated media. Text magnification minimized losses in reading performance with worsening patient VA. The majority of participants preferred reading on the iPad2 at 18PF. Conclusions. Back-illuminated devices may increase reading speed and comfort relative to nonilluminated devices and printed text, particularly in patients with decreased VA.

  4. Impact of a single drop on the same liquid: formation, growth and disintegration of jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbaglah, G. Gilou; Deegan, Robert

    2015-11-01

    One of the simplest splashing scenarios results from the impact of a single drop on on the same liquid. The traditional understanding of this process is that the impact generates a jet that later breaks up into secondary droplets. Recently it was shown that even this simplest of scenarios is more complicated than expected because multiple jets can be generated from a single impact event and there are bifurcations in the multiplicity of jets. First, we study the formation, growth and disintegration of jets following the impact of a drop on a thin film of the same liquid using a combination of numerical simulations and linear stability theory. We obtain scaling relations from our simulations and use these as inputs to our stability analysis. We also use experiments and numerical simulations of a single drop impacting on a deep pool to examine the bifurcation from a single jet into two jets. Using high speed X-ray imaging methods we show that vortex separation within the drop leads to the formation of a second jet long after the formation of the ejecta sheet.

  5. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. I.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of CO2 are reported in the 7 to 10 eV energy-loss range, at energies of 0.2, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 7.0 eV above threshold, and at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct overlapping continua with weak, diffuse bands superimposed are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of recent ab initio configuration-interaction calculations of the vertical transition energies of CO2. The experimental spectra are shown to be consistent with the excitation states of CO2.

  6. A versatile nanotechnology to connect individual nano-objects for the fabrication of hybrid single-electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernand-Mantel, A.; Bouzehouane, K.; Seneor, P.; Fusil, S.; Deranlot, C.; Brenac, A.; Notin, L.; Morel, R.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.

    2010-11-01

    We report on the high yield connection of single nano-objects as small as a few nanometres in diameter to separately elaborated metallic electrodes, using a 'table-top' nanotechnology. Single-electron transport measurements validate that transport occurs through a single nano-object. The vertical geometry of the device natively allows an independent choice of materials for each electrode and the nano-object. In addition ferromagnetic materials can be used without encountering oxidation problems. The possibility of elaborating such hybrid nanodevices opens new routes for the democratization of spintronic studies in low dimensions.

  7. A versatile nanotechnology to connect individual nano-objects for the fabrication of hybrid single-electron devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernand-Mantel, A; Bouzehouane, K; Seneor, P; Fusil, S; Deranlot, C; Petroff, F; Fert, A [Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Universite Paris-Sud, 1, Avenue Auguste Fresnel, F-91767 Palaiseau (France); Brenac, A; Notin, L; Morel, R, E-mail: anne.bernand-mantel@grenoble.cnrs.fr, E-mail: karim.bouzehouane@thalesgroup.fr [INAC/SP2M CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-11-05

    We report on the high yield connection of single nano-objects as small as a few nanometres in diameter to separately elaborated metallic electrodes, using a 'table-top' nanotechnology. Single-electron transport measurements validate that transport occurs through a single nano-object. The vertical geometry of the device natively allows an independent choice of materials for each electrode and the nano-object. In addition ferromagnetic materials can be used without encountering oxidation problems. The possibility of elaborating such hybrid nanodevices opens new routes for the democratization of spintronic studies in low dimensions.

  8. Single Whole-Body Cryostimulation Procedure versus Single Dry Sauna Bath: Comparison of Oxidative Impact on Healthy Male Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sutkowy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to extreme heat and cold is one of the environmental factors whose action is precisely based on the mechanisms involving free radicals. Fluctuations in ambient temperature are among the agents that toughen the human organism. The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of extremely high (dry sauna, DS and low (whole-body cryostimulation, WBC environmental temperatures on the oxidant-antioxidant equilibrium in the blood of healthy male subjects. The subjects performed a single DS bath (n=10; 26.2 ± 4.6 years and a single WBC procedure (n=15; 27.5 ± 3.1 years. In the subjects’ blood taken immediately before and 20 min after the interventions, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in erythrocytes (TBARSer and blood plasma (TBARSpl were determined. Single WBC and DS procedures induced an increase in the activity of SOD and GPx, as well as SOD and CAT, respectively. The SOD activity was higher after WBC than after DS. Extremely high and low temperatures probably induce the formation of reactive oxygen species in the organisms of healthy men and, therefore, disturb the oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  9. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    CERN Document Server

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Fursa, Dmitry V; Bray, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudo-state and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the $(2s2p)^3P$ and $(2s2p)^1P$ states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set o...

  10. Too Hot for Photon-Assisted Transport: Hot-Electrons Dominate Conductance Enhancement in Illuminated Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, E-Dean; Adak, Olgun; Lovat, Giacomo; Scarabelli, Diego; Venkataraman, Latha

    2017-02-08

    We investigate light-induced conductance enhancement in single-molecule junctions via photon-assisted transport and hot-electron transport. Using 4,4'-bipyridine bound to Au electrodes as a prototypical single-molecule junction, we report a 20-40% enhancement in conductance under illumination with 980 nm wavelength radiation. We probe the effects of subtle changes in the transmission function on light-enhanced current and show that discrete variations in the binding geometry result in a 10% change in enhancement. Importantly, we prove theoretically that the steady-state behavior of photon-assisted transport and hot-electron transport is identical but that hot-electron transport is the dominant mechanism for optically induced conductance enhancement in single-molecule junctions when the wavelength used is absorbed by the electrodes and the hot-electron relaxation time is long. We confirm this experimentally by performing polarization-dependent conductance measurements of illuminated 4,4'-bipyridine junctions. Finally, we perform lock-in type measurements of optical current and conclude that currents due to laser-induced thermal expansion mask optical currents. This work provides a robust experimental framework for studying mechanisms of light-enhanced transport in single-molecule junctions and offers tools for tuning the performance of organic optoelectronic devices by analyzing detailed transport properties of the molecules involved.

  11. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes...

  12. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  13. Single-Event Transient Testing of the Crane Aerospace and Electronics SMHF2812D Dual DC-DC Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this testing was to characterize the Crane Aerospace & Electronics (Crane) Interpoint SMHF2812D for single-event transient (SET) susceptibility. These data shall be used for flight lot evaluation, as well as qualification by similarity of the SMHF family of converters, all of which use the same active components.

  14. Simulation optimization of single-shot continuously time-resolved MeV ultra-fast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renkai; Huang, Wenhui; Du, Yingchao; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2011-05-01

    In a so-called single-shot continuously time-resolved mega-electron-volt ultra-fast electron diffraction (CTR MeV UED) system, a radio-frequency streaking cavity maps the temporally distributed diffraction features into a transverse pattern, from which structural changes within the duration of the electron pulse can be resolved continuously. Due to the high charge density of the MeV beam, such a pattern can be achieved with a single electron pulse. In this paper, we present the proposed configuration and the simulation optimization of such a system. A thin slit is used as the key element to minimize overlaps of the diffraction features when they are streaked. Using polycrystalline aluminum as the sample, we obtain a streaked pattern in which features of different lattice planes are clearly resolved. It is demonstrated that such a system can take an ‘atomic movie’ with a duration of a few picoseconds, and continuously distributed ˜100-femtosecond frames, by using a single electron pulse.

  15. Electrical Control, Read-out and Initialization of Single Electron Spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafiei, M.

    2013-01-01

    An electron, in addition to its electric charge, possesses a small magnetic moment, called spin. The spin of an electron can point parallel (spin-up) or antiparallel (spin-down) to the magnetic field. These two states are analogous to zero and one of the logical bit in current digital electronic

  16. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Uytven, Eric [National Research Council Institute for Biodiagnostics, 435 Ellice Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 1Y6 (Canada); Pistorius, Stephen [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3A 1R9 (Canada); Gordon, Richard [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)], E-mail: eric.vanuytven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Stephen.Pistorius@cancercare.mb.ca, E-mail: gordonr@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2008-10-07

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p < 0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  17. Matching the dosimetry characteristics of a dual-field Stanford technique to a customized single-field Stanford technique for total skin electron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Agostinelli, Alfred G; Wilson, Lynn D; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-07-01

    To compare the dosimetry characteristics of a customized single-field and a matching dual-field electron beam for total skin electron therapy (TSET) within the framework of the Stanford technique. To examine and quantify its impact on patient dosimetry. Two characteristically different electron beams were used for TSET employing the Stanford technique: a single-field beam created from a pencil beam of electrons passing through 7 meters of air and a dual-field beam created from two heavily scattered electron beams directed at oblique angles to patients. The dosimetry characteristics of the two beams were measured by using ionization chambers, radiographic films, and thermal luminescent detectors. The impact of beam characteristic on patient dosimetry was quantified on both anthromorphic phantoms and on patients. Treatment protocols aimed at matching the patient dose between the two systems were established on the basis of these and other measurements. The dual-field beam was matched to the single-field beam, resulting in approximately the same mean energy (approximately 4.0 MeV) and most probable energy (approximately 4.5 MeV) at their respective treatment source-to-patient-surface distance (SSD). The depth dose curves on the beam axis were nearly identical for both beams. X-ray contamination on the beam axis was 0.43% for the dual-field beam, slightly higher than that (0.4%) of the single-field beam. The beam uniformity, however, was quite different: the dual-field beam was more uniform in the vertical direction but was worse in the lateral direction compared to the single-field beam. For a TSET treatment using the Stanford technique, the composite depth dose curves were nearly identically at the level of beam axis: with an effective depth of maximum buildup (d(max)) at approximately 1 mm below the skin surface and the depth to 80% depth dose at around 6 mm. The overall X-ray contamination was approximately 1.0% and 1.2% for the single-field and dual-field system

  18. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. I.; Chutjian, A.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of nitrous oxide are reported in the 5- to 10-eV energy-loss range at scattering angles of 20, 30, 90, and 130 deg at a residual energy of 7.0 eV; and at residual energies of 10.0, 2.0, 1.0, 0.6, and 0.2 eV at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct and overlapping continua are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of semiempirical INDO calculations of Chutjian and Segal (1972) of the vertical transition energies of N2O. An assignment of the symmetries of the observed excitations consistent with the experimental and theoretical data is suggested.

  19. Academic impact of a public electronic health database: bibliometric analysis of studies using the general practice research database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Wu, Jau-Ching; Haschler, Ingo; Majeed, Azeem; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Studies that use electronic health databases as research material are getting popular but the influence of a single electronic health database had not been well investigated yet. The United Kingdom's General Practice Research Database (GPRD) is one of the few electronic health databases publicly available to academic researchers. This study analyzed studies that used GPRD to demonstrate the scientific production and academic impact by a single public health database. A total of 749 studies published between 1995 and 2009 with 'General Practice Research Database' as their topics, defined as GPRD studies, were extracted from Web of Science. By the end of 2009, the GPRD had attracted 1251 authors from 22 countries and been used extensively in 749 studies published in 193 journals across 58 study fields. Each GPRD study was cited 2.7 times by successive studies. Moreover, the total number of GPRD studies increased rapidly, and it is expected to reach 1500 by 2015, twice the number accumulated till the end of 2009. Since 17 of the most prolific authors (1.4% of all authors) contributed nearly half (47.9%) of GPRD studies, success in conducting GPRD studies may accumulate. The GPRD was used mainly in, but not limited to, the three study fields of "Pharmacology and Pharmacy", "General and Internal Medicine", and "Public, Environmental and Occupational Health". The UK and United States were the two most active regions of GPRD studies. One-third of GRPD studies were internationally co-authored. A public electronic health database such as the GPRD will promote scientific production in many ways. Data owners of electronic health databases at a national level should consider how to reduce access barriers and to make data more available for research.

  20. Academic impact of a public electronic health database: bibliometric analysis of studies using the general practice research database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies that use electronic health databases as research material are getting popular but the influence of a single electronic health database had not been well investigated yet. The United Kingdom's General Practice Research Database (GPRD is one of the few electronic health databases publicly available to academic researchers. This study analyzed studies that used GPRD to demonstrate the scientific production and academic impact by a single public health database. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: A total of 749 studies published between 1995 and 2009 with 'General Practice Research Database' as their topics, defined as GPRD studies, were extracted from Web of Science. By the end of 2009, the GPRD had attracted 1251 authors from 22 countries and been used extensively in 749 studies published in 193 journals across 58 study fields. Each GPRD study was cited 2.7 times by successive studies. Moreover, the total number of GPRD studies increased rapidly, and it is expected to reach 1500 by 2015, twice the number accumulated till the end of 2009. Since 17 of the most prolific authors (1.4% of all authors contributed nearly half (47.9% of GPRD studies, success in conducting GPRD studies may accumulate. The GPRD was used mainly in, but not limited to, the three study fields of "Pharmacology and Pharmacy", "General and Internal Medicine", and "Public, Environmental and Occupational Health". The UK and United States were the two most active regions of GPRD studies. One-third of GRPD studies were internationally co-authored. CONCLUSIONS: A public electronic health database such as the GPRD will promote scientific production in many ways. Data owners of electronic health databases at a national level should consider how to reduce access barriers and to make data more available for research.

  1. Primary and secondary impaction of four primary molar teeth in a single patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ramos Chrcanovic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of eruption of a primary tooth can be considered rare. In primary impaction, the primary tooth not only has never appeared in the oral cavity, but also is always covered by a more or less thick layer of bone. Secondary impaction, which is relatively more common, denotes teeth that at one time erupted into the mouth, but subsequently clinically appear to have receded from this position. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of primary and secondary impaction of four primary molar teeth in a single patient.

  2. A qualitative study of the impact of electronic journals on scholarly information behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé, Candela; Borrego, Àngel (Borrego Huerta)

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative study of the impact of electronic journals on the information behavior of academics at Catalan universities shows that academics now read more, and more widely. However, their reading is becoming more superficial; they are compelled to improve their discrimination skills in order to decide what to read in more depth. The electronic accessibility of journals means that academics now make fewer library visits. Web browsing and TOC e-mail alerts are replacing physical browsing, and...

  3. The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality

    OpenAIRE

    J. E.; Rocha; W.D.C Sanchez

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the electrical architectures adopted in wind turbines and its impact on the harmonic flux at the connected electric network. The integration of wind electric generators with the power grid needs energy processing by power electronics. It shows that different types of wind turbine generator systems use different types of electronic converters. This work provides a discussion on harmonic distortion taking place on the generator side, as well as in the power grid side. Key...

  4. NASA's Electronic Procurement System and the Impact on Small Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Three workshops, held in Lancaster, Orange County and Compton, were produced by the Los Angeles Regional Technology Alliance (LARTA) and NASA Far West Technology Transfer Center (FWRTTC). The workshops were held on December 12, 1997, February 5, 1998, and March 30, 1998, respectively. The purpose behind these workshops was to spread information regarding NASA procurement opportunities to small businesses in the region. This was accomplished by inviting economic and business development organizations to the three workshops, presenting NASA procurement resources to them, and asking them to distribute this information to the small businesses in their communities. With the assistance of LARTA, marketing and publicity in the form of direct mail, telemarketing, and promotion via a web site was implemented to publicize the workshops. These methods were remarkably effective because they enabled the workshops to attain its full capacity. Further publicity was provided by Wendy Reed of Valley Focus Magazine, an Antelope Valley Magazine aimed at business people. Her article entitled, "Doing Business with the Government" recapped the Lancaster workshop that she had attended and made references to several presentations. In the article, she discussed selling to the government via electronic commerce, and specifically mentioned Robert Medina, the NASA Dryden Small Business Specialist, as a contact person for those interested in pursuing procurement opportunities. The feedback provided by the participants is illustrated by the enclosed graphs and charts. These figures represent the number of participants who have frequented web sites presented at workshops, specifically the NASA procurement resources, and how extensive information dissemination was. Input from participants was favorable and encouraged more NASA Dryden workshops directly to the small business communities. There was an overwhelming response to the benefit of the NASA procurement opportunities presented at the

  5. 75 FR 65558 - Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Single Nuclear Unit at the Bellefonte Plant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Single Nuclear Unit at the Bellefonte Plant Site... Nuclear Unit at the Bellefonte Plant Site (final SEIS) on September 9, 2010. The location of the proposed nuclear plant site was stated incorrectly in the heading of the ROD. TVA prepared the final SEIS to update...

  6. The Impact of Psychotherapeutic Reiki on Anxiety and Mindfulness: A Single-Case Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lindsay C.

    2016-01-01

    Reiki healing is one of several complementary and integrative therapies becoming increasingly prevalent in mental health counseling. It has been identified in the medical field for its usefulness in treating anxiety, depression, distress, and pain but has rarely been studied for its counseling impact on client wellness. I conducted single-case…

  7. Cross sections measurements for dissociation of CHClF{sub 2} by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigaud, L; Ferreira, Natalia; Wolff, W; Santos, A C F dos; Montenegro, E C [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barros, A L F de [CEFET/RJ, Av. Maracana 229, 20271-110 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jesus, V L B de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia, R. Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil); Shah, M B, E-mail: lucassigaud@hotmail.co, E-mail: montenegro@if.ufrj.b [The Queen' s University Belfast, University Road Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    CFC compounds at the atmosphere play a crucial role to the environment, being the main responsible for the increase of the ozone hole. Recent studies show that electron impact is the most likely process for the dissociation of these molecules, creating atomic chlorine, which breaks down ozone molecules. An experimental setup was built in order to analyse the collisional processes of CHClF{sub 2} (one of the CFC compounds still in use by the industry) by electron impact. Total and partial cross sections have been obtained, showing the predominance of the channel of chlorine atom production.

  8. Electron Impact Induced Reactions of Ethyl Acetate and Its Sulphur Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn; Carlsen, Lars

    1983-01-01

    The electron impact induced reactions of ethyl acetate and its sulphur analogues have been studied by application of collision activation mass spectrometry and isotopic labelling with H-2 and O-18. The [M-C2H4]+·, [M-CH3]+ and [M-H2O]+· were selected for detailed investigations.......The electron impact induced reactions of ethyl acetate and its sulphur analogues have been studied by application of collision activation mass spectrometry and isotopic labelling with H-2 and O-18. The [M-C2H4]+·, [M-CH3]+ and [M-H2O]+· were selected for detailed investigations....

  9. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  10. Electrons, photons, and force: quantitative single-molecule measurements from physics to biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claridge, Shelley A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Weiss, Paul S

    2011-02-22

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution.

  11. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, A; Millo, O; Barbone, M; Alpern, H; Kalcheim, Y; Sassi, U; Ott, A K; De Fazio, D; Yoon, D; Amado, M; Ferrari, A C; Linder, J; Robinson, J W A

    2017-01-19

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K.

  12. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, A.; Millo, O.; Barbone, M.; Alpern, H.; Kalcheim, Y.; Sassi, U.; Ott, A. K.; De Fazio, D.; Yoon, D.; Amado, M.; Ferrari, A. C.; Linder, J.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2017-01-01

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K. PMID:28102222

  13. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Bernardo, A.; Millo, O.; Barbone, M.; Alpern, H.; Kalcheim, Y.; Sassi, U.; Ott, A. K.; de Fazio, D.; Yoon, D.; Amado, M.; Ferrari, A. C.; Linder, J.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2017-01-01

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K.

  14. Calculated low-energy electron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections for CO2 molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Celiberto, R

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational-excitation cross sections of ground electronic state of carbon dioxide molecule by electron-impact through the CO2-(2\\Pi) shape resonance is considered in the separation of the normal modes approximation. Resonance curves and widths are computed for each vibrational mode. The calculations assume decoupling between normal modes and employ the local complex potential model for the treatment of the nuclear dynamics, usually adopted for the electron-scattering involving diatomic molecules. Results are presented for excitation up to 10 vibrational levels in each mode and comparison with data present in the literature is discussed.

  15. Differential cross sections for the ionization of oriented H2 molecules by electron-impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pindzola, M S [AUBURN UNIV; Kaiser, C [UNIV MANCHESTER; Madison, D H [MISSOURI INST.; Robicheaux, F [AUBURN UNIV; Balance, J [ROLLINS COLLEGE

    2008-01-01

    A nonperturbative close-coupling technique is used to calculate differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of H{sub 2} at an energy of 35.4 eV. Our approach allows cross sections for any orientation of the molecule with respect to the incident electron beam to be analyzed. New features in the resulting cross sections are found compared with the case where the molecular orientation is averaged, and also with cross sections for He at equivalent electron kinematics. When averaged over all possible molecular orientations, good agreement is found with recent experimental results.

  16. Angular and energy distributions of electrons produced in arbitrary biomaterials by proton impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vera, Pablo; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel

    2015-01-09

    We present a simple method for obtaining reliable angular and energy distributions of electrons ejected from arbitrary condensed biomaterials by proton impact. Relying on a suitable description of the electronic excitation spectrum and a physically motivated relation between the ion and electron scattering angles, it yields cross sections in rather good agreement with experimental data in a broad range of ejection angles and energies, by only using as input the target composition and density. The versatility and simplicity of the method, which can be also extended to other charged particles, make it especially suited for obtaining ionization data for any complex biomaterial present in realistic cellular environments.

  17. The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Rocha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the electrical architectures adopted in wind turbines and its impact on the harmonic flux at the connected electric network. The integration of wind electric generators with the power grid needs energy processing by power electronics. It shows that different types of wind turbine generator systems use different types of electronic converters. This work provides a discussion on harmonic distortion taking place on the generator side, as well as in the power grid side. Keywords: grid connection, harmonic distortion, power electronics and converters, wind energy conversion systems, wind power, wind technology, wind turbines

  18. High efficiency noble gas electron impact ion source for isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, A. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dahl, D. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ward, M. B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-01

    An electron impact ion source has been designed for generation of noble gas ions in a compact isotope separator. The source utilizes a circular filament that surrounds an ionization chamber, enabling multiple passes of electrons through the ionization chamber. This report presents ion optical design and the results of efficiency and sensitivity measurements performed in an ion source test chamber and in the compact isotope separator. The cylindrical design produced xenon ions at an efficiency of 0.37% with a sensitivity of ~24 µA /Pa at 300 µA of electron current.

  19. The Impact of Electronic Medical records on improvement of health care delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Giaedi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: There is an increasing need to incorporate the use of electronic medical records EMR in our healthcare delivery. The advancement in information technology and its impact in all sectors including healthcare has accelerated this need amidst the ever growing challenges facing healthcare today. These challenges include; reducing preventable errors, improving communication among health care providers and facilities, and controlling the cost of medical care. I may argue that employing an electronic medical record system may be the one solution that will addresses all of these issues. The literature shows that Innovations in electronic record keeping have dramatically improved communication and patient safety without increasing costs.

  20. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  1. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of single and shared rooms on family-centred care in children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Penny; Northcott, Andy

    2017-06-01

    To explore whether and how spatial aspects of children's hospital wards (single and shared rooms) impact upon family-centred care. Family-centred care has been widely adopted in paediatric hospitals internationally. Recent hospital building programmes in many countries have prioritised the provision of single rooms over shared rooms. Limited attention has, however, been paid to the potential impact of spatial aspects of paediatric wards on family-centred care. Qualitative, ethnographic. Phase 1; observation within four wards of a specialist children's hospital. Phase 2; interviews with 17 children aged 5-16 years and 60 parents/carers. Sixty nursing and support staff also took part in interviews and focus group discussions. All data were subjected to thematic analysis. Two themes emerged from the data analysis: 'role expectations' and 'family-nurse interactions'. The latter theme comprised three subthemes: 'family support needs', 'monitoring children's well-being' and 'survey-assess-interact within spatial contexts'. Spatial configurations within hospital wards significantly impacted upon the relationships and interactions between children, parents and nurses, which played out differently in single and shared rooms. Increasing the provision of single rooms within wards is therefore likely to directly affect how family-centred care manifests in practice. Nurses need to be sensitive to the impact of spatial characteristics, and particularly of single and shared rooms, on families' experiences of children's hospital wards. Nurses' contribution to and experience of family-centred care can be expected to change significantly when spatial characteristics of wards change and, as is currently the vogue, hospitals maximise the provision of single rather than shared rooms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Single atomic particle at rest in free space : new value for electron radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmelt, H.

    Zero-point confinement in a suitable trap is briefly discussed as a quantum-mechanical equivalent of the classical single particle at rest in free space. So far, such confinement has been realized only for the 150 GHz cyclotron motion in geonium, a single electron permanently confined in a Penning trap. The most important result of mono-ion spectroscopy is a new, 10 000 times smaller, radius for the electron. This result was obtained by analyzing our g-factor data, g/2 = 1.001 159 652 193 (4), on the basis of a near-Dirac particle model. RF spectroscopy in geonium relies on the Continuous Stem Gerlach Effect in which a spin flip is detected as a small change in the ~ 60 MHz axial oscillation frequency of the electron in the trap. The Kaufmann Effect or relativistic mass shift may become a superior alternative : operating a geonium apparatus as a frequency selective mini-synchro-cyclotron has produced an easily detectable shift in the axial frequency. Like in Habann's 1926 split-anode magnetron, energy is quickly transferred from the oscillating electron to a resonant circuit, but by us for the purpose of detection, damping and cooling of the oscillatory motion. Conversely, localizing the electron to ~ 60 μm in the node of a standing wave in the trap cavity, where this cavity looks like a short, when it is resonant with the cyclotron motion, has made it possible to decrease the natural line width ten-fold. By driving the axial frequency not on resonance but on a side band higher by the ~ 12 kHz magnetron frequency, it has been possible to force the magnetron motion to absorb the excess in the photon energy and thereby shrink the magnetron radius to ~ 15 μm. By an analogous laser spectroscopic procedure the oscillation amplitude of a Ba+ ion in a different trap has been reduced to ~ 120 nm or less. Like in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, confinement is now much smaller than the wave length and no motional side bands appear in the optical spectrum. Such a mono

  4. The Impact of Electronic Health Record Usage on Cancer Registry Systems in Alabama

    OpenAIRE

    Houser, Shannon H; Colquitt, Shannon; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2012-01-01

    As the use of information technology within the healthcare setting increases, the impact of bridging registry data with electronic health records (EHRs) must be addressed. Current EHR implementation may create benefits as well as challenges to cancer registries in areas such as policies and regulations, data quality, reporting, management, staffing, and training. The purpose of this study was to assess 1) the status of EHR usage in cancer registries, 2) the impact of EHR usage on cancer regis...

  5. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymenko, M. V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); Klein, M. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levine, R. D. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Remacle, F., E-mail: fremacle@ulg.ac.be [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-07-14

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  6. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Illinois

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Effect of a single large impact on the coupled atmosphere-interior evolution of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmann, Cédric; Golabek, Gregor J.; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of a single large impact either during the Late Veneer or Late Heavy Bombardment on the evolution of the mantle and atmosphere of Venus. We use a coupled interior/exterior numerical code based on StagYY developed in Gillmann and Tackley (Gillmann, C., Tackley, P.J. [2014]. J. Geophys. Res. 119, 1189-1217). Single vertical impacts are simulated as instantaneous events affecting both the atmosphere and mantle of the planet by (i) eroding the atmosphere, causing atmospheric escape and (ii) depositing energy in the crust and mantle of the planet. The main impactor parameters include timing, size/mass, velocity and efficiency of energy deposition. We observe that impact erosion of the atmosphere is a minor effect compared to melting and degassing triggered by energy deposition in the mantle and crust. We are able to produce viable pathways that are consistent with present-day Venus, especially considering large Late Veneer Impacts. Small collisions (focused at the impact location and near the antipode. Depending on the timing of the impact, it can also have major consequences for the long-term evolution of the planet and its surface conditions by either (i) efficiently depleting the upper mantle of the planet, leading to the early loss of its water or (ii) imposing a volatile-rich and hot atmosphere for billions of years.

  8. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of {sigma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Fei [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu Pan [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Feng Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Han Xiaodong; Mao Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM micrograph of {sigma} phase; (b) HRTEM image of {sigma}/{gamma} interface corresponding to the area of the white frame in (a); (c) an enlarged image of area from the white frame in (b). The combination of {sigma}/{gamma} interface appears very well, and a two-atomic-layer step is shown on the {sigma}/{gamma} interface. In addition, {sigma} phase has the orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental characteristic of {sigma} phase is studied by HAADF techniques and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial characteristics of {sigma}/{gamma} interface are revealed by HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An atomic structural {sigma}/{gamma} interface with a two-atomic-layer step has been proposed. - Abstract: By means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field image technique (HAADF), morphological of plate-shaped {sigma} phase and interfacial characteristics between plate-shaped {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys have been studied. On the basis of HRTEM observations, an atomic structural interface between {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase with a step has been proposed. {sigma} Phase has the relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma},} (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. The compositional characteristics of the {sigma} phase which

  9. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  10. Diffracted transition radiation of an ultra-high-energy relativistic electron beam in a thin single-crystal wafer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V., E-mail: noskovbupk@mail.ru [Belgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    We consider diffracted transition radiation (DTR) emitted by high-energy relativistic electrons crossing a thin single-crystal wafer in the Laue geometry. The expression describing the DTR angular density is derived for the case where the electron path length in the target is much smaller than the X-ray wave extinction length in the crystal and the kinematic nature of this expression is demonstrated. It is shown that the DTR angular density in a thin target is proportional to the target thickness.

  11. Verification of electron doping in single-layer graphene due to H{sub 2} exposure with thermoelectric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Ju; Kang, Hojin; Soler-Delgado, David; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Yung Woo, E-mail: ywpark@phya.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong [Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Byung Hoon, E-mail: ywpark@phya.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Kubatkin, Sergey [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-06

    We report the electron doping of single-layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) by means of dissociative hydrogen adsorption. The transfer characteristic showed n-type doping behavior similar to that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. Furthermore, we studied the thermoelectric power (TEP) of CVD-grown SLG before and after exposure to high-pressure H{sub 2} molecules. From the TEP results, which indicate the intrinsic electrical properties, we observed that the CVD-grown SLG is n-type doped without degradation of the quality after hydrogen adsorption. Finally, the electron doping was also verified by Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Electronic and Physical Characterization of Hydrothermally Grown Single Crystal ThO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    52 LEED low energy electron diffraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 DOS density of states...bottom level consists of a low energy electron diffraction ( LEED ) assembly and is not used in this research. Figure 24 provides a top view of the...mineralizer solutions. Due to the corrosive nature of the mineralizer solution, the reaction was performed in a sealed silver ampoule (Stern Leach

  13. Single Bunch Electron Cloud Effects in the NLC Beam Delivery System(LCC-0126)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D

    2003-12-08

    A positron beam passing through a linear collider beam delivery beam line is finely focused to desired specifications during collimation and especially in Final Focusing (FFS). Undesired additional focusing is generated by beam-electron cloud interactions, which typically leads to beam size increases at high cloud densities. This paper examines the severity of the electron cloud effects and assesses the critical cloud density.

  14. Direct extraction of photosynthetic electrons from single algal cells by nanoprobing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, WonHyoung; Bai, Seoung-Jai; Park, Joong Sun; Huang, Zubin; Moseley, Jeffrey; Fabian, Tibor; Fasching, Rainer J; Grossman, Arthur R; Prinz, Fritz B

    2010-04-14

    There are numerous sources of bioenergy that are generated by photosynthetic processes, for example, lipids, alcohols, hydrogen, and polysaccharides. However, generally only a small fraction of solar energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms is converted to a form of energy that can be readily exploited. To more efficiently use the solar energy harvested by photosynthetic organisms, we evaluated the feasibility of generating bioelectricity by directly extracting electrons from the photosynthetic electron transport chain before they are used to fix CO(2) into sugars and polysaccharides. From a living algal cell, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, photosynthetic electrons (1.2 pA at 6000 mA/m(2)) were directly extracted without a mediator electron carrier by inserting a nanoelectrode into the algal chloroplast and applying an overvoltage. This result may represent an initial step in generating "high efficiency" bioelectricity by directly harvesting high energy photosynthetic electrons.

  15. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  16. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for neon-like Ni XIX ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In a recent paper [Pramana – J. Phys. 64, 129 (2005)] results have been presented for electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions among the fine- structure levels of the 2s22p6 and 2s22p53s configurations of Ni XIX. In this paper we demonstrate through an independent calculation with the ...

  17. Excitation of He(2(1,3)S) by electron impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeHeer, FJ; Bray, [No Value; Fursa, DV; Bliek, FW; Hoekstra, R; Summers, HP

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical data for electron impact excitation of neutral helium in the He (2(1,3)S) states are reviewed and a preferred data set is established for excitation to the He (n(1,3)L) states with n=2-4. Such a set of data was presented in a FOM report. The present work is an improvement made possible

  18. Field ionization kinetic and electron impact studies of gas phase transition states - The cyclic bromonium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. M.; Giguere, R. J.; Falick, A. M.; Aberth, W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Cis- and trans-isomers of 4-t-butylcyclohexyl bromide were studied to determine the mechanism of cyclic bromonium ion formation. The field ionization kinetic and electron impact data indicate that the formation of the cyclic structure occurs simultaneously with loss of the neutral fragment. The data also show that little or no gas-phase cis-trans isomerization occurs.

  19. Low Energy Electron-Impact Spectroscopy of C(sup 60) Buckminsterfullerene Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajmar, S.; Wang, S.

    1993-01-01

    The methods of electron-impact spectroscopy were utilized to obtain the first low-energy, high-resolution energy-loss spectra of gas phase pure C(sub 60) and C(sub 60) + C(sub 70) mixture buckminsterfullerene molecules.

  20. Impact of Electronic Teaching Materials on Process of Education--Results of an Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhorec, Ján; Hašková, Alena; Munk, Michal

    2010-01-01

    In their paper the authors deal with the vital issues of creation and application of electronic teaching materials for natural science subjects teaching. They describe an experimental examination of qualitative impact of these aids on education. The authors present a part of research results, which they obtained in a major research focused on…