WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron excitation densities

  1. Multicomponent Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Proton and Electron Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Culpitt, Tanner; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-04-05

    The quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons in the calculation of excited state properties is critical for describing nonadiabatic processes such as photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer. Multicomponent density functional theory enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of more than one type of particle and has been implemented previously for studying ground state molecular properties within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework, where all electrons and specified protons are treated quantum mechanically. To enable the study of excited state molecular properties, herein the linear response multicomponent time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived and implemented within the NEO framework. Initial applications to FHF - and HCN illustrate that NEO-TDDFT provides accurate proton and electron excitation energies within a single calculation. As its computational cost is similar to that of conventional electronic TDDFT, the NEO-TDDFT approach is promising for diverse applications, particularly nonadiabatic proton transfer reactions, which may exhibit mixed electron-proton vibronic excitations.

  2. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-01-01

    -srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2......Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become...... and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC...

  3. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, John P., E-mail: jps13@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Carlson, Benjamin T. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Duggins, Danielle O. [Gordon College, Wenham, MA 01984 (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); De Santis, Stefano [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tencate, Alister J. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  4. Population densities and rate coefficients for electron impact excitation in singly ionized oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awakowicz, P.; Behringer, K.

    1995-01-01

    In non-LTE arc plasmas, O II excited state number densities were measured relative to the O II ground and metastable states. The results were compared with collisional-radiative code calculations on the basis of the JET ADAS programs. Stationary He plasmas with small oxygen admixtures, generated in a 5 mm diameter cascade arc chamber (pressures 13-70 hPa, arc current 150 A), were investigated spectroscopically in the visible and the VUV spectral range. The continuum of a 2 mm diameter pure He arc (atmospheric pressure, current 100 A) served for calibration of the VUV system response. Plasma diagnostics on the basis of Hβ Stark broadening yielded electron densities between 2.4 x 10 14 and 2.0 x 10 15 cm -3 for the low-pressure O II mixture plasmas. The agreement of measured and calculated excited state populations is generally very satisfactory, thus confirming the rate coefficients in the code. This is of particular interest in this intermediate region between corona balance and LTE, where many atomic data are required in the simulation. Clear indications were found for the diffusion of metastables lowering their number densities significantly below their statistical values. (author)

  5. Assessment of oscillator strengths with multiconfigurational short-range density functional theory for electronic excitations in organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan

    2017-01-01

    considered the large collection of organic molecules whose excited states were investigated with a range of electronic structure methods by Thiel et al. As a by-product of our calculations of oscillator strengths, we also obtain electronic excitation energies, which enable us to compare the performance......We have in a series of recent papers investigated electronic excited states with a hybrid between a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave function and density functional theory (DFT). This method has been dubbed the CAS short-range DFT method (CAS–srDFT). The previous papers...

  6. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  7. Interaction of the modulated electron beam with inhomogeneous plasma: plasma density profile deformation and langmuir waves excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, I.O.; Kelnyk, O.I.; Soroka, S.V.; Siversky, T.V.

    2005-01-01

    Nonlinear deformation of the initially linear plasma density profile due to the modulated electron beam is studied via computer simulation. In the initial time period the field slaves to the instantaneous profile of the plasma density. Langmuir waves excitation is suppressed by the density profile deformation. The character of the plasma density profile deformation for the late time period depends significantly on the plasma properties. Particularly, for plasma with hot electrons quasi-periodic generation of ion-acoustic pulses takes place in the vicinity of the initial point of plasma resonance

  8. Electronic Excitations in Solution: The Interplay between State Specific Approaches and a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Ciro A; Jacquemin, Denis; Adamo, Carlo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2015-12-08

    We critically analyze the performances of continuum solvation models when coupled to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to predict solvent effects on both absorption and emission energies of chromophores in solution. Different polarization schemes of the polarizable continuum model (PCM), such as linear response (LR) and three different state specific (SS) approaches, are considered and compared. We show the necessity of introducing a SS model in cases where large electron density rearrangements are involved in the excitations, such as charge-transfer transitions in both twisted and quadrupolar compounds, and underline the very delicate interplay between the selected polarization method and the chosen exchange-correlation functional. This interplay originates in the different descriptions of the transition and ground/excited state multipolar moments by the different functionals. As a result, the choice of both the DFT functional and the solvent polarization scheme has to be consistent with the nature of the studied electronic excitation.

  9. Collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices and plasma modes of a two-dimensional electron gas with spatially modulated charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices is formulated by using linear response theory. Different kinds of collective excitations in type I (GaAs-GaAlAs) and type II (GaSb-InAs) superlattices are surveyed. Special attention is paid to the presence of surface and finite-size effects. In calculating the dielectric matrix, the effect of different approximations of the system is discussed. The theory for inelastic length scattering (Raman scattering), and for Electron Energy Loss (EEL) due to collective excitations, is formulated. Calculations for several model systems are presented and the main features of the spectra are discussed. In part II the theory of collective excitations of a two-dimensional electron gas with a spatially periodic equilibrium density is formulated. As a first example a periodic array of two-dimensional electron gas strips with constant equilibrium density is studied. The integral equation that describes the charge fluctuations on the strips is derived and solved numerically. The spatial dependence of the density fluctuation across a single strip can be in the form of either propagating or evanescent waves

  10. The Influence of Non-Equilibrium Excitation on the Electron Density in One-Dimensional MFD Channel Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichert, K.; Kaeppeler, H. J. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung der Technischen Hochschule Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1966-10-15

    In previous publications, a system of equations was derived from the gas-kinetic description of a multi-component reacting plasma and employed for the calculation of one-dimensional subsonic flows. This system is now extended to include non-equilibrium excitation. No thermal or chemical equilibrium between the various components of the plasma is assumed. The components of the plasma considered are a non-reacting working fluid, an alkali metal vapour as a seeding material, ions of this seeding substance, and electrons. Three levels for the excited states are introduced. The reactions considered are excitation and ionization by electron collisions, and photo-ionization, as well as the corresponding reverse processes. For the reaction velocities, analytical equations are introduced permitting insertion of any excitation or ionization cross-sections of either experimental or theoretical origin. The method employed had been previously suggested by one of the authors. As examples, the degrees of excitation and ionization in the flow of a helium working fluid with 1% caesium seeding through a channel against transverse magnetic fields of 15 and 40 kg at Mach numbers of 0.7 and 0.8, respectively, were calculated. The results of the calculations show that for relatively small magnetic fields there is no rapid rise of the ionization to Saha-equilibrium as a function of electron temperature. A comparison with the results of a calculation neglecting excitation shows that especially for relatively large magnetic fields non-equilibrium excitation has an essential influence on the electron density and its approach to equilibrium. Neglecting excitation, there results a nearly frozen behaviour of the degree of ionization within channel lengths of technical interest for small magnetic fields. (author)

  11. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9681 Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited -State Absorption Spectra...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited -State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 59 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited -state

  12. Optical excitation and electron relaxation dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: a combined approach of density functional and density matrix theory applied to the silicon (001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecking, N

    2007-11-05

    In this work a new theoretical formalism is introduced in order to simulate the phononinduced relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution to equilibrium at a semiconductor surface numerically. The non-equilibrium distribution is effected by an optical excitation. The approach in this thesis is to link two conventional, but approved methods to a new, more global description: while semiconductor surfaces can be investigated accurately by density-functional theory, the dynamical processes in semiconductor heterostructures are successfully described by density matrix theory. In this work, the parameters for density-matrix theory are determined from the results of density-functional calculations. This work is organized in two parts. In Part I, the general fundamentals of the theory are elaborated, covering the fundamentals of canonical quantizations as well as the theory of density-functional and density-matrix theory in 2{sup nd} order Born approximation. While the formalism of density functional theory for structure investigation has been established for a long time and many different codes exist, the requirements for density matrix formalism concerning the geometry and the number of implemented bands exceed the usual possibilities of the existing code in this field. A special attention is therefore attributed to the development of extensions to existing formulations of this theory, where geometrical and fundamental symmetries of the structure and the equations are used. In Part II, the newly developed formalism is applied to a silicon (001)surface in a 2 x 1 reconstruction. As first step, density-functional calculations using the LDA functional are completed, from which the Kohn-Sham-wave functions and eigenvalues are used to calculate interaction matrix elements for the electron-phonon-coupling an the optical excitation. These matrix elements are determined for the optical transitions from valence to conduction bands and for electron-phonon processes inside the

  13. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  14. Excited electronic states of MnO{sub 4}{sup −}: Challenges for wavefunction and density functional response theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Nuno M.S.; McKinlay, Russell G.; Paterson, Martin J., E-mail: m.j.paterson@hw.ac.uk

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • Linear response coupled cluster hierarchy CCS, CC2, CCSD, CC3 applied to lowest excited states of MnO{sub 4}{sup −}. • Unphysical results obtained for approximate CCn methods. • Failure traced to very large singles amplitudes. • HF and RASSCF calculations on ground state show strong correlations give very poor HF single particle picture. • TD-CAM-B3LYP describes LMCT states with reasonable accuracy. - Abstract: The lowest excited electronic states of the permanganate ion MnO{sub 4}{sup −} are calculated using a hierarchy of coupled cluster response approaches, as well as time-dependent density functional theory. It is shown that while full linear response coupled cluster with singles and doubles (or higher) performs well, that permanganate represents a stern test for approximate coupled cluster response models, and that problems can be traced to very large orbital relaxation effects. TD-DFT is reasonably robust although errors around 0.6 eV are still observed. In order to further investigate the strong correlations prevalent in the electronic ground state large-scale RASSCF calculations were also performed. Again very large orbital relaxation in the correlated wavefunction is observed. Although the system can qualitatively be described by a single configuration, multi-reference diagnostic values show that care must be taken in this and similar metal complexes.

  15. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ω α and oscillator strengths f α for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ω α (R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li 2 , and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate

  16. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shunsuke A. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yasutaka [Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Department of Medical and General Sciences, Nihon Institute of Medical Science, 1276 Shimogawara, Moroyama-Machi, Iruma-Gun, Saitama 350-0435 (Japan); Shinohara, Yasushi [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Germany); Yabana, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  17. F + centre generation in MgO crystals at high density of excitation by accelerated electrons of subthreshold energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, Y. M.; Surzhikov, A. P.; Surzhikov, V. P.; Pogrebnjak, A. D.

    1981-07-01

    Optical absorption spectra and the angular distribution of annihilated positrons in MgO crystals irradiated by subtreshold superdense electron pulses are measured. The experimental results obtained show the effective contribution of the creation mechanism of non-impact radiation defects in MgO crystals at the highest electron irradiation densities.

  18. Tight-binding approximations to time-dependent density functional theory — A fast approach for the calculation of electronically excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüger, Robert, E-mail: rueger@scm.com [Scientific Computing & Modelling NV, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Linnéstr. 2, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Lenthe, Erik van [Scientific Computing & Modelling NV, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heine, Thomas [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Linnéstr. 2, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Visscher, Lucas [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-14

    We propose a new method of calculating electronically excited states that combines a density functional theory based ground state calculation with a linear response treatment that employs approximations used in the time-dependent density functional based tight binding (TD-DFTB) approach. The new method termed time-dependent density functional theory TD-DFT+TB does not rely on the DFTB parametrization and is therefore applicable to systems involving all combinations of elements. We show that the new method yields UV/Vis absorption spectra that are in excellent agreement with computationally much more expensive TD-DFT calculations. Errors in vertical excitation energies are reduced by a factor of two compared to TD-DFTB.

  19. Thermal and optical excitation of trapped electrons in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) studied through positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahid, F.; Zhang, J.D.; Yu, T.F.; Ling, C.C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Positronium (Ps) formation in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) has been studied below the glass transition temperature. The formation probability increases with positron irradiation time due to an increasing number of inter-track trapped electrons becoming available for positron capture. The temperature variation of the saturated Ps level is discussed in different models. The quenching of trapped electrons by light has been studied and the optical de-trapping cross-section for different photon energies has been estimated over the visible region.

  20. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  1. Creation of excitations and defects in insulating materials by high-current-density electron beams of nanosecond pulse duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisburd, D.I.; Evdokimov, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is concerned with fast and ultra-fast processes in insulating materials under the irradiation by a high-current-density electron beam of a nanosecond pulse duration. The inflation process induced by the interaction of a high-intensity electron beam with a dielectric is examined. The ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes is one of the most important stages of the process. Ionization-passive electrons and holes make the main contribution to many fast processes with a characteristic time in the range 10 -14 /10 -12 s: high-energy conductivity, intraband luminescence, etc. A technique was developed for calculation of the ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes in a dielectric prior to electron-phonon relaxation. The following experimental effects are considered: intraband luminescence, coexistence of intraband electron luminescence and band-to-band hole luminescence in CsI, high energy conductivity; generation of mechanical fields and their interaction with cracks and dislocations. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  3. Electron-impact excitation of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, D.A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    A simple expression is derived that relates the rate coefficient for dipole-allowed electron-impact excitation of a molecular ion in the Coulomb-Born approximation to the Einstein A coefficient for the corresponding radiative decay. Results are given for several molecular ions of astrophysical interest. A general analytic expression is obtained for the equilibrium rotational level populations in the ground vibrational state of any molecular ion excited by collisions with electrons. The expression depends only upon the electron temperature, the electron density, and the rotational constant of the molecular ion. A similar expression is obtained for neutral polar molecules

  4. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Shuji; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl}benzene (AC5-CF 3 ), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF 3 , we confirm that CF 3 substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF 3 , and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  5. Excited-state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbola, Manoj K; Hemanadhan, M; Shamim, Md; Samal, P

    2012-01-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to excited-state density functional theory, we present our method of constructing modified local density approximated (MLDA) energy functionals for the excited states. We show that these functionals give accurate results for kinetic energy and exchange energy compared to the ground state LDA functionals. Further, with the inclusion of GGA correction, highly accurate total energies for excited states are obtained. We conclude with a brief discussion on the further direction of research that include the construction of correlation energy functional and exchange potential for excited states.

  6. Electron excitation of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormonde, S.

    1979-02-01

    The development and testing of a synthesized close-coupling effective model potential ten-channel electron-atom scattering code and some preliminary calculations of resonances in cross sections for the excitation of excited states of potassium by low energy electrons are described. The main results obtained are: identification of 1 S and 1 D structures in excitation cross sections below the 5 2 S threshold of neutral potassium; indications of additional structures - 1 P and 1 D between the 5 2 S and 5 2 D thresholds; and a suggested explanation of anomalously high interstate-electron impact excitation cross sections inferred from experiments on potassium-seeded plasmas. The effective potential model imbedded in the code can be used to simulate any atomic system that can be approximated by a single bound electron outside an ionic core. All that is needed is a set of effective potential parameters--experimental or theoretical. With minor modifications the code could be adapted to calculations of electron scattering by two-electron systems

  7. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  8. Applications of high order harmonic radiation to UVX-solids interaction: high excitation density in electronic relaxation dynamics and surface damaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grazia, M.

    2007-12-01

    The new sources of radiation in the extreme-UV (X-UV: 10-100 nm), which deliver spatially coherent, ultra-short and intense pulses, allow studying high flux processes and ultra-fast dynamics in various domains. The thesis work presents two applications of the high-order laser harmonics (HH) to solid state physics. In Part I, we describe the optimization of the harmonic for studies of X-UV/solids interaction. In Part II, we investigate effects of high excitation density in the dynamics of electron relaxation in dielectric scintillator crystals - tungstates and fluorides, using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Quenching of luminescence at short time gives evidence of the competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons (STE). The non-radiative channel is identified to mutual interaction of STE at high excitation density. In Part III, we study the X-UV induced damage mechanism in various materials, either conductor (amorphous carbon) or insulators (organic polymers, e.g., PMMA). In PMMA-Plexiglas, in the desorption regime (0.2 mJ/cm 2 , i.e., below damage threshold), the surface modifications reflect X-UV induced photochemical processes that are tentatively identified, as a function of dose: at low dose, polymer chain scission followed by the blow-up of the volatile, low-molecular fragments leads to crater formation; at high dose, cross-linking in the near-surface layer of remaining material leads to surface hardening. These promising results have great perspectives considering the performances already attained and planned in the next future in the development of the harmonic sources. (author)

  9. Electron distribution function in electron-beam-excited plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    In monatomic plasmas excited by high-intensity relativistic electron beams, the electron secondary distribution function is dominated by elastic electron-electron collisions at low electron energies and by inelastic electron-atom collisions at high electron energies (above the excitation threshold). Under these conditions, the total rate of excitation by inelastic collisions is limited by the rate at which electron-electron collisions relax the distribution function in the neighborhood of the excitation threshold. To describe this effect quantitatively, an approximate analytic solution of the electron Boltzmann equation is obtained, including both electron-electron and inelastic collisions. The result provides a simple formula for the total rate of excitation

  10. Statistical density of nuclear excited states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kolomietz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A semi-classical approximation is applied to the calculations of single-particle and statistical level densities in excited nuclei. Landau's conception of quasi-particles with the nucleon effective mass m* < m is used. The approach provides the correct description of the continuum contribution to the level density for realistic finite-depth potentials. It is shown that the continuum states does not affect significantly the thermodynamic calculations for sufficiently small temperatures T ≤ 1 MeV but reduce strongly the results for the excitation energy at high temperatures. By use of standard Woods - Saxon potential and nucleon effective mass m* = 0.7m the A-dependency of the statistical level density parameter K was evaluated in a good qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  11. Composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, A.E.; Hickman, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Based on recent studies, the effect of re-excited ions in the emission of electron beam induced fluorescence in nitrogen has been estimated. These effects are included in the formulation of a composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam. The shortcomings of previous models, namely the dependence of the measured temperature on true gas temperature as well as the gas density, are almost completely eliminated in the range of temperatures and densities covered by the available data. (auth)

  12. Quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setser, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The two-body, thermal quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms are reviewed using excited states of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms as examples. State-specific interstate relaxation and excitation-transfer reactions with atomic colliders are discussed first. These results then are used to discuss quenching reactions of excited-state atoms with diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the latter have large cross sections, and the reactions can proceed by excitation transfer and by reactive quenching. Excited states of molecules are not considered; however, a table of quenching rate constants is given for six excited-state molecules in an appendix

  13. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. W. [DESY (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron), FS-PEX, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Yiu, Y. M., E-mail: yyiu@uwo.ca; Sham, T. K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A5B7 (Canada); Ward, M. J. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Liu, L. [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Soochow University-Western University Center for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, 215123 (China); Hu, Y. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N2V3 (Canada); Zapien, J. A. [Center Of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Liu, Yingkai [Institute of Physics and Electronic Information, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan, 650500 (China)

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  14. Collective electronic excitations in C60 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X.; Ulloa, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic excitations in fullerene crystals by calculating the density-density correlation function in a fully nonlocal linear response theory. Our results indicate that the collective features associates with the π→π * transitions show strong anisotropic properties, with peaks changing by as much as 0.7 eV in different directions. Meanwhile, the calculated mode dispersion exhibits rather weak wave-number dependence along a given direction, in general agreement with experimental results. The oscillator strength also shows anisotropic behavior, with significant weight redistribution for different directions. We also analyze this system in terms of a classical point-dipole array model, and show that this simple model approximates well the quantum results

  15. Calculations on the vibrational level density in highly excited formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The object of the present work is to develop a model that provides realistic estimates of the vibrational level density in polyatomic molecules in a given electronic state, at very high (chemically relevant) vibrational excitation energies. For S 0 formaldehyde (D 2 CO), acetylene, and a number of triatomics, the estimates using conventional spectroscopic formulas have yielded densities at the dissociation threshold, very much lower than the experimentally measured values. In the present work we have derived a general formula for the vibrational energy levels of a polyatomic molecule, which is a generalization of the conventional Dunham spectroscopic expansion. Calculations were performed on the vibrational level density in S 0 D 2 CO, H 2 C 2 , and NO 2 at excitation energies in the vicinity of the dissociation limit, using the newly derived formula. The results from the calculations are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured data

  16. Positive streamers in air of varying density : experiments on the scaling of the excitation density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubrovin, D.; Nijdam, S.; Clevis, T.T.J.; Heijmans, L.C.J.; Ebert, U.; Yair, Y.; Price, C.

    2015-01-01

    Streamers are rapidly extending ionized finger-like structures that dominate the initial breakdown of large gas volumes in the presence of a sufficiently strong electric field. Their macroscopic parameters are described by simple scaling relations, where the densities of electrons and of excited

  17. Density-dependent lines of one- and two-electron ions in diagnostics of laboratory plasma. I. The rates of collision relaxation of excited levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelko, V P; Skobelev, I Yu; Vinogradov, A V [Lebedev Physical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Moscow, USSR

    1977-01-01

    Plasma devices with inertial plasma confinement such as laser produced plasmas, exploding wires, plasma focus, etc., which have been rapidly developed during recent years., appear to be very intensive sources of spectral line radiation in far UV and X-ray regions. Analysis of this radiation provides a good tool for plasma diagnostics with very high electron densities up to 10/sup 22/cm/sup -3/. In this work, consisting of two parts, the authors consider the mechanism of the formation of spectral lines in hot and dense plasma. The key point for density diagnostics is the fact that for some ion levels the rate of collisional relaxation has the same order of magnitude as the radiative decay. Thus the intensities of spectral lines arising from these levels show a strong dependence on electron density which makes diagnostics possible. In this paper, emphasis is laid on the calculation of rates of transition between close ion levels induced by electron or ion impact, which usually gives the main contribution to the collisional relaxation constants. The influence of plasma polarization effects on the collision frequency in a dense plasma is also considered.

  18. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schober H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external periodic potential while phonons exemplify a decoupled system of interacting particles. The way we develop the argument gives as by-product a short account of molecular orbitals and molecular vibrations.

  19. Dissociative Excitation of Thymine by Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, William; Tiessen, Collin; Hein, Jeffrey; Trocchi, Joshuah; Kedzierski, Wladek

    2014-05-01

    A crossed electron-gas beam system coupled to a VUV spectrometer has been used to investigate the dissociation of thymine (C5H6N2O2) into excited atomic fragments in the electron-impact energy range from threshold to 375 eV. A special stainless steel oven is used to vaporize the thymine and form it into a beam where it is intersected by a magnetically collimated electron beam, typical current 50 μA. The main features in the spectrum are the H Lyman series lines. The probability of extracting excited C or N atoms from the ring is shown to be very small. In addition to spectral data, excitation probability curves as a function of electron energy will be presented for the main emission features. Possible dissociation channels and excitation mechanisms in the parent molecule will be discussed. The authors thank NSERC (Canada) for financial support.

  20. Vibrational excitation of D2 by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.J.; Phelps, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Excitation coefficients for the production of vibrationally exicted D 2 by low energy electrons have been determined from measurements of the intensity of infrared emission from mixtures of D 2 and small concentrations of CO 2 or CO. The measurements were made using the electron drift tube technique and covered electric field to gas density ratios (E/n) from (5 to 80) x 10 -21 V m 2 , corresponding to mean electron energies between 0.45 and 4.5 eV. The CO 2 and CO concentrations were chosen to allow efficient excitation transfer from the D 2 to the carbon containing molecule, but to minimize direct excitation of the CO 2 or CO. The measured infrared intensities were normalized to predicted values for N 2 --CO 2 and N 2 --CO mixtures at E/n where the efficiency of vibrational excitation is known to be very close to 100%. The experimental excitation coefficients are in satisfactory agreement with predictions based on electron--D 2 cross sections at mean electron energies below 1 eV, but are about 50% too high at mean energies above about 2 eV. Application of the technique to H 2 did not yield useful vibrational excitation coefficients. The effective coefficients in H 2 --CO 2 mixtures were a factor of about 3 times the predicted values. For our H 2 --CO mixtures the excitation of CO via excitation transfer from H 2 is small compared to direct electron excitation of CO molecules. Published experiments and theories on electron--H 2 and electron--D 2 collisions are reviewed to obtain the cross sections used in the predictions

  1. Direct conversion of graphite into diamond through electronic excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, H

    2003-01-01

    An ab initio total energy calculation has been performed for electronic excited states in diamond and rhombohedral graphite by the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA). First, calculations for the core-excited state in diamond have been performed to show that the ab initio calculations based on the LDA describe the wavefunctions in the electronic excited states as well as in the ground state quite well. Fairly good coincidence with both experimental data and theoretical prediction has been obtained for the lattice relaxation of the core exciton state. The results of the core exciton state are compared with nitrogen-doped diamond. Next, the structural stability of rhombohedral graphite has been investigated to examine the possibility of the transition into the diamond structure through electronic excited states. While maintaining the rhombohedral symmetry, rhombohedral graphite can be spontaneously transformed to cubic diamond. Tota...

  2. Correlation of III/V semiconductor etch results with physical parameters of high-density reactive plasmas excited by electron cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, FRANZ; Ralf, MEYER; Markus-Christian, AMANN

    2017-12-01

    Reactive ion etching is the interaction of reactive plasmas with surfaces. To obtain a detailed understanding of this process, significant properties of reactive composite low-pressure plasmas driven by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) were investigated and compared with the radial uniformity of the etch rate. The determination of the electronic properties of chlorine- and hydrogen-containing plasmas enabled the understanding of the pressure-dependent behavior of the plasma density and provided better insights into the electronic parameters of reactive etch gases. From the electrical evaluation of I(V) characteristics obtained using a Langmuir probe, plasmas of different compositions were investigated. The standard method of Druyvesteyn to derive the electron energy distribution functions by the second derivative of the I(V) characteristics was replaced by a mathematical model which has been evolved to be more robust against noise, mainly, because the first derivative of the I(V) characteristics is used. Special attention was given to the power of the energy dependence in the exponent. In particular, for plasmas that are generated by ECR with EM modes, the existence of Maxwellian distribution functions is not to be taken as a self-evident fact, but the bi-Maxwellian distribution was proven for Ar- and Kr-stabilized plasmas. In addition to the electron temperature, the global uniform discharge model has been shown to be useful for calculating the neutral gas temperature. To what extent the invasive method of using a Langmuir probe could be replaced with the non-invasive optical method of emission spectroscopy, particularly actinometry, was investigated, and the resulting data exhibited the same relative behavior as the Langmuir data. The correlation with etchrate data reveals the large chemical part of the removal process—most striking when the data is compared with etching in pure argon. Although the relative amount of the radial variation of plasma density and

  3. Collective density excitations in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.K.; Tankeshwar, K.; Moudgil, R.K.

    1997-11-01

    The dynamical structure factor S(q, ω) and first order memory function of liquid sodium near its triple point is studied by using the Mori's memory function formalism. The memory function has been evaluated self-consistently by expressing the third stage memory function in terms of scaled second order memory function. The short time properties of S(q, ω) are exactly incorporated by the use of frequency sum rules while the long time property is fixed by the scaling parameter. The scaled parameter is determined from the zero frequency dynamical structure factor. For the interaction between the ions we have used the effective pair potential based on pseudopotential theory. It is found that for q ≤ 1.16A 0-1 our method predicts the collective density excitation peak in S(q, ω) in agreement with the molecular dynamics data. For q = 1.99A 0-1 no such peak is observed at finite w which is again in agreement with molecular dynamics data, but for q = 2.74A 0-1 we again observed a shoulder. The results for the first order memory function have also been compared with the molecular dynamics data and a good agreement is obtained at short times. (author)

  4. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.; Gerardo, J.B.; Patterson, E.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Rice, J.K.; Bingham, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe 2 / sup *(1)/, Kr:O(2 1 S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  5. Electronic excitation and Auger spectroscopy of hexamethyldissilane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, G.G.B. de; Azevedo e Souza, A.C. de; Martins, R.J.; Lucas, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is presented an spectroscopic study of Si 2 (CH 3 ) 6 which presents interesting characteristics in the Si - Si bond. Electron energy loss technique was used in the energy range of 500 - 200 eV for the electron beam. Electronic excitation spectra were obtained for the energy loss range from 5 to 30 eV, and also Auger spectra. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Dissociative Excitation of Adenine by Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, J. William; Trocchi, Joshuah; Dech, Jeffery; Kedzierski, Wladek

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative excitation of adenine (C6H5NH2) into excited atomic fragments has been studied in the electron impact energy range from threshold to 300 eV. A crossed beam system coupled to a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) monochromator is used to study emissions in the wavelength range from 110 to 200 nm. The beam of adenine vapor from a stainless steel oven is crossed at right angles by the electron beam and the resultant UV radiation is detected in a mutually orthogonal direction. The strongest feature in the spectrum is H Lyman- α. Financial support from NSERC and CFI, Canada, is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Electronic excitation of Na atom by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielschowsky, C.E.; Souza, G.G.B. de; Lucas, C.A.; Nogueira, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Electronic excitation of the 3s-3p transition in the Na atom was studied by intermediate energy electron impact spectroscopy. Differential Cross Sections (DCS) and Generalized Oscillator Strenghts (GOS) were determined experimentally for 1 KeV electrons. Theoretical results within the First Born Approximation as well as Glauber theory, were also performed. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  8. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J.; Nguyen, Huy A.; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x0, y0) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x0, y0) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density |φi) (x0,y0)|nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  9. Transition densities with electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisenberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the ground state and transition charge densities in nuclei via electron scattering. Using electrons as a spectroscopic tool in nuclear physics, these transition densities can be determined with high precision, also in the nuclear interior. These densities generally ask for a microscopic interpretation in terms of contributions from individual nucleons. The results for single particle transitions confirm the picture of particle-phonon coupling. (Auth.)

  10. Statistics of excitations in the electron glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palassini, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    We study the statistics of elementary excitations in the classical electron glass model of localized electrons interacting via the unscreened Coulomb interaction in the presence of disorder. We reconsider the long-standing puzzle of the exponential suppression of the single-particle density of states near the Fermi level, by measuring accurately the density of states of charged and electron-hole pair excitations via finite temperature Monte Carlo simulation and zero-temperature relaxation. We also investigate the statistics of large charge rearrangements after a perturbation of the system, which may shed some light on the slow relaxation and glassy phenomena recently observed in a variety of Anderson insulators. In collaboration with Martin Goethe.

  11. Electroluminescence from graphene excited by electron tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams, Ryan; Bharadwaj, Palash; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    We use low-energy electron tunneling to excite electroluminescence in single layer graphene. Electrons are injected locally using a scanning tunneling microscope and the luminescence is analyzed using a wide-angle optical imaging system. The luminescence can be switched on and off by inverting the tip–sample bias voltage. The observed luminescence is explained in terms of a hot luminescence mechanism. (paper)

  12. Study of single-electron excitations by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, A.J.; Gibson, J.M.; Howie, A.; Spalding, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of fast electrons by the excitation of L-shell electrons at a stacking fault in silicon has been studied with a scanning transmission electron microscope. It was found that the bright-field stacking fault contrast is preserved in the filtered L-shell-loss signal at 100 eV. This result is discussed in terms of the delocalization of the excitation mechanism. It is concluded that localization effects will typically become significant only for energy transfers greater than 1 keV from a fast electron of energy 80 keV. (author)

  13. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  14. Electron-impact excitation of Zn II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msezane, A.Z.; Henry, R.J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Collision strengths are calculated for excitation of Zn II from the 4s ground state to excited states 4p, 3d 9 4s 2 , 5s, and 4d in a five-state close-coupling approximation for the electron-impact energy range 15 5 3d 10 4s 2 in a two-state close-coupling approximation for the same energy range. Accurate target functions are used in the expansion. Very good agreement with measurements of absolute emission cross sections of Rogers et al. is obtained for energy region 15< E<100 eV, when cascade contributions are included. Poorer agreement is obtained with experiment for excitation of the 5s state, owing to sensitivities in the close-coupling approximation

  15. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  16. Ultrafast equilibration of excited electrons in dynamical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhibin; Allen, Roland E

    2009-12-02

    In our density-functional-based simulations of materials responding to femtosecond-scale laser pulses, we have observed a potentially useful phenomenon: the excited electrons automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within ∼100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion. Microscopic simulations like these can then provide the separate electronic and kinetic temperatures, chemical potentials, pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses as input for studies on larger lengths and timescales.

  17. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straten, P. van der.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li + -He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li + -He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He) + -quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  18. Electron-lattice Interaction and Nonlinear Excitations in Cuprate Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, J.; Eschrig, H.; Drechsler, S.L.; Malek, J.

    1995-01-01

    A low temperature lattice modulation of the chains of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 is considered by deriving a Hamiltonian of electron-lattice interaction from density-functional calculations for deformed lattice and solving it for the groundstate. Hubbard-type Coulomb interaction is included. The obtained groundstate is a charge-density-wave state with a pereodicity of four lattice constants and a gap for one-electron excitations of about 1eV, sensitively depending on parameters of the Hamiltonian. There are lots of polaronic and solitonic excitations with formation energies deep in the gap, which can pin the Fermi level and thus produce again metallicity of the chain. They might also contribute to pairing of holes in adjacent CuO 2 -planes. (author)

  19. Search for Excited Electrons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    A search for excited electron e* production is described in which the electroweak decays e*->e gamma, e*->e Z and e*->nu W are considered. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 120 pb^(-1) taken in e^(+-)p collisions from 1994 to 2000 with the H1 detector at HERA at centre-of-mass energies of 300 and 318 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits are derived for the ratio of the couplings to the compositeness scale, f/Lambda. These limits extend the excluded region to higher masses than has been possible in previous direct searches for excited electrons.

  20. Photoionization of furan from the ground and excited electronic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzi, Aurora; Sapunar, Marin; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Došlić, Nađa; Decleva, Piero

    2016-02-28

    Here we present a comparative computational study of the photoionization of furan from the ground and the two lowest-lying excited electronic states. The study aims to assess the quality of the computational methods currently employed for treating bound and continuum states in photoionization. For the ionization from the ground electronic state, we show that the Dyson orbital approach combined with an accurate solution of the continuum one particle wave functions in a multicenter B-spline basis, at the density functional theory (DFT) level, provides cross sections and asymmetry parameters in excellent agreement with experimental data. On the contrary, when the Dyson orbitals approach is combined with the Coulomb and orthogonalized Coulomb treatments of the continuum, the results are qualitatively different. In excited electronic states, three electronic structure methods, TDDFT, ADC(2), and CASSCF, have been used for the computation of the Dyson orbitals, while the continuum was treated at the B-spline/DFT level. We show that photoionization observables are sensitive probes of the nature of the excited states as well as of the quality of excited state wave functions. This paves the way for applications in more complex situations such as time resolved photoionization spectroscopy.

  1. Sequential double excitations from linear-response time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Ratner, Mark A.; Schatz, George C., E-mail: g-schatz@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chen, Lin X. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Traditional UV/vis and X-ray spectroscopies focus mainly on the study of excitations starting exclusively from electronic ground states. However there are many experiments where transitions from excited states, both absorption and emission, are probed. In this work we develop a formalism based on linear-response time-dependent density functional theory to investigate spectroscopic properties of excited states. We apply our model to study the excited-state absorption of a diplatinum(II) complex under X-rays, and transient vis/UV absorption of pyrene and azobenzene.

  2. Realistic level densities in fragment emission at high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy fragment emission from a 44 100 Ru compound nucleus at 400 and 800 MeV of excitation is analyzed to study the influence of level density models on final yields. An approach is used in which only quasibound shell-model levels are included in calculating level densities. We also test the traditional Fermi gas model for which there is no upper energy limit to the single particle levels. We compare the influence of these two level density models in evaporation calculations of primary fragment excitations, kinetic energies and yields, and on final product yields

  3. Local density approximation for exchange in excited-state density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Samal, Prasanjit

    2004-01-01

    Local density approximation for the exchange energy is made for treatment of excited-states in density-functional theory. It is shown that taking care of the state-dependence of the LDA exchange energy functional leads to accurate excitation energies.

  4. Solar corona electron density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, P.B.; Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.

    1980-01-01

    Three and one-half months of single-frequency (f= 0 2.2 x 10 9 Hz) time delay data (earth-to-spacecraft and return signal travel time) were acquired from the Helios 2 spacecraft around the time of its solar occupation (May 16, 1976). Following the determination of the spacecraft trajectory the excess time delay due to the integrated effect of free electrons along the signal's ray path could be separated and modeled. An average solar corona, equatorial, electron density profile, during solar minimum, was deduced from time delay measurements acquired within 5--60 solar radii (R/sub S/) of the sun. As a point of reference, at 10 R/sub S/ from the sun we find an average electron density of 4500 el cm -3 . However, there appears to be an asymmtry in the electron density as the ray path moved from the west (preoccultation) to east (post-occulation) solar limb. This may be related to the fact that during entry into occulation the heliographic latitude of the ray path (at closes approach to the sun) was about 6 0 , whereas during exit it became -7 0 . The Helios electron density model is compared with similar models deduced from a variety of different experimental techniques. Within 5--20 R/sub S/ of the sun the models separate according to solar minimum or maximum conditions; however, anomalies are evident

  5. Excited state electron affinity calculations for aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Adnan Yousif

    2017-08-01

    Excited states of negative aluminum ion are reviewed, and calculations of electron affinities of the states (3s^23p^2)^1D and (3s3p^3){^5}{S}° relative to the (3s^23p)^2P° and (3s3p^2)^4P respectively of the neutral aluminum atom are reported in the framework of nonrelativistic configuration interaction (CI) method. A priori selected CI (SCI) with truncation energy error (Bunge in J Chem Phys 125:014107, 2006) and CI by parts (Bunge and Carbó-Dorca in J Chem Phys 125:014108, 2006) are used to approximate the valence nonrelativistic energy. Systematic studies of convergence of electron affinity with respect to the CI excitation level are reported. The calculated value of the electron affinity for ^1D state is 78.675(3) meV. Detailed Calculations on the ^5S°c state reveals that is 1216.8166(3) meV below the ^4P state.

  6. Electron-impact excitation of the potassium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, J.O.; Solomon, J.E.; Korff, D.F.; Lin, C.C.; Lee, E.T.P.

    1979-01-01

    Absolute optical electron-impact excitation functions for 24 transitions of the sharp, principal, diffuse, and fundamental spectral series of potassium have been measured. The determination of the density of the potassium vapor in the collision chamber was made by measuring the degree of transmission, by the vapor, of potassium resonance radiation generated externally in a fluorescence cell. Direct excitation functions were determined for 14 states (5S, 6S, 7S, 8S, 4P, 5P, 6P, 7P, 3D, 5D, 6D, 5F, 6F, and 7F) with the aid of known radiative-transition probabilities. Theoretical calculations of these same 14 excitation functions, as well as 4D and 4F, were carried out by means of the Born approximation. The 4P, 5P, 5S, 3D, and 4D direct excitation functions at intermediate energies (10--25 eV) were also calculated by the method of multistate close coupling, neglecting projectile--target-electron exchange. The high-energy (above 100 eV) Born-approximation cross sections agree with the experimental results for 4P and for all S states, but are lower than experimental results, by 30--40%, for the D and F states. At intermediate energies the close-coupling excitation calculations agree well with the experimental excitation functions for 4P and 5P, but are significantly higher than experimental values for 5S and 3D. The discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical results are probably due to a combination of systematic experimental errors, errors in the available transition-probability values, and errors in the theoretical excitation functions introduced by the use of approximate excited-state wave functions (Hartree-Fock-Slater), by the neglect of projectile--target-electron exchange. The polarization of the 4P-4S and 3D-4P radiation produced by electron impact was measured, and the results were used to determine the direct excitation functions of the separate magnetic sublevels of the 4P state

  7. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  8. Rydberg energies using excited state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Wu Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-01-01

    We utilize excited state density functional theory (eDFT) to study Rydberg states in atoms. We show both analytically and numerically that semilocal functionals can give quite reasonable Rydberg energies from eDFT, even in cases where time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) fails catastrophically. We trace these findings to the fact that in eDFT the Kohn-Sham potential for each state is computed using the appropriate excited state density. Unlike the ground state potential, which typically falls off exponentially, the sequence of excited state potentials has a component that falls off polynomially with distance, leading to a Rydberg-type series. We also address the rigorous basis of eDFT for these systems. Perdew and Levy have shown using the constrained search formalism that every stationary density corresponds, in principle, to an exact stationary state of the full many-body Hamiltonian. In the present context, this means that the excited state DFT solutions are rigorous as long as they deliver the minimum noninteracting kinetic energy for the given density. We use optimized effective potential techniques to show that, in some cases, the eDFT Rydberg solutions appear to deliver the minimum kinetic energy because the associated density is not pure state v-representable. We thus find that eDFT plays a complementary role to constrained DFT: The former works only if the excited state density is not the ground state of some potential while the latter applies only when the density is a ground state density.

  9. Excitation of lowest electronic states of thymine by slow electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontros, E. J.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2013-11-01

    Excitation of lowest electronic states of the thymine molecules in the gas phase is studied by elec- tron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition to dipole-allowed transitions to singlet states, transitions to the lowest triplet states were observed. The low-energy features of the spectrum at 3.66 and 4.61 eV are identified with the excitation of the first triplet states 13 A' (π → π*) and 13 A″ ( n → π*). The higher-lying features at 4.96, 5.75, 6.17, and 7.35 eV are assigned mainly to the excitation of the π → π* transitions to the singlet states of the molecule. The excitation dynamics of the lowest states is studied. It is found that the first triplet state 13 A'(π → π*) is most efficiently excited at a residual energy close to zero, while the singlet 21 A'(π → π*) state is excited with almost identical efficiency at different residual energies.

  10. Statistical theory of electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Hoffman, G.G.; Harris, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    An optimized Thomas--Fermi theory is proposed which retains the simplicity of the original theory and is a suitable reference theory for Monte Carlo density functional treatments of condensed materials. The key ingredient of the optimized theory is a neighborhood sampled potential which contains effects of the inhomogeneities in the one-electron potential. In contrast to the traditional Thomas--Fermi approach, the optimized theory predicts a finite electron density in the vicinity of a nucleus. Consideration of the example of an ideal electron gas subject to a central Coulomb field indicates that implementation of the approach is straightforward. The optimized theory is found to fail completely when a classically forbidden region is approached. However, these circumstances are not of primary interest for calculations of interatomic forces. It is shown how the energy functional of the density may be constructed by integration of a generalized Hellmann--Feynman relation. This generalized Hellmann--Feynman relation proves to be equivalent to the variational principle of density functional quantum mechanics, and, therefore, the present density theory can be viewed as a variational consequence of the constructed energy functional

  11. Electron impact excitation of copper atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    The optical excitation function method has been used in a crossed atom and electron beam arrangement to measure the electron impact cross section of the copper 4 2 P → 4 2 S resonance lines (324.8, 327.4 nm) from threshold (3.8 eV) to 8 eV. Relative experimental cross section data are normalized at an energy of 1000 eV with respect to first Born theory that includes the 4 2 S → 4 2 P resonance transition with an oscillator strength of 0.652 and cascading from the (3d 10 nd) 2 D states with n = 4, hor-ellipsis 10. The measured Cu 4 2 S 4 → 4 2 P cross section is compared with recent theoretical calculations in close-coupling approximation. Very good agreement is found with the ten-state close-coupling theory of Scheibner

  12. Electron Impact Excitation-Ionization of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Esam Abobakr A.

    In the last few decades, the study of atomic collisions by electron-impact has made significant advances. The most difficult case to study is electron impact ionization of molecules for which many approximations have to be made and the validity of these approximations can only be checked by comparing with experiment. In this thesis, I have examined the Molecular three-body distorted wave (M3DW) or Molecular four-body distorted wave (M4DW) approximations for electron-impact ionization. These models use a fully quantum mechanical approach where all particles are treated quantum mechanically and the post collision interaction (PCI) is treated to all orders of perturbation. These electron impact ionization collisions play central roles in the physics and chemistry of upper atmosphere, biofuel, the operation of discharges and lasers, radiation induced damage in biological material like damage to DNA by secondary electrons, and plasma etching processes. For the M3DW model, I will present results for electron impact single ionization of small molecules such as Water, Ethane, and Carbon Dioxide and the much larger molecules Tetrahydrofuran, phenol, furfural, 1-4 Benzoquinone. I will also present results for the four-body problem in which there are two target electrons involved in the collision. M4DW results will be presented for dissociative excitation-ionization of orientated D2. I will show that M4DW calculations using a variational wave function for the ground state that included s- and p- orbital states give better agreement to the experimental measurements than a ground state approximated as a product of two 1s-type Dyson orbitals.

  13. Self-Consistent Optimization of Excited States within Density-Functional Tight-Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Le, Khoa; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-12

    We present an implementation of energies and gradients for the ΔDFTB method, an analogue of Δ-self-consistent-field density functional theory (ΔSCF) within density-functional tight-binding, for the lowest singlet excited state of closed-shell molecules. Benchmarks of ΔDFTB excitation energies, optimized geometries, Stokes shifts, and vibrational frequencies reveal that ΔDFTB provides a qualitatively correct description of changes in molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies due to excited-state relaxation. The accuracy of ΔDFTB Stokes shifts is comparable to that of ΔSCF-DFT, and ΔDFTB performs similarly to ΔSCF with the PBE functional for vertical excitation energies of larger chromophores where the need for efficient excited-state methods is most urgent. We provide some justification for the use of an excited-state reference density in the DFTB expansion of the electronic energy and demonstrate that ΔDFTB preserves many of the properties of its parent ΔSCF approach. This implementation fills an important gap in the extended framework of DFTB, where access to excited states has been limited to the time-dependent linear-response approach, and affords access to rapid exploration of a valuable class of excited-state potential energy surfaces.

  14. Calculation of nuclear excitation in an electron transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisk, K. (Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Kaliman, Z. (Rijeka Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Pedagogics); Logan, B.A. (Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Ottawa-Carleton Centre for Physics)

    1989-11-06

    We have made a theoretical investigation of nuclear excitation during an electron transition (NEET). Our approach allows us to express the NEET probabilities in terms of the excited nuclear level width, the energy difference between the nuclear and electron transition, the Coulomb interaction between the initial electron states, and the electron level width. A comparison is made with the available experimental results. (orig.).

  15. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  16. Density-dependent phonoriton states in highly excited semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Nguyen Minh Khue; Nguyen Que Huong

    1995-09-01

    The dynamical aspects of the phonoriton state in highly-photoexcited semiconductors is studied theoretically. The effect of the exciton-exciton interaction and nonbosonic character of high-density excitons are taken into account. Using Green's function method and within the Random Phase Approximation it is shown that the phonoriton dispersion and damping are very sensitive to the exciton density, characterizing the excitation degree of semiconductors. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  17. The effect of atoms excited by electron beam on metal evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Guo Feng; Ying Chun Tong

    2002-01-01

    In atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), the metal is heated to melt by electron beams. The vapor atoms may be excited by electrons when flying through the electron beam. The excited atoms may be deexcited by inelastic collision during expansion. The electronic energy transfers translational energy. In order to analyse the effect of reaction between atoms and electron beams on vapor physical parameters, such as density, velocity and temperature, direct-simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is used to simulate the 2-D gadolinium evaporation from long and narrow crucible. The simulation results show that the velocity and temperature of vapor increase, and the density decreases

  18. Electron impact ionization-excitation of Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo; Gomez, A. I.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ambrosio, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the process of ionization-excitation of Helium by fast electron impact in which the residual ion is left in the n =2 excited state. We chose the strongly asymmetric kinematics used in the experiment performed by Dupré et al.. In a perturbative scheme, for high projectile energies the four-body problem reduces to a three-body one and, within that framework, we solve the time- independent Schrödinger equation with a Sturmian approach. The method, based on Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF), is employed to obtain the initial ground state of Helium, the single-continuum state and the scattering wave function; for each of them, the GSF basis is constructed with the corresponding adequate asymptotic conditions. Besides, the method presents the following advantage: the scattering amplitudes can be extracted directly in the asymptotic region of the scattering solution, and thus the TDCS can be obtained without requiring a matrix element evaluation.

  19. Electron densities in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanghellini, L.; Kaler, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Electron densities for 146 planetary nebulae have been obtained for analyzing a large sample of forbidden lines by interpolating theoretical curves obtained from solutions of the five-level atoms using up-to-date collision strengths and transition probabilities. Electron temperatures were derived from forbidden N II and/or forbidden O III lines or were estimated from the He II 4686 A line strengths. The forbidden O II densities are generally lower than those from forbidden Cl III by an average factor of 0.65. For data sets in which forbidden O II and forbidden S II were observed in common, the forbidden O II values drop to 0.84 that of the forbidden S II, implying that the outermost parts of the nebulae might have elevated densities. The forbidden Cl II and forbidden Ar IV densities show the best correlation, especially where they have been obtained from common data sets. The data give results within 30 percent of one another, assuming homogeneous nebulae. 106 refs

  20. Quantification of entanglement entropies for doubly excited resonance states in two-electron atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Yew Kam; Lin, Chien-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the quantum entanglement for doubly excited resonance states in two-electron atomic systems such as the H - and Ps - ions and the He atom by using highly correlated Hylleraas type functions The resonance states are determined by calculation of density of resonance states with the stabilization method. The spatial (electron-electron orbital) entanglement entropies (linear and von Neumann) for the low-lying doubly excited states are quantified using the Schmidt-Slater decomposition method. (paper)

  1. Ab Initio Study of Electronic Excitation Effects on SrTiO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shijun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, William J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Interaction of energetic ions or lasers with solids often induces electronic excitations that may modify material properties significantly. In this study, effects of electronic excitations on strontium titanate SrTiO3 (STO) are investigated based on first-principles calculations. The lattice structure, electronic properties, lattice vibrational frequencies, and dynamical stabilities are studied in detail. The results suggest that electronic excitation induces charge redistribution that is mainly observed in Ti–O bonds. The electronic band gap increases with increasing electronic excitation, as excitation mainly induces depopulation of Ti 3d states. Phonon analysis indicates that there is a large phonon band gap induced by electronic excitation because of the changes in the vibrational properties of Ti and O atoms. In addition, a new peak appears in the phonon density of states with imaginary frequencies, an indication of lattice instability. Further dynamics simulations confirm that STO undergoes transition to an amorphous structure under strong electronic excitations. In conclusion, the optical properties of STO under electronic excitation are consistent with the evolution of atomic and electronic structures, which suggests a possibility to probe the properties of STO in nonequilibrium state using optical measurement.

  2. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, Franco, E-mail: franco.egidi@sns.it; Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Koch, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Cappelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi, 3 I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  3. Production and Decay of Excited Electrons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cakir, O; Mehdiyev, R; Belyaev, A

    2004-01-01

    We study single production of excited electrons at the CERN LHC through contact interactions of fermions. Subsequent decays of excited electrons to ordinary electrons and light fermions via gauge and contact interactions are examined. The mass range accessible with the ATLAS detector is obtained.

  4. Electron affinity and excited states of methylglyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauletyarov, Yerbolat; Dixon, Andrew R.; Wallace, Adam A.; Sanov, Andrei

    2017-07-01

    Using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we characterized the anion of methylglyoxal (X2A″ electronic state) and three lowest electronic states of the neutral methylglyoxal molecule: the closed-shell singlet ground state (X1A'), the lowest triplet state (a3A″), and the open-shell singlet state (A1A″). The adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of the ground state, EA(X1A') = 0.87(1) eV, spectroscopically determined for the first time, compares to 1.10(2) eV for unsubstituted glyoxal. The EAs (adiabatic attachment energies) of two excited states of methylglyoxal were also determined: EA(a3A″) = 3.27(2) eV and EA(A1A″) = 3.614(9) eV. The photodetachment of the anion to each of these two states produces the neutral species near the respective structural equilibria; hence, the a3A″ ← X2A″ and A1A″ ← X2A″ photodetachment transitions are dominated by intense peaks at their respective origins. The lowest-energy photodetachment transition, on the other hand, involves significant geometry relaxation in the X1A' state, which corresponds to a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group, compared to the anion structure. Accordingly, the X1A' ← X2A″ transition is characterized as a broad, congested band, whose vertical detachment energy, VDE = 1.20(4) eV, significantly exceeds the adiabatic EA. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the ab initio predictions using several equation-of-motion methodologies, combined with coupled-cluster theory.

  5. Inelastic electron and light scattering from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wells: Zero magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most fundamental approach to an understanding of electronic, optical, and transport phenomena which the condensed matter physics (of conventional as well as nonconventional systems offers is generally founded on two experiments: the inelastic electron scattering and the inelastic light scattering. This work embarks on providing a systematic framework for the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering from the electronic excitations in GaAs/Ga1−xAlxAs quantum wells. To this end, we start with the Kubo's correlation function to derive the generalized nonlocal, dynamic dielectric function, and the inverse dielectric function within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. This is followed by a thorough development of the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering. The methodological part is then subjected to the analytical diagnoses which allow us to sense the subtlety of the analytical results and the importance of their applications. The general analytical results, which know no bounds regarding, e.g., the subband occupancy, are then specified so as to make them applicable to practicality. After trying and testing the eigenfunctions, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum made up of intrasubband and intersubband – single-particle and collective (plasmon – excitations, the loss functions for all the principal geometries envisioned for the inelastic electron scattering, and the Raman intensity, which provides a measure of the real transitions induced by the (laser probe, for the inelastic light scattering. It is found that the dominant contribution to both the loss peaks and the Raman peaks comes from the collective (plasmon excitations. As to the single-particle peaks, the analysis indicates a long-lasting lack of quantitative comparison between theory and experiments. It is inferred that the inelastic electron

  6. Electron excitation relaxation in wide-gap single crystal insulators under swift heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavlinskii, Yu.N.

    2000-01-01

    A heavy, multicharged ion moving in a solid interacts with nuclei and electrons of the matter atoms. If the projectile velocity exceeds the typical orbital velocity of the target electrons, the main process is excitation of the electronic subsystem, i.e., excitation and ionization of bound electrons. Initially, relaxation of the electron excitations results from electronic processes alone, and energy transfer from electrons to lattice happens later. Since free charge carriers are absent in insulators before irradiation, the motion of the excited electrons is possible only together with holes. Due to inner pressure of the electron-hole plasma the expansion takes place. The velocity of the expansion is determined by the heat velocity of electron-hole pairs. As the excitation region expands, the density of the electron-hole pairs decreases, the average distance between pairs increases, and excitons are produced. The expansion can be terminated in the time t≅10 -13 s, when, due to the electron-phonon interaction, self-trapped holes (and excitons) are formed. The annihilation of the trapped excitons gives rise to Frenkel defects. The set of equations comprising the continuity equation, the Euler equation and energy conservation is considered. The analytic dependence on time of the electron temperature and the radius of the excitation region is derived. The observation of projectile traces in a target is discussed in the single projectile regime

  7. Electron density profile in multilayer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toekesi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been used extensively to study the multilayer systems, where the thickness of layers are in the nanometer range. These studies has received considerable attention because of its technological interest, for example in the nanotechnology. On the most fundamental level, its importance is derived from the basic physics that is involved. One key quantities of interest is the response of a many-body system to an external perturbation: How act and how modify the interface between the solid-solid or solid-vacuum the excitations in the solid and in the vicinity of the interfaces. In this work, as a starting point of such investigations we calculated the electron density profile for multilayer systems. Our approach employs the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), that is, the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the potential and forces are determined selfconsistently from the dynamics governed by the Schroedinger equation. We treat the problem in TDDFT at the level of the local-density approximation (LDA). Later, the comparison of experimentally obtained loss functions and the theory, based on our TDDFT calculations can provide deeper understanding of surface physics. We performed the calculations for half-infinite samples characterized by r s =1.642 and r s =1.997. We also performed the calculations for double layer systems. The substrate was characterized by r s =1.997 and the coverage by r s =1.642. Fig. 1. shows the obtained electron density profile in LDA approximation. Because of the sharp cutoff of electronic wave vectors at the Fermi surface, the densities in the interior exhibit slowly decaying Friedel oscillations. To highlight the Friedel oscillation we enlarged the electron density profile in Fig. 1a. and Fig. 1b. The work was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Found: OTKA No. T038016, the grant 'Bolyai' from the Hungarian Academy of

  8. On the acceleration of charged particles by strong longitudinal plasma wake fields excited by electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amatuni, A.Ts.; Elbakyan, S.S.; Sekhpossyan, E.V.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of the use of longitudinal field excited in a plasma by electron bunches to accelerate charged particles is investigated. It is shown that the highets value of accelerating fields proportional to the square root of factor of electrons in the bunch is achieved in the case when bunch particle density approaches a limit equal to the half of the the plasma electron equilibrium density

  9. Electronic excitations in fast ion-solid collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1990-01-01

    We review recent developments in the study of electronic excitation of projectiles in fast ion-solid collisions. Our focus will be primarily on theory but experimental advances will also be discussed. Topics include the evidence for velocity-dependent thresholds for the existence of bound states, wake-field effects on excited states, the electronic excitation of channeled projectiles, transport phenomena, and the interaction of highly charged ions with surfaces. 44 refs., 14 figs

  10. Search for Excited Electrons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-01-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full $e^{\\pm}p$ data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb$^{-1}$. The electroweak decays of excited electrons ${e}^{*}\\to{e}{\\gamma}$, ${e}^{*}\\to{e}Z$ and ${e}^{*}{\\to}\

  11. Vibrational and electronic excitation of hexatriacontane thin films by low energy electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, M.R.; Schott, M.; Pfluger, P.

    1990-01-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of hexatriacontane (HTC) were irradiated with low energy (E=0.5--15 eV) electrons, and off-specular backscattered electron spectra were measured. Below E∼7 eV, single and multiple vibrational excitations only are observed, which relax the electrons down to the bottom of the HTC conduction band. Due to the negative electron affinity of HTC, thermal electrons are emitted into vacuum. Structure in the backscattered electron current at kinetic energies about 1.5 and 4 eV are associated to conduction band density of states. Above E∼7 eV, the dominant losses correspond to electronic excitations, excitons, or above a threshold (energy of the electron inside the HTC film) at 9.2±0.1 eV, electron--hole pair generation. The latter process is very efficient and reaches a yield of the order of one ∼11 eV. Evidence for chemical reaction above E∼4 eV is observed

  12. Nuclear fission fragment excitation of electronic transition laser media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorents, D.C.; McCusker, M.V.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of high energy electronic transition lasers excited by fission fragments are expanded. Specific characteristics of the media including density, excitation rates, wavelength, kinetics, fissile material, scale size, and medium uniformity are assessed. The use of epithermal neutrons, homogeneously mixed fissile material, and special high cross section nuclear isotopes to optimize coupling of the energy to the medium are shown to be important considerations maximizing the scale size, energy deposition, and medium uniformity. A performance limit point of approximately 1000 J/l in approximately 100 μs pulses is established for a large class of systems operating in the near ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. It is demonstrated that e-beam excitation can be used to simulate nuclear pumping conditions to facilitate the search for candidate media. Experimental data for the kinetics of a XeF* laser operating in Ar/Xe/F 2 /UF 6 mixtures are given. These reactor-pumped systems are suitable for scaling to volumes on the order of (meters) 3

  13. Ultra-stretchable Interconnects for high-density stretchable electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafqat, S.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Savov, A.; Joshi, S.; Dekker, R.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2017-01-01

    The exciting field of stretchable electronics (SE) promises numerous novel applications, particularly in-body and medical diagnostics devices. However, future advanced SE miniature devices will require high-density, extremely stretchable interconnects with micron-scale footprints, which calls for

  14. Excitation of high density surface plasmon polariton vortex array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2018-06-01

    This study proposes a method to excite surface plasmon polariton (SPP) vortex array of high spatial density on metal/air interface. A doughnut vector beam was incident at four rectangularly arranged slits to excite SPP vortex array. The doughnut vector beam used in this study has the same field intensity distribution as the regular doughnut laser mode, TEM01* mode, but a different polarization distribution. The SPP vortex array is achieved through the matching of both polarization state and phase state of the incident doughnut vector beam with the four slits. The SPP field distribution excited in this study contains stable array-distributed time-varying optical vortices. Theoretical derivation, analytical calculation and numerical simulation were used to discuss the characteristics of the induced SPP vortex array. The period of the SPP vortex array induced by the proposed method had only half SPPs wavelength. In addition, the vortex number in an excited SPP vortex array can be increased by enlarging the structure.

  15. Impulse approximation treatment of electron-electron excitation and ionization in energetic ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouros, T.J.M.; Lee, D.H.; Sanders, J.M.; Richard, P.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of electron-electron interactions between projectile and target electrons observed in recent measurements of projectile K-shell excitation and ionization using 0 projectile Auger electron spectroscopy are analysed within the framework of the impulse approximation (IA). The IA formulation is seen to give a good account of the threshold behavior of both ionization and excitation, while providing a remarkably simple intuitive picture of such electron-electron interactions in ion-atom collisions in general. Thus, the applicability of the IA treatment is extended to cover most known processes involving such interactions including resonance transfer excitation, binary encounter electron production, electron-electron excitation and ionization. (orig.)

  16. Thermodynamics of excited nuclei and nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthy, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    A review has been made of the different approaches that are being used for a theoretical calculation of nuclear level densities. It is pointed out that while the numerical calculations based on the partition function approach and shell model single particle level schemes have shed important insight into the influence of nuclear shell effects on level densities and its excitation energy dependence and have brought out the inadequacy of the conventional Bethe Formula, these calculations are yet to reach a level where they can be directly used for quantitative comparisons. Some of the important drawbacks of the numerical calculations are also discussed. In this context, a new semi-empirical level density formula is described which while retaining the simplicity of analytical formulae, takes into account nuclear shell effects in a more realistic manner. (author)

  17. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    , we examine the effect of the nanoscale interfacial morphology and solvation on the electronic excited states of TFB/F8BT. Here, we employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the relevant excited states of two stacking configurations. We show that the calculated states agree with the excited states responsible for the experimentally observed emission peaks and that these states are blue shifted relative to those of the isolated chain. Furthermore, slight lateral shifts in the stacking orientation not only shift the excited state energies; more importantly, they alter the nature of these states altogether. Lastly, we see that solvation greatly stabilizes the charge-transfer states.

  18. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  19. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  20. Some features of excited states density matrix calculation and their pairing relations in conjugated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Direct PPP-type calculations of self-consistent (SC) density matrices for excited states are described and the corresponding 'thawn' molecular orbitals (MO) are discussed. Special attention is addressed to particular solutions arising in conjugated systems of a certain symmetry, and to their chemical implications. The U(2) and U(3) algebras are applied respectively to the 4-electron and 6-electron cases: a natural separation of excited states in different cases follows. A simple approach to the convergence problem for excited states is given. The complementarity relations, an alternative formulation of the pairing theorem valid for heteromolecules and non-alternant systems, allow some fruitful experimental applications. Together with the extended pairing relations shown here, they may help to rationalize general trends. (Author) [pt

  1. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.)

  2. Range-separated density-functional theory for molecular excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebolini, E.

    2014-01-01

    Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is nowadays a method of choice to compute molecular excitation energies. However, within the usual adiabatic semi-local approximations, it is not able to describe properly Rydberg, charge-transfer or multiple excitations. Range separation of the electronic interaction allows one to mix rigorously density-functional methods at short range and wave function or Green's function methods at long range. When applied to the exchange functional, it already corrects most of these deficiencies but multiple excitations remain absent as they need a frequency-dependent kernel. In this thesis, the effects of range separation are first assessed on the excitation energies of a partially-interacting system in an analytic and numerical study in order to provide guidelines for future developments of range-separated methods for excitation energy calculations. It is then applied on the exchange and correlation TDDFT kernels in a single-determinant approximation in which the long-range part of the correlation kernel vanishes. A long-range frequency-dependent second-order correlation kernel is then derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation and added perturbatively to the range-separated TDDFT kernel in order to take into account the effects of double excitations. (author)

  3. Cross sections for the vibrational excitation of the H2 X 1Σ+g(v) levels generated by electron collisional excitation of the higher singlet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation cross sections, σ(v,v double-prime), for an H 2 molecule initially in any one of the 15 vibrational levels, v belonging to the ground electronic state and excited to a final vibrational level, v double-prime are evaluated for direct excitations via all members of the excited electronic singlet spectrum. Account is taken of predissociation, autoionization, and radiative decay of the excited electronic spectrum that leads to a final population distribution for the ground electronic state, X 1 Σ + g (v double-prime). For v=0, account is taken explicitly of transitions via the B, C, B', and D electronic states in evaluating the cross sections. The additional contribution of excitations via all Rydberg states lying above the D state enhances these cross sections by approximately 10%. For v>0, cross sections are evaluated taking explicit account of transitions through the B and C states; higher singlet excitations enhance these values by 25%. The choice of the reference total cross sections remains a subjective one, causing the values calculated here to have a possible uncertainty of +20% -30% . For excitations occurring within a hydrogen discharge, collisional excitation-ionization events among the intermediate singlet states will effectively quench the v, v double-prime excitation process for discharge densities in excess of the range 10 15 --10 16 electrons/cm -3

  4. Electron transfer from electronic excited states to sub-vacuum electron traps in amorphous ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichnevetski, E.; Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the electron stimulated yield of electronically excited argon atoms (Ar * ) from monolayer quantities of Ar deposited onto thin films of amorphous ice. Two peaks of narrow width ( - electron-exciton complex into exciton states, by the transfer of an electron into a sub-vacuum electron state within the ice film. However, the 10.7 eV feature is shifted to lower energy since electron attachment to Ar occurs within small pores of amorphous ice. In this case, the excess electron is transferred into an electron trap below the conduction band of the ice layer

  5. Search for excited charged leptons in electron positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vachon, Brigitte Marie Christine; Sobie, Randall

    2002-01-01

    A search for evidence that fundamental particles are made of smaller subconstituents is performed. The existence of excited states of fundamental particles would be an unambiguous indication of their composite nature. Experimental signatures compatible with the production of excited states of charged leptons in electron-positron collisions are studied. The data analysed were collected by the OPAL detector at the LEP collider. No evidence for the existence of excited states of charged leptons was found. Upper limits on the product of the cross-section and the electromagnetic branching fraction are inferred. Using results from the search for singly produced excited leptons, upper limits on the ratio of the excited lepton coupling constant to the compositeness scale are calculated. From pair production searches, 95% confidence level lower limits on the masses of excited electrons, muons and taus are determined to be 103.2 GeV.

  6. Ultrafast dynamics of electronically excited molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietard, Aude

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis investigated the ultrafast dynamics of photo-chromic molecules and argon clusters in the gas phase at the femtosecond timescale. Pump-probe experiments are performed in a set-up which associates a versatile pulsed molecular beam coupled to a photoelectron/photoion velocity map imager (VMI) and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Theses pump-probe experiments provides the temporal evolution of the electronic distribution for each system of interest. Besides, a modelization has been performed in order to characterize the density and the velocity distribution in the pulsed beam. Regarding the photo-chromic di-thienyl-ethene molecules, parallel electronic relaxation pathways were observed. This contrasts with the observation of sequential relaxation processes in most molecules studied so far. In the present case, the initial wave packet splits in two parts. One part is driven to the ground state at the femtosecond time scale through a conical intersection, and the second part remains for ps in the excited state and experiences oscillations in a suspended well. This study has shed light into the intrinsic dynamics of the molecules under study and a general relaxation mechanism has been proposed, which applies to the whole family of di-thienyl-ethene molecules whatever the state of matter (gas phase or solution) in which they have been investigated. Concerning argon clusters excited at about 14 eV, two behaviors of different time scale have been observed at different time scales. The first one occurs in the first picoseconds of the dynamics. It corresponds to the electronic relaxation of an excitonic state at a rate of 1 eV.ps -1 . The second phenomenon corresponds to the localization of the exciton on the excimer Ar 2 *. This phenomenon is observed 4-5 ps after the excitation. In this study, we also observed the ejection of excited argon atoms, addressing the lifetime of the delocalized excitonic state. This work provide additional informations

  7. Multiply excited molecules produced by photon and electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, T.; Kouchi, N.

    2006-01-01

    The photon and electron interactions with molecules resulting in the formation of multiply excited molecules and the subsequent decay are subjects of great interest because the independent electron model and Born-Oppenheimer approximation are much less reliable for the multiply excited states of molecules than for the ground and lower excited electronic states. We have three methods to observe and investigate multiply excited molecules: 1) Measurements of the cross sections for the emission of fluorescence emitted by neutral fragments in the photoexcitation of molecules as a function of incident photon energy [1-3], 2) Measurements of the electron energy-loss spectra tagged with the fluorescence photons emitted by neutral fragments [4], 3) Measurements of the cross sections for generating a pair of photons in absorption of a single photon by a molecule as a function of incident photon energy [5-7]. Multiply excited states degenerate with ionization continua, which make a large contribution in the cross section curve involving ionization processes. The key point of our methods is hence that we measure cross sections free from ionization. The feature of multiply excited states is noticeable in such a cross section curve. Recently we have measured: i) the cross sections for the emission of the Lyman- fluorescence in the photoexcitation of CH 4 as a function of incident photon energy in the range 18-51 eV, ii) the electron energy-loss spectrum of CH 4 tagged with the Lyman-photons at 80 eV incident electron energy and 10 electron scattering angle in the range of the energy loss 20-45 eV, in order to understand the formation and decay of the doubly excited methane in photon and electron interactions. [8] The results are summarized in this paper and the simultaneous excitation of two electrons by electron interaction is compared with that by photon interaction in terms of the oscillator strength. (authors)

  8. Electronic excitation in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, V.D.; Miraglia, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical calculations for excitation of hydrogen-like atoms by ion impact at high and intermediate energies, are presented. Impulsive and eikonal wave functions are employed, both normalized. It is studied the dependence on energy and projectil charge (saturation) of cross sections, compared to experimental results. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  9. Electron-phonon contribution to the phonon and excited electron (hole) linewidths in bulk Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklyadneva, I Yu; Leonardo, A; Echenique, P M; Eremeev, S V; Chulkov, E V

    2006-01-01

    We present an ab initio study of the electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling and its contribution to the phonon linewidths and to the lifetime broadening of excited electron and hole states in bulk Pd. The calculations, based on density-functional theory, were carried out using a linear-response approach in the plane-wave pseudopotential representation. The obtained results for the Eliashberg spectral function α 2 F(ω), e-ph coupling constant λ, and the contribution to the lifetime broadening, Γ e-ph , show strong dependence on both the energy and momentum of an electron (hole) state. The calculation of phonon linewidths gives, in agreement with experimental observations, an anomalously large broadening for the transverse phonon mode T 1 in the Σ direction. In addition, this mode is found to contribute most strongly to the electron-phonon scattering processes on the Fermi surface

  10. Benzonitrile: Electron affinity, excited states, and anion solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew R.; Khuseynov, Dmitry; Sanov, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    We report a negative-ion photoelectron imaging study of benzonitrile and several of its hydrated, oxygenated, and homo-molecularly solvated cluster anions. The photodetachment from the unsolvated benzonitrile anion to the X ˜ 1 A 1 state of the neutral peaks at 58 ± 5 meV. This value is assigned as the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the valence anion and the upper bound of adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of benzonitrile. The EA of the lowest excited electronic state of benzonitrile, a ˜ 3 A 1 , is determined as 3.41 ± 0.01 eV, corresponding to a 3.35 eV lower bound for the singlet-triplet splitting. The next excited state, the open-shell singlet A ˜ 1 A 1 , is found about an electron-volt above the triplet, with a VDE of 4.45 ± 0.01 eV. These results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations for neutral benzonitrile and its valence anion but do not preclude the existence of a dipole-bound state of similar energy and geometry. The step-wise and cumulative solvation energies of benzonitrile anions by several types of species were determined, including homo-molecular solvation by benzonitrile, hydration by 1-3 waters, oxygenation by 1-3 oxygen molecules, and mixed solvation by various combinations of O2, H2O, and benzonitrile. The plausible structures of the dimer anion of benzonitrile were examined using density functional theory and compared to the experimental observations. It is predicted that the dimer anion favors a stacked geometry capitalizing on the π-π interactions between the two partially charged benzonitrile moieties.

  11. Electron impact excitation and ionization of laser-excited sodium atoms Na*(7d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienhaus, J.; Dorn, A.; Mehlhorn, W.; Zatsarinny, O.I.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the ejected-electron spectrum following impact excitation and ionization of laser-excited Na * (nl) atoms by 1.5 keV electrons. By means of two-laser excitation 3s → 3p 3/2 → 7d and subsequent cascading transitions about 8% (4%) of the target atoms were in excited states with n > 3 (7d). The experimental ejected-electron spectrum due to the decay of Auger and autoionization states of laser-excited atoms Na * (nl) with n = 4-7 has been fully interpreted by comprehensive calculations of the energies, cross sections and decay probabilities of the corresponding states. The various processes contributing to the ejected-electron spectrum are with decreasing magnitude: 2s ionization leading to 2s2p 6 nl Auger states, 2p → 3s excitation leading to 2p 5 3s( 1 P)nl autoionization states and 2s → 3l' excitation leading to 2s2p 6 3l'( 1 L)nl autoionization states. (Author)

  12. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-08-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb-1. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e→eγ, e→eZ and e→νW with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e production cross sections and on the ratio f/Λ of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions.

  13. Electron-phonon relaxation and excited electron distribution in gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, V. P. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pervomayskaya st. 91, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tyuterev, V. G., E-mail: valtyut00@mail.ru [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Kievskaya st. 60, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Lenin st. 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Chulkov, E. V. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tomsk State University, Lenin st. 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Qumicas, UPV/EHU and Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-MPC and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Apdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Echenique, P. M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Qumicas, UPV/EHU and Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-MPC and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Apdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2016-08-28

    We develop a theory of energy relaxation in semiconductors and insulators highly excited by the long-acting external irradiation. We derive the equation for the non-equilibrium distribution function of excited electrons. The solution for this function breaks up into the sum of two contributions. The low-energy contribution is concentrated in a narrow range near the bottom of the conduction band. It has the typical form of a Fermi distribution with an effective temperature and chemical potential. The effective temperature and chemical potential in this low-energy term are determined by the intensity of carriers' generation, the speed of electron-phonon relaxation, rates of inter-band recombination, and electron capture on the defects. In addition, there is a substantial high-energy correction. This high-energy “tail” largely covers the conduction band. The shape of the high-energy “tail” strongly depends on the rate of electron-phonon relaxation but does not depend on the rates of recombination and trapping. We apply the theory to the calculation of a non-equilibrium distribution of electrons in an irradiated GaN. Probabilities of optical excitations from the valence to conduction band and electron-phonon coupling probabilities in GaN were calculated by the density functional perturbation theory. Our calculation of both parts of distribution function in gallium nitride shows that when the speed of the electron-phonon scattering is comparable with the rate of recombination and trapping then the contribution of the non-Fermi “tail” is comparable with that of the low-energy Fermi-like component. So the high-energy contribution can essentially affect the charge transport in the irradiated and highly doped semiconductors.

  14. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of the hydroxyl radical in the nighttime upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence; Brunger, Michael J.

    2018-02-01

    Chemical processes produce vibrationally excited hydroxyl (OH) in a layer centred at an altitude of about 87 km in the Earth's atmosphere. Observations of this layer are used to deduce temperatures in the mesosphere and to observe the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. Due to the low densities and energies at night of electrons at the relevant altitude, it is not expected that electron-impact excitation of OH would be significant. However, there are unexplained characteristics of OH densities and radiative emissions that might be explained by electron impact. These are measurements of higher than expected densities of OH above 90 km and of emissions at higher energies that cannot be explained by the chemical production processes. This study simulates the role of electron impact in these processes, using theoretical cross sections for electron-impact excitation of OH. The simulations show that electron impact, even in a substantial aurora, cannot fully explain these phenomena. However, in the process of this investigation, apparent inconsistencies in the theoretical cross sections and reaction rates were found, indicating that measurements of electron-impact excitation of OH are needed to resolve these problems and scale the theoretical predictions to allow more accurate simulations.

  15. A ballistic transport model for electronic excitation following particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, S.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a ballistic model for the transport of electronic excitation energy induced by keV particle bombardment onto a solid surface. Starting from a free electron gas model, the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is employed to follow the evolution of the temporal and spatial distribution function f (r → , k → , t) describing the occupation probability of an electronic state k → at position r → and time t. Three different initializations of the distribution function are considered: i) a thermal distribution function with a locally and temporally elevated electron temperature, ii) a peak excitation at a specific energy above the Fermi level with a quasi-isotropic distribution in k-space and iii) an anisotropic peak excitation with k-vectors oriented in a specific transport direction. While the first initialization resembles a distribution function which may, for instance, result from electronic friction of moving atoms within an ion induced collision cascade, the peak excitation can in principle result from an autoionization process after excitation in close binary collisions. By numerically solving the BTE, we study the electronic energy exchange along a one dimensional transport direction to obtain a time and space resolved excitation energy distribution function, which is then analyzed in view of general transport characteristics of the chosen model system.

  16. Excitation of lower hybrid waves by electron beams in finite geometry plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.m.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The quasi-static lower hybrid eigenmodes of a plasma column in a cylindrical waveguide are determined, and their linear excitation by a small density electron beam is discussed for the cases of a hot electron beam as well as for a cold electron beam. It is shown that under certain conditions, finite geometry effects introduce important quantitative and qualitative differences with respect to the results obtained in an infinite geometry. (author)

  17. Laterally excited flexible tanks with nonuniform density liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu

    1996-01-01

    A study of the dynamic responses of flexible tanks containing nonuniform liquid under horizontal base excitations is presented. The system considered is an upright, circular cylindrical tank filled with an incompressible and inviscid liquid in which the density increases with the liquid depth. Only the impulsive components of response are considered in this study since the convective components can be computed by considering the tank to be rigid. It is shown in this study that for tanks with height-to-radius ratios between 0.3 and 1.2, the response quantities may be estimated utilizing the rigid tank solutions. Also, it is found that the pressure distribution along the tank wall is not sensitive to the detailed distribution function of the liquid density, and that the base shear and moments for the tank with nonuniform liquid can be estimated conservatively by assuming that the tank is filled with an equivalent uniform liquid density that preserves the total liquid weight. Finally, a simple equation for evaluating the fundamental natural frequency of the system is proposed

  18. Parity dependence of the nuclear level density at high excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.V.; Agrawal, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    The basic underlying assumption ρ(l+1, J)=ρ(l, J) in the level density function ρ(U, J, π) has been checked on the basis of high quality data available on individual resonance parameters (E 0 , Γ n , J π ) for s- and p-wave neutrons in contrast to the earlier analysis where information about p-wave resonance parameters was meagre. The missing level estimator based on the partial integration over a Porter-Thomas distribution of neutron reduced widths and the Dyson-Mehta Δ 3 statistic for the level spacing have been used to ascertain that the s- and p-wave resonance level spacings D(0) and D(1) are not in error because of spurious and missing levels. The present work does not validate the tacit assumption ρ(l+1, J)=ρ(l, J) and confirms that the level density depends upon parity at high excitation. The possible implications of the parity dependence of the level density on the results of statistical model calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections as well as on pre-compound emission have been emphasized. (orig.)

  19. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palffy, Adriana; Scheid, Werner; Harman, Zoltan

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC), in which a continuum electron is captured into a bound state of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. In order to derive the cross section a Feshbach projection operator formalism is introduced. Nuclear states and transitions are described by a nuclear collective model and making use of experimental data. Transition rates and total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are calculated for various heavy-ion collision systems

  20. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  1. First-principles calculations of heat capacities of ultrafast laser-excited electrons in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J.P.; Recoules, V.; Stoian, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser excitation can induce fast increases of the electronic subsystem temperature. The subsequent electronic evolutions in terms of band structure and energy distribution can determine the change of several thermodynamic properties, including one essential for energy deposition; the electronic heat capacity. Using density functional calculations performed at finite electronic temperatures, the electronic heat capacities dependent on electronic temperatures are obtained for a series of metals, including free electron like, transition and noble metals. The effect of exchange and correlation functionals and the presence of semicore electrons on electronic heat capacities are first evaluated and found to be negligible in most cases. Then, we tested the validity of the free electron approaches, varying the number of free electrons per atom. This shows that only simple metals can be correctly fitted with these approaches. For transition metals, the presence of localized d electrons produces a strong deviation toward high energies of the electronic heat capacities, implying that more energy is needed to thermally excite them, compared to free sp electrons. This is attributed to collective excitation effects strengthened by a change of the electronic screening at high temperature

  2. Double-electron excitation above Xe K-edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Tochio, T.; Vlaicu, A.M.; Mutaguchi, K.; OhHashi, H.; Shigeoka, N.; Nakata, Y.; Akahama, Y.; Uruga, T.; Emura, Sh.

    2000-01-01

    When X-rays fall on any substance, whether solid, liquid, or gaseous, a photoabsorption occurs. Photoabsorption in atoms has been generally treated as a single-electron excitation process. However, the existence of the multi-electron excitation process, where the removal of a core electron by photoabsorption causes excitation of additional electrons in the same atoms, has been known in x-ray absorption spectra for a long time. In x-ray absorption spectra, experimental investigations of the shake processes in inner-shell ionization phenomena have been performed by detecting discontinuities. The shake effect which is a consequence of rearrangement of the atomic electrons, occurs in association with inner-shell excitation and ionization phenomena in x-ray absorption. The shake process has been studied extensively in various gases, because it is usually considered that the measurement of the multi-electron excitation is only possible for monatomic gases or vapors. The x-ray absorption spectra in Kr gas were measured by Ito et al. in order to observe precisely x-ray absorption spectra and to investigate the multi-electron excitation cross sections in Kr as a function of photon energy using synchrotron radiation. However, no suitable measured K x-ray absorption spectra was available to elucidate the shake processes. In the present work, the photoabsorption cross sections in Xe have been precisely measured in order to determine the features on the shake processes resulting from multiple electron excitations as a function of photon energy. Double-electron transitions of [1s4d], [1s4p], [1s4s], and [1s3d] are first detected. (author)

  3. Theory of electronic excitations: a complex story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinig, L.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of radiation with matter is a challenge for condensed matter physics. Indeed, it consists in understanding how a collective system of about 10 23 electrons reacts to a perturbation. The difficulty lays in the fact that the electrons are not independent and the correlations between electrons appear for instance in the complexity of the energy spectra of the electrons released in the photon-induced emission process. It is unrealistic to solve the multi-particle Schroedinger equation that describes the behaviour of 10 23 electrons, the challenge is to find adequate mathematical models and approximations that contains the physics we want to study. Feynman diagrams are used to interpret the equations more easily

  4. Analyticity of the density of electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Maria; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei.......We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei....

  5. Reduction effect of neutral density on the excitation of turbulent drift waves in a linear magnetized plasma with flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Y.; Yonesu, A.; Shinohara, S.; Ignatenko, M. V.; Kasuya, N.; Kawaguchi, M.; Terasaka, K.; Nishijima, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Azumi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of reducing the neutral density to reach strong drift wave turbulence is clarified from the results of the extended magnetohydrodynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in a linear magnetized plasma. An upper bound of the neutral density relating to the ion-neutral collision frequency for the excitation of drift wave instability is shown, and the necessary flow velocity to excite this instability is also estimated from the neutral distributions. Measurements of the Mach number and the electron density distributions using Mach probe in the large mirror device (LMD) of Kyushu University [S. Shinohara et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37, 1015 (1995)] are reported as well. The obtained results show a controllability of the neutral density and provide the basis for neutral density reduction and a possibility to excite strong drift wave turbulence in the LMD

  6. Electronic-excitation energy transfer in heterogeneous dye solutions under laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshin, L.V.; Mukushev, B.T.; Saletskii, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of electronic-excitation energy transfer (EEET) among dye molecules of different types for different exciting-fight wavelengths and temperatures. Upon selective laser excitation of the donor, the inhomogeneous broadening of molecular levels increases the probability of EEET from the donor to acceptor molecules. The efficiency of this process is directly proportional to the acceptor molecule concentration and is temperature dependent. The EEET is accompanied by the spectral migration of energy among donor molecules, which reduces the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the donor. Increasing the frequency of the exciting light decreases in the donor fluorescence quantum efficiency. An increase in the acceptor molecule concentration results in a decrease of the spectral migration of excitation in the donor molecule system. 5 refs., 5 figs

  7. Dissociative Excitation of Acetylene Induced by Electron Impact: Excitation-emission Cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Országh, Juraj; Danko, Marián; Čechvala, Peter; Matejčík, Štefan, E-mail: matejcik@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F-2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-05-20

    The optical emission spectrum of acetylene excited by monoenergetic electrons was studied in the range of 190–660 nm. The dissociative excitation and dissociative ionization associated with excitation of the ions initiated by electron impact were dominant processes contributing to the spectrum. The spectrum was dominated by the atomic lines (hydrogen Balmer series, carbon) and molecular bands (CH(A–X), CH(B–X), CH{sup +}(B–A), and C{sub 2}). Besides the discrete transitions, we have detected the continuum emission radiation of ethynyl radical C{sub 2}H(A–X). For most important lines and bands of the spectrum we have measured absolute excitation-emission cross sections and determined the energy thresholds of the particular dissociative channels.

  8. Electron scattering by nuclei and transition charge densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul'karov, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Transition charge densities for states of electric type, for nuclei with A≤40--50 as obtained from data on inelastic electron scattering, are studied. The formalism of electroexcitation of nuclei is considered, together with various models (macroscopic and microscopic) used to calculate form factors, transition charge densities, and the moments of these densities: B(Eλ) and R/sub λ/ . The macroscopic models are derived microscopically, and it is shown that the model-independent sum rules lead to the same transition densities as calculations based on various hydrodynamic models. The sum rules with and without allowance for the Skyrme exchange interaction are discussed. The results of the calculations are compared with the experimental form factors of electron scattering by nuclei from 12 C to 48 Ca with excitation in them of normal-parity states with I/sup π/ = 0 + , 1 - , 2 + , 3 - , 4 + , 5 - and T = 0. The model-independent transition charge densities for the weakly collectivized excitations differ strongly from the model-dependent densities. The influence of neutrons on the transition charge densities of the nuclear isotopes 16 /sup ,/ 18 O, 32 /sup ,/ 34 S, and 40 /sup ,/ 48 Ca is considered

  9. Excitation of lower hybrid waves by electron beams in finite geometry plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.R.J.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    The dispersion relations for the quasi-static lower hybrid surface waves are derived. Conditions for their existence and their linear excitation by a small density electron beam are discussed. Instabilities appearing in low-frequency surface waves are also discussed. (author)

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  11. Excited baryon program at the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menze, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA is the first of a new generation of continuous beam machines in the GeV region. It is qualified for experiments with tagged photons and with polarized electrons on polarized nucleons to investigate the electromagnetic properties of excited baryon resonances

  12. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  13. Search for excited electrons using the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports a search for excited electrons at the HERA electron-proton collider. In a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 26 nb -1 , no evidence was found for any resonant state decaying into e - γ, νW - or e - Z 0 . Limits on the coupling strength of an excited electron have been determined for masses between 45 and 225 GeV. This study also reports the observation of the wide-angle eγ Compton scattering process. (orig.)

  14. An Exciting Aspect of Nanotechnology: Unimolecular Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger R. M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief update on our experimental work towards better one-molecule-thick monolayer rectifiers of electrical current, and on theoretical progress towards a one-molecule amplifier of electrical current. This program aims to provide electronic devices at the 2 to 3 nm level, as a dramatic advance towards practical integrated circuits of the future.

  15. Excitation density dependence of the photoluminescence from CdxHg1-xTe multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonheim, C R; Selvig, E; Nicolas, S; Breivik, M; Haakenaasen, R; Gunnaes, A E

    2008-01-01

    A study of the photoluminescence from a four-period Cd x Hg 1-x Te multiple quantum well structure at 11 K as a function of excitation density is presented. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the quantum well structure is of high quality. This was supported by the narrow photoluminescence peak originating in the ground state electron - heavy hole transition, with a full width at half maximum of only 7.4 meV for an excitation density of 1.3 W/cm 2 . When the excitation density was increased from 1.3 to 23.4 W/cm 2 , the peak position was shifted toward higher energy by 2.6 meV and the full width at half maximum increased from 7.4 to 10.9 meV

  16. Electron velocity and momentum density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A null 4-vector eta + sigma/sub μ/based on Dirac's relativistic electron equation, is shown explicitly for a plane wave and various Coulomb states. This 4-vector constitutes a mechanical ''model'' for the electron in those staes, and expresses the important spinor quantities represented conventionally by n, f, g, m, j, kappa, l, and s. The model for a plane wave agrees precisely with the relation between velocity and phase gradient customarily used in quantum theory, but the models for Coulomb states contradict that relation

  17. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    Basic atomic-collision processes at intermediate and high energies are being studied theoretically at Penn State by Alston and Winter. In the high velocity regime, single-electron capture is treated using a high order multiple-scattering approach; extensive comparison with experiment and analysis of mechanisms have been made. Fitting the calculated amplitude with a simple analytic form, the asymptotic velocity dependence of the cross section is obtained. The effect on the capture amplitude of altering the inner part of the internuclear potential has also been explored. In the intermediate velocity regime, earlier work on collisions between protons and hydrogenic-ion targets using a coupled-state approach is being extended to the two-electron helium target. 29 refs

  18. Coherence in electron-impact excitation of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batelaan, Hermanus.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis describes an experimental study into the electron-impact excitation to the 3 3 P, 3 1 D and 3 3 D states of Helium. The scattered electron and the photon, emitted by the excited atom, are measured in coincidence. The parameters, which can be varied, are the scattering angle and the kinetic energy of the projectile. Two parameters, which are used to characterize the excited state, are the angular momentum transferred to the atom, L perpendicular, and the alignment angle γ. It is shown that results of measurements on 3 1 D excitation with photon detection perpendicular to the scattering plane do not agree in the small scattering angle region with any of the model calculations currently available. Remarkable is the sign of L perpendicular, which appears to start of negatively at 60 eV. It is shown that for 3 3 P excitation the predicted large value of γ is indeed found experimentally. This supports the suggestion that exchange scattering is underestimated in model calculations for 1 P excitation. Another result is that for 1 P and 3 P excitation the behaviour of L perpendicular as a function of the scattering angle can be related at different impact energies with the help of a partial wave expansion. A scaling relation can be formulated for the behaviour of L perpendicular. The influence of a negative ion resonance to excitation of the 3 3 D state is investigated. Both in coincidence and non-coincidence measurements the presence of the resonance yields information on both the direct and indirect excitation of the 3 3 D state. It is shown that the coincident measurement gives an unique opportunity to determine the excited 3 3 D state completely. Results of measurements with photon detection in the scattering plane are given. They supplement previous 3 1 D and 3 3 D results and allow physical parameters, such as L perpendicular and γ, to be obtained. (H.W.). 132 refs.; 20 figs.; 18 tabs

  19. Electron scattering and collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear collective degrees of freedom are investigated through the study of the radial dependance of their wave function. Inelastic electron scattering is shown to be the appropriate tool to extract such a detailed information. Some recent results on spherical as well as deformed nuclei are discussed and the most recent extensions to the mean field approach are compared to these data in order to clarify the present status of our understanding of the dynamical properties of complex nuclei

  20. Electron-collision excitation cross section of the silver atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavin, A.Y.; Kuchenev, A.N.; Smirnov, Y.M.

    1983-01-01

    The cross sections for direct excitation by electron collision were measured for fifteen transitions of the silver atom. For thirteen of these transitions the optical excitation functions were recorded, varying the energy of the exciting electrons from the threshold energy to 250 eV. The operating region of the spectrum was 2000--5500 A. The excitation cross sections of the two principal lines exceeded the excitation cross sections of all the remaining lines by more than an order of magnitude. Reabsorption of the resonance lines was detected from the change in the ratio of intensities of the lines at 3280.68 and 3382.89 A, and so their intensity has been corrected relative to the intensities of the nonreabsorbed lines. All radiative transitions, with the exception of resonance transitions, participate in cascade population of the lowest resonance levels, making it possible to determine the resulting direct excitation cross sections of the 5p 2 P/sub 1/2/ and 5p 2 P/sub 3/2/ levels from the ground state of the silver atom. The part played by cascade population of the resonance levels is not large and is 2 P/sub 3/2/ level, and 10% for the 5p 2 P/sub 1/2/ level, of the excitation cross sections of the corresponding resonance transitions

  1. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed

  2. Electronically excited negative ion resonant states in chloroethylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, O.G., E-mail: khv@mail.ru; Lukin, V.G.; Tuimedov, G.M.; Khatymova, L.Z.; Kinzyabulatov, R.R.; Tseplin, E.E.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Several novel dissociative negative ion channels were revealed in chloroethylenes. • The electronically excited resonant states were recorded in all chloroethylenes under study. • The states were assigned to the inter-shell types, but not to the core-excited Feshbach one. - Abstract: The negative ion mass spectra of the resonant electron capture by molecules of 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene-cis, 1,2-dichloroethylene-trans, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene have been recorded in the 0–12 eV range of the captured electron energy using static magnetic sector mass spectrometer modified for operation in the resonant electron capture regime. As a result, several novel low-intensive dissociation channels were revealed in the compounds under study. Additionally, the negative ion resonant states were recorded at approximately 3–12 eV, mostly for the first time. These resonant states were assigned to the electronically excited resonances of the inter-shell type by comparing their energies with those of the parent neutral molecules triplet and singlet electronically excited states known from the energy-loss spectra obtained by previous studies.

  3. Electron impact excitation of xenon from the metastable state to the excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jun; Dong Chenzhong; Xie Luyou; Zhou Xiaoxin [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Jianguo [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematic, Beijing 100088 (China)], E-mail: dongcz@nwnu.edu.cn

    2008-12-28

    The electron impact excitation cross sections from the lowest metastable state 5p{sup 5}6sJ = 2 to the six lowest excited states of the 5p{sup 5}6p configuration of xenon are calculated systematically by using the fully relativistic distorted wave method. In order to discuss the effects of target state descriptions on the electron impact excitation cross sections, two correlation models are used to describe the target states based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method. It is found that the correlation effects play a very important role in low energy impact. For high energy impact, however, the cross sections are not sensitive to the description of the target states, but many more partial waves must be included.

  4. Limitations in accurate electron density studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wal, R. van der.

    1982-01-01

    Most of X-ray diffraction studies are devoted to the determination of three-dimensional crystal structures from the electron density distributions. In these cases the density distributions are described by the independent atom model (IAM model), which consists of a superposition of spherically averaged free atom densities, which are smeared by thermal vibrations. During the last few decades studies have been made into the deviations of the density distribution from the IAM model, which enables a study of the chemical binding between atoms. The total density can be described using pseudo-atom multipole models as a superposition of aspherical pseudo-atom densities. A fundamental problem is that the separation of this density into an IAM and a deformation part is not unique. This thesis considers the problem and besides deformation densities from X-ray diffraction also considers the corresponding deformation electric field and deformation potential. (C.F.)

  5. Electron impact excitation of Kr XXXII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Lawson, K. D.

    2009-09-01

    Collision strengths (Ω) have been calculated for all 7750 transitions among the lowest 125 levels belonging to the 2s2p,2s2p,2p,2s3ℓ,2s2p3ℓ, and 2p3ℓ configurations of boron-like krypton, Kr XXXII, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code has been adopted. All partial waves with angular momentum J⩽40 have been included, sufficient for the convergence of Ω for forbidden transitions. For allowed transitions, a top-up has been included in order to obtain converged values of Ω up to an energy of 500 Ryd. Resonances in the thresholds region have been resolved in a narrow energy mesh, and results for effective collision strengths (ϒ) have been obtained after averaging the values of Ω over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. Values of ϒ are reported over a wide temperature range below 107.3K, and the accuracy of the results is assessed. Values of ϒ are also listed in the temperature range 7.3⩽logTe(K)⩽9.0, obtained from the nonresonant collision strengths from the Flexible Atomic Code.

  6. Search for nuclear excitation by laser-driven electron motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounds, J.A.; Dyer, P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that a nucleus may be excited by first exciting the atom's electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple to the electrons, which would then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, experiments with 235 U have been performed. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic vapor of 235 U which is then bombarded by a high-brightness UV laser beam. The resulting ions are collected. The first excited nuclear state of 235 U has a 26-min half-life and decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. These conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. An upper limit of 4.0x10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting the nucleus of a 235 U atom that is in the 248-nm UV beam for 700 fs at an irradiance in the range of 1.0x10 15 to 2.5x10 15 W/cm 2

  7. Anomalous evolution of Ar metastable density with electron density in high density Ar discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Shin, Yong-Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with plasma discharge power (electron density) was reported [A. M. Daltrini, S. A. Moshkalev, T. J. Morgan, R. B. Piejak, and W. G. Graham, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Although the importance of the metastable atom and its density has been reported in a lot of literature, however, a basic physics behind the anomalous evolution of metastable density has not been clearly understood yet. In this study, we investigated a simple global model to elucidate the underlying physics of the anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with the electron density. On the basis of the proposed simple model, we reproduced the anomalous evolution of the metastable density and disclosed the detailed physics for the anomalous result. Drastic changes of dominant mechanisms for the population and depopulation processes of Ar metastable atoms with electron density, which take place even in relatively low electron density regime, is the clue to understand the result.

  8. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He + collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential

  9. Multireference Density Functional Theory with Generalized Auxiliary Systems for Ground and Excited States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehua; Zhang, Du; Jin, Ye; Yang, Yang; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao

    2017-09-21

    To describe static correlation, we develop a new approach to density functional theory (DFT), which uses a generalized auxiliary system that is of a different symmetry, such as particle number or spin, from that of the physical system. The total energy of the physical system consists of two parts: the energy of the auxiliary system, which is determined with a chosen density functional approximation (DFA), and the excitation energy from an approximate linear response theory that restores the symmetry to that of the physical system, thus rigorously leading to a multideterminant description of the physical system. The electron density of the physical system is different from that of the auxiliary system and is uniquely determined from the functional derivative of the total energy with respect to the external potential. Our energy functional is thus an implicit functional of the physical system density, but an explicit functional of the auxiliary system density. We show that the total energy minimum and stationary states, describing the ground and excited states of the physical system, can be obtained by a self-consistent optimization with respect to the explicit variable, the generalized Kohn-Sham noninteracting density matrix. We have developed the generalized optimized effective potential method for the self-consistent optimization. Among options of the auxiliary system and the associated linear response theory, reformulated versions of the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (SF-TDDFT) are selected for illustration of principle. Numerical results show that our multireference DFT successfully describes static correlation in bond dissociation and double bond rotation.

  10. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying...... EELS to ultra-sharp convex grooves in gold, we directly probe extremely confined gap surface-plasmon (GSP) modes excited by swift electrons in nanometre-wide gaps. We reveal the resonance behaviour associated with the excitation of the antisymmetric GSP mode for extremely small gap widths, down to ~5...... mode exploited in plasmonic waveguides with extreme light confinement is a very important factor that should be taken into account in the design of nanoplasmonic circuits and devices....

  11. Laboratory Astrophysics Using High Energy Density Photon and Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bingham, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The development of intense laser and particle beams has opened up new opportunities to study high energy density astrophysical processes in the Laboratory. With even higher laser intensities possible in the near future vacuum polarization processes such as photon - photon scattering with or without large magnetic fields may also be experimentally observed. In this talk I will review the status of laboratory experiments using intense beans to investigate extreme astrophysical phenomena such as supernovae explosions, gamma x-ray bursts, ultra-high energy cosmic accelerators etc. Just as intense photon or electron beams can excite relativistic electron plasma waves or wakefields used in plasma acceleration, intense neutrino beams from type II supernovae can also excite wakefields or plasma waves. Other instabilities driven by intense beams relevant to perhaps x-ray bursts is the Weibel instability. Simulation results of extreme processes will also be presented.

  12. Simultaneous electron capture and excitation in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Graham, W.G.; Clark, M.; Shafroth, S.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.; Meron, M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent efforts to observe simultaneous electron capture-and-K-shell excitation in ion-atom collisions is presented. This process which has been referred to as resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE), is qualitatively analogous to dielectronic recombination (inverse Auger transition) in free-electron-ion collisions, and, hence, is expected to be resonant. Experimentally, events having the correct signature for simultaneous capture-and-excitation are isolated by detecting projectile K x rays in coincidence with ions which capture a single electron. In a recent experiment involving 70-160 MeV S 13+ ions incident on Ar, a maximum was observed in the yield of projectile K x rays associated with electron capture. This maximum is attributed to simultaneous capture - and excitation. The position (120 MeV) and width (60 MeV) of the observed maximum are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The data indicate that RTE is an important mechanism for inner-shell vacancy production in the energy range studied

  13. The coupling of condensed matter excitations to electron probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Aspects of coupling of a classical electron with bulk and surface excitations in condensed matter have been sketched. Some considerations of a self-energy approach to the complete quantal treatment of this coupling have been given. 19 refs., 3 figs

  14. Electronic-excitation induced radiation damage in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigouroux, J P

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the microscopic nature of radiation induced defects in insulators, we have studied localization of negative and positive charges in amorphous and monocrystalline SiO2. The behaviour of these charges is linked to creation of point defects by electronic excitation. The role of intense electric fields under irradiation is pointed out.

  15. 23P excitation of helium by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, J.; Ehrhardt, H.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.

    1996-03-01

    We present highly accurate relative measurements of 23P excitation of helium by electron impact at 30, 40 and 50 eV. These, when normalised to the convergent close-coupling (CCC) theory at one angle, yield excellent agreement at the remaining angles. This resolves some of the outstanding discrepancies between the CCC theory and earlier measurements. (authors). 14 refs., 3 figs

  16. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  17. Electron-impact excitation autoionization of Ga II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pindzola, M.S.; Griffin, D.C.; Bottcher, C.

    1982-01-01

    The general-reaction theory of Feshbach is applied, within the framework of the distorted-wave approximation, to the calculation of excitation-autoionization resonances in the electron-impact ionization of Ga + . Although the spectrum of autoionizing levels for Ga + is quite complex, we focus our attention on the important 3d 10 4s 2 → 3d 9 4s 2 4p inner-shell excitations. For excitation of the 3d 9 4s 2 4p 1 P 1 autoionizing level we make a general-reaction-theory calculation for the dominant partial-wave cross section and compute a typical resonance profile in the ejected-electron differential cross section. We find that the quantum-mechanical interference between the direct and indirect processes has a small effect on the total ionization cross section. Employing an independent-processes approximation we calculate excitation-autoionization contributions to all twelve levels of the 3d 9 4s 2 4p configuration. Using the results of our calculations and their comparison with a recent crossed-beam experiment by Rogers et al., we discuss the accuracy of the distorted-wave method and the effects of configuration interaction on energy levels and excitation cross sections

  18. Study of excitation energy dependence of nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanto, G.; Nayak, B.K.; Saxena, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have populated CN by fusion reaction and excitation energy of the intermediate nuclei is determined after first chance α-emission to investigate excitation energy dependence of the NLD parameter. Evaporated neutron spectra were measured following alpha evaporation for obtaining NLD parameter for the reaction 11 B + 197 Au, populating CN 208 Po. This CN after evaporating an α-particle populates intermediate nucleus 204 Pb. The 204 Pb has magic number of Z=82. Our aim is to study the excitation energy dependence of NLD parameter for closed shell nuclei

  19. Electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections for ground state and excited helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yu.; Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.; Heer, F.J. de

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive and critically assessed cross sections for the electron-impact excitation and ionization of ground state and excited helium atoms are presented. All states (atomic terms) with n≤4 are treated individually, while the states with n≥5 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n≥5 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of transitions, from both ground and excited states, convergent close coupling calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions, which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in graphical form

  20. Electron emission from materials at low excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urma, N.; Kijek, M.; Millar, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An experimental system has been designed and developed with the purpose of measuring the total electron emission yield from materials at low energy excitation. In the first instance the reliability of the system was checked by measuring the total electron emission yield for a well defined surface (aluminium 99.45%). The obtained data was in the expected range given by the literature, and consequently the system will be used further for measuring the total electron yield for a range of materials with interest in the instrumentation industry. We intend to measure the total electron emission yield under electron bombardment as a function of incident electron energy up to 1200 eV, angle of incidence, state of the surface and environment to which the surface has been exposed. Dependence of emission on total electron irradiated dose is also of interest. For many practical application of the 'Secondary Electron Emission', the total electron yield is desired to be as large as possible. The above phenomenon has practical applicability in electron multiplier tube and Scanning electron microscopy - when by means of the variation of the yield of the emitted electrons one may produce visible images of small sample areas. The electron multiplier tube, is a device which utilises the above effect to detect and amplify both single particles and low currents streams of charged particles. The majority of electron tubes use electrons with low energy, hundreds of eV. Not a lot has been published in the literature about this regime and also about the emission when the impinging electrons have small energy, up to 1 KeV. The information obtained from the experimental measurements concerning the total electron emission yield is used to asses the investigated materials as a potential electron emitting surfaces or dynodes in an electron multiplier tube

  1. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  2. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  3. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  4. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  5. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-01-01

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He + 2 . The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He + 2 , which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD + is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  6. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  7. Modifications of poly (vinilydene fluoride) under electronic excitations produced by charged particles (heavy ions and electrons)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fina, A.

    1990-04-01

    Some of the physico-chemical properties of organic solids like conductivity or permeation can be improved by irradiation. The aim of this work is to characterize modifications induced in poly (vinylidene fluoride) films (PVDF) by charged particles (ions and electrons), with electronic stopping power, for doses ranging from zero to twenty G-Grays. Influence of dose, density of electronic excitations, and flux (in particles per square centimeter), and the nature of defects induced by the beam, were studied with two methods: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (or XPS) for surface analysis, and electron Spin Resonance (or ESR) to probe the bulk of the film. Three ranges of doses are revealed in view of experimental results. At lower doses, PVDF undergoes deshydrofluorination induced by desorption; it is a low modifications regime. For intermediate range doses, conjugated carbon backbones of polyene compounds are produced. At higher doses, intermolecular interactions between the resulting fragments give a crosslinked network. For the upper limit of doses used, bond breaking results in a non reversible degradation of PVDF. In this last situation, direct atomic displacement of target atoms, is not negligible [fr

  8. First Principles Calculations of Electronic Excitations in 2D Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Filip Anselm

    electronic transport, optical and chemical properties. On the other hand it has shown to be a great starting point for a systematic pertubation theory approach to obtain the so-called quasiparticle spectrum. In the GW approximation one considers the considers the potential from a charged excitation...... as if it is being screened by the electrons in the material. This method has been very successful for calculating quasiparticle energies of bulk materials but results have been more varying for 2D materials. The reason is that the 2D confined electrons are less able to screen the added charge and some...

  9. Electron-impact excitation of diatomic hydride cations II: OH+ and SH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, James R.; Faure, Alexandre; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    R-matrix calculations combined with the adiabatic-nuclei-rotation and Coulomb-Born approximations are used to compute electron-impact rotational rate coefficients for two open-shell diatomic cations of astrophysical interest: the hydoxyl and sulphanyl ions, OH+ and SH+. Hyperfine resolved rate coefficients are deduced using the infinite-order-sudden approximation. The propensity rule ΔF = Δj = ΔN = ±1 is observed, as is expected for cations with a large dipole moment. A model for OH+ excitation in the Orion Bar photon-dominated region is presented which nicely reproduces Herschel observations for an electron fraction xe = 10-4 and an OH+ column density of 3 × 1013 cm-2. Electron-impact electronic excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients for the ions are also presented.

  10. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  11. Study of the electronic structure of pure aluminium, aluminium oxide and nitride by spectroscopy of electrons excited under electronic and photonic bombardment (X and UV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Soyer, Martine

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis reports the use of electron spectroscopy with electrons excited under electronic or photonic (X or UV) bombardment for the study of electronic state density of aluminium, aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and aluminium nitride (AlN). The objective is to get an insight into phenomena related to technological problems of adherence, wear, lubrication, corrosion or breakdown met in metals, insulators and semiconductors. The author highlighted the presence of occupied surface states on Al(111) and Al(100), and electronic levels localised in the forbidden band of Al 2 O 3 and AlN, induced by structural defects which promote surface reactivity [fr

  12. Electrostatic lower hybrid waves excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves scattering from planar magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, T.F.; Ngo, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    Recent satellite observations demonstrate that high amplitude, short wavelength (5 m ≤ λ ≤ 100 m) electrostatic waves are commonly excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves propagating in regions of the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere where small-scale magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities are thought to exist. A new theoretical model of this phenomenon is presented, based upon passive linear scattering in a cold magnetoplasma. In this model the electrostatic waves are excited by linear mode coupling as the incident electromagnetic whistler mode waves scatter from the magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities. The excited short wavelength waves are quasi-electrostatic whistler mode waves, a type of lower hybrid wave, whose wave normal lies near the whistler mode resonance cone where the wave refractive index becomes very large. The amplitude of the excited electrostatic lower hybrid waves is calculated for a wide range of values of input electromagnetic wave frequency, wave normal direction, electron plasma frequency, gyrofrequency, ion composition, and irregularity scale and density enhancement. Results indicate that high amplitude lower hybrid waves can be excited over a wide range of parameters for irregularity density enhancements as low as 5% whenever the scale of the irregularity is of the same order as the lower hybrid wavelength

  13. Electron-impact excitation of complex atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, P.G.; Burke, V.M.; Dunseath, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    A new R-matrix approach for calculating cross sections and rate coefficients for electron-impact excitation of complex atoms and ions is described. This approach, based on an expansion of the total wavefunction in target configurations rather than in individual target states and taking advantage of the special status of the scattered electron in the collisional wavefunction, enables the angular integrals to be performed very much more efficiently than hitherto. It also enables electron correlation effects in the target and in the electron-target collision complex to be treated consistently, eliminating pseudo-resonances which have caused serious difficulties in some earlier work. A major new program package RMATRIX II has been written that implements this approach and, as an example, electron-impact excitation of Fe 2+ is considered where the four target configurations 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, 3d 5 4p and 3d 5 4d are retained in the expansion of the total wavefunction. RMATRIX II is compared with the standard R-matrix program package and is found to be much more efficient showing that accurate electron scattering calculations involving complex targets, such as the astrophysically important low ionization stages of iron-peak elements, are now possible. (author)

  14. General theory for environmental effects on (vertical) electronic excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2016-10-21

    Almost 70 years ago, the first theoretical model for environmental effects on electronic excitation energies has been derived. Since then, several different interpretations and refined models have been proposed for the perichromic shift of a chromophore due to its surrounding medium. Some of these models are contradictory. Here, the contributing terms are derived within the framework of long-range perturbation theory with the least approximations so far. The derivation is based on a state-specific interpretation of the interaction energies and all terms can be identified with individual properties of either the chromophore or the surroundings, respectively. Further, the much debated contribution due to transition moments coupled to the environment can be verified in the form of a non-resonant excitonic coupling to the dynamic polarizabilities in the environment. These general insights should clarify discussions and interpretations of environmental effects on electronic excitations and should foster the development of new models for the computation of these effects.

  15. VUV Study of Electron-Pyrimidine Dissociative Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jeff; Al-Khazraji, Hajar; Tiessen, Collin; Lukic, Dragan; Trocchi, Joshuah; McConkey, William

    2013-05-01

    A crossed electron-gas beam system coupled to a VUV spectrometer has been used to investigate the dissociation of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) into excited atomic fragments in the electron-impact energy range from threshold to 375 eV. Data have been made absolute using Lyman- α from H2 as a secondary standard. The main features in the spectrum are the H Lyman series lines. The emission cross section of Lyman- α is measured to be (2.44 +/- 0.25) 10-18 cm2 at 100 eV impact energy. The probability of extracting C or N atoms from the ring is shown to be very small. Possible dissociation channels and excitation mechanisms in the parent molecule will be discussed. The authors thank NSERC (Canada) for financial support.

  16. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  17. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Do, T. P. T. [School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  18. A study of vibrational relaxation of electronically-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datsyuk, V.V.; Izmailov, I.A.; Kochelap, V.A.

    1992-09-01

    The time kinetics of the vibrational relaxation of excimers is studied in the diffusional approximation. Simple formulae for functions of nonstationary vibrational distribution are found for the electronically excited molecules. Some spectral-kinetic dependencies of the excimer luminescence are explained in a new way. The possibilities of the determination of excimer parameters are discussed. The dependence of energetical characteristics of excimer lasers on these parameters is particularly emphasized. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  19. [Electron transfer, ionization and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental atomic-collision processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation. Winter has focussed attention on intermediate and, more recently, higher collision energies -- proton energies of at least about 50 keV -- for which coupled-state approaches are appropriate. Alston has concentrated on perturbative approaches to symmetric ion-ion/atom collisions at high energies and to asymmetric collisions at intermediate to high energies

  20. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagyi-Palffy, A.

    2006-07-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments with trapped or stored ions was discussed focusing on the cases with the largest calculated resonance strength. As the photons emitted in different channels of the electron recombination process are indistinguishable in the total cross section, the interference between NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus and radiative recombination was investigated. The angular distribution of the emitted photons in the recombination process provides means to discern the two processes. Angular differential cross sections for the emitted photons in the case of E2 nuclear transitions were presented for several heavy elements. (orig.)

  1. Ab initio calculation of electron excitation energies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, S.G.

    1996-02-01

    Progress in the first-principles calculation of electron excitation energies in solids is discussed. Quasiparticle energies are computed by expanding the electron self energy to first order in the screened Coulomb interaction in the so-called GW approximation. The method was applied to explain and predict spectroscopic properties of a variety of systems. Several illustrative applications to semiconductors, materials under pressure, chemisorption, and point defects in solids are presented. A recent reformulation of the method employing mixed- space functions and imaginary time techniques is also discussed

  2. Electron plasma dynamics during autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C. J., E-mail: cbaker@physics.ucsd.edu; Danielson, J. R., E-mail: jrdanielson@ucsd.edu; Hurst, N. C., E-mail: nhurst@physics.ucsd.edu; Surko, C. M., E-mail: csurko@ucsd.edu [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Chirped-frequency autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode is used to move electron plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap across the magnetic field for advanced plasma and antimatter applications. Plasmas of 10{sup 8} electrons, with radii small compared to that of the confining electrodes, can be moved from the magnetic axis to ≥90% of the electrode radius with near unit efficiency and reliable angular positioning. Translations of ≥70% of the wall radius are possible for a wider range of plasma parameters. Details of this process, including phase and displacement oscillations in the plasma response and plasma expansion, are discussed, as well as possible extensions of the technique.

  3. Density and mobility effects of the majority carriers in organic semiconductors under light excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagenas, N.; Giannopoulou, A.; Kounavis, P., E-mail: pkounavis@upatras.gr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patra (Greece)

    2015-01-21

    This study demonstrates that the effect of light excitation on the density and the mobility of the majority carriers can be explored in organic semiconductors by modulated photocurrent spectroscopy. The spectra of phase and amplitude of the modulated photocurrent of pentacene films indicate a significant increase in the density of the photogenerated mobile holes (majority carriers). This increase is accompanied by a comparatively much smaller increase of the steady state photocurrent response which can be reconciled with a decrease in the mobility (μ) of holes. The decrease of μ is supported from an unusual increase of the Y/μ ratio of the out-of-phase modulated photocurrent (Y) signal to the mobility under light excitation. It is proposed that the mobile holes, which are generated from the dissociation of the light-created excitons more likely near the pentacene-substrate interface by electron trapping, populate grain boundaries charging them and producing a downward band bending. As a result, potential energy barriers are build up which limit the transport of holes interacting through trapping-detrapping with deep partially occupied traps in the charged grain boundaries. On the other hand, the transport of holes interacting through trapping-detrapping with empty traps is found unaffected.

  4. Boltzmann equation analysis of electrons swarm parameters and properties of excited particle number densities in Xe/Ne plasmas. Laser absorption effect; Xe/Ne plasma chudenshi yuso keisu narabi ni reiki ryushisu mitsudo tokusei no Boltzmann hoteishiki kaiseki. Laser ko kyushu koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, S.; Sugawara, H.; Ventzek, P.; Sakai, Y. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Xe/Ne plasmas are important for plasma display panels and VUV light sources. However, reactions between electrons and excited particles in the mixtures are so complicated that influence of the reactions on the plasma properties is not understood well. In this work, taking account of reactions through which electrons are produced, such as cumulative and Penning ionization, and of transition between excited levels, the electron and excited particle properties in Xe/Ne plasmas are calculated using the Boltzmann equation. The ionization coefficient and electron drift velocity agreed with experimental data. The influence of laser absorption in Xe/Ne plasmas on the plasma properties is also discussed. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Electron impact excitation of fine-structure levels of neon-like titanium (Ti XIII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.P.; Deb, N.C.; Msezane, A.Z.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present results of a Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation for the electron impact excitation of neon-like titanium, in which the 27 lowest fine-structure target levels arising out of the 4 lowest configurations 2s 2 2p 6 , 2s 2 2p 5 3s, 2s 2 2p 5 3p, and 2s 2 2p 5 3d are included. These target levels are represented by configuration interaction wave functions using the 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, and 3d basic orbitals. The relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli approximation via one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit interaction terms in the scattering equations. For many transitions, complex resonance structures are found in the excitation cross sections. The excitation cross sections are integrated over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies to give electron excitation rate coefficients over a wide temperature range from 150 to 600 eV. The relative populations for different electron densities and temperatures are also presented

  6. Linear interpolation method in ensemble Kohn-Sham and range-separated density-functional approximations for excited states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senjean, Bruno; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2015-01-01

    Gross-Oliveira-Kohn density-functional theory (GOK-DFT) for ensembles is, in principle, very attractive but has been hard to use in practice. A practical model based on GOK-DFT for the calculation of electronic excitation energies is discussed. The model relies on two modifications of GOK-DFT: use...... promising results have been obtained for both single (including charge transfer) and double excitations with spin-independent short-range local and semilocal functionals. Even at the Kohn-Sham ensemble DFT level, which is recovered when the range-separation parameter is set to 0, LIM performs better than...

  7. Electron impact excitation of helium in Debye plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, S.; Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Tall, M. S.; Diédhiou, I. [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences and Techniques, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Diatta, C. S. [Institut International des Sciences et de Technologie, 28 Avenue des Ambassadeurs Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Zammit, M. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The probability, differential, and integral scattering cross sections of the 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}S and 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}P transitions of helium have been calculated in the first Born approximation. The projectile-target interactions depending on the temperature and the density of plasma are described by the Debye-Hückel model. Wave functions of the target before and after collision were modeled by non orthogonal Hartree-Fock orbitals. The wave functions parameters are calculated with the Ritz variational method. We improve our unscreened first Born approximation integral cross sections by using the BE-scaled (B stands for binding energy and E excitation energy) method. The second Born approximation has also been used to calculate the excitation cross sections in Debye plasma. Our calculations are compared to other theoretical and experimental results where applicable.

  8. Deriving the coronal hole electron temperature: electron density dependent ionization / recombination considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, John Gerard; Perez-Suarez, David; Singh, Avninda; Chapman, Steven; Bryans, Paul; Summers, Hugh; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of appropriate theoretically derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground-state. A more accurate treatment is to include ionization/recombination to and from metastable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages, Mg IX 368 A and Mg X 625 A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This, however, is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.

  9. Damage generation by electronic excitations in crystalline metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, A.; Lesueur, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will give a rapid overview of the main experimental results concerning the effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets and present a tentative model based on the Coulomb explosion mechanism. More detailed reviews have been made recently concerning both the experiments and the theoretical model. High levels of localized energy deposition in electronic excitation are easily obtained using GeV heavy ions which during their slowing-down typically transfer a few keV/A to the electronic system of the target and a few eV/A in elastic collisions with target nuclei. In insulators and organic materials, it is well-known that both slowing-down processes contribute to damage creation, whereas in metals it has been claimed for a long time that the sole nuclear collisions are involved in damage processes. Although this last assertion remains true for some metals such as Cu, Ag, W, Cu 3 Au...[2], high levels of electronic excitation can induce a partial annealing of the defects resulting from nuclear collisions in Fe, Ni, Nb, Pt..., lead to additional defect creation in Fe, Co, Zr, Ti...[2] or even to phase transformations in NiZr 2 [5], Ni 3 B [6], NiTi [7], Ti [8]... In the following, we shall only focus on the last two effects. (author). 15 refs

  10. A density matrix renormalization group study of low-lying excitations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Symmetrized density-matrix-renormalization-group calculations have been carried out, within Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian, to explore the nature of the ground and low-lying excited states of long polythiophene oligomers. We have exploited 2 symmetry and spin parity of the system to obtain excited states of ...

  11. Influence of excited molecules on electron swarm transport coefficients and gas discharge kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Z.L.; Jovanovic, J.V.; Raspopovic, Z.M.; Bzenic, S.A.; Vrhovac, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we study different effects of excited molecules on swarm parameters, electron energy distribution functions and gas discharge modeling. First we discuss a possible experiment in parahydrogen to resolve the discrepancy in hydrogen vibrational excitation cross section data. Negative differential conductivity (NDC) is a kinetic phenomenon which manifests itself in a particular dependence of the drift velocity on E=N and it is affected by superelastic collisions with excited states. A complete kinetic scheme for argon required to model excited state densities in gas discharges is also described. These results are used to explain experiments in capacitively and inductively coupled RF plasmas used for processing. The paper illustrates the application of atomic and molecular collision data, swarm data and the theoretical techniques in modeling of gas discharges with large abundances of excited molecules. It is pointed out that swarm experiments with excited molecules are lacking and that there is a shortage of reliable data, while the numerical procedures are sufficiently developed to include all the important effects. (authors). 59 refs., 12 figs

  12. Density-dependent squeezing of excitons in highly excited semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang.

    1995-07-01

    The time evolution from coherent states to squeezed states of high density excitons is studied theoretically based on the boson formalism and within the Random Phase Approximation. Both the mutual interaction between excitons and the anharmonic exciton-photon interaction due to phase-space filling of excitons are taken into account. It is shown that the exciton squeezing depends strongly on the exciton density in semiconductors and becomes smaller with increasing the latter. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs

  13. Determination of electron temperature and electron density in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is seen that the electron temperature increases from 5.8 × 102 oK to 7.83 × 104 oK as the pd is reduced from 130mm Hg × mm to 60 mm Hg × mm for argon. The electron densities increases from 2.8 × 1011/cm3 to 3.2 × 1011 /cm3 for the same variation of pds. For air the electron temperature increases from 3.6 × 104 oK to ...

  14. Dynamic analysis of electron density in the course of the internal motion of molecular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, A.; Hori, K.; Asai, Y.; Yamabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general dynamic aspect of electron density of a molecular system is studied on the basis of the general equation of the electron orbital which is formulated for the dynamic study of electronic motion. The newly defined electron orbital incorporates the dynamics of molecular vibration into the electronic structures. In this scheme, the change of electron distribution caused by excitation of vibrational state is defined as the ''dynamic electron transfer.'' The dynamic electron density is found to have the remarkable ''additive'' property. The time-dependent aspect of the dynamic electron redistribution is also analyzed on the basis of the ''coherent state.'' The new method relates the classical vibrational amplitude to the quantum number of the vibrational state. As a preliminary application of the present treatment, the dynamic electron densities of H 2 , HD, HT, HF, and HCl molecules are calculated by use of ab initio molecular orbital method

  15. Trapped electronic states in YAG crystal excited by femtosecond radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavedeev, E.V.; Kononenko, V.V.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    The excitation of an electronic subsystem of an yttrium aluminum garnet by 800 nm femtosecond radiation was studied theoretically and experimentally. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the refractive index (n) inside the beam waist was explored by means of the pump-probe interferometric technique with a submicron resolution. The observed increase in n indicated the formation of bound electronic states relaxed for ∝ 150 ps. We showed that the experimental data agreed with the computational simulation based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation only if these transient states were considered to arise from a direct light-induced process but not from the decay of radiatively generated free-electron-hole pairs. (orig.)

  16. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described

  17. Topside electron density at low latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezquer, R.G.; Cabrera, M.A.; Flores, R.F.; Mosert, M.

    2002-01-01

    The validity of IRI to predict the electron density at the topside electron density profile over the low latitude region is checked. The comparison with measurements obtained with the Taiyo satellite during low solar activity shows that, the disagreement between prediction and measurement is lower than 40% for 70% of considered cases. These IRI predictions are better than those obtained in a previous work at the southern peak of the equatorial anomaly for high solar activity. Additional studies for low solar activity, using ionosonde data as input parameters in the model, are needed in order to check if the observed deviations are due to the predicted peak characteristics or to the predicted shape of the topside profile. (author)

  18. Electron density measurement for steady state plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Yasunori; Chiba, Shinichi; Inoue, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Electron density of a large tokamak has been measured successfully by the tangential CO 2 laser polarimeter developed in JT-60U. The tangential Faraday rotation angles of two different wavelength of 9.27 and 10.6 μm provided the electron density independently. Two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of Faraday rotation at vacuum windows is verified for the first time. A system stability for long time operation up to ∼10 hours is confirmed. A fluctuation of a signal baseline is observed with a period of ∼3 hours and an amplitude of 0.4 - 0.7deg. In order to improve the polarimeter, an application of diamond window for reduction of the Faraday rotation at vacuum windows and another two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of mechanical rotation component are proposed. (author)

  19. Dissociative electron attachment and electronic excitation in Fe(CO)5

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allan, M.; Lacko, M.; Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Zlatar, M.; Fabrikant, I. I.; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Fedor, Juraj

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 17 (2018), s. 11692-11701 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-04844S Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrons * FEBID * electronic excitation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  20. Electron transfer by excited benzoquinone anions: slow rates for two-electron transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamadar, Matibur; Cook, Andrew R; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Holroyd, Richard; Jiang, Yan; Bikalis, Jin; Miller, John R

    2013-09-05

    Electron transfer (ET) rate constants from the lowest excited state of the radical anion of benzoquinone, BQ(-•)*, were measured in THF solution. Rate constants for bimolecular electron transfer reactions typically reach the diffusion-controlled limit when the free-energy change, ΔG°, reaches -0.3 eV. The rate constants for ET from BQ(-•)* are one-to-two decades smaller at this energy and do not reach the diffusion-controlled limit until -ΔG° is 1.5-2.0 eV. The rates are so slow probably because a second electron must also undergo a transition to make use of the energy of the excited state. Similarly, ET, from solvated electrons to neutral BQ to form the lowest excited state, is slow, while fast ET is observed at a higher excited state, which can be populated in a transition involving only one electron. A simple picture based on perturbation theory can roughly account for the control of electron transfer by the need for transition of a second electron. The picture also explains how extra driving force (-ΔG°) can restore fast rates of electron transfer.

  1. Assessment of Ab Initio and Density Functional Theory Methods for the Excitations of Donor-Acceptor Complexes: The Case of the Benzene-Tetracyanoethylene Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the excited-state properties of electron donors, acceptors and their interfaces in organic optoelectronic devices is a fundamental issue for their performance optimization. In order to obtain a balanced description of the different excitation types for electron-donor-acceptor systems, including the singlet charge transfer (CT, local excitations, and triplet excited states, several ab initio and density functional theory (DFT methods for excited-state calculations were evaluated based upon the selected model system of benzene-tetracyanoethylene (B-TCNE complexes. On the basis of benchmark calculations of the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster with single and double excitations method, the arithmetic mean of the absolute errors and standard errors of the electronic excitation energies for the different computational methods suggest that the M11 functional in DFT is superior to the other tested DFT functionals, and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT with the Tamm–Dancoff approximation improves the accuracy of the calculated excitation energies relative to that of the full TDDFT. The performance of the M11 functional underlines the importance of kinetic energy density, spin-density gradient, and range separation in the development of novel DFT functionals. According to the TDDFT results, the performances of the different TDDFT methods on the CT properties of the B-TCNE complexes were also analyzed.

  2. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl - repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O 2 is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO 2 is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed

  3. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.

    1993-01-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4to 12), np(n=4to8) and nd(n=3to8)of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4 to 7), np (n=4 to 7) and nd (n=3 to 8). 3.- comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author) 35 refs

  4. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutro argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Ramos, F.

    1993-01-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 12), np(n=4 to 8) and nd(n=3 to 8) of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 7), np(n=4 to 7) and nd(n=3 to 8). 3.- Comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author)

  5. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, A.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq); Mohammad, F.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Tikreet, Tikreet (Iraq); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Mukesh [Physics Division, Forensic Science Laboratory, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using {sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  6. Defect creation in solids by a decay of electronic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, M.I.; Lushchik, Ch.B.; Mashovets, T.V.; Kholodar', G.A.; Shejnkman, M.K.; Ehlango, M.A.; Kievskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Poluprovodnikov)

    1985-01-01

    A new type of radiationless transitions in nonmetallic solids accompanied by neither the extraction of a heat nor the luminescence, but by a large (in comparison with the interatomic distance) displacements of a small number of atoms is discussed. A classification is given of the instabilities (electrostatic, electron-vibrational, structural) leading to a creation of the defects in crystalline and glassy solids. The processes of the defect creation, due to both the decay of self-trapped excitions in ionic crystals and the multiple ionization of atoms near the pre-existing charged centres in semiconductor are described. The mechanisms of the complex defects reconstruction in semiconductors by nonequilibrium charge carriers and by an electron-hole recombination are discussed. The role of charge carriers in a thermal defect generation is considered. A mechanism of the peculiar defect creation in glassy semiconductors is discussed

  7. Analysis of Atomic Electronic Excitation in Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xin; Jia Hong-Hui; Yin Hong-Wei; Zhang Hai-Liang; Chang Sheng-Li; Yang Jun-Cai; Dang Wei-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Electronic excitation of atoms is studied in nonequilibrium air plasmas with the electronic temperature between 8000 K and 20000 K. By using the modified Saha—Boltzmann equation, our simplified method takes into account significant radiative processes and strong self-absorption of the vacuum ultraviolet lines. Calculations are carried out at three trajectory points of the Fire II flight experiment. Good agreement with the detailed collisional-radiative model is obtained, and the performance of this method in applications to highly nonequilibrium conditions is better than Park's quasi-steady-state model and Spradian-9.0. A short discussion on the influence of optical thickness of the vacuum ultraviolet radiation is also given. It costs about 2.9 ms on the average to solve one cell of the shock layer on a low cost computer, which shows that the present method is fast and efficient. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  8. Electron impact excitation of the iron peak element Fe II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsbottom, C.A.; Scott, M.P.; Bell, K.L.; McLaughlin, B.M.; Burke, P.G.; Keenan, F.P.; Sunderland, A.G.; Burke, V.M.; Noble, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of Fe II are presented for all sextet-to-quartet transitions among the 38 LS states formed from the basis configurations 3d 6 4s, 3d 7 and 3d 6 4p. A total of 112 individual transitions are considered at electron temperatures in the range 30-100,000 K, encompassing values of importance for applications in astrophysics as well as laboratory plasmas. A limited comparison is made with earlier theoretical work and large differences are found to occur at the temperatures considered. In particular, it is found that the inclusion or omission of some (N+1)-bound configurations in the Hamiltonian matrices describing the collision process can have a huge effect on the resulting effective collision strengths, by up to a factor of four in some cases. (author)

  9. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B12 in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states

  10. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter...

  11. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Ma, Jianyi; Peng, Daoling; Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-02-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO4-, is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3T1 and 3T2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted.

  12. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenhua; Ma Jianyi; Peng Daoling; Zou Wenli; Liu Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO 4 - , is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3 T 1 and 3 T 2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted

  13. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-01-01

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of β-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  14. Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A; Foulkes, W M C; Horsfield, A P; Mason, D R; Schleife, A; Draeger, E W; Correa, A A

    2016-01-29

    We use time-dependent density functional theory to study self-irradiated Si. We calculate the electronic stopping power of Si in Si by evaluating the energy transferred to the electrons per unit path length by an ion of kinetic energy from 1 eV to 100 keV moving through the host. Electronic stopping is found to be significant below the threshold velocity normally identified with transitions across the band gap. A structured crossover at low velocity exists in place of a hard threshold. An analysis of the time dependence of the transition rates using coupled linear rate equations enables one of the excitation mechanisms to be clearly identified: a defect state induced in the gap by the moving ion acts like an elevator and carries electrons across the band gap.

  15. Electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact in a linear algebraic, separable potential approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The linear algebraic, separable potential approach is applied to the electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact. By representing the exchange and off-diagonal direct terms on a basis, the standard set of coupled inelastic equations is reduced to a set of elastic inhomogeneous equations. The procedure greatly simplifies the formulation by allowing a large portion of the problem to be handled by standard bound-state techniques and by greatly reducing the order of the scattering equations that must be solved. Application is made to the excitation of atomic hydrogen in the three-state close-coupling (1s, 2s, 2p) approximation. (author)

  16. Electron density measurements on the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckle, B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a determination of the maximum electron density in a plasma focus, produced with the NESSI experimental setup, by the method of laser beam deflection. For each discharge a time-resolved measurement was performed at four different places. Neutron efficiency as well as the time of the initial X-ray emission was registrated. The principle and the economic aspects of the beam deflection method are presented in detail. The experimental findings and the resulting knowledge of the neutron efficiency are discussed. (GG) [de

  17. Electron Density Calibration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, A.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images are used as basic input data for most modern radiosurgery treatment planning systems (TPS). CT data not only provide anatomic information to delineate target volumes, but also allow the introduction of corrections for tissue inhomogeneities into dose calculations during the treatment planning procedure. These corrections involve the determination of a relationship between tissue electron density (ρe) and their corresponding Hounsfield Units (HU). In this work, an elemental analysis of different commercial tissue equivalent materials using Scanning Electron Microscopy was carried out to characterize their chemical composition. The tissue equivalent materials were chosen to ensure a large range of ρe to be included in the CT scanner calibration. A phantom was designed and constructed with these materials to simulate the size of a human head

  18. Ultra-Stretchable Interconnects for High-Density Stretchable Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Shafqat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The exciting field of stretchable electronics (SE promises numerous novel applications, particularly in-body and medical diagnostics devices. However, future advanced SE miniature devices will require high-density, extremely stretchable interconnects with micron-scale footprints, which calls for proven standardized (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS-type process recipes using bulk integrated circuit (IC microfabrication tools and fine-pitch photolithography patterning. Here, we address this combined challenge of microfabrication with extreme stretchability for high-density SE devices by introducing CMOS-enabled, free-standing, miniaturized interconnect structures that fully exploit their 3D kinematic freedom through an interplay of buckling, torsion, and bending to maximize stretchability. Integration with standard CMOS-type batch processing is assured by utilizing the Flex-to-Rigid (F2R post-processing technology to make the back-end-of-line interconnect structures free-standing, thus enabling the routine microfabrication of highly-stretchable interconnects. The performance and reproducibility of these free-standing structures is promising: an elastic stretch beyond 2000% and ultimate (plastic stretch beyond 3000%, with <0.3% resistance change, and >10 million cycles at 1000% stretch with <1% resistance change. This generic technology provides a new route to exciting highly-stretchable miniature devices.

  19. Electron capture into excited states of multi-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkkamp, D.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with charge exchange reactions in slow collisions of multi-charged ions with neutral atoms or molecules. These reactions proceed very efficiently via a curve crossing mechanism, which leads to preferential population of excited states of the ion. The subsequent decay of these states leads to the emission of characteristic radiation. From wavelength resolved measurements of the absolute intensity of this radiation, cross sections for selective population of the excited (n,l-) states of the ion were determined. In addition, for some systems the total capture cross section was measured directly by means of charge state analysis of the secondary projectile ions. The role of charge exchange processes in fusion plasmas and in astrophysical plasmas is indicated. An experimental set-up is described with emphasis on the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source that was used in the experiments. Results for collisions of C 6+ , N 6+ , O 6+ and Ne 6+ with He, H 2 and Ar are presented as well as for electron capture from Li atoms by C 4+ and He 2+ . The interaction of the iso-electronic sequence C 4+ , N 5+ , O 6+ with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen and helium is studied. First results for partial and total cross sections in collisions of fully stripped carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ions with atomic hydrogen are presented. These data are of particular importance for applications in fusion diagnostics. The data indicate that calculations of both molecular and atomic orbital type yield correct results, if an extended basis set is used. (Auth.)

  20. Transition and Electron Impact Excitation Collision Rates for O III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2017-12-01

    Transition probabilities, electron excitation collision strengths, and rate coefficients for a large number of O III lines over a broad wavelength range, from the infrared to ultraviolet, have been reported. The collision strengths have been calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method in combination with B-spline expansions is employed for an accurate representation of the target wave functions. The close-coupling expansion contains 202 O2+ fine-structure levels of the 2{s}22{p}2,2s2{p}3, 2{p}4,2{s}22p3s,3p,3d, 4s,4p,4d,4f,5s, and 2s2{p}33s,3p,3d configurations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging electron excitation collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities at electron temperatures ranging from 100 to 100,000 K. The calculated effective collision strengths have been reported for the 20,302 transitions between all 202 fine-structure levels. There is an overall good agreement with the recent R-matrix calculations by Storey et al. for the transitions between all levels of the ground 2{s}22{p}2 configuration, but significant discrepancies have been found with Palay et al. for transitions to the 2{s}22{p}2 1 S 0 level. Line intensity ratios between the optical lines arising from the 2{s}22{p}2{}3{P}{0,1,2} - 1 D 2 transitions have been compared with other calculations and observations from the photoionized gaseous nebulae, and good agreement is found. The present calculations provide the most complete and accurate data sets, which should allow a more detailed treatment of the available measured spectra from different ground and space observatories.

  1. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG [or quantum wire(s for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES and the inelastic light scattering (ILS from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of

  2. Wave excitation in electron beam experiment on Japanese satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reports on a beam-plasma interaction experiment conducted in the magnetosphere by emitting an electron beam (100-200 eV, 0.25-1.0 mA) from the JIKIKEN satellite. Topics considered include instrumentation, wave excitation, and the charging of the satellite. Various types of wave emission are detected by low frequency and high frequency wave detectors. Waves near upper-hybrid frequency and at electron cyclotron frequency are detected in a low L-value region, which will be useful diagnostic means for plasma density and magnetic field. Vehicle charging up to the beam energy is observed outside the plasmapause. The main objectives of the Controlled Beam Experiment (CBE) are to control the satellite potential by an electron beam emission, and to study the wave excitation (linear and non-linear wave phenomena due to the beam-plasma interaction). It is concluded that waves excited in the beamplasma interaction are strongly dependent on plasma and other parameters in the magnetosphere so that it will provide important knowledge of the magnetosphere plasma processes

  3. Emission properties of Ga2O3 nano-flakes: effect of excitation density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozina, G; Forsberg, M; Kaliteevski, M A; Hemmingsson, C

    2017-02-08

    In the quest of developing high performance electronic and optical devices and more cost effective fabrication processes of monoclinic β-Ga 2 O 3 , new growth techniques and fundamental electronic and optical properties of defects have to be explored. By heating of dissolved metallic Ga in HCl in a NH 3 and N 2 atmosphere, nano-flake films of monoclinic β-phase Ga 2 O 3 were grown as confirmed by XRD. From optical measurements, we observe two strong emissions. A red band peaking at ~2.0 eV and a UV band at ~3.8 eV. The band at ~2.0 eV is attributed to donor-acceptor pair recombination where the donor and acceptor level is suggested to be related to V O and nitrogen, respectively. By studying the dependence of the intensity of the UV band at 3.8 eV versus excitation density, a model is suggested. In the model, it is assumed that local potential fluctuations forming minima (maxima), where the carriers would be localized with a summarized band offset for conduction and valence band of 1 eV. The origin of the fluctuations is tentatively suggested to be related to micro-inclusions of different phases in the film.

  4. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ratnavelu, K. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  5. Analysis of Data on the Cross Sections for Electron-Impact Ionization and Excitation of Electronic States of Atomic Hydrogen (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhatov, V. A.; Lebedev, Yu. A.

    2018-01-01

    A review is given of experimental and theoretical data on the cross sections for ionization, excitation, and deexcitation of atomic hydrogen. The set of the cross sections required to calculate the electron energy distribution function and find the level-to-level rate coefficients needed to solve balance equations for the densities of neutral and charged particles in hydrogen plasma is determined.

  6. Electron-impact excitation of the In+ ion resonance line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomonai, A.; OvcharenkO, E.; Imre, A.; Hutych, Yu.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Study of the electron-impact excitation of the In + ion is important not only for atomic structure research, but also for applications to astrophysics, analytical techniques and fusion research, as well as for new applications of this ion such as a component of solid state laser media and as a source for an optical frequency standart. The energy dependence of the electron-impact excitation of the In + ion resonance line was studied by spectroscopic method using the crossed-beam technique in the energy range from the threshold up to 300 eV for the following process: e + In + (4d 10 5s 2 ) 1 S 0 e' + In + (4d 10 5s5p) 1 P 0 1 e' + In + (4d 10 5s 2 ) 1 S 0 +h (1) Process (1) includes the direct electron-impact excitation of the 5s5p 1 P 0 1 state from the ground 5s 2 1 S 0 state, as well as the contribution of the cascade transitions and resonance processes: In + (4d 10 5s nln 1 l 1 , 4d 10 5p 2 nl, 4d 9 5s 2 nln 1 l 1 ) In + (4d 10 5s 2 ) 1 S 0 + e' (2) The peculiarity of this investigation is the presence of low lying metastable states and high temperature (T1250K) of atomic vapour. The ions produced in the ion source on the heated tantalum surface were extracted, focused and accelerated by a system of ion optical lenses into a beam (E i = 700eV, I i (11.4)10 -6 A), separated from neutral atoms by means of a 90 deg electrostatic selector and crossed at the right angle by the ribbon electron beam (E e = (7300)eV, Ie = (610)10 -5 A, 0 1/2 (0.40.5)eV) in the collision region (at P 10 -8 Torr) [1]. Radiation observed at 90 deg with respect to the beam intersection plane was spectrally separated by a 70 deg vacuum monochromator (d/dl = 1.7nm/mm) based on the Seya- Namioka scheme and detected by a photomultiplier. The measurements and experimental data processing were realised by means of a PC. The drop of the energy dependence of the excitation cross section obey the E -1 lnE rule specific for the optically allow transitions. A distinct structure in the energy

  7. Development of neutral beam source using electron beam excited plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Hara, Tamio

    2011-01-01

    A low-energy neutral beam (NB) source, which consists of an electron-beam-excited plasma (EBEP) source and two carbon electrodes, has been developed for damageless etching of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) devices. It has been confirmed that the Ar ion beam energy was controlled by the acceleration voltage and the beam profile had good uniformity over the diameter of 80 mm. Dry etching of a Si wafer at the floating potential has been carried out by Ar NB. Si sputtering yield by an Ar NB clearly depends on the acceleration voltage. This result shows that the NB has been generated through the charge exchange reaction from the ion beam in the process chamber. (author)

  8. Collisionally excited few-electron systems: theoretical introduction and survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, A.L.; Reading, J.F.; Becker, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    We consider excitation, ionization, and charge transfer in collisions of protons (and antiprotons) with the single-electron targets H, He + , and Li 2+ . These collisions are first compared to other types of ion-atom collisions. A brief review of our own theoretical method is given; in particular we describe how we allow for both large charge transfer and ionization probabilities while retaining the computational efficiency that allows us to consider a variety of collision partners and collision energies. We comment on the comparison of our results to other theoretical work and to experiment. The qualitative features of the various inelastic cross sections are discussed, in particular how they scale with collision energy, target nuclear charge, and the sign of the projectile charge. 15 references, 6 figures

  9. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  10. An experimental and theoretical investigation into the excited electronic states of phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B.; Chiari, L. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); and others

    2014-08-21

    We present experimental electron-energy loss spectra (EELS) that were measured at impact energies of 20 and 30 eV and at angles of 90° and 10°, respectively, with energy resolution ∼70 meV. EELS for 250 eV incident electron energy over a range of angles between 3° and 50° have also been measured at a moderate energy resolution (∼0.9 eV). The latter spectra were used to derive differential cross sections and generalised oscillator strengths (GOS) for the dipole-allowed electronic transitions, through normalization to data for elastic electron scattering from benzene. Theoretical calculations were performed using time-dependent density functional theory and single-excitation configuration interaction methods. These calculations were used to assign the experimentally measured spectra. Calculated optical oscillator strengths were also compared to those derived from the GOS data. This provides the first investigation of all singlet and triplet excited electronic states of phenol up to the first ionization potential.

  11. Density and field effect on electron-ion collision cross-sections in hot dense plasma; Etude de l'influence de l'environnement plasma sur les sections efficaces d'excitation collisionnelle electron-ion dans un plasma chaud et dense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2003-03-15

    Collisional excitation cross-sections are essential for the modeling of the properties of non equilibrium plasmas. There has been a lot of work on electron impact excitation of isolated ions, but in dense plasmas, neighboring particles are expected to widely disturb these electron transitions in atoms. Plasma modeling through a radially perturbed potential has already been done but is not satisfactory as it does not account for levels degeneracy breaking and its consequences. Introduction of a quasistatic electric micro-field of neighboring ions allows us to break spherical symmetry. Our original theoretical study has given birth to a numerical code that accurately computes collisional strengths and rates (in the Distorted Waves approach) in atoms submitted to a realistic micro-field. Hydrogen- and helium-like aluminium is studied. Stark mixing widely increases rates of transitions from high l levels and forbidden transitions are field-enhanced by many orders of magnitude until they reach allowed ones. Eventually, we conduct an elementary stationary collisional radiative study to investigate field-enhancement effects on corresponding line shapes. In cases we study (aluminium, hydrogen- and helium-like) we find a relatively weak increase of K-shell line broadening.

  12. Electron-tunneling observation of localized excited states in superconducting manganese-doped lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, J.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    We have made electron-tunneling measurements on a dilute, superconducting lead-manganese alloy. A well-defined structure was observed in the ac-conductance--voltage curves, indicating excited states within the BCS energy gap. These states were partially accounted for by Shiba theory when spin-dependent s-, p-, and d-wave scattering were included. The phase shifts used in doing that were the results of band calculations. The experimental data also show the existence of a broad background density of states in the energy gap, which cannot be accounted for by the theory

  13. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D'’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    —In a series of systematic optical pump - terahertz probe experiments we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in a large range of carrier densities. The electron scattering time decreases by as much as a factor of 4, from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density...

  14. Laser excitation of 8-eV electronic states in Th{sup +}. A first pillar of the electronic bridge toward excitation of the Th-229 nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Sancho, Oscar-Andrey

    2012-11-23

    The possibility to realize a nuclear clock based on the optical magnetic dipole transition from the ground state to the low-energy isomeric state in the {sup 229}Th nucleus has motivated experiments and proposals toward highly accurate clocks with trapped ions and highly stable optical frequency standards with Th-doped solids. These systems hold great promise to open a field of research in the borderland between atomic and nuclear physics, which will enable highly sensitive tests of postulates from fundamental physics and also will allow us to coherently excite and control nuclear states, opening a wonderful and intriguing new field in physics. A major experimental obstacle that has to be overcome before any precision spectroscopy can be performed with this system is however the insufficient knowledge on the exact transition energy. The best experimental result so far is an indirect determination from {gamma}-spectroscopy with a relative uncertainty of about 6%. To facilitate the search for the nuclear transition within a wide uncertainty range around 8 eV, we investigate two-photon excitation in the dense electronic level structure of Th{sup +}, which enables the nuclear excitation via a resonantly enhanced inverse electronic bridge process. Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of buffer gas cooled {sup 232}Th{sup +} ions in a radio-frequency ion trap are reported in this thesis. The strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the (6d{sup 2}7s)J=3/2 ground state to the (6d7s7p)J=5/2 state is driven as the first excitation step. Using nanosecond laser pulses in the 250-nm wavelength range for the second step of a two-photon excitation, we have observed seven previously unknown levels in the unexplored region of the electronic level structure around 8 eV. This investigation shows that the Th{sup +} ion seems to be well suited for the search of the isomer transition because both, theory and experimental results, agree on the density of strong transitions

  15. Alpha particle emission as a probe of the level density in highly excited A∼200 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, D.; Fioretto, E.; Viesti, G.; Cinausero, M.; Gelli, N.; Hagel, K.; Lucarelli, F.; Natowitz, J.B.; Nebbia, G.; Prete, G.; Wada, R.

    1994-01-01

    The alpha particle emission from 90 to 140 MeV 19 F+ 181 Ta fusion-evaporation reactions has been studied. The comparisons of the experimental spectral shapes and multiplicities with statistical model predictions indicate a need to use an excitation energy dependent level-density parameter a=A/K in which K increases with excitation energy. This increase is more rapid than that in lower mass nuclei. The effect of this change in level density on the prescission multiplicities in fission is significant

  16. Energy principle for excitations in plasmas with counterstreaming electron flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2018-05-01

    A relativistic electron beam propagating through plasma induces a return electron current in the system. Such a system of interpenetrating forward and return electron current is susceptible to a host of instabilities. The physics of such instabilities underlies the conversion of the flow kinetic energy to the electromagnetic field energy. Keeping this in view, an energy principle analysis has been enunciated in this paper. Such analyses have been widely utilized earlier in the context of conducting fluids described by MHD model [I. B. Bernstein et al., Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences 244(1236), 17-40 (1958)]. Lately, such an approach has been employed for the electrostatic two stream instability for the electron beam plasma system [C. N. Lashmore-Davies, Physics of Plasmas 14(9), 092101 (2007)]. In contrast, it has been shown here that even purely growing mode like Weibel/current filamentation instability for the electron beam plasma system is amenable to such a treatment. The treatment provides an understanding of the energetics associated with the growing mode. The growth rate expression has also been obtained from it. Furthermore, it has been conclusively demonstrated in this paper that for identical values of S4=∑αn0 αv0α 2/n0γ0 α, the growth rate is higher when the counterstreaming beams are symmetric (i.e. S3 = ∑αn0αv 0α/n0γ0α = 0) compared to the case when the two beams are asymmetric (i.e. when S3 is finite). Here, v 0α, n0α and γ0α are the equilibrium velocity, electron density and the relativistic factor for the electron species `α' respectively and n0 = ∑αn0α is the total electron density. Particle - In - Cell simulations have been employed to show that the saturated amplitude of the field energy is also higher in the symmetric case.

  17. Excitation density dependence of the photoluminescence from Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonheim, C R; Selvig, E; Nicolas, S; Breivik, M; Haakenaasen, R [Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, PO Box 25, N-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Gunnaes, A E [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Boks 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: celin.tonheim@ffi.no

    2008-03-15

    A study of the photoluminescence from a four-period Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te multiple quantum well structure at 11 K as a function of excitation density is presented. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the quantum well structure is of high quality. This was supported by the narrow photoluminescence peak originating in the ground state electron - heavy hole transition, with a full width at half maximum of only 7.4 meV for an excitation density of 1.3 W/cm{sup 2}. When the excitation density was increased from 1.3 to 23.4 W/cm{sup 2}, the peak position was shifted toward higher energy by 2.6 meV and the full width at half maximum increased from 7.4 to 10.9 meV.

  18. Electron excitation cross sections for some Ar I 5d (J = 2) levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Sanchez, J.A.; Campos, J.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute excitation cross sections by electron impact for some 5d levels with J = 2 of Ar I have been measured by the optical method. Excitation functions for electron energies in the range from the excitation threshold to 1000 eV are also reported. A delayed coincidence analysis of the de-excitation at 100 eV electron energy allowed for the subtraction of radiative cascades. The resulting excitation cross sections are between 7.3 and 12x10 -20 cm 2 . (author)

  19. Experimental study on the kinetically induced electronic excitation in atomic collisional cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, S.

    2006-01-01

    the present thesis deals with the ion-collision-induced electronic excitation of metallic solids. For this for the first time metal-insulator-metal layer systems are used for the detection of this electronic excitation. The here applied aluminium/aluminium oxide/silver layer sytems have barrier heights of 2.4 eV on the aluminium respectively 3.3 eV on the silver side. With the results it could uniquely be shown that the electronic excitation is generated by kinetic processes, this excitation dependenc on the kinetic energy of the colliding particles, and the excitation dependes on the charge state of the projectile

  20. A low-cost approach to electronic excitation energies based on the driven similarity renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenyang; Verma, Prakash; Hannon, Kevin P.; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2017-08-01

    We propose an economical state-specific approach to evaluate electronic excitation energies based on the driven similarity renormalization group truncated to second order (DSRG-PT2). Starting from a closed-shell Hartree-Fock wave function, a model space is constructed that includes all single or single and double excitations within a given set of active orbitals. The resulting VCIS-DSRG-PT2 and VCISD-DSRG-PT2 methods are introduced and benchmarked on a set of 28 organic molecules [M. Schreiber et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 134110 (2008)]. Taking CC3 results as reference values, mean absolute deviations of 0.32 and 0.22 eV are observed for VCIS-DSRG-PT2 and VCISD-DSRG-PT2 excitation energies, respectively. Overall, VCIS-DSRG-PT2 yields results with accuracy comparable to those from time-dependent density functional theory using the B3LYP functional, while VCISD-DSRG-PT2 gives excitation energies comparable to those from equation-of-motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles.

  1. Electron excitation coefficients of neutral and ionic levels of krypton in Townsend discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malovic, G.N.; Strinic, A.I.; Petrovic, Z.Lj.; Sadeghi, N.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present experimental results for excitation coefficients of krypton atoms to several Kr and Kr + excited levels for E/N (electric field to gas particle number density ratio usually in units of Townsend, 1 Td = 10 -21 V m 2 ) values from 7 x 10 -20 V m 2 to above 1 x 10 -17 V m 2 . The data have been obtained in two different parallel plate self-sustained Townsend discharge drift tubes. The spatial distribution of the emission intensities were recorded and then normalized to give excitation coefficients at the anode, by using the electron flux at this point. The values of these coefficients are placed on an absolute scale by using a standard tungsten ribbon lamp calibrated against a primary blackbody radiation standard. The ionization rates at different E/N are obtained from the spatial emission profiles. The data for atomic krypton levels 2p 2 , 2p 3 , 2p 5 , 2p 6 , 2p 7 , 2p 8 , 3p 5 and 3p 6 (in Paschen notation) were converted to excitation coefficients by using quenching coefficients from the literature. The emission coefficients of eight 4s 2 4p 4 ( 3 P)5p levels of Kr + have also been measured for E/N values from about 1 x 10 -18 V m 2 up to nearly 8 x 10 -18 V m 2

  2. Linear-algebraic approach to electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1983-01-01

    A linear-algebraic method, based on an integral equations formulation, is applied to the excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact. Various schemes are devised for treating the one-electron terms that sometimes cause instabilities when directly incorporated into the solution matrix. These include introducing Lagrange undetermined multipliers and correlation terms. Good agreement between the method and other computational techniques is obtained for electron scattering for hydrogenic and Li-like atomic ions and for H 2 + in two- to five-state close-coupling calculations

  3. Bosonic excitations and electron pairing in an electron-doped cuprate superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M. C.; Yu, H. S.; Xiong, J.; Yang, Y.-F.; Luo, S. N.; Jin, K.; Qi, J.

    2018-04-01

    By applying ultrafast optical spectroscopy to electron-doped La1.9Ce0.1CuO4 ±δ , we discern a bosonic mode of electronic origin and provide the evolution of its coupling with the charge carriers as a function of temperature. Our results show that it has the strongest coupling strength near Tc and can fully account for the superconducting pairing. This mode can be associated with the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic spin correlations emerging below a critical temperature T† larger than Tc. Our work may help to establish a quantitative relation between bosonic excitations and superconducting pairing in electron-doped cuprates.

  4. Assessment of time-dependent density functional theory with the restricted excitation space approximation for excited state calculations of large systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; George, Michael W.; Besley, Nicholas A.

    2018-06-01

    The restricted excitation subspace approximation is explored as a basis to reduce the memory storage required in linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is shown that excluding the core orbitals and up to 70% of the virtual orbitals in the construction of the excitation subspace does not result in significant changes in computed UV/vis spectra for large molecules. The reduced size of the excitation subspace greatly reduces the size of the subspace vectors that need to be stored when using the Davidson procedure to determine the eigenvalues of the TDDFT equations. Furthermore, additional screening of the two-electron integrals in combination with a reduction in the size of the numerical integration grid used in the TDDFT calculation leads to significant computational savings. The use of these approximations represents a simple approach to extend TDDFT to the study of large systems and make the calculations increasingly tractable using modest computing resources.

  5. Imaginary time density-density correlations for two-dimensional electron gases at high density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, M.; Galli, D. E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Moroni, S. [IOM-CNR DEMOCRITOS National Simulation Center and SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Vitali, E. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8795 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We evaluate imaginary time density-density correlation functions for two-dimensional homogeneous electron gases of up to 42 particles in the continuum using the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method. We use periodic boundary conditions and up to 300 plane waves as basis set elements. We show that such methodology, once equipped with suitable numerical stabilization techniques necessary to deal with exponentials, products, and inversions of large matrices, gives access to the calculation of imaginary time correlation functions for medium-sized systems. We discuss the numerical stabilization techniques and the computational complexity of the methodology and we present the limitations related to the size of the systems on a quantitative basis. We perform the inverse Laplace transform of the obtained density-density correlation functions, assessing the ability of the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method to evaluate dynamical properties of medium-sized homogeneous fermion systems.

  6. Electric dipole excitation of {sup 208}Pb by polarized electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D.H. [University of Munich, Mathematics Institute, Munich (Germany); Ponomarev, V.Yu. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The cross sections and spin asymmetries for the excitation of 1{sup -} states in {sup 208}Pb by transversely polarized electrons with collision energy of 30-180MeV have been examined within the DWBA scattering formalism. As examples, we have considered a low-lying 1{sup -} state and also states belonging to the pygmy dipole and giant dipole resonances. The structure of these states and their corresponding transition charge and current densities have been taken from an RPA calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. The complex-plane rotation method has been applied to achieve the convergence of the radial DWBA integrals for backward scattering. We have studied the behaviour of the cross sections and spin asymmetries as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The role of the longitudinal and transversal contributions to the excitation has been thoroughly studied. We conclude that the spin asymmetry S, related to unpolarized outgoing electrons, is mostly well below 1% even at the backward scattering angles and its measurement provides a challenge for future experiments with polarized electrons. (orig.)

  7. Electronic band structure in porous silicon studied by photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki-Won; Kim, Young-You

    2004-01-01

    In this research, we used photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) to visualize the electronic band structure in porous silicon (PS). From the combined results of the PLE measurements at various PL emission energies and the PL measurements under excitation at various PLE absorption energies, we infer that three different electronic band structures, originating from different luminescent origins, give rise to the PL spectrum. Through either thermal activation or diffusive transfer, excited carriers are moved to each of the electronic band structures.

  8. Equation satisfied by electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional satisfies an equation that links functionals and functional derivatives at N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities for densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential for the N-electron system.

  9. Interaction effects in liquids with low electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses two complementary classes of systems in which strong electron-electron or electron-ion interactions appear at low electron densities. The first are the expanded liquid alkali metals (cesium) in which electron correlation effects have a profound effect on the magnetic properties on the metallic side of the metal-nonmetal transition. The second group are molten alkali halides containing low densities of localized electrons introduced, say, by dissolution of small amounts of excess metal. (Auth.)

  10. Radial electron beam laser excitation: the REBLE report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1978-10-01

    The results of an investigation of techniques to generate high-power radially converging electron beams and the application of these beams to gas lasers is discussed. The design and performance of the REBLE accelerator that was developed for this program is presented. Reliable operation of the radial diode has been obtained at levels up to 1 MV, 200 kA, and 20 ns. It has been demonstrated that the anode current density can be made uniform to better than 15% over 1000 cm 2 areas with 100 to 250 A/cm 2 intensities. The measured total and spatially resolved energy deposition of this radial electron beam in various gases is compared with Monte Carlo calculations. In most cases, these codes give an accurate description of the beam transport and energy deposition. With the electron beam pumping xenon gas, the amplitude of xenon excimer radiation (1720 A 0 ) was radially uniform to within the experimental uncertainty. The efficiency of converting deposited electron beam energy to xenon excimer radiation was 20%

  11. Fingerprint-based structure retrieval using electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuangye; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2011-03-01

    We present a computational approach that can quickly search a large protein structural database to identify structures that fit a given electron density, such as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. We use geometric invariants (fingerprints) constructed using 3D Zernike moments to describe the electron density, and reduce the problem of fitting of the structure to the electron density to simple fingerprint comparison. Using this approach, we are able to screen the entire Protein Data Bank and identify structures that fit two experimental electron densities determined by cryo-electron microscopy. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Electron-impact-excitation cross sections of hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, V.I.; Ralchenko, Y.V.; Bernshtam, V.A.; Goldgirsh, A.; Maron, Y.; Vainshtein, L.A.; Bray, I.; Golten, H.

    1997-01-01

    Convergent close-coupling (CCC) and Coulomb-Born with exchange and normalization (CBE) methods are used to study electron-impact excitation of hydrogenlike ions. The nl→n ' l ' cross sections demonstrate (i) good agreement between the CCC and CBE results, (ii) a scaling over ion nuclear charge z, (iii) a domination of the dipole (l ' =l±1) contributions in total n→n ' cross sections, and (iv) significant effect of electron exchange in the energy range x n,n ' ). For ions with z>5 the n→n ' cross sections obtained in the CCC and CBE approximations agree with each other to better than 10% for any x. An accuracy of the cross sections scaling over z 4 depends on z: for z=6 endash 18 the scaling is accurate to better than 10% (quantitative analysis is done for n ' 4 scaling more significantly (at x about unity). The n→n ' cross sections are presented by a formula which fits our CCC and CBE results with an accuracy to better than 10% (for transitions with n ' 5). The new Gaunt factor G(x) suggested for the widely used Van Regemorter formula [Astrophys. J. 136, 906 (1962)] makes this formula accurate to better than 50% in the x>3 range and to better than 20% in the x>100 range. It is shown that the semiempirical formula by Vainshtein, Sobelman, and Yukov provides an accuracy to better than 50% for any incident electron energy. For x<2 this formula is accurate to better than 30%. These accuracy assessments are based on a comparison with our CCC and CBE results. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. New Theoretical Developments in Exploring Electronically Excited States: Including Localized Configuration Interaction Singles and Application to Large Helium Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closser, Kristina Danielle

    This thesis presents new developments in excited state electronic structure theory. Contrasted with the ground state, the electronically excited states of atoms and molecules often are unstable and have short lifetimes, exhibit a greater diversity of character and are generally less well understood. The very unusual excited states of helium clusters motivated much of this work. These clusters consist of large numbers of atoms (experimentally 103--109 atoms) and bands of nearly degenerate excited states. For an isolated atom the lowest energy excitation energies are from 1s → 2s and 1s → 2 p transitions, and in clusters describing the lowest energy band minimally requires four states per atom. In the ground state the clusters are weakly bound by van der Waals interactions, however in the excited state they can form well-defined covalent bonds. The computational cost of quantum chemical calculations rapidly becomes prohibitive as the size of the systems increase. Standard excited-state methods such as configuration interaction singles (CIS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) can be used with ≈100 atoms, and are optimized to treat only a few states. Thus, one of our primary aims is to develop a method which can treat these large systems with large numbers of nearly degenerate excited states. Additionally, excited states are generally formed far from their equilibrium structures. Vertical excitations from the ground state induce dynamics in the excited states. Thus, another focus of this work is to explore the results of these forces and the fate of the excited states. Very little was known about helium cluster excited states when this work began, thus we first investigated the excitations in small helium clusters consisting of 7 or 25 atoms using CIS. The character of these excited states was determined using attachment/detachment density analysis and we found that in the n = 2 manifold the excitations could generally be interpreted as

  14. Final Technical Report [Scalable methods for electronic excitations and optical responses of nanostructures: mathematics to algorithms to observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-03-19

    The master project under which this work is funded had as its main objective to develop computational methods for modeling electronic excited-state and optical properties of various nanostructures. The specific goals of the computer science group were primarily to develop effective numerical algorithms in Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT). There were essentially four distinct stated objectives. The first objective was to study and develop effective numerical algorithms for solving large eigenvalue problems such as those that arise in Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. The second objective was to explore so-called linear scaling methods or Methods that avoid diagonalization. The third was to develop effective approaches for Time-Dependent DFT (TDDFT). Our fourth and final objective was to examine effective solution strategies for other problems in electronic excitations, such as the GW/Bethe-Salpeter method, and quantum transport problems.

  15. Spectral density of oscillator with bilinear stiffness and white noise excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rüdinger, Finn; Krenk, Steen

    2003-01-01

    The power spectral density of an oscillator with bilinear stiffness excited by Gaussian white noise is considered. A method originally proposed by Krenk and Roberts [J Appl Mech 66 (1999) 225] relying on slowly changing energy for lightly damped systems is applied. In this method an approximate...

  16. Excitation and ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches for very rapid calculation of atomic data for high temperature plasma modeling have been developed. The first uses hydrogenic basis states and has been developed and applied in many papers discussed in previous progress reports. Hence, it is only briefly discussed here. The second is a very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic approach that has been developed over the past two or three years. It is described in more detail. Recently it has been applied to large scale production of atomic data. Specifically, it has been used to calculate relativistic distorted wave collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the following: all transitions from the ground level to the n=3 and 4 excited levels in the 71 Neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 22 ≤ Z ≤ 92; all transitions among the 2s 1/2 , 2p 1/2 and 2p 3/2 levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=3,4 and 5 in the 85 Li-like ions with 8 ≤ Z ≤ 92; all transitions among the 3s 1/2 , 3p 3/2 , 3d 3/2 and 3d 5/2 levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=4 and 5 in the 71 Na-like ions with 22 ≤ Z ≤ 92; and all transitions among 4s 1/2 , 4p 1/2 , 4p 3/2 , 4d 3/2 , 4d 5/2 , 4f 5/2 and 4f 7/2 levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=5 in the 33 Cu-like ions with 60 ≤ Z ≤ 92. Also the program has been extended to give cross-sections for excitation to specific magnetic sublevels of the target ion by an electron beam and very recently it has been extended to give relativistic distorted wave cross sections for ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact

  17. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chodash, Perry Adam [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated con icting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of 235U. If NEET of 235U were to occur, 235mU would be created. 235mU decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of 235mU and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of 235U was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. In addition, explanations for the con icting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of 235U, it is likely that NEET of 235U has never been observed.

  18. Excited-atom production by electron and ion bombardment of alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkup, R.E.; Avouris, P.; Ghosh, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    We present experimental results on the production of excited atoms by electron and ion bombardment of alkali halides. For the case of electron bombardment, Doppler shift measurements show that the electronically excited atoms have a thermal velocity distribution in equilibrium with the surface temperature. Measurements of the absolute yield of excited atoms, the distribution of population among the excited states, and the systematic dependence on incident electron current and sample temperature support a model in which the excited atoms are produced by gas-phase collisions between desorbed ground-state atoms and secondary electrons. In contrast, for the case of ion bombardment, the excited atoms are directly sputtered from the surface, with velocity distributions characteristic of a collision cascade, and with typical energies of --10 eV

  19. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; do N. Varella, M. T.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C5H4O2). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C5H4O2. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20-40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ˜80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6-50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  20. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.

    2016-01-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C 5 H 4 O 2 ). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C 5 H 4 O 2 . The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6–50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  1. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Neves, R. F. C. [Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Câmpus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036-900 (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036-900 (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo 09210-580 (Brazil); Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-859 (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, Curitiba, Paraná 81531-990 (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P., E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-859 (Brazil); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2016-03-28

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C{sub 5}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6–50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  2. Electrons of high perpendicular energy in the low-density regime of Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornatici, M.; Engelmann, F.

    1978-01-01

    Effects due to instabilities excited in the low-density regime of tokamaks by runaway electrons via the cyclotron resonance ω+Ω=kV along with the formation of a positive slope in the runaway distribution are considered. Conditions for the production of electrons of high perpendicular energy and their trapping in toroidal field ripples, leading to liner damage, are discussed and found to be rather stringent. Fairly good agreement with the experiments is found

  3. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  4. submitter Measurement of LYSO Intrinsic Light Yield Using Electron Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez Turtos, Rosana; Pizzichemi, Marco; Ghezzi, Alessio; Pauwels, Kristof; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Paganoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the intrinsic light yield $(LY_{int})$ of scintillating crystals, i.e. number of optical photons created per amount of energy deposited, constitutes a key factor in order to characterize and optimize their energy and time resolution. However, until now measurements of this quantity are affected by large uncertainties and often rely on corrections for bulk absorption and surface/edge state. The novel idea presented in this contribution is based on the confinement of the scintillation emission in the central upper part of a 10 mm cubic crystal using a 1.5 MeV electron beam with diameter of 1 mm. A black non-reflective pinhole aligned with the excitation point is used to fix the light extraction solid angle (narrower than total reflection angle), which then sets a light cone travel path through the crystal. The final number of photoelectrons detected using a Hamamatsu R2059 photomultiplier tube (PMT) was corrected for the extraction solid angle, the Fresnel reflection coefficient and quantum...

  5. Resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitation of Cu-like gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, J.; Li, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-09-01

    Employing the independent-process and isolated-resonance approximations using distorted-waves (IPIRDW), we have performed a series of calculations of the resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitations (EIE) among 27 singly excited levels from the n ≤ 6 configurations of Cu-like gold (Au, Z = 79). Resonance excitation (RE) contributions from both the n = 4 → 4 - 7 and n = 3 → 4 core excitations have been considered. Our results demonstrate that RE contributions are significant and enhance the effective collision strengths (ϒ) of certain excitations by up to an order of magnitude at low temperature (106.1 K), and are still important at relatively high temperature (107.5 K). Results from test calculations of the resonance-enhanced EIE processes among 16 levels from the n ≤ 5 configurations using both the Dirac R-matrix (DRM) and IPIRDW approaches agree very well with each other. This means that the close-coupling effects are not important for this ion, and thus warrants the reliability of present resonance-enhanced EIE data among the 27 levels. The results from the collisional-radiative model (CRM) show that, at 3000 eV, near where Cu-like Au is most abundant, RE contributions have important effects (up to 25%) on the density diagnostic line intensity ratios, which are sensitive near 1020 cm-3. The present work is the first EIE research including RE contributions for Cu-like Au. Our EIE data are more accurate than previous results due to our consideration of RE contributions, and the data should be helpful for modeling and diagnosing a variety of plasmas.

  6. Differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); and others

    2015-03-14

    We report results from a joint theoretical and experimental investigation into electron scattering from the important organic species phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 15–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10{sup ∘} and 90{sup ∘}. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potentials calculations, with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were conducted at the static exchange plus polarisation (SEP)-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOBSCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was typically fair, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOBSCI.

  7. A technique for the measurement of electron attachment to short-lived excited species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Bitouni, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of electron attachment to short-lived (approx-lt 10 -9 s) excited species. Preliminary results are presented for photoenhanced electron attachment to short-lived electronically-excited states of triethylamine molecules produced by laser two-photon excitation. The attachment cross sections for these excited states are estimated to be >10 -11 cm 2 and are ∼10 7 larger compared to those for the unexcited (ground-state) molecules. 8 refs., 4 figs

  8. Electron impact excitation of the lowest doublet and quartet core-excited autoionizing states in Rb atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovik, A; Roman, V; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K

    2013-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the (4p 5 5s 2 ) 2 P 3/2,1/2 and (4p 5 4d5s) 4 P 1/2,3/2,5/2 autoionizing states in rubidium atoms was studied experimentally by measuring the ejected-electron excitation functions and theoretically by employing a fully relativistic Dirac B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) model. The experimental data were collected in an impact energy range from the respective excitation thresholds up to 50 eV with an incident electron energy resolution of 0.2 eV and an observation angle of 54.7°. Absolute values of the excitation cross sections were obtained by normalizing to the theoretical predictions. The observed near-threshold resonance structures were also analysed by comparison with theory. For the 2 P 3/2,1/2 doublet states, a detailed analysis of the R-matrix results reveals that the most intense resonances are related to odd-parity negative-ion states with dominant configurations 4p 5 5s5p 2 and 4p 5 4d5s6s. The measured excitation functions for the 2 P 1/2 and 4 P J states indicate a noticeable cascade population due to the radiative decay from high-lying autoionizing states. A comparative analysis with similar data for other alkali atoms is also presented.

  9. Effect of vacuum polarization on the excitation of hydrogen atom by electron impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Bhattacharyya

    1981-01-01

    for 1S−2S excitation of the hydrogen atom by electron impact. The excitation amplitude calculated field theoretically is found to be lowered by 0.47t2/(t2+93 where t2=4|P−Q|2, P and Q being the momenta of the incident and scattered electrons respectively.

  10. Interferometer for electron density measurement in exploding wire plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Jigyasa; Jaiswar, Ashutosh; Kaushik, T.C.

    2016-12-01

    Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has been developed for measuring electron density profile in pulsed plasmas. MZI is to be used for characterizing exploding wire plasmas for correlating electron density dynamics with x-rays emission. Experiments have been carried out for probing electron density in pulsed plasmas produced in our laboratory like in spark gap and exploding wire plasmas. These are microsecond phenomenon. Changes in electron density have been registered in interferograms with the help of a streak camera for specific time window. Temporal electron density profiles have been calculated by analyzing temporal fringe shifts in interferograms. This report deals with details of MZI developed in our laboratory along with its theory. Basic introductory details have also been provided for exploding wire plasmas to be probed. Some demonstrative results of electron density measurements in pulsed plasmas of spark gap and single exploding wires have been described. (author)

  11. Anisotropy of electronic states excited in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boskamp, E.B.

    1983-01-01

    The author reports coincidence measurements made on the He + + Ne and He + + He systems. The complex population amplitudes for the magnetic sublevels of the investigated excited states, Ne(2p 4 3s 2 ) 1 D and He(2p 2 ) 1 D, were completely determined and possible excitation mechanisms are described. (Auth.)

  12. Electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of endohedral fullerene containing electron donoracceptor complexes utilized in organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerikheirabadi, Fatemeh

    Organic Donor-Acceptor complexes form the main component of the organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs). The open circuit voltage of OPVs is directly related to the charge transfer excited state energies of these complexes. Currently a large number of different molecular complexes are being tested for their efficiency in photovoltaic devices. In this work, density functional theory as implemented in the NRLMOL code is used to investigate the electronic structure and related properties of these donor-acceptor complexes. The charge transfer excitation energies are calculated using the perturbative delta self-consistent field method recently developed in our group as the standard time dependent density functional approaches fail to accurately provide them. The model photovoltaics systems analyzed are as follows: Sc3N C 80--ZnTPP, Y3 N C80-- ZnTPP and Sc3 N C80-- ZnPc. In addition, a thorough analysis of the isolated donor and acceptor molecules is also provided. The studied acceptors are chosen from a class of fullerenes named trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes. These molecules have shown to possess advantages as acceptors such as long lifetimes of the charge-separated states.

  13. Two-electron excitation in slow ion-atom collisions: Excitation mechanisms and interferences among autoionizing states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, M.; Rice Univ., Houston, TX

    1990-01-01

    The two-electron capture or excitation process resulting from collisions of H + and O 6+ ions with He atoms in the energy range from 0.5 keV/amu to 5 keV/amu is studied within a molecular representation. The collision dynamics for formation of doubly excited O 4+ ions and He** atoms and their (n ell, n'ell ') populations are analyzed in conjunction with electron correlations. Autoionizing states thus formed decay through the Auger process. An experimental study of an ejected electron energy spectrum shows ample structures in addition to two characteristic peaks that are identified by atomic and molecular autoionizations. These structures are attributable to various interferences among electronic states and trajectories. We examine the dominant sources of the interferences. 12 refs., 5 figs

  14. Excitation energy and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the excitation energy (E) dependence of nuclear level density for Bethe formula and constant temperature model. The level density parameter aa nd the back shifted energy from the Bethe formula are obtained by fitting the complete level schemes. Also the level density parameters from the constant temperature model have been determined for several nuclei. we have shown that the microscopic theory provides more precise information on the nuclear level densities. On the other hand, the spin cut-off parameter and effective moment of inertia are determined by studying of the angular momentum (J) dependence of the nuclear level density, and effective moment of inertia is compared with rigid body value.

  15. Excitation of the 4.3-μm bands of CO2 by low-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, R.R.; Phelps, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the excitation of the 4.3-μm bands of CO 2 by low-energy electrons in CO 2 have been measured using a drift-tube technique. The CO 2 density [(1.5 to 7) x 10 17 molecules/cm 3 ] was chosen to maximize the radiation reaching the detector. Line-by-line transmission calculations were used to take into account the absorption of 4.3-μm radiation. A small fraction of the approximately 10 -8 W of the 4.3-μm radiation produced by the approximately 10 -7 -A electron current was incident on an InSb photovoltaic detector. The detector calibration and absorption calculations were checked by measuring the readily calculated excitation coefficients for vibrational excitation of N 2 containing a small concentration of CO 2 . For pure CO 2 the number of molecules capable of emitting 4.3-μm radiation produced per cm of electron drift and per CO 2 molecule varied from 10 -17 cm -2 at E/N = 6 x 10 -17 V cm 2 to 5.4 x 10 -16 cm -2 at E/N = 4 x 10 -16 V cm 2 . Here E is the electric field and N is total gas density. The excitation coefficients at lower E/N are much larger than estimated previously. A set of vibrational excitation cross sections is obtained for CO 2 which is consistent with the excitation coefficient data and with most of the published electron-beam data

  16. Fast-electron-impact study on excitations of 4p, 4s, and 3d electrons of krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhensheng; Zhu Linfan; Liu Xiaojing; Li Wenbin; Cheng Huadong; Xu Kezun; Zhong Zhiping

    2002-01-01

    Absolute optical oscillator strength densities for the excitations of the electrons 4p, 4s, and 3d have been measured. Their absolute optical oscillator strengths have also been obtained. An enhancement above the 4p ionization threshold in the photoabsorption spectrum was assigned as a delayed maximum which arises from the photoionization process of 4p→εd according to present Dirac-Slater calculation. In the energy region of 4s autoionization, we have observed several features that are absent in previous fast-electron-impact work, but exist in optical measurements. We clarify this discrepancy here. Two Rydberg series of optically forbidden transitions, i.e., 4s -1 ns( 1 S) (n=5,6,7) and 4s -1 nd( 1 D) (n=4,5,6,7) have been observed when the spectrometer worked at conditions with larger momentum transfers, namely, K 2 =0.23 a.u. and 0.67 a.u. Furthermore, the absolute optical oscillator strengths for the 3d excitation have been obtained

  17. Ab initio study on electron excitation and electron transfer in tryptophan-tyrosine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jing; Li Xiangyuan

    2002-01-01

    In this article, ab initio calculation has been performed to evaluate the transition energy of electronic excitation in tryptophan and tyrosine by using semiempirical molecular orbital method AM1 and complete active space self-consistent field method. The solvent effect has been considered by means of the conductor-like screening model. After geometric optimizations of isolated tryptophan and tyrosine, and their corresponding radicals and cations, reaction heat of these electron transfer reactions have been obtained by the means of complete active space self-consistent field method. The transition energies from the ground state, respectively, to the lowest excited state and to the lowest triplet state of these two amino acids are also calculated and compared with the experimentally observed values. The ionization potential and electron affinity are also calculated for tryptophan and tyrosine employing Koopmans' theorem and ab initio calculation. Compared with the experimental measurements, the theoretical results are found satisfactory. Theoretical results give good explanations on the experimental phenomena that N 3 · can preferably oxide the side chain of tryptophan residue and then the electron transfer from tyrosine residue to tryptophan residue follows in peptides involving tryptophan and tyrosine

  18. Electron excitation cross sections of the 2p53s levels of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    The electron excitation cross sections of the four 2p 5 3s levels of neon are measured by means of a new technique using laser induced fluorescenc. The values of both the apparent and direct excitatiuon cross sections are given as a function of incident electron energy (0-100eV for 1s 3 and 1s 5 metastable levels and 0-300 eV for the 1s 2 and 1s 4 resonance levels). The metastable levels are triplet states and their cross sections are sharply peaked. At the peak, 30 eV, the measured values of the cross sections are 0.59 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 3 level and 3.2 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 5 level. The 1s 2 and 1s 4 levels are mixtures of singlet and triplet states, and the cross sections are broad and peak at 60 eV. The apparent cross sections at 60 eV are 13.5 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 2 level and 2.9 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 4 level. Measurement of the atomic number density of each of the 1s levels is performed using the pulsed laser induced fluorescence. The measured values of the number density and the excitation cross section are used to obtain the lifetime of each level. The measured value of the reciprocal of the 1s 3 and 1s 5 lifetime is 1 x 10 5 s -1 . The 1s 2 and 1s 4 levels are radiation trapped, and the reciprocals of their lifetimes are 4 x 10 5 s -1 and 3 x 10 5 s -1 respectively. The electron excitation cross sections of the magnetic sublevels of each 1s level are obtained by measuring the polarization of the laser induced fluorescence as a function of laser polarization. The excitation cross sections of each of the magnetic sublevels within a particular 1s level are equal within experimental uncertainty

  19. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  20. Preionization electron density measurement by collecting electric charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, G.; Letardi, T.

    1988-01-01

    A method using electron collection for preionization-electron number density measurements is presented. A cathode-potential drop model is used to describe the measurement principle. There is good agreement between the model and the experimental result

  1. Development and implementation of theoretical methods for the description of electronically core-excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Jan

    2016-03-23

    -cc-series, a mean error of -0.23% ±0.12% for core-excitation energies can be identified at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen K-edge excitations, whereas CVS-ADC(3) exhibits errors of 0.61% ± 0.32%. This is due to fortuitous error compensation of basis set truncation, electron correlation, orbital relaxation and neglect of relativistic effects at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level. Transition moments and spectral features, as well as static dipole moments, are excellently described with both CVS-ADC(2)-x and CVS-ADC(3). Especially the 6-311++G** basis set provides an excellent ratio of accuracy to computational time. Another important topic is the description of orbital relaxation effects. In the scope of this thesis, I show, how these effects are included indirectly within the CVS-ADC approaches. For this purpose, two different descriptors are used, i.e. electron promotion numbers and the amount of doubly excited amplitudes. Furthermore, with the help of detachment/attachment (D/A) densities, which can be constructed via the CVS-ISR approach, relaxation effects can be visualized. For this purpose, the (D/A) densities are compared with hole/electron (h/e) densities based on the transition density matrix. With this knowledge, the X-ray absorption spectra of medium-sized molecules and radicals from the fields of organic electronics and biology are investigated and analyzed. On the basis of these studies, the restricted and unrestricted versions of CVS-ADC(2)-x in combination with the 6-311++G** basis set exhibit mean errors of core-excitation energies around 0.1%, compared to experimental values. Additionally, core-excited state characters are analyzed with the help of state densities obtained via the CVS-ISR approach or the transition density matrix. To demonstrate the computational savings as a function of the size of the core space, several systems are investigated. CVS-ADC(3) calculations take about 8-10 times longer than CVS-ADC(2)-x calculations and since the

  2. Impulsive response of nonuniform density liquid in a laterally excited tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.; Chang, Y.W.

    1994-04-01

    A study on the impulsive component of the dynamic response of a liquid of nonuniform density in a tank undergoing lateral base excitations is presented. The system considered is a circular cylindrical tank containing an incompressible and inviscid liquid whose density increases with the liquid depth. The density distribution along the depth can be of any arbitrary continuous or discontinuous function. In the analysis, the liquid field is divided into n layers. The thickness of the liquid layers can be different, but the density of each liquid layer is considered to be uniform and is equal to the value of the original liquid density at the mid-height of that layer. The problem is solved by the eigenfunction expansion in conjunction with the transfer matrix technique. The effect of the nonuniform liquid density on the impulsive component of the dynamic response is illustrated in a numerical example in which the linear and cosine distributions of the liquid density are assumed. The response quantities examined include the impulsive pressure, base shear and moments. The results are presented in tabular and graphical forms. It is found that the impulsive pressure distribution along the tank wall is not sensitive to the detailed distribution function of the density, and the base shear and moments for the nonuniform liquid can be estimated by assuming an equivalent uniform liquid density that preserves the total liquid weight. The effect of tank flexibility is assessed by a simple approach in which the response quantities for flexible tanks are evaluated by simplified equations

  3. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  4. Electron-helium S-wave model benchmark calculations. II. Double ionization, single ionization with excitation, and double excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2010-02-01

    The propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method is extended to all four-body processes in electron impact on helium in an S-wave model. Total and energy-differential cross sections are presented with benchmark accuracy for double ionization, single ionization with excitation, and double excitation (to autoionizing states) for incident-electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. While the PECS three-body cross sections for this model given in the preceding article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022715 (2010)] are in good agreement with other methods, there are considerable discrepancies for these four-body processes. With this model we demonstrate the suitability of the PECS method for the complete solution of the electron-helium system.

  5. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  6. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jianwei; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Perdew, John P. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  7. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei; Perdew, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  8. Excitation dependence of resonance line self-broadening at different atomic densities

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hebin; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2009-01-01

    We study the dipole-dipole spectral broadening of a resonance line at high atomic densities when the self-broadening dominates. The selective reflection spectrum of a weak probe beam from the interface of the cell window and rubidium vapor are recorded in the presence of a far-detuned pump beam. The excitation due to the pump reduces the self-broadening. We found that the self-broadening reduction dependence on the pump power is atomic density independent. These results provide experimental e...

  9. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modele...... resonance and the lowering of the resonance energy due to an image charge effect. Finally we apply the TDDFT procedure to only consider the decay of molecular excitations and find that it agrees quite well with the width of the projected density of Kohn-Sham states....

  10. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-12-15

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Resonance effects in projectile-electron loss in relativistic collisions with excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A B

    2005-01-01

    The theory of electron loss from projectile-ions in relativistic ion-atom collisions is extended to the case of collisions with excited atoms. The main feature of such collisions is a resonance which can emerge between electron transitions in the ion and atom. The resonance becomes possible due to the Doppler effect and has a well-defined impact energy threshold. In the resonance case, the ion-atom interaction is transmitted by the radiation field and the range of this interaction becomes extremely long. Because of this the presence of other atoms in the target medium and the size of the space occupied by the medium have to be taken into account and it turns out that microscopic loss cross sections may be strongly dependent on such macroscopic parameters as the target density, temperature and size. We consider both the total and differential loss cross sections and show that the resonance can have a strong impact on the angular and energy distributions of electrons emitted from the projectiles and the total number of electron loss events

  12. In which metals are high electronic excitations able to create damage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, P.; Dunlop, A.; Lesueur, D.; Lorenzelli, N.; Morillo, J.; Bouffard, S.

    1992-01-01

    Since a few years a certain number of results have shown that high energy deposition through electronic excitation can lead to damage creation in metallic targets. In order to test which is the right parameter favouring damage creation (high d-electrons density favouring electron-phonon coupling, various electrical conductivities, existence of different displacive phase transformations . . .) chosen metallic targets (Zr, Co, Ti, Ag, Pd, Pt, W, Ni) were irradiated on the french accelerator GANIL in Caen, at cryogenic temperatures with GeV-ions (Pb, O). In situ electrical resistance variation measurements at low temperature were achieved, followed by isochronal annealing of defects and post-X-ray observations at room temperature. This study shows that a very strong enhancement of the damage production occurs only in Zr, Ti and Co which present different allotropic phases and in particular a displacive transformation associated with soft modes in the phonon spectrum. The structure of stage I recovery of all the samples depends on the electronic stopping power

  13. Beyond the random-phase approximation for the electron correlation energy: the importance of single excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinguo; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias

    2011-04-15

    The random-phase approximation (RPA) for the electron correlation energy, combined with the exact-exchange (EX) energy, represents the state-of-the-art exchange-correlation functional within density-functional theory. However, the standard RPA practice--evaluating both the EX and the RPA correlation energies using Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals from local or semilocal exchange-correlation functionals--leads to a systematic underbinding of molecules and solids. Here we demonstrate that this behavior can be corrected by adding a "single excitation" contribution, so far not included in the standard RPA scheme. A similar improvement can also be achieved by replacing the non-self-consistent EX total energy by the corresponding self-consistent Hartree-Fock total energy, while retaining the RPA correlation energy evaluated using KS orbitals. Both schemes achieve chemical accuracy for a standard benchmark set of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

  14. Inhomogeneous free-electron distribution in InN nanowires: Photoluminescence excitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2010-09-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN nanowires (NWs) and a high-crystalline quality InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The PLE experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN NW. The differences in the PLE spectra can be accounted for the inhomogeneous electron distribution within the NWs caused by a bulk donor concentration (ND+) and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states (Nss+) . For NW radii larger than 30 nm, ND+ and Nss+ modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data.

  15. Electron-impact excitation rate-coefficients and polarization of subsequent emission for Ar"+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dipti; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Electron impact excitation in Ar"+ ions has been studied by using fully relativistic distorted wave theory. Calculations are performed to obtain the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p"5 (J=3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p"44s, 3p"44p, 3p"45s, 3p"45p, 3p"43d and 3p"44d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions. - Highlights: • Fully relativistic distorted wave theory has been used to study the excitation of fine-structure states of Ar"+. • We have calculated electron-impact excitation cross-sections for the wide range of incident electron energies. • Electron impact excitation rate-coefficients are calculated as a function of electron temperature. • Polarization of photons emitted following the decay of the excited fine-structure states are also reported.

  16. Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitarai, O; Nakashima, H; Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-02-01

    Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak are carried out by a 140 GHz microwave interferometer. To follow rapid density variations, a high-speed direct-reading type interferometer is constructed. The density of (1 - 20) x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ is measured.

  17. Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitarai, Osamu; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo

    1980-01-01

    Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak are carried out by a 140 GHz microwave interferometer. To follow rapid density variations, a high-speed direct-reading type interferometer is constructed. The density of (1 - 20) x 10 13 cm -3 is measured. (author)

  18. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma temperatures and electron number density in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.; Suri, B.M.; Gupta, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The HCD (Hollow Cathode Discharge) lamps have been used as a source of free atoms of any metal, controllable by direct current in the lamp. The plasma parameters including neutral species temperature, atomic excitation temperature and electron number density in a see-through type, homemade uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp with neon as a buffer gas have been investigated using optical emission spectroscopic techniques. The neutral species temperature has been measured using the Doppler broadening of a neon atomic spectral line. The atomic excitation temperature has been measured using the Boltzmann plot method utilizing uranium atomic spectral lines. The electron number density has been determined from the Saha-Boltzmann equation utilizing uranium atomic and ionic spectral lines. To the best of our knowledge, all these three plasma parameters are simultaneously measured for the first time in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

  19. Differential modulation of corticospinal excitability by different current densities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andisheh Bastani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have been developed in recent years. TDCS-induced corticospinal excitability changes depend on two important factors current intensity and stimulation duration. Despite clinical success with existing tDCS parameters, optimal protocols are still not entirely set. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: The current study aimed to investigate the effects of four different anodal tDCS (a-tDCS current densities on corticospinal excitability. METHODS: Four current intensities of 0.3, 0.7, 1.4 and 2 mA resulting in current densities (CDs of 0.013, 0.029, 0.058 and 0.083 mA/cm(2 were applied on twelve right-handed (mean age 34.5±10.32 yrs healthy individuals in different sessions at least 48 hours apart. a-tDCS was applied continuously for 10 minute, with constant active and reference electrode sizes of 24 and 35 cm(2 respectively. The corticospinal excitability of the extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR was measured before and immediately after the intervention and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. RESULTS: Post hoc comparisons showed significant differences in corticospinal excitability changes for CDs of 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.029 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.003. There were no significant differences between excitability changes for the 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.058 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.080 or 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.083 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.484 conditions. CONCLUSION: This study found that a-tDCS with a current density of 0.013 mA/cm(2 induces significantly larger corticospinal excitability changes than CDs of 0.029 mA/cm(2. The implication is that might help to avoid applying unwanted amount of current to the cortical areas.

  20. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-01-01

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  1. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-03-18

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  2. Derivation of electron density and temperature from (S II) and (O II) line intensity ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, J; Meaburn, J; Theokas, A C [Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept of Astronomy; Elliott, K H [Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia)

    1980-12-01

    Line intensity ratios for (S II) and (O II) due to collisional de-excitation are briefly discussed. Comparison is made between various reaction rate parameters presented by separate investigators. Included are observations of ratios obtained from the Orion nebula which experimentally confirm the reaction rates of Pradhan as best representing the observed distribution of these ratios. (O II) and (S II) contour plots are also presented, which allow effective electron temperatures and densities to be estimated from pairs of line ratios.

  3. Simulation of the electron cloud density in BEPC II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yudong; Guo Zhiyuan; Wang Jiuqing

    2004-01-01

    Electron Cloud Instability (ECI) may take place in positron storage ring when the machine is operated with multi-bunch positron beam. According to the actual shape of the vacuum chamber in the BEPC II, a program has been developed. With the code, authors can calculate the electron density in the chamber with different length of antechamber and the different secondary electron yield respectively. By the simulation, the possibility to put clearing electrodes in the chamber to reduce the electron density in the central region of the chamber is investigated. The simulation provides meaningful and important results for the BEPC II project and electron cloud instability research

  4. Dissociative excitation of lithium atom in electron collisions with LiBr molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.M.

    1998-01-01

    Effective cross sections of the lithium atom dissociative excitation in electron collisions with the LiBr molecules are measured. The measurement error equals 5-12%. The optical functions of the lithium atom dissociative excitation are calculated on the basis of the data obtained

  5. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, V.A.; Sidelnikov, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs

  6. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakirev, V A; Sidelnikov, G L [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs.

  7. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floris, Franca Maria, E-mail: floris@dcci.unipi.it; Amovilli, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, Via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Filippi, Claudia [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-01-21

    We investigate here the vertical n → π{sup *} and π → π{sup *} transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π{sup *} case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π{sup *} transition.

  8. Excitation of Ion Cyclotron Waves by Ion and Electron Beams in Compensated-current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, L.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.

    2018-04-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) can play important roles in the energization of plasma particles. Charged particle beams are ubiquitous in space, and astrophysical plasmas and can effectively lead to the generation of ICWs. Based on linear kinetic theory, we consider the excitation of ICWs by ion and electron beams in a compensated-current system. We also investigate the competition between reactive and kinetic instabilities. The results show that ion and electron beams both are capable of generating ICWs. For ICWs driven by ion beams, there is a critical beam velocity, v bi c , and critical wavenumber, k z c , for a fixed beam density; the reactive instability dominates the growth of ICWs when the ion-beam velocity {v}{bi}> {v}{bi}c and the wavenumber {k}zz≃ 2{k}zc/3 for a given {v}{bi}> {v}{bi}c. For the slow ion beams with {v}{bi}< {v}{bi}c, the kinetic instability can provide important growth rates of ICWs. On the other hand, ICWs driven by electron beams are excited only by the reactive instability, but require a critical velocity, {v}{be}c\\gg {v}{{A}} (the Alfvén velocity). In addition, the comparison between the approximate analytical results based on the kinetic theory and the exact numerical calculation based on the fluid model demonstrates that the reactive instabilities can well agree quantitatively with the numerical results by the fluid model. Finally, some possible applications of the present results to ICWs observed in the solar wind are briefly discussed.

  9. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floris, Franca Maria; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate here the vertical n → π * and π → π * transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π * case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π * transition

  10. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Franca Maria; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate here the vertical n → π* and π → π* transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π* case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π* transition.

  11. Acceleration of electrons at wakefield excitation by a sequence of relativistic electron bunches in dielectric resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.A.; Linnik, A.F.; Mirnyj, V.I.; Onishchenko, I.N.; Uskov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    Method is proposed to divide a regular sequence of electron bunches into parts of bunches driving wakefield and witness bunches, which should be accelerated. It allows to avoid the necessity of additional electron accelerator for witness bunches producing and the necessity of precision short time techniques of injection phase adjusting. The idea concludes to the frequency detuning between bunches repetition frequency and the frequency of the fundamental mode of excited wakefield. Experiments were carried out on the linear resonant accelerator 'Almaz-2', which injected in the dielectric resonator a sequence of 6000 short bunches of relativistic electrons with energy 4.5 MeV, charge 0.16 nC and duration 60 psec each, the repetition interval 360 ps. Frequency detuning was entered by change of frequency of the master generator of the klystron within the limits of one percent so that the phase taper on the length of bunches sequence achieved 2π. Energy spectra of electrons of bunches sequence, which have been propagated through the dielectric resonator are measured and analyzed

  12. An exciton approach to the excited states of two electron atoms. I Formalism and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipper, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The exciton model is formally applied to a description of the excited states of two electron atoms with the explicit inclusion of exchange. The model leads to a conceptually simple framework for the discussion of the electronic properties of the archetypical atomic electron pair

  13. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The author deals with excitation and dissociation processes which result from the interaction between low-energy (0.15 eV) electrons and molecules. Low-energy electron-impact spectroscopy is used to gain a better knowledge of the electronic structure of halomethanes, ethylene and some of its halogen substituted derivatives, and some more complex organic molecules. (Auth.)

  14. Electron spectroscopy studies of argon K-shell excitation and vacancy cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; MacDonald, M.A.; LeBrun, T.; Azuma, Y.; Cooper, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used for studies of Ar K-shell excitation and vacancy decay processes. In addition, electrons and fluorescent X-rays have been recorded in coincidence to select subsets of the ejected electron spectra. Examples are presented for Ar 1s photoelectrons and KLL and LMM Auger spectra

  15. Determination of Jupiter's electron density profile from plasma wave observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.; Kurth, W.S.; Shaw, R.R.; Poynter, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes the electron density measurements obtained in the Jovian magnetosphere from the plasma wave instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. Three basic techniques are discussed for determining the electron density: (1) local measurements from the low-frequency cutoff of continuum radiation, (2) local measurements from the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and (3) integral measurements from the dispersion of whistlers. The limitations and advantages of each technique are critically reviewed. In all cases the electron densities are unaffected by spacecraft charging or sheath effects, which makes these measurements of particular importance for verifying in situ plasma and low-energy charged particle measurments. In the outer regions of the dayside magnetosphere, beyond about 40 R/sub J/, the electron densities range from about 3 x 10 -3 to 3 x 10 -2 cm -3 . On Voyager 2, several brief excursions apparently occurred into the low-density region north of the plasma sheet with densities less than 10 -3 cm -3 . Approaching the planet the electron density gradually increases, with the plasma frequency extending above the frequency range of the plasma wave instrument (56 kHz, or about 38 electrons cm -3 ) inside of about 8 R/sub J/. Within the high-density region of the Io plasma torus, whistlers provide measurements of the north-south scale height of the plasma torus, with scale heights ranging from about 0.9 to 2.5 R/sub J/

  16. Excitation of density waves at the Lindblad and corotation resonances by an external potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1979-01-01

    We calculate the linear response of a differentially rotating two-dimensional gas disk to a rigidly rotating external potential. The main assumptions are that the sound speed is much smaller than the orbital velocity and that the external potential varies on the scale of the disk radius. We investigate disks both with and without self-gravity.The external potential exerts torques on the disk only at the Lindblad and corotation resonances. The torque is positive at the outer Lindblad resonance and negative at the inner Lindblad resonance; at corotation the torque has the sign of the radial gradient of vorticity per unit surface density. The torques are of the same order of magnitude at both types of resonance and are independent of the sound speed in the disk.The external potential also excites density waves in the vicinity of the Lindblad and corotation resonances. The long trailing wave is excited at a Lindblad resonance. It transports away from the resonance all of the angular momentum which is deposited there by the external torque. Short trailing waves are excited at the corotation resonance. The amplitudes of the excited waves are the same on both sides of the resonance and are small unless the disk is almost gravitationally unstable. No net angular momentum is transported away from the corotation region by the waves. Thus the angular momentum deposited there by the external torque accumulates in the gas.We briefly discuss the behavior of particle disks and prove that the external torques on particle disks are identical to those on gas disks

  17. Compilation of excitation cross sections for He atoms by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T.; Itikawa, Y.; Sakimoto, K.

    1992-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical data are compiled on the cross section for the excitation of He atoms by electron impact. The available data are compared graphically. The survey of the literature has been made through the end 1991. (author)

  18. What we do and not know about electron impact excitation of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, J.

    1982-11-01

    The present state of knowledge derived from both theoretical and experimental information on electron impact excitation of atomic hydrogen is briefly reviewed. Suggestions are made for further calculations and for additional experiments. (author)

  19. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E. [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Keenan, F. P., E-mail: c.ramsbottom@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  20. Experimental installation for excitation of semiconductors and dielectrics by picosecond pulsed electron beam and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasibov, A.S.; Berezhnoj, K.V.; Shapkin, P.V.; Reutova, A.G.; Shunajlov, S.A.; Yalandin, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental facility for shaping high-voltage pulses with amplitudes of 30-250 kV and durations of 100-500 ps and electron beams with a current density of up to 1000 A/cm -2 is described. The facility was built using the principle of energy compression of a pulse from a nanosecond high-voltage generator accompanied by the subsequent pulse sharpening and cutting. The setup is equipped with two test coaxial chambers for radiation excitation in semiconductor crystals by an electron beam or an electric field in air at atmospheric pressure and T = 300 K. Generation of laser radiation in the visible range under field and electron pumping was attained in ZnSSe, ZnSe, ZnCdS, and CdS (462, 480, 515, and 525 nm, respectively). Under the exposure to an electric field (up to 10 6 V x cm -1 ), the laser generation region is as large as 300-500 μm. The radiation divergence was within 5 Deg C. The maximum integral radiation power (6 kW at λ = 480 nm) was obtained under field pumping of a zinc selenide sample with a single dielectric mirror [ru

  1. Electronically excited C 2 from laser photodissociated C 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, S.; Scott, C. D.; Nikolaev, P.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-03-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C 60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C 2 and, at early times, also from a black-body continuum. Transient measurements indicate two characteristic periods of decay 2 and 50 μs long, with characteristic decay times of ˜0.3 and 5 μs, respectively. The first period is thought to be associated with decomposition and radiative cooling of C 60 molecules or nano-sized carbon particles and the second period continues with decomposition products of laser excited C 60, C 58, C 56, etc.

  2. Nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances in the electron scattering from hydrogen halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, G.; Gote, M.; Radle, M.; Jung, K.; Ehrhardt, H.

    1989-01-01

    The energy dependences of the differential cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the higher vibrational levels (v=2 and v=3) of HF and HCl have been measured. Besides the threshold peak a resonance structure has been observed in the v=3 excitation functions of HF below the cusp structure at the opening of the v=4 channel. This resonance structure is the first experimental proof for the existence of the nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances which are interpreted to be the origin of the threshold peaks in the vibrational excitation channels

  3. Partial level density of the n-quasiparticle excitations in the nuclei of the 40≤A≤200 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Level density and radiative strength functions are obtained from the analysis of two-step cascades intensities following the thermal neutron capture. The data on level density are approximated by the sum of the partial level densities corresponding to n-quasiparticle excitations. The most probable values of the collective enhancement factor of the level density are found together with the thresholds of the next Cooper nucleons pair breaking. These data allow one to calculate the level density of practically any nucleus in given spin window in the framework of model concepts, taking into account all known nuclear excitation types. The presence of an approximation results discrepancy with theoretical statements specifies the necessity of rather essentially developing the level density models. It also indicates the possibilities to obtain the essentially new information on nucleon correlation functions of the excited nucleus from the experiment

  4. Electronic excitations in metallic systems: from defect annihilation to track formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, A.; Lesueur, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets irradiated with GeV heavy ions. The main result of these investigations is that high electronic excitations lead to various and sometimes conflicting effects according to the nature of the target: - partial annealing of the defects induced by elastic collisions, - creation of additional disorder, - phase transformation (tracks formation and amorphization), - anisotropic growth. These different effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets are probably manifestations at various degrees of the same basic energy transfer process between the excited electrons and the target atoms. Up to now no theoretical model explains these effects. 24 refs

  5. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, T. P. T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  6. Nonequilibrium Dynamics in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Electron Plasma after Ultrafast Intersubband Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutgen, S.; Kaindl, R.A.; Woerner, M.; Elsaesser, T.; Hase, A.; Kuenzel, H.; Gulia, M.; Meglio, D.; Lugli, P.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum wells is studied after excitation from the n=1 to the n=2 conduction subband. Femtosecond pump-probe experiments demonstrate for the first time athermal distributions of n=1 electrons on a surprisingly long time scale of 2ps. Thermalization involves intersubband scattering of excited electrons via optical phonon emission with a time constant of 1ps and intrasubband Coulomb and phonon scattering. Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations show that the slow electron equilibration results from Pauli blocking and screening of carrier-carrier scattering. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. The role of the excited electronic states in the C++H2O reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Jesus R.; Gonzalez, Adan B.

    2008-01-01

    The electronic excited states of the [COH 2 ] + system have been studied in order to establish their role in the dynamics of the C + +H 2 O→[COH] + +H reaction, which is a prototypical ion-molecule reaction. The most relevant minima and saddle points of the lowest excited state have been determined and energy profiles for the lowest excited doublet and quartet electronic states have been computed along the fragmentation and isomerization coordinates. Also, nonadiabatic coupling strengths between the ground and the first excited state have been computed where they can be large. Our analysis suggests that the first excited state could play an important role in the generation of the formyl isomer, which has been detected in crossed beam experiments [D. M. Sonnenfroh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3985 (1985)], but could not be explained in quasiclassical trajectory computations [Y. Ishikawa et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 370, 490 (2003); J. R. Flores, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164309 (2006)

  8. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions

  9. Dual structure in the charge excitation spectrum of electron-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejas, Matías; Yamase, Hiroyuki; Greco, Andrés

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by the recent resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments for electron-doped cuprates, we study the charge excitation spectrum in a layered t -J model with the long-range Coulomb interaction. We show that the spectrum is not dominated by a specific type of charge excitations, but by different kinds of charge fluctuations, and is characterized by a dual structure in the energy space. Low-energy charge excitations correspond to various types of bond-charge fluctuations driven by the exchange term (J term), whereas high-energy charge excitations are due to usual on-site charge fluctuations and correspond to plasmon excitations above the particle-hole continuum. The interlayer coupling, which is frequently neglected in many theoretical studies, is particularly important to the high-energy charge excitations.

  10. Isomer 103Rh excitation in the electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpatov, V.G.; Berezkin, V.V.; Vysotskij, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Rhodium foil targets were irradiated by a beam of electrons from a linear accelerator containing a minor impurity of bremsstrahlung. X-ray and γ-quanta from decay of 103m Rh isomer states were detected. The ratio of isomer cross section activation by bremsstrahlung, formed in the target, and electrons, equals 89. 7 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Electron heating via self-excited plasma series resonance in geometrically symmetric multi-frequency capacitive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüngel, E; Brandt, S; Schulze, J; Donkó, Z; Korolov, I; Derzsi, A

    2015-01-01

    The self-excitation of plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations plays an important role in the electron heating dynamics in capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) plasmas. In a combined approach of PIC/MCC simulations and a theoretical model based on an equivalent circuit, we investigate the self-excitation of PSR oscillations and their effect on the electron heating in geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas driven by multiple consecutive harmonics. The discharge symmetry is controlled via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), i.e. by varying the total number of harmonics and tuning the phase shifts between them. It is demonstrated that PSR oscillations will be self-excited under both symmetric and asymmetric conditions, if (i) the charge–voltage relation of the plasma sheaths deviates from a simple quadratic behavior and (ii) the inductance of the plasma bulk exhibits a temporal modulation. These two effects have been neglected up to now, but we show that they must be included in the model in order to properly describe the nonlinear series resonance circuit and reproduce the self-excitation of PSR oscillations, which are observed in the electron current density resulting from simulations of geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas. Furthermore, the effect of PSR self-excitation on the discharge current and the plasma properties, such as the potential profile, is illustrated by applying Fourier analysis. High-frequency oscillations in the entire spectrum between the applied frequencies and the local electron plasma frequency are observed. As a consequence, the electron heating is strongly enhanced by the presence of PSR oscillations. A complex electron heating dynamics is found during the expansion phase of the sheath, which is fully collapsed, when the PSR is initially self-excited. The nonlinear electron resonance heating (NERH) associated with the PSR oscillations causes a spatial asymmetry in the electron heating. By discussing the resulting ionization

  12. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    as well as experimental result. The redistribution of electron density will, if not accounted for, result in increased thermal parameters. It is estimated that 1.7-2 electrons is transferred from boron to nitrogen. [1]: N. Bindzus, T. Straasø, N. Wahlberg, J. Becker, L. Bjerg, N. Lock, A.-C. Dippel, and B......Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride Nanna Wahlberg*, Niels Bindzus*, Lasse Bjerg*, Jacob Becker*, and Bo B. Iversen* *Aarhus University, Department of Chemistry, CMC, Langelandsgade 140, 8000 Århus, Denmark The resent progress in powder diffraction provides data of quality...... obtained. The displacement parameters reported here are significantly lower than those previously reported, stressing the importance of an adequate description of the core density. The charge transfer from boron to nitrogen clearly affects the inner electron density, which is evident from theoretical...

  13. Electron density distribution in Si and Ge using multipole, maximum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si and Ge has been studied using multipole, maximum entropy method (MEM) and ... and electron density distribution using the currently available versatile ..... data should be subjected to maximum possible utility for the characterization of.

  14. Exchange-correlation energies of atoms from efficient density functionals: influence of the electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Ye, Lin-Hui; Duan, Yuhua

    2017-12-01

    The primary goal of Kohn-Sham density functional theory is to evaluate the exchange-correlation contribution to electronic properties. However, the accuracy of a density functional can be affected by the electron density. Here we apply the nonempirical Tao-Mo (TM) semilocal functional to study the influence of the electron density on the exchange and correlation energies of atoms and ions, and compare the results with the commonly used nonempirical semilocal functionals local spin-density approximation (LSDA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), and hybrid functional PBE0. We find that the spin-restricted Hartree-Fock density yields the exchange and correlation energies in good agreement with the Optimized Effective Potential method, particularly for spherical atoms and ions. However, the errors of these semilocal and hybrid functionals become larger for self-consistent densities. We further find that the quality of the electron density have greater effect on the exchange-correlation energies of kinetic energy density-dependent meta-GGA functionals TPSS and TM than on those of the LSDA and GGA, and therefore, should have greater influence on the performance of meta-GGA functionals. Finally, we show that the influence of the density quality on PBE0 is slightly reduced, compared to that of PBE, due to the exact mixing.

  15. Apparatus and method for generating high density pulses of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.; Oettinger, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for the production of high density pulses of electrons using a laser energized emitter. Caesium atoms from a low pressure vapour atmosphere are absorbed on and migrate from a metallic target rapidly heated by a laser to a high temperature. Due to this heating time being short compared with the residence time of the caesium atoms adsorbed on the target surface, copious electrons are emitted which form a high current density pulse. (U.K.)

  16. Observation of roton density of states in two-dimensional Landau-level excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinczuk, A.; Valladares, J.P.; Heiman, D.; Gossard, A.C.; English, J.H.; Tu, C.W.; Pfeiffer, L.; West, K.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic light scattering by inter-Landau-level excitations of the 2D electron gas in high-mobility GaAs structures in a perpendicular magnetic field was observed at the energies of the critical points in the mode dispersions. For Landau-level filling factors /nu//ge/, structure in the spectra indicates the excitonic binding and roton behavior predicted by the Hartree-Fock approximation. The large critical-point wave vectors, qapprox. >((h/2/pi/)c/eB)/sup -1/2/approx. >10/sup 6/ cm/sup -1/, are probably accessible in resonant light scattering through the residual disorder that broadens the Landau levels

  17. Nuclear quantum effects on the nonadiabatic decay mechanism of an excited hydrated electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgis, Daniel; Rossky, Peter J.; Turi, László

    2007-11-01

    We present a kinetic analysis of the nonadiabatic decay mechanism of an excited state hydrated electron to the ground state. The theoretical treatment is based on a quantized, gap dependent golden rule rate constant formula which describes the nonadiabatic transition rate between two quantum states. The rate formula is expressed in terms of quantum time correlation functions of the energy gap and of the nonadiabatic coupling. These gap dependent quantities are evaluated from three different sets of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations of a hydrated electron equilibrated (a) in its ground state, (b) in its first excited state, and (c) on a hypothetical mixed potential energy surface which is the average of the ground and the first excited electronic states. The quantized, gap dependent rate results are applied in a phenomenological kinetic equation which provides the survival probability function of the excited state electron. Although the lifetime of the equilibrated excited state electron is computed to be very short (well under 100fs), the survival probability function for the nonequilibrium process in pump-probe experiments yields an effective excited state lifetime of around 300fs, a value that is consistent with the findings of several experimental groups and previous theoretical estimates.

  18. On the importance of excited state dynamic response electron correlation in polarizable embedding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Janus J; Sauer, Stephan P A; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Jensen, Hans J Aa; Kongsted, Jacob

    2012-09-30

    We investigate the effect of including a dynamic reaction field at the lowest possible ab inito wave function level of theory, namely the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent field level within the polarizable embedding (PE) formalism. We formulate HF based PE within the linear response theory picture leading to the PE-random-phase approximation (PE-RPA) and bridge the expressions to a second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) frame such that dynamic reaction field contributions are included at the RPA level in addition to the static response described at the SOPPA level but with HF induced dipole moments. We conduct calculations on para-nitro-aniline and para-nitro-phenolate using said model in addition to dynamic PE-RPA and PE-CAM-B3LYP. We compare the results to recently published PE-CCSD data and demonstrate how the cost effective SOPPA-based model successfully recovers a great portion of the inherent PE-RPA error when the observable is the solvatochromic shift. We furthermore demonstrate that whenever the change in density resulting from the ground state-excited state electronic transition in the solute is not associated with a significant change in the electric field, dynamic response contributions formulated at the HF level of theory manage to capture the majority of the system response originating from derivative densities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Density profiles and collective excitations of a trapped two-component Fermi vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoruso, M.; Meccoli, I.; Minguzzi, A.; Tosi, M.P.

    1999-08-01

    We discuss the ground state and the small-amplitude excitations of a degenerate vapour of fermionic atoms placed in two hyperfine states inside a spherical harmonic trap. An equations-of-motion approach is set up to discuss the hydrodynamic dissipation processes from the interactions between the two components of the fluid beyond mean-field theory and to emphasize analogies with spin dynamics and spin diffusion in a homogeneous Fermi liquid. The conditions for the establishment of a collisional regime via scattering against cold-atom impurities are analyzed. The equilibrium density profiles are then calculated for a two-component vapour of 40 K atoms: they are little modified by the interactions for presently relevant values of the system parameters, but spatial separation of the two components will spontaneously arise as the number of atoms in the trap is increased. The eigenmodes of collective oscillation in both the total particle number density and the concentration density are evaluated analytically in the special case of a symmetric two-component vapour in the collisional regime. The dispersion relation of the surface modes for the total particle density reduces in this case to that of a one-component Fermi vapour, whereas the frequencies of all other modes are shifted by the interactions. (author)

  20. Excitation and characterization of image potential state electrons on quasi-free-standing graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Li, Yunzhe; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Jin, Wencan; Dadap, Jerry I.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Osgood, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the band structure of image potential states in quasi-free-standing graphene (QFG) monolayer islands using angle-resolved two-photon-photoemission spectroscopy. Direct probing by low-energy electron diffraction shows that QFG is formed following oxygen intercalation into the graphene-Ir(111) interface. Despite the apparent decoupling of the monolayer graphene from the Ir substrate, we find that the binding energy of the n =1 image potential state on these QFG islands increases by 0.17 eV, as compared to the original Gr/Ir(111) interface. We use calculations based on density-functional theory to construct an empirical, one-dimensional potential that quantitatively reproduces the image potential state binding energy and links the changes in the interface structure to the shift in energy. Specifically, two factors contribute comparably to this energy shift: a deeper potential well arising from the presence of intercalated oxygen adatoms and a wider potential well associated with the increase in the graphene-Ir distance. While image potential states have not been observed previously on QFG by photoemission, our paper now demonstrates that they may be strongly excited in a well-defined QFG system produced by oxygen intercalation. This opens an opportunity for studying the surface electron dynamics in QFG systems, beyond those found in typical nonintercalated graphene-on-substrate systems.

  1. Experimental determination of electron shock excitation cross sections for a singly charged gadolinium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.M.

    1995-01-01

    The trends observed in the processes of excitation with simultaneous ionization have received little study. This is particularly so for rare-earth elements having electron shells of complex structure and optical spectra very rich in lines. Among the basic factors responsible for such a situation, we should mention two: the difficulty presented by theoretical analysis of the processes discussed and the absence of factual information about the excitation cross sections with simultaneous ionization for the majority of rare-earth elements. The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation of a singly charged gadolinium ion in the collisions of monokinetic electrons with gadolinium atoms. Up to the present time, only the excitation cross sections of a gadolinium atom have been measured, where investigation of the electron shock excitation of gadolinium atoms in their free state is associated with overcoming large experimental difficulties. About 160 crosss sections for the excitation of a singly charged gadolinium ion were measured and for a third of the cross sections; the energy dependences were recorded for the change in energy of the elecrons from the excitation threshold up to 200 eV. Included are tables of the wavelength, transistion, internal quantum number, the energy of the lowere and upper levels, and the values of cross sections for the charged gadolinium ion. Diagrams of the transistion energy states of Gd (II) and spectroscopy are presented and explained

  2. Theoretical resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections of ro-vibrationally excited BeH"+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporta, V.; Chakrabarti, K.; Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Mezei, J. Zs.; Niyonzima, S.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I.F.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study of resonant vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation processes of the beryllium monohydride cation, BeH"+ , induced by electron impact, is reported. Full sets of ro-vibrationally-resolved cross sections and of the corresponding Maxwellian rate coefficients are presented for the three processes. Particular emphasis is given to the high-energy behaviour. Potential curves of "2σ"+, "2σ and "2δ symmetries and the corresponding resonance widths, obtained from R-matrix calculations, provide the input for calculations which use a local complex-potential model for resonant collisions in each of the three symmetries. Rotational motion of nuclei and isotopic effects are also discussed. The relevant results are compared with those obtained using a multichannel quantum defect theory method. Full results are available from the Phys4Entry database.

  3. Wigner-like crystallization of Anderson-localized electron systems with low electron densities

    CERN Document Server

    Slutskin, A A; Pepper, M

    2002-01-01

    We consider an electron system under conditions of strong Anderson localization, taking into account interelectron long-range Coulomb repulsion. We establish that at sufficiently low electron densities and sufficiently low temperatures the Coulomb electron interaction brings about ordering of the Anderson-localized electrons into a structure that is close to an ideal (Wigner) crystal lattice, provided the dimension of the system is > 1. This Anderson-Wigner glass (AWG) is a new macroscopic electron state that, on the one hand, is beyond the conventional Fermi glass concept, and on the other hand, qualitatively differs from the known 'plain' Wigner glass (inherent in self-localized electron systems) in that the random slight electron displacements from the ideal crystal sites essentially depend on the electron density. With increasing electron density the AWG is found to turn into the plain Wigner glass or Fermi glass, depending on the width of the random spread of the electron levels. It is shown that the res...

  4. Parametric excitation of electron Bernstein waves by radio waves in the ionosphere and its possible consequence for airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashok; Tripathi, V K [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2007-06-07

    A high power radio wave, launched into the polar ionosphere at angle {theta} with the earth's magnetic field from a ground-based transmitter in the vicinity of twice the electron cyclotron frequency (2.75 MHz), is reported to create an airglow at an effective radiated power (ERP) = 10 MW. We interpret this result as a consequence of parametric decay of the radio wave into an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) and an ion acoustic wave (IAW). The oscillatory velocity of electrons due to the pump couples with the density perturbation due to the IAW to produce a current, driving the Bernstein mode. The latter, in connection with the pump, exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons, driving the IAW. The growth rate of the parametric instability is maximum for {theta} = 0. At the same time, for any given value of {theta}, the growth rate increases with b(=k{sub 1}{sup 2}v{sub th}{sup 2}/2{omega}{sub c}{sup 2}) and attains a maximum around b {approx} 2, then falls gradually. The EBW produces energetic electrons via cyclotron damping. These electrons collide with the neutral atoms of the plasma to excite them to higher energy states. As the excited atoms return to lower energy states, they radiate in the visible.

  5. Parametric excitation of electron Bernstein waves by radio waves in the ionosphere and its possible consequence for airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Tripathi, V K

    2007-01-01

    A high power radio wave, launched into the polar ionosphere at angle θ with the earth's magnetic field from a ground-based transmitter in the vicinity of twice the electron cyclotron frequency (2.75 MHz), is reported to create an airglow at an effective radiated power (ERP) = 10 MW. We interpret this result as a consequence of parametric decay of the radio wave into an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) and an ion acoustic wave (IAW). The oscillatory velocity of electrons due to the pump couples with the density perturbation due to the IAW to produce a current, driving the Bernstein mode. The latter, in connection with the pump, exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons, driving the IAW. The growth rate of the parametric instability is maximum for θ = 0. At the same time, for any given value of θ, the growth rate increases with b(=k 1 2 v th 2 /2ω c 2 ) and attains a maximum around b ∼ 2, then falls gradually. The EBW produces energetic electrons via cyclotron damping. These electrons collide with the neutral atoms of the plasma to excite them to higher energy states. As the excited atoms return to lower energy states, they radiate in the visible

  6. Plasmon excitations in small diamond spheres by fast penetrating electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlhaber, R.P.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrodynamic model is used to calculate the excitation probability due to the surface and the volume plasmon of small diamond spheres. The theoretical approach incorporates an impact parameter p 0 and includes all multipole modes; it was first derived by Tran Thoai and Zeitler (1988, Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 107, 791) who applied it to investigate small aluminium spheres. The aim of the present work is to analyze the multipole modes in detail since certain aspects are screened out due to the large damping factor of a wide band gap material like diamond. Various patterns will be revealed, thus simplifying computational attempts and enhancing the predictability of experimental results. It will finally be shown that using this model, it is possible to determine the grain size to an accuracy of about 1 Angstrom. (authors)

  7. Characteristics of Response of Piezoelectric Actuators in Electron Flux Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C. Hadinata

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the working parameters of non-contact strain control for piezoelectric ceramics are evaluated. The piezoelectric material functions as an actuator that transforms electrical into mechanical energy, and the electrical input is carried out by electron flux on the positive surface. The sample is exposed to some quasi-static inputs, and its responses are recorded using strain gages. The data shows faster and more stable response in the positive regime, but significantly slower response with drift in the negative regime. An electron collector is introduced on the positive surface to enhance the response in the negative regime. Theoretical analyses of energy transfer and electron movements is discussed, and a string of working conditions for controlling the surface strain of piezoelectric material are given as conclusions.

  8. Calculation of excited vector meson electron widths using QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geshkenbein, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    The sum rules are suggested which allow one to calculate the electron widths of excited vector mesons of the PSI, UPSILON, rho meson family assuming the values of their masses to be known. The calculated values of the electron widths agree with experiment

  9. Two types of charge transfer excitations in low dimensional cuprates: an electron energy-loss study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knupfer, M.; Fink, J.; Drechsler, S.-L.; Hayn, R.; Málek, Jiří; Moskvin, A.S.

    137-140, - (2004), s. 469-473 ISSN 0368-2048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : cuprates * electronic excitations * electron energy-loss spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.069, year: 2004

  10. POSITRON-ELECTRON DECAY OF SI-28, AT AN EXCITATION-ENERGY OF 50-MEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUDA, A; BACELAR, JC; BALANDA, A; VANDERPLOEG, H; SUJKOWSKI, Z; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1993-01-01

    The electron-positron pair decay of Si-28 at 50 MeV excitation produced by the isospin T=0 (alpha + Mg-24) and the mixed isospin T=0,1 (He-3 + Mg-25) reactions has been studied using a special designed Positron-Electron pair spectrometer PEPSI.

  11. Positron-electron decay of 28Si at an excitation energy of 50 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buda, A.; Bacelar, J.C.; Balanda, A.; Ploeg, H. van der; Sujkowski, Z.; Woude, A. van der

    1993-01-01

    The electron-positron pair decay of 28 Si at 50 MeV excitation produced by the isospin T=0 (α+ 24 Mg) and the mixed isospin T=0, 1 ( 3 He+ 25 Mg) reactions has been studied using a special designed Positron-Electron pair spectrometer PEPSI. (orig.)

  12. TARGET EXCITATION IN BARE ION XE/AR COLLISIONS STUDIED BY ELECTRON TARGET ION COINCIDENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENIJS, G; HOEKSTRA, R; MORGENSTERN, R

    We present electron spectra resulting from collisions of bare ions N-15(7+) and C-13(6+) on Ar and the charge state distribution of target ions resulting from C-13(6+)-Xe collisions. From both type of experiments we find evidence that electron capture accompanied by target excitation is an important

  13. Measurements of electron excitation and recombination for Ne-like Ba46+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Levine, M.A.; Knapp, D.A.; Henderson, J.R.

    1987-07-01

    A new facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used to obtain measurements for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination and radiative recombination for the neon-like Ba 46+ ion. The experimental technique consists of trapping highly charged ions inside the space charge of an electron beam and measuring their x-ray emission spectra

  14. Calculation of electronic stopping power along glancing swift heavy ion tracks in perovskites using ab initio electron density data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmani, O; Duvenbeck, A; Akcoeltekin, E; Meyer, R; Schleberger, M [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Lebius, H [CIMAP, blvd Henri Becquerel, 14070 Caen (France)], E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de

    2008-08-06

    In recent experiments the irradiation of insulators of perovskite type with swift (E{approx}100 MeV) heavy ions under glancing incidence has been shown to provide a unique means to generate periodically arranged nanodots at the surface. The physical origin of these patterns has been suggested as stemming from a highly anisotropic electron density distribution within the bulk. In order to show the relevance of the electron density distribution of the target we present a model calculation for the system Xe{sup 23+} {yields} SrTiO{sub 3} that is known to produce the aforementioned surface modifications. On the basis of the Lindhard model of electronic stopping, we employ highly-resolved ab initio electron density data to describe the conversion of kinetic energy into excitation energy along the ion track. The primary particle dynamics are obtained via integration of the Newtonian equations of motion that are governed by a space- and time-dependent frictional force originating from Lindhard stopping. The analysis of the local electronic stopping power along the ion track reveals a pronounced periodic structure. The periodicity length varies strongly with the particular choice of the polar angle of incidence and is directly correlated to the experimentally observed formation of periodic nanodots at insulator surfaces.

  15. Carbon K-shell excitation in small molecules by high-resolution electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, M.; King, G.C.; Read, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The excitation of 1s carbon electrons has been observed in C0, CH 4 , CF4, C0 2 , COS, C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 4 by means of the electron energy-loss technique with high resolution (70 meV in the 300 eV excitation energy range) and at an incident electron energy of 1.5 keV. The energies, widths and vibrational structures of excited states corresponding to the promotion of 1s carbon electrons to unoccupied valence and Rydberg orbitals have been obtained. The validity of the equivalent-core model, and the role of resonances caused by potential barriers, are discussed. (author)

  16. Tomography of the ionospheric electron density with geostatistical inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Minkwitz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In relation to satellite applications like global navigation satellite systems (GNSS and remote sensing, the electron density distribution of the ionosphere has significant influence on trans-ionospheric radio signal propagation. In this paper, we develop a novel ionospheric tomography approach providing the estimation of the electron density's spatial covariance and based on a best linear unbiased estimator of the 3-D electron density. Therefore a non-stationary and anisotropic covariance model is set up and its parameters are determined within a maximum-likelihood approach incorporating GNSS total electron content measurements and the NeQuick model as background. As a first assessment this 3-D simple kriging approach is applied to a part of Europe. We illustrate the estimated covariance model revealing the different correlation lengths in latitude and longitude direction and its non-stationarity. Furthermore, we show promising improvements of the reconstructed electron densities compared to the background model through the validation of the ionosondes Rome, Italy (RO041, and Dourbes, Belgium (DB049, with electron density profiles for 1 day.

  17. Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Excited-State Aromaticity: Capturing Electronic Structures and Conformations upon Aromaticity Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juwon; Sung, Young Mo; Hong, Yongseok; Kim, Dongho

    2018-03-06

    Aromaticity, the special energetic stability derived from cyclic [4 n + 2]π-conjugated electronic structures, has been the topic of intense interest in chemistry because it plays a critical role in rationalizing molecular stability, reactivity, and physical/chemical properties. Recently, the pioneering work by Colin Baird on aromaticity reversal, postulating that aromatic (antiaromatic) character in the ground state reverses to antiaromatic (aromatic) character in the lowest excited triplet state, has attracted much scientific attention. The completely reversed aromaticity in the excited state provides direct insight into understanding the photophysical/chemical properties of photoactive materials. In turn, the application of aromatic molecules to photoactive materials has led to numerous studies revealing this aromaticity reversal. However, most studies of excited-state aromaticity have been based on the theoretical point of view. The experimental evaluation of aromaticity in the excited state is still challenging and strenuous because the assessment of (anti)aromaticity with conventional magnetic, energetic, and geometric indices is difficult in the excited state, which practically restricts the extension and application of the concept of excited-state aromaticity. Time-resolved optical spectroscopies can provide a new and alternative avenue to evaluate excited-state aromaticity experimentally while observing changes in the molecular features in the excited states. Time-resolved optical spectroscopies take advantage of ultrafast laser pulses to achieve high time resolution, making them suitable for monitoring ultrafast changes in the excited states of molecular systems. This can provide valuable information for understanding the aromaticity reversal. This Account presents recent breakthroughs in the experimental assessment of excited-state aromaticity and the verification of aromaticity reversal with time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements. To

  18. Spin polarized and density modulated phases in symmetric electron-electron and electron-hole bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishan; Moudgil, R K

    2012-10-17

    We have studied symmetric electron-electron and electron-hole bilayers to explore the stable homogeneous spin phase and the feasibility of inhomogeneous charge-/spin-density ground states. The former is resolved by comparing the ground-state energies in states of different spin polarizations, while the latter is resolved by searching for a divergence in the wavevector-dependent static charge/spin susceptibility. For this endeavour, we have used the dielectric approach within the self-consistent mean-field theory of Singwi et al. We find that the inter-layer interactions tend to change an abrupt spin-polarization transition of an isolated layer into a nearly gradual one, even though the partially spin-polarized phases are not clearly stable within the accuracy of our calculation. The transition density is seen to decrease with a reduction in layer spacing, implying a suppression of spin polarization by inter-layer interactions. Indeed, the suppression shows up distinctly in the spin susceptibility computed from the spin-polarization dependence of the ground-state energy. However, below a critical layer spacing, the unpolarized liquid becomes unstable against a charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state at a density preceding full spin polarization, with the transition density for the CDW state increasing on further reduction in the layer spacing. Due to attractive e-h correlations, the CDW state is found to be more pronounced in the e-h bilayer. On the other hand, the static spin susceptibility diverges only in the long-wavelength limit, which simply represents a transition to the homogeneous spin-polarized phase.

  19. Excitation of plasma waves by electron guns at the ISEE-1 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, Zh.P.; Torbert, R.; Anderson, R.; Kharvi, K.

    1985-01-01

    Study of the effects resulting from excitation of plasma waves by electron beams injected from JSEE-1 satellite is carried out. Cases of the satellite traversing the magnetosphere magnetosheath and solar wind are considered. 10-60 μA and 0-40 V electron beam injection from the satellite increased electrostatic waves spectral intensity. The waves below ionic plasma frequency are interpreted as ion acoustic waves. To explain the-above-electron-plasma-frequency wave oscillation a communication system between electron plasma mode and electron flux with the velocities above the mean thermal velocity of plasma cold electrons is suggested

  20. Plasma density profiles and finite bandwidth effects on electron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Bollen, W.M.; Woo, W.

    1980-01-01

    Intense, p-polarized microwaves are incident on an inhomogeneous plasma in a cylindrical waveguide. Microwaves are mainly absorbed by resonant absorption near the critical surface (where the plasma frequency, ω/sub pe/, equals the microwave frequency, ω/sub o/). The localized plasma waves strongly modify the plasma density. Step-plateau density profiles or a cavity are created depending on the plasma flow speed. Hot electron production is strongly affected by the microwave bandwidth. The hot electron temperature varies as T/sub H/ is proportional to (Δ ω/ω) -0 25 . As the hot electron temperature decreases with increasing driver bandwidth, the hot electron density increases. This increase is such that the heat flux into the overdense region (Q is proportional to eta/sub H/T/sub H/ 3 2 ) is nearly constant

  1. Three phase carbon EOS model with electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Thiel, M.; Ree, F.H.; Grover, R.

    1987-07-01

    A simple and rapid way for computing EOS data of multiphase solids with a liquid phase is described with emphasis on carbon. The method uses a scaling model for the liquid phase and includes a provision for electronic effects. The free energy minimum determines the stable phase

  2. The interaction of swift electrons with surface excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1992-01-01

    For many decades swift electrons have comprised a powerful tool for the study of the dynamical properties of condensed matter. The development of this technique has involved much important physics. Here we sketch the historical background of the field and some important developments in theory and experiment. Possible directions for future research are indicated

  3. Precision Electron Density Measurements in the SSX MHD Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen-Lewis, Emma M.; Barbano, Luke J.; Shrock, Jaron E.; Kaur, Manjit; Schaffner, David A.; Brown, Michael R.

    2017-10-01

    We characterize fluctuations of the line averaged electron density of Taylor states produced by the magnetized coaxial plasma gun of the SSX device using a 632.8 nm HeNe laser interferometer. The analysis method uses the electron density dependence of the refractive index of the plasma to determine the electron density of the Taylor states. Typical magnetic field and density values in the SSX device approach about B ≅ 0.3 T and n = 0 . 4 ×1016 cm-3 . Analysis is improved from previous density measurement methods by developing a post-processing method to remove relative phase error between interferometer outputs and to account for approximately linear phase drift due to low-frequency mechanical vibrations of the interferometer. Precision density measurements coupled with local measurements of the magnetic field will allow us to characterize the wave composition of SSX plasma via density vs. magnetic field correlation analysis, and compare the wave composition of SSX plasma with that of the solar wind. Preliminary results indicate that density and magnetic field appear negatively correlated. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  4. Quantitative Measurements of Electronically Excited CH Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the electronically excited CH spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of electronically excited CH chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on electronically excited CH concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the electronically excited CH emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the electronically excited CH concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame electronically excited CH concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend

  5. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Resonant Electron capture for be-like ions with K- and L- shell excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafy, H.

    2005-01-01

    Resonant electron capture in electron-ion collisions is known as dielectronic recombination (DR). It was proved that, DR dominants usually over radiative recombination (RR) at high energy. Since 1980's, DR is considered a very important process in thermal plasma. The DR is an effective process in self-cooling and ionization balance as well as plasma modeling. Experimental works are still carried out to understand the trends of DR process. In the present work, DR cross sections are calculated for Be-like ions with K- and L- shell excitations. It is found that, DR cross sections increase as the effective charge (Zeff) increases for both types of excitations. DR rates coefficient in case of L-shell excitation is found to be five times larger than that of K-shell excitation

  7. The influence of autoionizing states on the excitation of helium by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ittersum, T. van

    1976-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with resonance effects in the scattering of electrons by helium at energies near the threshold of the autoionizing states (50-70 eV). The investigation is performed by studying light emission following the excitation of singly excited states. In some cases, the polarization of the radiation was also investigated. The purpose of the research was (i) to enlarge our knowledge of triply excited negative ion states, i.e. resonance states which are formed by temporary binding of the incident electron to a doubly excited (autoionizing) state of neutral helium, and (ii) to clear up the nature of some resonance structures which could not be explained in terms of negative ion resonances

  8. Calculation of the differential cross sections of excitation and ionization of a helium atom by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkin, V.P.; Pecheritsyn, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Equations for the amplitudes and differential cross sections of electronic excitation and ionization of a helium atom are derived in the approximation of a open-quotes frozenclose quotes ion core. The wave functions of the discrete states are chosen in the form of generalized hydrogenlike orbitals. The radial wave functions of the continuous spectrum are determined by solving the equation of motion numerically. The differential excitation cross sections of excitation of the 2p, 3p, and 4p levels and ionization of a helium atom by electrons are calculated in the energy range up to 50 eV. Estimates are obtained for the nonorthogonal wave functions in the amplitudes of the excitation and ionization processes. It is shown that the given method is more compatible with experiment than the Born method

  9. Single Production of Excited Neutrino at Clic based Electron Photon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirca, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of excited quarks and leptons, as predicted by composite models, would supply convincing evidence for substructure of fermions. Electron-photon interactions at very high energies provide ideal conditions to look for excited states of first generations offermions. In particular, in magnetic- transition coupling the electron to a gauge bo son would allow for single production of excited neutrinos (ν * ) through t-channel W boson exchange. In this work, (ν * ) production followed by the electroweak radiative decays ν * →νγ, ν * →eW, ν * →νZ is presented. The production cross sections and P T distributions of excited neutrino are studied for CLlC

  10. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  11. Surface excitation correction of electron IMFP of selected polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergely, G.; Orosz, G.T.; Lesiak, B.; Jablonski, A.; Toth, J.; Varga, D.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The IMFP [1] of selected polymers: polythiophenes, polyanilines, polyethylene (PE) [2] was determined by EPES [3] experiments, using Si, Ge and Ag (for PE) reference samples. Experiments were evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations [1] applying the NIST 64 (1996 and 2002) databases and IMFP data of Tanuma and Gries [1]. The integrated experimental elastic peak ratios of sample and reference are different from those calculated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation [1]. The difference was attributed to the difference of surface excitation parameters (SEP) [4] of the sample and reference. The SEP parameters of the reference samples were taken from Chen and Werner. A new procedure was developed for experimental determination of the SEP parameters of polymer samples. It is a trial and error method for optimising the SEP correction of the IMFP and the correction of experimental elastic peak ratio [4]. Experiments made with a HSA spectrometer [5] covered the E = 0.2-2 keV energy range. The improvements with SEP correction appears in reduc- ing the difference between the corrected and MC calculated IMFPs, assuming Gries and Tanuma's et al IMFPs [1] for polymers and standard respectively. The experimental peak areas were corrected for the hydrogen peak. For the direct detection of hydrogen see Ref. [6] and [7]. Results obtained with the different NIST 64 databases and atomic potentials [8] are presented. This work was supported by the Hungarian Science Foundation of OTKA: T037709 and T038016. (author)

  12. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  13. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  14. Hyperspherical approach to double-electron excitation of He by fast-ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moribayashi, K.; Hino, K.; Matsuzawa, M.; Kimura, M.

    1991-01-01

    Double-electron-excitation processes of He atoms by proton, antiproton, and C 6+ -ion impact have been theoretically investigated using the second-order Born approximation and the close-coupling method in the energy regime of MeV/u. The semiclassical impact-parameter method with a straight-line-trajectory approximation is employed to describe the collision processes. Hyperspherical wave functions are adopted to take full account of the strongly correlated motion of two atomic electrons in He. For proton and antiproton impact, it is found that the first-order mechanism dominates for excitation to the (2s2p) 1 Po excited state, while the second-order processes play a significant role in excitation to the (2s2s) 1 Se, (2p2p) 1 Se, and (2p2p) 1 De excited states at a few MeV/u. It should be noted that the doubly excited (2s2p) 1 Po state plays an important role as an intermediate state in these second-order processes in addition to the singly excited 1s2p 1 Po state. It is also found that the difference for the double-electron-excitation processes by proton impact and by antiproton impact is much smaller than that for the double-ionization processes in this energy range. For the C 6+ -ion impact, higher-order mechanisms play more important roles at a few MeV/u. The excitation mechanism is also discussed based on the classification scheme of the correlation quantum numbers, which enables us to obtain a more direct physical insight into the collision mechanism

  15. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth\\'s ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields. Within this model framework the effect of the

  16. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields

  17. Electrical field excitation in non-uniform plasma by a modulated electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, I.O.; Borisov, O.A.

    2000-01-01

    Excitation of electric fields due to a modulated electron beam in a warm non-uniform plasma is treated for weak beams in warm plasma. It is shown that the maximum electric field magnitude that is reached near the local plasma resonance point depends significantly on the direction of the electron stream motion. In collisional plasma the magnitude of the Langmuir wave that propagates to the subcritical plasma also depends on the direction of the electron stream motion. The motion of the modulated electron stream front results in beatings between oscillations on the modulation frequency and on the local electron plasma frequencies at the initial moment. Later these beatings damp in the supercritical plasma, whereas in the subcritical plasma they are transformed into spatial beatings between the field of the modulated electron stream and the excited Langmuir wave. (orig.)

  18. Evidence for charge exchange effects in electronic excitations in Al by slow singly charged He ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardi, P., E-mail: Pierfrancesco.riccardi@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria and INFN Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci cubo 31C, 87036 – Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Sindona, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria and INFN Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci cubo 31C, 87036 – Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Dukes, C.A. [Laboratory for Astrophysics and Surface Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We report on experiments of secondary electron emission in the interaction of helium ions with aluminum surfaces. Comparison between the electron emission induced by the impact of {sup 3}He{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} on Al illustrates similarities and differences between the two projectiles. The intensity of emission shows the same dependence on velocity for the two isotopes, showing that KEE yields for helium ions impact on Al are dominated by direct excitation of valence electrons and not by electron promotion. Electron promotion and charge transfer processes are unambiguously identified by the observation of Auger electron emission from Al, at energies below the excitation threshold of Al–Al collisions, indicating energy losses for the projectiles higher than those commonly considered.

  19. Production of electronically excited NO via DEA to NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gope, Krishnendu; Tadsare, Vishvesh; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2017-12-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to NO2 in the 7-11 eV range is studied using velocity slice imaging technique. Two distinct channels are observed in the DEA corresponding to O- + NO(A 2Σ+) and O- + NO(C 2Π and/or D 2Σ+). While NO(A 2Σ+) is found to be formed only in very high vibrational levels, NO(C 2Π and/or D 2Σ+) is found to be formed with vibrational distribution starting from v = 0. From the angular distribution of the O- ions leading to the NO(C 2Π and/or D 2Σ+) channel, we obtain the symmetry of the negative ion resonance to be dominantly B1 with small contribution from B2. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Low Energy Positron and Electron Interactions", edited by James Sullivan, Ron White, Michael Bromley, Ilya Fabrikant, and David Cassidy.

  20. Parametric excitation of electromagnetic waves by electron Bernstein waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    A parametric instability involving the decay of a standing electron Bernstein pump into electromagnetic sidebands and lower-hybrid decay waves is studied. A general dispersion relation is derived and analyzed. Threshold fields and growth rates are obtained for the two cases that the electron Bernstein pump is introduced near the X-mode cutoff layer or introduced in the region between the upper-hybrid resonance layer and the O-mode cutoff layer. Applications of these results to the recent observation [P. Stubbe and H. Kopka, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 183 (1990)] of stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) with a broad symmetrical structure (BSS) in the ionospheric modifications by powerful high-frequency (HF) wave are discussed

  1. Electron impact excitation of autoionising states of krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-loss spectra of krypton in the region between 21 and 29 eV have been obtained at electron impact energies of 30, 60 and 100 eV. For each energy, the angular distribution of intensities has been measured at 5, 10 and 15 deg scattering angles. Assignments of spectral features found in this region are suggested and a comparison is made with previous measurements.

  2. DENSITY WAVES EXCITED BY LOW-MASS PLANETS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. LINEAR REGIME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Stone, James M.; Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2011-01-01

    Density waves excited by planets embedded in protoplanetary disks play a central role in planetary migration and gap opening processes. We carry out two-dimensional shearing sheet simulations to study the linear regime of wave evolution with the grid-based code Athena and provide detailed comparisons with theoretical predictions. Low-mass planets (down to ∼0.03 M ⊕ at 1 AU) and high spatial resolution (256 grid points per scale height) are chosen to mitigate the effects of wave nonlinearity. To complement the existing numerical studies, we focus on the primary physical variables such as the spatial profile of the wave, torque density, and the angular momentum flux carried by the wave, instead of secondary quantities such as the planetary migration rate. Our results show percent level agreement with theory in both physical and Fourier spaces. New phenomena such as the change of the toque density sign far from the planet are discovered and discussed. Also, we explore the effect of the numerical algorithms and find that a high order of accuracy, high resolution, and an accurate planetary potential are crucial to achieve good agreement with the theory. We find that the use of a too large time step without properly resolving the dynamical timescale around the planet produces incorrect results and may lead to spurious gap opening. Global simulations of planet migration and gap opening violating this requirement may be affected by spurious effects resulting in, e.g., the incorrect planetary migration rate and gap opening mass.

  3. Instabilities excited by head-on collisions of two relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou Shu-Ying

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, we studied the instabilities excited by head-on collision of two relativistic electron beams in transporting, taking account of the magnetic field B/sub 0/ and the thermal pressure delp of the beams. The conditions under which the instabilities occur and the growth rate of instabilities are obtained. The results show that these instabilities can be excited or inhibited by controlling the velocity of the beams.

  4. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  5. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom ''sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly

  6. Idempotent Dirac density matrix for ten-electron central field inhomogeneous electron liquids in terms of electron- and kinetic energy-densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2006-08-01

    A differential equation for the Dirac density matrix γ(r, r'), given ground-state electron- and kinetic energy-densities, has been derived by March and Suhai for one- and two-level occupancy. For ten-electron spin-compensated spherical systems, it is shown here that γ ≡ γ[ρ, t g ] where ρ and t g are electron- and kinetic energy-densities. The philosophy of March and Suhai is confirmed beyond two-level filling. An important byproduct of the present approach is an explicit expression for the one-body potential of DFT in terms of the p-shell electron density. (author)

  7. Workshop report of problems relating to multi-electron excited ions in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takayanagi, Toshinobu; Koike, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Koji.

    1979-08-01

    A workshop was held to discuss the problems relating to multiple electron-excited ions in plasma. The first part of this report deals with the problems of satellite lines. The satellite lines from laser plasma and vacuum sparks are discussed. Review papers on satellite lines and bielectronic recombination are also presented. The second part of this report deals with the problems of autoionization. Theory, comment on the compound state, observation of autoionization and resonance scattering, excitation cross-section, inner shell ionization, excitation through autoionization, and the bielectronic recombination of helium-like ions are discussed. (Kato, T.)

  8. Continuum corrections to the level density and its dependence on excitation energy, n-p asymmetry, and deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    In the independent-particle model, the nuclear level density is determined from the neutron and proton single-particle level densities. The single-particle level density for the positive-energy continuum levels is important at high excitation energies for stable nuclei and at all excitation energies for nuclei near the drip lines. This single-particle level density is subdivided into compound-nucleus and gas components. Two methods are considered for this subdivision: In the subtraction method, the single-particle level density is determined from the scattering phase shifts. In the Gamov method, only the narrow Gamov states or resonances are included. The level densities calculated with these two methods are similar; both can be approximated by the backshifted Fermi-gas expression with level-density parameters that are dependent on A, but with very little dependence on the neutron or proton richness of the nucleus. However, a small decrease in the level-density parameter is predicted for some nuclei very close to the drip lines. The largest difference between the calculations using the two methods is the deformation dependence of the level density. The Gamov method predicts a very strong peaking of the level density at sphericity for high excitation energies. This leads to a suppression of deformed configurations and, consequently, the fission rate predicted by the statistical model is reduced in the Gamov method

  9. Excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron wave in electron beam plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Takashi; Takamoto, Teruo

    1984-01-01

    The electrostatic ion cyclotron waves excited in an electron beam plasma system was investigated. The excitation condition of the waves was calculated by using Harris type dispersion relation under some assumption, and its comparison with the experimental result was made. Beam plasma discharge is a kind of RF discharge, and it is caused by the waves generated by the interaction of electron beam with plasma. It was shown that electrostatic ion cyclotron waves seemed to be the most probable as excited waves. But the excitation mechanism of these waves has not been concretely investigated. In this study, the excitation condition of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves was calculated as described above. The experimental apparatus and the results of potential, electric field and ion saturation current in beam plasma, electron drift motion in azimuthal direction and the waves excited in beam plasma are reported. The frequency of oscillation observed in beam plasma corresponds to the harmonics or subharmonics of ion cyclotron frequency. The calculation of Harris type dispersion relation, the numerical calculation and the comparison of the experimental result with the calculated result are described. (Kako, I.)

  10. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a 87Sr optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-01-01

    We observe two-body loss of 3 P 0 87 Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 μK that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  11. Dissipation of the electronic excitation energy in fluorides with different type of a crystal lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyn, V.M.; Grechkina, T. V.; Korepanov, V.I.; Lisitsyna, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this paper we present results of comparison of efficiency creations of primary defects in crystals of fluorides of two different lattice structures: stone salt - LiF and rutile MgF 2 . We have used the methods with nanosecond time-resolved of pulse spectroscopy and found laws of creation and evolution self-trapped exciton (STE) and the F centers in a temperature range from 12.5 to 500 K and a time interval from 10 -8 to 10 -1 s after the ending of influence of a pulse electron. The density of excitation of crystals in a pulse is no more than 0.1 J·cm -3 , average energy electrons made 200 keV, duration electron pulse - 7 ns. It is established, that in crystal LiF under action of radiation are created STE two types which have various spectral-kinetic parameters absorption and emission transitions, various values of activation energy of processes of a post-industrial relaxation and different character of temperature dependences of creation efficiency under action electron pulse. In the field of low temperatures (12.5 K) created on center STE has absorption bands on 5.5 and 5.1 eV and emission band on 5.8 eV. Off-center STE has absorption on 5.3 and 4.75 eV and emission on 4.4 eV bands and are created in the interval 12.5-170 K with peak efficiency h area 60 K. In crystal MgF 2 at low temperatures (20 K) under action of radiation one STE with a nucleus occupying off-center configuration, having luminescence band on 3.2 eV and a series absorption transitions in area 4-5.5 eV is created. Concurrently with STE in both crystals under action of a pulse electron the F-centers with efficiency, not dependent on temperature of a crystal in area 20-100 K are created. There are two alternative processes under action of an irradiation with growth of temperature higher 100 K: reducing of STE creation and increasing of F centers creation. In both crystals quenching temperature of luminescence STE at T>60 K which is not accompanied by growth of efficiency of creation

  12. Muon spin relaxation by electronic excitations moving in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jestaedt, Th.; Sivia, D.S.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The manner in which an electronic spin, executing a linear random walk, e.g. along a polymer chain, depolarizes a muon (or proton) probe spin, is investigated by computer simulation. The essential features of the model are the assumptions of a contact hyperfine interaction with limited range and of loss of coherence between successive encounters. The low dimensionality of the motion is reflected in the shape of the relaxation functions generated, which depart significantly from simple exponentials. Fits to various functional forms are examined for different combinations of hop rate and chain length, hyperfine constant and applied magnetic field

  13. Study on the intense relativistic electron beam propagation in a collisionless plasma of small density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Rubin, N.B.; Khodataev, K.V.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the experimental studies of the intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) propagation with ν/γ approximately 0.1, and γ approximately 1.6 (γ is an electron beam relativistic factor) in a collisionless plasma of small density over the 180 cm length are presented. Plasma is generated with the incomplete discharge over dielectric surface at the residual gas pressure of P approximately 10 -5 Torr. It is shown that the transportation efficiency may be essentially high, if the electron concentration in plasma satisfies the equilibrium conditions and if it is less or equal to the electron concentration in a beam. At concentration less than optimum one, the transportation efficiency decreases due to violations of equilibrium conditions. At high concentration the transportation efficiency also decreased due to the scattering and breaking on excited small-scale and plasma oscillations. The IREB propagation occurs without essential time delay under optimum conditions

  14. Two-electron excitation to Rydberg levels in fast I6+ on hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Zouros, T.J.M.; Montenegro, E.C.; Toth, G.; Richard, P.; Grabbe, S.; Bhalla, C.P.

    1995-01-01

    The emission of electrons in the forward direction in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u I 6+ with H 2 has been studied, and strong autoionization peaks are observed on the shoulder of the cusp peak. The energies of these autoionization lines in the projectile rest frame are determined by high-resolution electron spectroscopy. Using the electron projectile final charge state coincidence technique, we probe different collision mechanisms, which create continuum electrons that are slow in the projectile rest frame. We conclude that the observed autoionization lines are due to two electron excitation to projectile Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  15. A large-scale R-matrix calculation for electron-impact excitation of the Ne2 +, O-like ion

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin , B M; Lee , Teck-Ghee; Ludlow , J A; Landi , E; Loch , S D; Pindzola , M S; Ballance , C P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The five J? levels within a np2 or np4 ground state complex provide an excellent testing ground for the comparison of theoretical line ratios with astrophysically observed values, in addition to providing valuable electron temperature and density diagnostics. The low temperature nature of the line ratios ensure that the theoretically derived values are sensitive to the underlying atomic structure and electron-impact excitation rates. Previous R- matrix calculations for the O-like ...

  16. Rocket measurements of electron density irregularities during MAC/SINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulwick, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Four Super Arcas rockets were launched at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as part of the MAC/SINE campaign to measure electron density irregularities with high spatial resolution in the cold summer polar mesosphere. They were launched as part of two salvos: the turbulent/gravity wave salvo (3 rockets) and the EISCAT/SOUSY radar salvo (one rocket). In both salvos meteorological rockets, measuring temperature and winds, were also launched and the SOUSY radar, located near the launch site, measured mesospheric turbulence. Electron density irregularities and strong gradients were measured by the rocket probes in the region of most intense backscatter observed by the radar. The electron density profiles (8 to 4 on ascent and 4 on descent) show very different characteristics in the peak scattering region and show marked spatial and temporal variability. These data are intercompared and discussed.

  17. An open-source framework for analyzing N-electron dynamics. II. Hybrid density functional theory/configuration interaction methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Gunter; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2017-10-30

    In this contribution, we extend our framework for analyzing and visualizing correlated many-electron dynamics to non-variational, highly scalable electronic structure method. Specifically, an explicitly time-dependent electronic wave packet is written as a linear combination of N-electron wave functions at the configuration interaction singles (CIS) level, which are obtained from a reference time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation. The procedure is implemented in the open-source Python program detCI@ORBKIT, which extends the capabilities of our recently published post-processing toolbox (Hermann et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2016, 37, 1511). From the output of standard quantum chemistry packages using atom-centered Gaussian-type basis functions, the framework exploits the multideterminental structure of the hybrid TDDFT/CIS wave packet to compute fundamental one-electron quantities such as difference electronic densities, transient electronic flux densities, and transition dipole moments. The hybrid scheme is benchmarked against wave function data for the laser-driven state selective excitation in LiH. It is shown that all features of the electron dynamics are in good quantitative agreement with the higher-level method provided a judicious choice of functional is made. Broadband excitation of a medium-sized organic chromophore further demonstrates the scalability of the method. In addition, the time-dependent flux densities unravel the mechanistic details of the simulated charge migration process at a glance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Excitation of surface and volume plasmons in a metal nanosphere by fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gildenburg, V. B., E-mail: gil@appl.sci-nnov.ru; Kostin, V. A.; Pavlichenko, I. A. [University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    Collective multipole oscillations (surface and volume plasmons) excited in a metal nanosphere by moving electron and corresponding inelastic scattering spectra are studied based on the hydrodynamic approach. Along with the bulk (dielectric) losses traditionally taken into account, the surface and radiative ones are also considered as the physical mechanisms responsible for the plasmon damping. The second and third mechanisms are found to be essential for the surface plasmons (at small or large cluster radii, respectively) and depend very differently on the multipole mode order. The differential equations are obtained which describe the temporal evolution of every particular mode as that one of a linear oscillator excited by the given external force, and the electron energy loss spectra are calculated. The changes in spectrum shape with the impact parameter and with the electron passage time are analyzed; the first of them is found to be in good enough agreement with the data of scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments. It is shown that, in the general case, a pronounced contribution to the formation of the loss spectrum is given by the both surface and volume plasmons with low and high multipole indices. In particular, at long electron passage time, the integral (averaged over the impact parameter) loss spectrum which is calculated for the free-electron cluster model contains two main peaks: a broad peak from merging of many high-order multipole resonances of the surface plasmons and a narrower peak of nearly the same height from merged volume plasmons excited by the electrons that travel through the central region of the cluster. Comparatively complex dependences of the calculated excitation coefficients and damping constants of various plasmons on the order of the excited multipole result in wide diversity of possible types of the loss spectrum even for the same cluster material and should be taken into account in interpretation of corresponding

  19. Observation of preformed electron-hole Cooper pairs in highly excited ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, M.A.M.; van Lange, A.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    Electrons and holes in a semiconductor form hydrogen-atom-like bound states, called excitons. At high electron-hole densities the attractive Coulomb force becomes screened and excitons can no longer exist. Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory predicts that at such high densities co-operative many-body

  20. Cross-sections for dissociative excitation of lead atom in collisions of slow electrons with PbI2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.M.

    2006-01-01

    The dissociative excitation of the lead atom in e-PbI 2 collisions has been studied experimentally. 27 excitation cross-sections are measured at an exciting-electron energy of 100 eV. Nine optical excitation functions are recorded at the electron energy varying in the 0-100 eV range. The most possible reaction channels at low electron energies along with the relation of the dissociative-excitation cross-sections of the lead atom both in e-PbI 2 and e-PbCl 2 collisions are discussed. (authors)

  1. Electron density profile measurements by microwave reflectometry on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairet, F.; Paume, M.; Chareau, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A proposal is presented developing reflectometry diagnostic for electron density profile measurements as routine diagnostic without manual intervention as achieved at JET. Since density fluctuations seriously perturb the reflected signal and the measurement of the group delay, a method is described to overcome the irrelevant results with the help of an adaptive filtering technique. Accurate profiles are estimated for about 70% of the shots. (author) 3 refs.; 6 figs

  2. Multiple scattering approach to the vibrational excitation of molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukarev, G.

    1976-01-01

    Another approach to the problem of vibrational excitation of homonuclear two-atomic molecules by slow electrons possibly accompanied by rotational transitions is presented based on the picture of multiple scattering of an electron inside the molecule. The scattering of two fixed centers in the zero range potential model is considered. The results indicate that the multiple scattering determines the order of magnitude of the vibrational excitation cross sections in the energy region under consideration even if the zero range potential model is used. Also the connection between the multiple scattering approach and quasi-stationary molecular ion picture is established. 9 refs

  3. Studies of isotopic effects in the excited electronic states of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Rare gas halogen (RGH) lasers serve as convenient tools for a range of photophysical processes which exhibit isotope effects. This document summarizes progress in the production of molecular systems in their electronic excited states with the aid of RGH lasers, and the various isotopic effects one can study under these conditions. We conclude that the basic physical mechanisms involved in the isotopically sensitive characteristics of excited molecular electronic states are sufficiently selective to be useful in both the detection and separation of many atomic materials

  4. Optical excitation cross-sections for electron collisions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConkey, J.W.; Univ. of Windsor, Ontario)

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of the status of absolute electron-impact excitation cross-section measurements for atoms and molecules is presented. Some of the reasons for the wide discrepancies which exist in the published data are discussed. Tables are presented of recent publications in the field which are not included in the J.I.L.A. compilations. A tabular compilation of the existing data for e-impact on H 2 O is also given and discussed. Some recent experiments of particular interest to the development of the theory of electron-molecule excitation are mentioned. 112 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  5. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  6. Electron-impact excitation out of the metastable levels of Krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, R.O.; Stone, Tom E.; Boffard, John B.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, Chun C.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured the electron-impact excitation cross sections out of the two metastable levels of Kr into the ten levels of the 4p 5 5p configuration. For a common 4p 5 5p final level, the peak excitation cross sections out of the two individual 4p 5 5s metastable levels are found to differ by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. This is explained by the special features of the electronic structure of the two configurations involved. The peak cross sections are 10 to 1600 times larger than the corresponding peak cross sections out of the ground state

  7. Wakefield excitation in plasma resonator by a sequence of relativistic electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.A.; Linnik, A.F.; Mirny, V.I.; Onishchenko, I.N.; Uskov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Wakefield excitation in a plasma resonator by a sequence of relativistic electron bunches with the purpose to increase excited field amplitude in comparison to waveguide case is experimentally investigated. A sequence of short electron bunches is produced by the linear resonant accelerator. Plasma resonator is formed at the beam-plasma discharge in rectangular metal waveguide filled with gas and closed by metal foil at entrance and movable short-circuited plunger at exit. Measurements of wakefield amplitude are performed showing considerably higher wakefield amplitude for resonator case

  8. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K, E-mail: sami@iitk.ac.i, E-mail: mkh@iitk.ac.i [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2010-11-14

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  9. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K

    2010-01-01

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  10. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  11. Reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density by geostatistical inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, David; van den Boogaart, Karl Gerald; Hoque, Mainul; Gerzen, Tatjana

    2015-04-01

    The ionosphere is the upper part of the atmosphere where sufficient free electrons exist to affect the propagation of radio waves. Typically, the ionosphere extends from about 50 - 1000 km and its morphology is mainly driven by solar radiation, particle precipitation and charge exchange. Due to the strong ionospheric impact on many applications dealing with trans-ionospheric signals such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) positioning, navigation and remote sensing, the demand for a highly accurate reconstruction of the electron density is ever increasing. Within the Helmholtz Alliance project "Remote Sensing and Earth System Dynamics" (EDA) the utilization of the upcoming radar mission TanDEM-L and its related products are prepared. The TanDEM-L mission will operate in L-band with a wavelength of approximately 24 cm and aims at an improved understanding of environmental processes and ecosystem change, e.g. earthquakes, volcanos, glaciers, soil moisture and carbon cycle. Since its lower frequency compared to the X-band (3 cm) and C-band (5 cm) radar missions, the influence of the ionosphere will increase and might lead to a significant degradation of the radar image quality if no correction is applied. Consequently, our interest is the reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density in order to mitigate the ionospheric delay. Following the ionosphere's behaviour we establish a non-stationary and anisotropic spatial covariance model of the electron density separated into a vertical and horizontal component. In order to estimate the model's parameters we chose a maximum likelihood approach. This approach incorporates GNSS total electron content measurements, representing integral measurements of the electron density between satellite to receiver ray paths, and the NeQuick model as a non-stationary trend. Based on a multivariate normal distribution the spatial covariance model parameters are optimized and afterwards the 3D electron density can be

  12. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  13. Positivity of the spherically averaged atomic one-electron density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Maria; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the positivity of the spherically averaged atomic one-electron density . For a which stems from a physical ground state we prove that for r ≥  0. This article may be reproduced in its entirety for non-commercial purposes.......We investigate the positivity of the spherically averaged atomic one-electron density . For a which stems from a physical ground state we prove that for r ≥  0. This article may be reproduced in its entirety for non-commercial purposes....

  14. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O.

    1999-01-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index. (Author)

  15. Addressing the electronic properties of III–V nanowires by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, M

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been attracting an increasing interest in the scientific community. This is due to their peculiar filamentary shape and nanoscale diameter, which renders them versatile and cost-effective components of novel technological devices and also makes them an ideal platform for the investigation of a variety of fascinating physical effects. Absorption spectroscopy is a powerful and non-destructive technique able to provide information on the physical properties of the NWs. However, standard absorption spectroscopy is hard to perform in NWs, because of their small volume and the presence of opaque substrates. Here, we demonstrate that absorption can be successfully replaced by photoluminescence excitation (PLE). First, the use of polarization-resolved PLE to address the complex and highly-debated electronic band structure of wurtzite GaAs and InP NWs is shown. Then, PLE is used as a statistically-relevant method to localize the presence of separate wurtzite and zincblende NWs in the same InP sample. Finally, a variety of resonant exotic effects in the density of states of In x Ga 1−x As/GaAs core/shell NWs are highlighted by high-resolution PLE. (paper)

  16. The formation of electronically excited fragments by the electron impact of furan and related five-membered heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokue, Ikuo; Ikarashi, Masami; Takizawa, Sadachika; Ito, Yoshio

    1983-01-01

    In the wavelength region of 200-600 nm, photoemissions from electronically excited H, CH, C 2 , and CS (only from thiophene and tetrahydrothiophene) were observed when furan, tetrahydrofuran, thiophene, and tetrahydrothiophene were excited by electron impact (0-70 eV). Hydrogen atoms (n = 4) and CH(A 2 Δ) radicals were produced from these five-membered heterocycles via single collision excitations, while CS(A 1 PI) radicals from thiophene and tetrahydrothiophene were partly formed in secondary processes. The appearance potentials for the hydrogen Balmer β and the CH(A 2 Δ-X 2 PI) bands from these five-membered heterocycles are determined, and the dissociation processes forming H(n = 4) and CH(A) are discussed. (author)

  17. Effect of neutron irradiation on the density of low-energy excitations in vitreous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    Systematic low-temperature measurements of the thermal conductivity, specific heat, dielectric constant, and temperature-dependent ultrasound velocity were made on a single piece of vitreous silica. These measurements were repeated after fast neutron irradiation of the material. It was found that the irradiation produced changes of the same relative magnitude in the low-temperature excess specific heat C/sub ex/, the thermal conductivity kappa, and the anomalous temperature dependence of the ultrasound velocity Δv/v. A corresponding change in the temperature dependent dielectric constant was not observed. It is therefore likely that kappa and Δv/v are determined by the same localized excitations responsible for C/sub ex/, but the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant may have a different, though possibly related, origin. A consistent account for the measured C/sub ex/, kappa, and Δv/v of unirradiated silica is given by the tunneling-state model with a single, energy-dependent density of states. Changes in these three properties due to irradiation can be explained by altering only the density of tunneling states incorporated in the model

  18. Probing neutral density at the plasma edge of Tore Supra with CX excited impurity ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, W.R.; Mattioli, M.; Guirlet, R.

    1993-01-01

    In Tokamak plasma physics renewed interest in visible spectroscopy has grown for two reasons. The use of fiber optics allows observation of local sources of both impurities and of hydrogen by observing radiation of low ionization states. Moreover, charge exchange spectroscopy (CXS) with either auxiliary or heating neutral beams is a standard technique to determine the ion temperature and impurity density profiles. After a short description of the experimental setup and the ergodic divertor of Tore Supra (TS), two discharges in which space-resolved observations of the CVI (8-7) line clearly show the presence of CX-related effects. A well isolated spectral line at 5304.6 A is discussed. Tentative identification as CIII (1s 2 2s, 7-5) is suggested. The conclusion shows the usefulness of the reported results for probing neutral density at the plasma edge by detecting CX excited impurity ions and that highly ionized C 6+ ions exist in the MARFE regions. To the best of our knowledge, only very low ionization C and O ions (such as CIII or OIV) have been previously reported in these regions

  19. X-ray electron charge density distribution in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, U.

    1986-01-01

    During the last two years new highly accurate X-ray structure amplitudes for silicon have been published. Also the scattering phases of some 'forbidden' reflections have been determined using the X-ray three-beam case. This allows the construction of most precise valence and difference electron density plots and the comparison with those calculated on the basis of the Aldret-Hart X-ray pendelloesung data or theoretically. The density plots are discussed in details of both, the bond and the atomic site. The contributions of various Fourier components and the influence of different temperature factors on the difference density are studied. (author)

  20. Electronically excited states of vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin: theoretical analysis of absorption, CD, and MCD data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Harald; Kornobis, Karina; Ruud, Kenneth; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2011-02-03

    Linear and quadratic response time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been applied to investigate absorption (Abs), circular dichroism (CD), and magnetic CD (MCD) spectra of cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) and methylcobalamin (MeCbl). Although electronically excited states of both cobalamins have been probed by applying different experimental techniques, their exact nature remains poorly understood from an electronic structure point of view. Recent theoretical studies have revealed a lot of relevant information about their properties but also left some unresolved issues related to the nature of individual transitions. In this contribution, not only Abs but also CD and MCD spectra of both cobalamins were computed for direct comparison with experiment. The results were evaluated with respect to the choice of exchange-correlation functional, basis set, and the environment (gas phase or solvent) used in the calculation. Taking into account the complexity of the CNCbl and MeCbl systems, reliable agreement between theory and experiment was achieved based on calculations employing the BP86 functional, particularly for the low-energy α/β bands. This spectral range has been traditionally interpreted as a vibrational progression associated with a single electronic excitation, but according to the present analysis for both cobalamins, these bands are best interpreted as consisting of multiple electronic transitions.

  1. Spin-orbit excitations and electronic structure of the putative Kitaev magnet α -RuCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, Luke J.; Tian, Yao; Reijnders, Anjan A.; Kim, Heung-Sik; Plumb, K. W.; Kim, Young-June; Kee, Hae-Young; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2016-02-01

    Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling have been proposed to host unconventional magnetic states, including the Kitaev quantum spin liquid. The 4 d system α -RuCl3 has recently come into view as a candidate Kitaev system, with evidence for unusual spin excitations in magnetic scattering experiments. We apply a combination of optical spectroscopy and Raman scattering to study the electronic structure of this material. Our measurements reveal a series of orbital excitations involving localized total angular momentum states of the Ru ion, implying that strong spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron interactions coexist in this material. Analysis of these features allows us to estimate the spin-orbit coupling strength, as well as other parameters describing the local electronic structure, revealing a well-defined hierarchy of energy scales within the Ru d states. By comparing our experimental results with density functional theory calculations, we also clarify the overall features of the optical response. Our results demonstrate that α -RuCl3 is an ideal material system to study spin-orbit coupled magnetism on the honeycomb lattice.

  2. Electron density measurements during ion beam transport on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, B.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    High-sensitivity laser interferometry was used to measure the electron density created when an intense proton beam (100 kA, 1 MeV, 50 ns) from the Gamble II generator was transported through low-pressure gas as part of a project investigating Self-Pinched Transport (SPT) of intense ion beams. This measurement is non-perturbing and sufficiently quantitative to allow benchmarking of codes (particularly IPROP) used to model beam-gas interaction and ion-beam transport. Very high phase sensitivity is required for this measurement. For example, a 100-kA, 1-MeV, 10-cm-radius proton beam with uniform current density has a line-integrated proton density equal to n b L = 3 x 10 13 cm -2 . An equal electron line-density, n e L = n b L, (expected for transport in vacuum) will be detected as a phase shift of the 1.064 microm laser beam of only 0.05degree, or an optical path change of 1.4 x 10 -4 waves (about the size of a hydrogen atom). The time-history of the line-integrated electron density, measured across a diameter of the transport chamber at 43 cm from the input aperture, starts with the proton arrival time and decays differently depending on the gas pressure. The gas conditions included vacuum (10 -4 Torr air), 30 to 220 mTorr He, and 1 Torr air. The measured densities vary by three orders of magnitude, from 10 13 to 10 16 cm -2 for the range of gas pressures investigated. In vacuum, the measured electron densities indicate only co-moving electrons (n e L approximately n b L). In He, when the gas pressure is sufficient for ionization by beam particles and SPT is observed, n e L increases to about 10 n b L. At even higher pressures where electrons contribute to ionization, even higher electron densities are observed with an ionization fraction of about 2%. The diagnostic technique as used on the SPT experiment will be described and a summary of the results will be given. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions from the IPROP code

  3. Electron and current density measurements on tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammeren, A.C.A.P. van.

    1991-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes the Thomson-scattering diagnostic as it was present at the TORTUR tokamak. For the first time with this diagnostic a complete tangential scattering spectrum was recorded during one single laser pulse. From this scattering spectrum the local current density was derived. Small deviations from the expected gaussian scattering spectrum were observed indicating the non-Maxwellian character of the electron-velocity distribution. The second part of this thesis describes the multi-channel interferometer/ polarimeter diagnostic which was constructed, build and operated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) tokamak. The diagnostic was operated routinely, yielding the development of the density profiles for every discharge. When ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) is switched on the density profile broadens, the central density decreases and the total density increases, the opposite takes place when ECRH is switched off. The influence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) activity on the density was clearly observable. In the central region of the plasma it was measured that in hydrogen discharges the so-called sawtooth collapse is preceded by an m=1 instability which grows rapidly. An increase in radius of this m=1 mode of 1.5 cm just before the crash is observed. In hydrogen discharges the sawtooth induced density pulse shows an asymmetry for the high- and low-field side propagation. This asymmetry disappeared for helium discharges. From the location of the maximum density variations during an m=2 mode the position of the q=2 surface is derived. The density profiles are measured during the energy quench phase of a plasma disruption. A fast flattening and broadening of the density profile is observed. (author). 95 refs.; 66 figs.; 7 tabs

  4. Investigation of transversal nuclear excitation in 208Pb at excitation energies between 6 MeV and 8 MeV using inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Using high resolution inelastic electron scattering magnitic dipole and quadrupole excitations in 208 Pb were investigated in the energy range between 6 MeV and 8 MeV. The electron energy was 50 MeV and 63.5 MeV. With a mean absolute energy resolution of 33 kev. 44 excited states were found in the above energy range. The measured angular distributions were compared with DWBA-calculations using random phase approximated wave functions. (FKS)

  5. Correlated electron capture and inner-shell excitation measurements in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    In an ion-atom collision projectile excitation and charge transfer (electron capture) may occur together in a single encounter. If the excitation and capture are correlated, then the process is called resonant transfer and excitation (RTE); if they are uncorrelated, then the process is termed nonresonant transfer and excitation (NTE). Experimental work to date has shown the existence of RTE and provided strong evidence for NTE. Results presented here provide information on the relative magnitudes of RTE and NTE, the charge state dependence of RTE, the effect of the target momentum distribution on RTE, the magnitude of L-shell RTE compared to K-shell RTE, and the target Z dependences of RTE and NTE. 15 refs., 5 figs

  6. Plasma excitation processes in flue gas simulated with Monte Carlo electron dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tas, M.A.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Rutgers, W.R. [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands). Div. of Electrical Energy Systems

    1997-06-07

    The excitation of gas molecules in flue gas by electron impact is calculated with a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm for electron dynamics in partially ionized gases. The MC algorithm is straightforward for any mixture of molecules for which cross sections are available. Electron drift is simulated in the first case for homogeneous electric fields and in the second case for secondary electrons which are produced by electron-beam irradiation. The electron energy distribution function {epsilon}-bar{sub {theta}}, V-bar{sub d}, {lambda}-bar, the energy branching and the rate of excitation are calculated for standard gas mixtures of Ar-N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. These fundamental process parameters are needed for the study of reactions to remove NO{sub x} from flue gas. The calculated results indicate that the production of highly excited molecules in the high electric field of a streamer corona discharge has an efficiency similar to that of electron-beam irradiation. (author)

  7. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  8. Investigation of the energy-averaged double transition density of isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelik, M.L.; Shlomo, S. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Tulupov, B.A. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Urin, M.H., E-mail: urin@theor.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The particle–hole dispersive optical model, developed recently, is applied to study properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. The energy-averaged strength functions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone in {sup 208}Pb are analyzed. In particular, we analyze the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density, the key quantity in the description of the hadron–nucleus inelastic scattering, and studied the validity of the factorization approximation using semi classical and microscopic one body transition densities, respectively, in calculating the cross sections for the excitation of isoscalar giant resonances by inelastic alpha scattering.

  9. Interferometric determination of electron density in a high pressure hydrogen arc. 1. Calculation of refraction index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, R; Guenther, K; Ulbricht, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik

    1980-01-14

    The refraction index of a hydrogen plasma in LTE was calculated as a function of the wavelength of observation, temperature and pressure, taking into account bound-bound and bound-free transitions of the neutral atom. According to the present calculation, the influence of excited states at higher temperatures is smaller than indicated by Baum et al (Plasma Phys.; 17: 79 (1975)) for argon. Using the calculations presented here, the interferometric investigation of a high pressure hydrogen arc should allow the determination of the electron density with an accuracy of the order of 1%.

  10. Possible interaction between thermal electrons and vibrationally excited N2 in the lower E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-I. Oyama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the tasks to find the energy source(s of thermal electrons, which elevate(s electron temperature higher than neutral temperature in the lower ionosphere E-region, energy distribution function of thermal electron was measured with a sounding rocket at the heights of 93–131 km by the applying second harmonic method. The energy distribution function showed a clear hump at the energy of ~0.4 eV. In order to find the reason of the hump, we conducted laboratory experiment. We studied difference of the energy distribution functions of electrons in thermal energy range, which were measured with and without EUV radiation to plasma of N2/Ar and N2/O2 gas mixture respectively. For N2/Ar gas mixture plasma, the hump is not clearly identified in the energy distribution of thermal electrons. On the other hand for N2/O2 gas mixture, which contains vibrationally excited N2, a clear hump is found when irradiated by EUV. The laboratory experiment seems to suggest that the hump is produced as a result of interaction between vibrationally excited N2 and thermal electrons, and this interaction is the most probable heating source for the electrons of thermal energy range in the lower E-region. It is also suggested that energy distribution of the electrons in high energy part may not be Maxwellian, and DC probe measures the electrons which are non Maxwellian, and therefore "electron temperature" is calculated higher.

  11. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin,’ Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, C.P. 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  12. Theoretical studies of atomic and quasiatomic excitations by electron and ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, K.F.

    1999-09-01

    Electron emission from ion induced excitations of Ca, Sc, Ti and V metal surfaces and from electron impact on transition metal oxides CoO and TiO 2 has been studied in this thesis. Both the autoionising emission from sputtered atoms and the 3p→3d and 3s→3d excitations in the oxides reveal strong atomic features. The work has involved explaining these spectra in an atomic approach, via the use of atomic structure calculations, cross section studies and empirical/semi-empirical analyses. The other aspect of this work involves extension of current theories of electron-atom scattering in the high electron energy impact regime. Overall it is shown that much can be learned about some solid-state spectra by relating them to atomic phenomena. (author)

  13. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  14. Spectral density of electron concentration fluctuations in ionospheric D region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    Expression for spectral density of electron concentration fluctuations in D-region with regard to the effect of ionization-recombination proceses and negative ions is obtained in terms of atmospheric turbulence model which obeys Kolmogorov-Obukhov 2/3 law

  15. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of ... The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology.

  16. Electron density measurement in an evolving plasma. Experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consoli, Terenzio; Dagai, Michel

    1960-01-01

    The experimental devices described here allow the electron density measurements in the 10 16 e/m 3 to 10 20 e/m 3 interval. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 1223-1225, sitting of 15 February 1960 [fr

  17. Density functional theory study of structure, electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHIJIT DUTTA

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... magnetic properties of non-metal (Group 13) doped stable. Rhn(n = 2−8) ... Deformed electron density was found to be higher in the case of Rh5B, Rh4Al, Rh7Al and ...... systems: Modeling of surface alloys and alloy surfaces.

  18. Covariance and correlation estimation in electron-density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Angela; Cuocci, Corrado; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Moliterni, Anna; Rizzi, Rosanna

    2012-03-01

    Quite recently two papers have been published [Giacovazzo & Mazzone (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 210-218; Giacovazzo et al. (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 368-382] which calculate the variance in any point of an electron-density map at any stage of the phasing process. The main aim of the papers was to associate a standard deviation to each pixel of the map, in order to obtain a better estimate of the map reliability. This paper deals with the covariance estimate between points of an electron-density map in any space group, centrosymmetric or non-centrosymmetric, no matter the correlation between the model and target structures. The aim is as follows: to verify if the electron density in one point of the map is amplified or depressed as an effect of the electron density in one or more other points of the map. High values of the covariances are usually connected with undesired features of the map. The phases are the primitive random variables of our probabilistic model; the covariance changes with the quality of the model and therefore with the quality of the phases. The conclusive formulas show that the covariance is also influenced by the Patterson map. Uncertainty on measurements may influence the covariance, particularly in the final stages of the structure refinement; a general formula is obtained taking into account both phase and measurement uncertainty, valid at any stage of the crystal structure solution.

  19. Behavior of the bottomside electron density profile over Pruhonice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mosert, M.; Burešová, Dalia; Ezquer, R.; Mansilla, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2004), s. 1982-1989 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : Electron density profiles * Variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2004

  20. Isomer depletion as experimental evidence of nuclear excitation by electron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, C. J.; Carroll, J. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Hartley, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lane, G. J.; Marsh, J. C.; Matters, D. A.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Bottoni, S.; Hayes, A. B.; Karamian, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    The atomic nucleus and its electrons are often thought of as independent systems that are held together in the atom by their mutual attraction. Their interaction, however, leads to other important effects, such as providing an additional decay mode for excited nuclear states, whereby the nucleus releases energy by ejecting an atomic electron instead of by emitting a γ-ray. This ‘internal conversion’ has been known for about a hundred years and can be used to study nuclei and their interaction with their electrons. In the inverse process—nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC)—a free electron is captured into an atomic vacancy and can excite the nucleus to a higher-energy state, provided that the kinetic energy of the free electron plus the magnitude of its binding energy once captured matches the nuclear energy difference between the two states. NEEC was predicted in 1976 and has not hitherto been observed. Here we report evidence of NEEC in molybdenum-93 and determine the probability and cross-section for the process in a beam-based experimental scenario. Our results provide a standard for the assessment of theoretical models relevant to NEEC, which predict cross-sections that span many orders of magnitude. The greatest practical effect of the NEEC process may be on the survival of nuclei in stellar environments, in which it could excite isomers (that is, long-lived nuclear states) to shorter-lived states. Such excitations may reduce the abundance of the isotope after its production. This is an example of ‘isomer depletion’, which has been investigated previously through other reactions, but is used here to obtain evidence for NEEC.

  1. Ligand Electron Density Shape Recognition Using 3D Zernike Descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Prasad; Grandison, Scott; Cowtan, Kevin; Mak, Lora; Lawson, David M.; Morris, Richard J.

    We present a novel approach to crystallographic ligand density interpretation based on Zernike shape descriptors. Electron density for a bound ligand is expanded in an orthogonal polynomial series (3D Zernike polynomials) and the coefficients from this expansion are employed to construct rotation-invariant descriptors. These descriptors can be compared highly efficiently against large databases of descriptors computed from other molecules. In this manuscript we describe this process and show initial results from an electron density interpretation study on a dataset containing over a hundred OMIT maps. We could identify the correct ligand as the first hit in about 30 % of the cases, within the top five in a further 30 % of the cases, and giving rise to an 80 % probability of getting the correct ligand within the top ten matches. In all but a few examples, the top hit was highly similar to the correct ligand in both shape and chemistry. Further extensions and intrinsic limitations of the method are discussed.

  2. X-ray electron density distribution of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, U.

    1986-01-01

    Using ten X-ray structure amplitudes of strong reflections and nine weak reflections both, the valence electron and the difference electron density distribution of GaAs, are calculated. The experimental data are corrected for anomalous dispersion using a bond charge model. The calculated plots are compared with up to now published band structure-based and semiempirically calculated density plots. Taking into account the experimental data of germanium, measured on the same absolute scale, the difference density between GaAs and Ge is calculated. This exhibits the charge transfer between both the f.c.c.-sublattices as well as both, the shift and the decrease of the bond charge, quite closely connected to the theoretical results published by Baur et al. (author)

  3. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, J.

    2005-11-01

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  4. Electron-impact coherence parameters for 41 P 1 excitation of zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwiński, Mariusz; Kłosowski, Łukasz; Chwirot, Stanisław; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Das, Tapasi; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    We present electron-impact coherence parameters (EICP) for electron-impact excitation of 41 P 1 state of zinc atoms for collision energies 40 eV and 60 eV. The experimental results are presented together with convergent close-coupling and relativistic distorted-wave approximation theoretical predictions. The results are compared and discussed with EICP data for collision energies 80 eV and 100 eV.

  5. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  6. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habenicht, Bradley F.; Tani, Noriyuki P.; Provorse, Makenzie R.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S 0 state and the doubly-excited S 2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation

  7. Analytical formulas for dipole excitation cross sections of ions colliding with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevelko, V.P.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical formulas describing electron-impact induced dipole excitation of ions from threshold (E = ΔE) to high energies (E >> ΔE) are suggested. The formulas are based on the model dipole potential and are expressed in terms of McDonald functions. The results are compared with numerical calculations, other semiempirical formulas and experimental data

  8. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for neon-like Ni XIX ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In a recent paper [Pramana – J. Phys. 64, 129 (2005)] results have been presented for electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions among the fine- structure levels of the 2s22p6 and 2s22p53s configurations of Ni XIX. In this paper we demonstrate through an independent calculation with the ...

  9. Electron impact excitation of 1'S-2'S transition in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, J.P.; Singh, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The modified variable-charge Coulomb-projected Born approximation is applied to electron impact excitation of 1 1 S-2 1 S transition in helium. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental results. (author). 30 refs., 4 figs

  10. Reduction of the Glauber amplitude for electron impact rotational excitation of quadrupolar molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, K.C.; Gupta, G.P.; Pundir, R.S.

    1981-06-01

    A reduction of the Glauber amplitude for the rotational excitation of pure quadrupolar molecular ions by electron impact is presented in a form suitable for numerical evaluation. The differential cross-section is expressed in terms of one dimensional integrals over impact parameter. (author)

  11. Inner shell excitation in atoms and molecules by high resolution electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this work an inner-shell spin-forbidden transition in N 2 and a parity-forbidden transition in Ar were studied. These transitions were observed by using incident electron energies as low as 1.15 times the excitation energy of the inner-shell states. (Auth.)

  12. Enhanced Electron Attachment to Highly-Excited Molecules and Its Applications in Pulsed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.X.; Ma, C.Y.; McCorkle, D.L.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past several years have shown that electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules have extremely large cross sections. We will discuss the implications of this for pulsed discharges used for H - generation, material processing, and plasma remediation

  13. Implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states in pulsed-power discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    1997-01-01

    The author points out the possible implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules in two pulsed power technologies. One involves the pulsed H 2 discharges used for the generation of H ion beams for magnetic fusion energy and particle accelerators. The other is the power modulated plasma discharges used for material processing

  14. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for neon-like Ni XIX ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a recent paper [Pramana - J. Phys. 64, 129 (2005)] results have been presented for electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions among the fine-structure levels of the 2s22p6 and 2s22p53s configurations of Ni XIX. In this paper we demonstrate through an independent calculation with the relativistic -matrix ...

  15. Bibliography on electron collisions with molecules: rotational and vibrational excitations, 1980-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2001-04-01

    A list of papers reporting cross sections for electron-impact excitations of rotational and vibrational states of molecules is presented. The list includes both the theoretical and the experimental papers published in 1980-2000. An index by molecular species is provided at the end of the bibliography. (author)

  16. Dynamic correlation of photo-excited electrons: Anomalous levels induced by light–matter coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiankai [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); Song, Bo, E-mail: bosong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear light–matter coupling plays an important role in many aspects of modern physics, such as spectroscopy, photo-induced phase transition, light-based devices, light-harvesting systems, light-directed reactions and bio-detection. However, excited states of electrons are still unclear for nano-structures and molecules in a light field. Our studies unexpectedly present that light can induce anomalous levels in the electronic structure of a donor–acceptor nanostructure with the help of the photo-excited electrons transferring dynamically between the donor and the acceptor. Furthermore, the physics underlying is revealed to be the photo-induced dynamical spin–flip correlation among electrons. These anomalous levels can significantly enhance the electron current through the nanostructure. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the understanding of the photo-excited electrons with dynamic correlations, which provides a push to the development and application of techniques based on photosensitive molecules and nanostructures, such as light-triggered molecular devices, spectroscopic analysis, bio-molecule detection, and systems for solar energy conversion.

  17. Inelastic scattering of high transfer moment electrons to the first excited state (Jsup(π)=3-) of 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Dominique.

    1979-10-01

    A determination was made of an angular distribution of the inelastic scattering cross-sections of electrons by the first excited state (Jsup(π)=3 - , E*=2.615 MeV) of 208 Pb. The statistical accuracy of previous data was improved between 2 and 2.7 fm -1 and the area of transfer of moment was extended up to qsub(max)=3.4 fm -1 . Cross-sections up to 10 -37 cm 2 /sr were determined whereas the limit reached before was 7x10 -35 cm 2 /sr. In order to determine the transition charge density, it was put into parametric form by a Fourier-Bessel development using 12 coefficients and an 11 fm cut-off radius. The model error inherent in this method is reduced to an insignificant contribution by the sufficiently high transfer of moment. The experimental transition charge density was compared with the theoretical predictions [fr

  18. Density-density functionals and effective potentials in many-body electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of different density-density functionals designed to retain selected properties of the many-body ground state in a non-interacting solution starting from the standard density functional theory ground state. We focus on diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applications that require trial wave functions with optimal Fermion nodes. The theory is extensible and can be used to understand current practices in several electronic structure methods within a generalized density functional framework. The theory justifies and stimulates the search of optimal empirical density functionals and effective potentials for accurate calculations of the properties of real materials, but also cautions on the limits of their applicability. The concepts are tested and validated with a near-analytic model.

  19. Suppression of beam-excited electron waves by an externally applied RF signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumasa, Osamu; Itatani, Ryohei

    1980-11-01

    Suppression of the beam-excited electron wave in a bounded system is investigated in connection with the beam distribution function. Wave suppression has two different processes depending on whether injected beams are reflected at the other end or not. In the absence of reflected beam electrons, deformation of the beam distribution function is observed in relation to the suppression of the electron wave. However, when beam electrons are reflected, the external wave suppresses the electron wave but distribution function shows no appreciable change. These experimental results show that nonlinear behaviors of beam electrons, namely behaviors of reflected beams, are quite important for wave suppression. By using the method of partial simulation, interaction between two waves in the bounded system including nonlinear motions of beam electrons is studied numerically. Qualitative agreement between experimental and numerical results is obtained. (author)

  20. Analysis of Total Electron Content and Electron Density Profile during Different Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, N. P.; Rana, B.; Adhikari, B.

    2017-12-01

    Total Electron content (TEC) and electron density are the key parameters in the mitigation of ionospheric effects on radio communication system. Detail study of the TEC and electron density variations has been carried out during geomagnetic storms, with longitude and latitude, for four different locations: (13˚N -17˚N, 88˚E -98˚E), (30˚N-50˚N, 120˚W -95˚W), (29˚S-26˚S, 167˚W-163˚W,) and (60˚S-45˚S, 120˚W-105˚W) using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observations. In order to find the geomagnetic activity, the solar wind parameters such as north-south component of inter planetary magnetic field (Bz), plasma drift velocity (Vsw), flow pressure (nPa), AE, Dst and Kp indices were obtained from Operating Mission as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) web system. The data for geomagnetic indices have been correlated with the TEC and electron density for four different events of geomagnetic storms on 6 April 2008, 27 March 2008, 4 September 2008, and 11 October 2008. The result illustrates that the observed TEC and electron density profile significantly vary with longitudes and latitudes. This study illustrates that the values of TEC and the vertical electron density profile are influenced by the solar wind parameters associated with solar activities. The peak values of electron density and TEC increase as the geomagnetic storms become stronger. Similarly, the electron density profile varies with altitudes, which peaks around the altitude range of about 250- 350 km, depending on the strength of geomagnetic storms. The results clearly show that the peak electron density shifted to higher altitude (from about 250 km to 350 km) as the geomagnetic disturbances becomes stronger.

  1. Excitation-energy-dependent resonances in x-ray emissions under near-threshold electron excitation of the Ce 3d and 4d levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.B.; Baun, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Soft x-ray appearance potential spectra of the 3d and 4d levels of polycrystalline cerium metal are reported in this paper. Resonant x-ray emissions are observed when the electron-excitation energy sweeps through the ionization energies of the 3d and 4d levels. The resonant x rays excited at the 3d-level onsets are considerably more intense, and are excited at a lower electron-excitation energy than the 3d-series characteristic x rays. In the neighborhood of the 4d-electron thresholds, four line-like structures extend to approx.8 eV below the 4d-electron binding energies, while two broad and more intense structures occur above the 4d onsets, with the largest one reaching a peak intensity at 12 eV above the 4d thresholds. The resonant emissions apparently arise from the decay of threshold-excited states which are bound to the inner vacancy and have core configurations nd 9 4f 3 , (n=3,4). The exchange interaction between the three 4f electrons and the respective d-orbital vacancy spreads the 4d-threshold structures over a 20 eV range of excitation energies and the 3d-threshold structures over a much smaller range

  2. Collimated fast electron beam generation in critical density plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwawaki, T., E-mail: iwawaki-t@eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Habara, H.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Baton, S.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S. [LULI, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-Université Pierre et Marie Curie-CEA, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Nakatsutsumi, M. [LULI, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-Université Pierre et Marie Curie-CEA, 91128 Palaiseau (France); European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Facility (XFEL) GmbH (Germany); Rousseaux, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Filippi, F. [La SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, 00161 Rome (Italy); Nazarov, W. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is observed when an ultra-intense laser pulse (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 300 fs) irradiates a uniform critical density plasma. The uniform plasma is created through the ionization of an ultra-low density (5 mg/c.c.) plastic foam by X-ray burst from the interaction of intense laser (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 600 ps) with a thin Cu foil. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation well reproduces the collimated electron beam with a strong magnetic field in the region of the laser pulse propagation. To understand the physical mechanism of the collimation, we calculate energetic electron motion in the magnetic field obtained from the 2D PIC simulation. As the results, the strong magnetic field (300 MG) collimates electrons with energy over a few MeV. This collimation mechanism may attract attention in many applications such as electron acceleration, electron microscope and fast ignition of laser fusion.

  3. Electron density in non-ideal metal complexes. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, J.N.; Maslen, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of copper sulphate pentahydrate was refined using an accurate set of X-ray data: Msub(r)=249.68, triclinic, Panti 1, a=6.1224(4), b=10.7223(4), c=5.9681(4) A, α=82.35(2), β=107.33(2), γ=102.60(4) 0 , V=364.02(3) A 3 , Z=2, Dsub(x)=2.278 Mg m -3 , Mo Kα, lambda=0.71069 A, μ=3.419 mm -1 , F(000)=254.0, T=298 K, R=0.039 for 7667 reflections. The structural parameters are compared with those obtained by neutron diffraction. The differences between X-ray and neutron positions are related to the hydrogen bonding in the structure. The dominant features in the residual density near the two crystallographically independent Cu atoms result from the redistribution of 3d electrons due to bonding. The density is anisotropic, as expected in view of the Jahn-Teller distortion in the structure. Marked differences in the d-electron distributions for the two Cu atoms correlate with small variations in molecular geometry. Second-nearest-neighbour effects, such as those arising from differently oriented ligating waters, are significant in this structure. Sharp features in the difference density close to the Cu nuclei are similar to those in other Cu 2+ complexes, indicating that the electron density in this region is more reliable than previously believed. (orig.)

  4. Gentlest ascent dynamics for calculating first excited state and exploring energy landscape of Kohn-Sham density functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Lu, Jianfeng; Yang, Weitao

    2015-12-14

    We develop the gentlest ascent dynamics for Kohn-Sham density functional theory to search for the index-1 saddle points on the energy landscape of the Kohn-Sham density functionals. These stationary solutions correspond to excited states in the ground state functionals. As shown by various examples, the first excited states of many chemical systems are given by these index-1 saddle points. Our novel approach provides an alternative, more robust way to obtain these excited states, compared with the widely used ΔSCF approach. The method can be easily generalized to target higher index saddle points. Our results also reveal the physical interest and relevance of studying the Kohn-Sham energy landscape.

  5. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function

  6. C library for topological study of the electronic charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Aray, Yosslen; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2012-12-05

    The topological study of the electronic charge density is useful to obtain information about the kinds of bonds (ionic or covalent) and the atom charges on a molecule or crystal. For this study, it is necessary to calculate, at every space point, the electronic density and its electronic density derivatives values up to second order. In this work, a grid-based method for these calculations is described. The library, implemented for three dimensions, is based on a multidimensional Lagrange interpolation in a regular grid; by differentiating the resulting polynomial, the gradient vector, the Hessian matrix and the Laplacian formulas were obtained for every space point. More complex functions such as the Newton-Raphson method (to find the critical points, where the gradient is null) and the Cash-Karp Runge-Kutta method (used to make the gradient paths) were programmed. As in some crystals, the unit cell has angles different from 90°, the described library includes linear transformations to correct the gradient and Hessian when the grid is distorted (inclined). Functions were also developed to handle grid containing files (grd from DMol® program, CUBE from Gaussian® program and CHGCAR from VASP® program). Each one of these files contains the data for a molecular or crystal electronic property (such as charge density, spin density, electrostatic potential, and others) in a three-dimensional (3D) grid. The library can be adapted to make the topological study in any regular 3D grid by modifying the code of these functions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Harvesting multiple electron-hole pairs generated through plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Smith, Jeremy G; Jain, Prashant K

    2018-05-07

    Multi-electron redox reactions, although central to artificial photosynthesis, are kinetically sluggish. Amidst the search for synthetic catalysts for such processes, plasmonic nanoparticles have been found to catalyse multi-electron reduction of CO 2 under visible light. This example motivates the need for a general, insight-driven framework for plasmonic catalysis of such multi-electron chemistry. Here, we elucidate the principles underlying the extraction of multiple redox equivalents from a plasmonic photocatalyst. We measure the kinetics of electron harvesting from a gold nanoparticle photocatalyst as a function of photon flux. Our measurements, supported by theoretical modelling, reveal a regime where two-electron transfer from the excited gold nanoparticle becomes prevalent. Multiple electron harvesting becomes possible under continuous-wave, visible-light excitation of moderate intensity due to strong interband transitions in gold and electron-hole separation accomplished using a hole scavenger. These insights will help expand the utility of plasmonic photocatalysis beyond CO 2 reduction to other challenging multi-electron, multi-proton transformations such as N 2 fixation.

  8. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  9. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  10. Nonequilibrium excitations and transport of Dirac electrons in electric-field-driven graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajun; Han, Jong E.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium excitations and charge transport in charge-neutral graphene driven with dc electric field by using the nonequilibrium Green's-function technique. Due to the vanishing Fermi surface, electrons are subject to nontrivial nonequilibrium excitations such as highly anisotropic momentum distribution of electron-hole pairs, an analog of the Schwinger effect. We show that the electron-hole excitations, initiated by the Landau-Zener tunneling with a superlinear I V relation I ∝E3 /2 , reaches a steady state dominated by the dissipation due to optical phonons, resulting in a marginally sublinear I V with I ∝E , in agreement with recent experiments. The linear I V starts to show the sign of current saturation as the graphene is doped away from the Dirac point, and recovers the semiclassical relation for the saturated velocity. We give a detailed discussion on the nonequilibrium charge creation and the relation between the electron-phonon scattering rate and the electric field in the steady-state limit. We explain how the apparent Ohmic I V is recovered near the Dirac point. We propose a mechanism where the peculiar nonequilibrium electron-hole creation can be utilized in a infrared device.

  11. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Blanco, F.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°-90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  12. Fine structures of atomic excited states: precision atomic spectroscopy and electron-ion collision process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Cheng Cheng; Li Jiaming

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research fields for future energies such as inertial confinement fusion researches and astrophysics studies especially with satellite observatories advance into stages of precision physics. The relevant atomic data are not only enormous but also of accuracy according to requirements, especially for both energy levels and the collision data. The fine structure of high excited states of atoms and ions can be measured by precision spectroscopy. Such precision measurements can provide not only knowledge about detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions but also a bench mark examination of the accuracy of electron-ion collision data, especially incorporating theoretical computations. We illustrate that by using theoretical calculation methods which can treat the bound states and the adjacent continua on equal footing. The precision spectroscopic measurements of excited fine structures can be served as stringent tests of electron-ion collision data. (authors)

  13. Observations of localised dielectric excitations, secondary events and ionisation damage by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, A.

    1988-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) a high intensity /approximately/0.5nm diameter, probe of 100 keV electrons is formed. This can be positioned to collect energy loss spectra from surfaces, interfaces, small spheres or other particles at controlled values of impact parameter or can be scanned across the object (usually a thin film) to produce high resolution images formed from a variety of signals - small angle or large angle (Z contrast) elastic scattering, inelastic scattering (both valence and core losses), secondary electron emission and x-ray or optical photon emission. The high spatial resolution achievable in a variety of simple structures raises many unsolved theoretical problems concerning the generation, propagation and decay of excitations in inhomogeneous media. These range from quite well posed problems in the mathematical physics of dielectric excitation to problems of plasmon propagation and rather more exotic and less well understood problems of radiation damage. 15 refs., 4 figs

  14. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  15. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, 09210-580 São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  16. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.

    2015-01-01

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule

  17. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  18. Emission spectroscopic studies on dynamics of molecular excitation and dissociation by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro

    1986-01-01

    Emission spectrum by controlled electron impact has been a successful technique for the investigation of molecular dynamics. (1) Molecular excitation. Aromatic molecules give an optical emission similar to fluorescence. However, as is shown by the vibrational structure and the electron energy dependence of benzene emission, its excitation process is not necessarily optical. Some aliphatic molecules also exhibit an emission band at the ultraviolet region. (2) Molecular dissociation. Analysis of the Doppler profile, the threshold energy, the excitation function and the isotope effect of the atomic emission produced in electron-molecule collisions has clarified the dynamics of the molecular dissociation. Especially the Doppler profile has given the translational energy distribution of the fragment atom, which is very useful to disclose the potential energy curve. Its angular dependence has recently found to allow determination of the symmetry of the intermediate excited state and the magnetic sublevel distribution of the fragment atom. These finding has revealed detailed state-to-state dynamics of the molecular dissociation. (author)

  19. Excitation of the 5p57p levels of xenon by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, L.; Sharma, L.; Srivastava, R.; Stauffer, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    We have used our relativistic distorted-wave method to calculate cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of the ground state of xenon to all the 5p 5 7p fine-structure levels. The results are compared with the recent experimental measurements of Jung et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80, 062708 (2009)]. We show that the measured cross sections of Jung et al. for excitation of the levels with angular momentum J odd are dominated by cascading from higher-lying levels. Analytic fits to our cross sections are also provided for use in plasma modeling studies

  20. Antibonding intermediate state in the theory of vibrational excitation of diatomic molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskii, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    An exactly solvable model is constructed for the description of the processes that take place when a slow electron collides with a diatomic molecule (vibrational excitation, associative detachment, and dissociative attachment). As a particular model of the variant, the case of an antibonding (virtual) state of an intermediate state is considered, and a term of this state is parametrized in a very simple manner. The vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment are calculated for a system corresponding to the HCl molecule. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experiment

  1. A search for excited fermions in electron-proton collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1994-10-01

    A search for excited states of the standard model fermions was performed using the ZEUS detector at the HERA electron-proton collider, operating at a centre of mass enery of 296 GeV. In a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.55 pb -1 , no evidence was found for any resonant state decaying into final states composed of a fermion and a gauge boson. Limits on the coupling strength times branching ratio of excited fermions are presented for masses between 50 GeV and 250 GeV, extending previous search regions significantly. (orig.)

  2. Structure and conformational dynamics of molecules in the excited electronic states: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godunov, I.A.; Bataev, V.A.; Maslov, D.V.; Yakovlev, N.N.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of conformational non-rigid molecules in the excited electronic states are investigated by joint theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical part of work consist of two stages. In first stage the ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are carried out using high level methods. In second stage the vibrational problems of the various dimensions are solved by variational method for vibrations of large amplitude. In experimental part of work the vibronic spectra are investigated: gas-phase absorption and also, fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules. Some examples are considered.

  3. Density effects on electronic configurations in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    We present a quantum mechanical model to describe the density effects on electronic configurations inside a plasma environment. Two different approaches are given by starting from a quantum average-atom model. Illustrations are shown for an aluminum plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium at solid density and at a temperature of 100 eV and in the thermodynamic conditions of a recent experiment designed to characterize the effects of the ionization potential depression treatment. Our approach compares well with experiment and is consistent in that case with the approach of Stewart and Pyatt to describe the ionization potential depression rather than with the method of Ecker and Kröll.

  4. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations

  5. High-frequency emissions during the propagation of an electron beam in a high-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalita and Tripathi, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic annular electron beam passing through a high-density plasma excites Langmuir waves via Cerenkov interaction. The Langmuir waves are backscattered off ions via nonlinear ion Landau damping. At moderately high amplitudes these waves are parametrically up-converted by the beam into high-frequency electromagnetic radiation, as observed in some recent experiments. A nonlocal theory of this process is developed in a cylindrical geometry. It is seen that the growth rate of the Langmuir wave scales as one-third power of beam density. The growth rate of parametric instability scales as one-fourth power of beam density and the square root of beam thickness

  6. Wigner-like crystallization of Anderson-localized electron systems with low electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutskin, A.A.; Kovtun, H.A.; Pepper, M.

    2002-01-01

    We consider an electron system under conditions of strong Anderson localization, taking into account interelectron long-range Coulomb repulsion. We establish that at sufficiently low electron densities and sufficiently low temperatures the Coulomb electron interaction brings about ordering of the Anderson-localized electrons into a structure that is close to an ideal (Wigner) crystal lattice, provided the dimension of the system is > 1. This Anderson-Wigner glass (AWG) is a new macroscopic electron state that, on the one hand, is beyond the conventional Fermi glass concept, and on the other hand, qualitatively differs from the known 'plain' Wigner glass (inherent in self-localized electron systems) in that the random slight electron displacements from the ideal crystal sites essentially depend on the electron density. With increasing electron density the AWG is found to turn into the plain Wigner glass or Fermi glass, depending on the width of the random spread of the electron levels. It is shown that the residual disorder of the AWG is characterized by a multi-valley ground-state degeneracy akin to that in a spin glass. Some general features of the AWG are discussed, and a new conduction mechanism of a creep type is predicted

  7. The relationship between ionospheric temperature, electron density and solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.N.; Williams, P.J.S.

    1980-01-01

    In studying the F-region of the ionosphere several authors have concluded that the difference between the electron temperature Tsub(e) and the ion temperature Tsub(i) is related to the electron density N. It was later noted that solar activity (S) was involved and an empirical relationship of the following form was established: Tsub(e)-Tsub(i) = A-BN+CS. The present paper extends this work using day-time data over a four year period. The results are given and discussed. A modified form of the empirical relation is proposed. (U.K.)

  8. Potential and electron density calculated for freely expanding plasma by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C. Y.; Tsai, Y. H.; Ma, C.; Wen, M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the radial distributions of potential and electron density in free expansion plasma induced by an electron beam irradiating on the plate. The region of plasma production is assumed to be cylindrical, and the plasma expansion is assumed to be from a cylindrical source. Therefore, the one-dimensional model in cylindrical coordinates is employed in order to analyze the radial distributions of the potential and electron density. The Runge-Kutta method and the perturbation method are utilized in order to obtain the numerical and approximate solutions, respectively. The results reveal that the decrease in the initial ion energy makes most of the ions gather near the plasma production region and reduces the distribution of the average positive potential, electron, and ion density along the radial direction. The oscillation of steady-state plasma along the radial direction is also presented in this paper. The ions induce a larger amplitude of oscillation along the radial direction than do electrons because the electrons oscillate around slowly moving ions due to a far smaller electron mass than ion mass. The radial distributions of the positive potential and electron density predicted from this study are compared with the available experimental data.

  9. State-specific transport properties of electronically excited Ar and C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, a theoretical model of state-resolved transport properties in electronically excited atomic species developed earlier is applied to argon and carbon atomic species. It is shown that for Ar and C, similarly to the case of atomic nitrogen and oxygen, the Slater-like models can be applied to calculate diameters of electronically excited atoms. Using the Slater-like model it is shown that for half-filled N (2 px1py1pz1) and full-filled Ar (3 px2py2pz2) electronic shells the growth of atomic radius goes slowly compared to C (2 px1py1) and O (2 px2py1pz1). The effect of collision diameters on the transport properties of Ar and C is evaluated. The influence of accounted number of electronic levels on the transport coefficients is examined for the case of Boltzmann distributions over electronic energy levels. It is emphasized that in the temperature range 1000-14000 K, for Boltzmann-like distributions over electronic states the number of accounted electronic levels do not influence the transport coefficients. Contrary to this, for higher temperatures T > 14000 K this effect becomes of importance, especially for argon.

  10. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  11. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H β spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier

  12. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N 4 ). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S ^2 〉 are also developed and tested

  13. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N{sup 4}). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S{sup ^2}〉 are also developed and tested.

  14. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Verity Instruments, Inc., 2901 Eisenhower Street, Carrollton, Texas 75007 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  15. The electronic density of states of disordered compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geertsma, W.; Dijkstra, J.

    1984-11-01

    Recently, the electronic properties of liquid alkali (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs)-group IV (Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) alloys have been discussed by the present authors using a tight-binding model. Only anion orbitals (= group IV) are taken into account. Disorder is described by a pseudo lattice, which takes into account local coordination in one of the sublattices (cation or anion) only. In the first part of this paper it is shown that this approximation is consistent with the usual valence rules used by structural chemists for crystalline structures. In the second part of the paper the solutions for the density of states of the tight-binding Hamiltonian are studied for a number of pseudolattices. The infinite set of Green function equations is solved by using the effective transfer method, which replaces the famous Block condition. It is shown that such a model can explain the formation of bandgaps in disordered systems. By choosing the proper smallest cluster(s) of transfer loops to model the real structure by a pseudolattice, a density of states is obtained which represents properly that of the corresponding crystalline structure. Structures reminiscent to those caused by van Hove singularities already appear in the electronic density of states when relatively small cluster(s) of transfer loops are used. The approach outlined in this paper is capable of describing the electronic density of states due to various degrees of local order in a sublattice. Some of the peculiarities occurring in the solution of the density of states of certain pseudolattices, such as poles outside the band, are discussed in an appendix. (author)

  16. New Data on the Topside Electron Density Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from hmF2 to approx. 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms and most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350,000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling approx.70 % of the ionograms. An 'editing process' is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle. The ISIS data restoration efforts are supported through NASA's Applied Systems and Information Research Program.

  17. Effective atomic number and electron density of marble concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; El-Khayatt, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron density (N e ) of different type concrete have been measured and the results were compared with the calculation obtained using the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) obtained via XCOM in the photon energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV. Six different concrete in where marble has been used in the rate of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 %, has been used in the study. (author)

  18. Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect for linear electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, H.; Osland, P.; Wu, T.T.; European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva

    2001-01-01

    When the electron density is a linear function of distance, it is known that the MSW equations for two neutrino species can be solved in terms of known functions. It is shown here that more generally, for any number of neutrino species, these MSW equations can be solved exactly in terms of single integrals. While these integrals cannot be expressed in terms of known functions, some of their simple properties are obtained. Application to the solar neutrino problem is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  19. Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein Effect for Linear Electron Density

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, H; Wu Tai Tsun; Lehmann, Harry; Osland, Per; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2001-01-01

    When the electron density is a linear function of distance, it is known that the MSW equations for two neutrino species can be solved in terms of known functions. It is shown here that more generally, for any number of neutrino species, these MSW equations can be solved exactly in terms of single integrals. While these integrals cannot be expressed in terms of known functions, some of their simple properties are obtained. Application to the solar neutrino problem is briefly discussed.

  20. Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein Effect for Linear Electron Density

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, H; Osland, P; Wu Tai Tsun

    2000-01-01

    When the electron density is a linear function of distance, it is known that the MSW equations for two neutrino species can be solved in terms of known functions. It is shown here that more generally, for any number of neutrino species, these MSW equations can be solved exactly in terms of single integrals. While these integrals cannot be expressed in terms of known functions, some of their simple properties are obtained. Application to the solar neutrino problem is briefly discussed.