WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron donor molecules

  1. On the effect of nuclear bridge modes on donor-acceptor electronic coupling in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Daly; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Speiser, Shammai; Peskin, Uri

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of intra-molecular electronic coupling in a symmetric DBA (donor-bridge-acceptor) complex, in which a donor electronic site is coupled to an acceptor site by way of intervening orbitals of a molecular bridge unit. In the off-resonant (deep tunneling) regime of electronic transport, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (MO's) of the DBA system are split into distinguishable donor/acceptor and bridge orbitals. The effect of geometrical changes at the bridge on the donor/acceptor electronic energy manifold is studied for local stretching and bending modes. It is demonstrated that the energy splitting in the manifold of donor/acceptor unoccupied MOs changes in response to such changes, as assumed in simple McConnell-type models. Limitations of the simple models are revealed where the electronic charging of the bridge orbitals correlates with increasing donor/acceptor orbital energy splitting only for stretching but not for bending bridge modes.

  2. T-Shaped Indan-1,3-dione derivatives as promising electron donors for bulk heterojunction small molecule solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Tham; Solanke, Parmeshwar; Pathak, Dinesh; Wagner, Tomas; Bureš, Filip; Reed, Tyler; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2017-07-01

    We report on the photovoltaic performance of novel T-Shaped Indan-1,3-dione derivatives as donors in a solution processed bulk heterojunction solar cells. Small molecule bulk heterojunction solar cells of these molecules with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) were fabricated and characterized. The preliminary characterization of these devices yielded a PCE of 0.24% and 0.33% for two separate derivatives. These low power conversion efficiencies were attributed to a high surface roughness with a large number of dewetting spots. Doping with 10% Polystyrene in the Indan-1,3-dione derivatives decreases surface roughness and dewetting spots thereby improving the efficiency of the devices. Efficiency of the devices was found as 0.39% and 0.51% for two derivatives after doping with polystyrene. The charge transfer mechanism was studied with photoluminescence quenching. The morphology and packing behavior of molecules were further studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer through hydrogen bonds in a rod-like donor-acceptor molecule: A time-resolved EPR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakob, Manuela; Berg, Alexander; Stavitski, Eli; Chernick, Erin T.; Weiss, Emily A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Levanon, Haim

    2006-01-01

    Light-driven multi-step intramolecular electron transfer in a rod-like triad, in which two of the three redox components are linked by three hydrogen bonds, was studied by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) and optical spectroscopies. One part of the molecule consists of a p-methoxyaniline primary electron donor (MeOAn) covalently linked to a 4-aminonaphthalene-1, 8-dicarboximide (6ANI) chromophoric electron acceptor (MeOAn-6ANI). The unsubstituted dicarboximide of 6ANI serves as one half of a hydrogen bonding receptor pair. The other half of the receptor pair consists of a melamine linked to a naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NI) secondary electron acceptor (MEL-NI). TREPR spectroscopy is used to probe the electronic interaction between the radicals within the photogenerated, spin-correlated radical ion pair MeOAn ·+ -6ANI/MEL-NI ·- . The results are compared to those obtained in earlier studies in which MeOAn-6ANI is covalently linked to NI through a 2,5-dimethylphenyl group (MeOAn-6ANI-Ph-NI). We show that the electronic coupling between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor in the hydrogen-bonded radical ion pair MeOAn ·+ -6ANI/MEL-NI ·- is very similar to that of MeOAn ·+ -6ANI-Ph-NI ·-

  4. Density functional theory study of silodithiophene thiophenepyrrolopyrroledion-based small molecules: The effect of alkyl side chain length in electron donor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong Kyun; Yeo, Hak; Kwak, Kyung Won [Dept. of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Woon; Kim, Bong Soo [Photo-electronic Hybrids Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Koo [Dept. of Chemistry, Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Push–pull small molecules are promising electron-donor materials for organic solar cells. Thus, precise prediction of their electronic structures is of paramount importance to control the optical and electrical properties of the solar cells. Various types of alkyl chains are usually introduced to increase solubility and modify the morphology of the resulting molecular films. Here, using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT), we report the precise effect of increasing the length of the alkyl chain on the electronic structure of an electron donor molecule 6,60-((4,4-dialkyl-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]-dithiophene-2,6-diyl) bis(thiophene-5,2-diyl))bis(2,5-alkyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl) -2,5-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione) (DTS1TDPP). Alkyl groups were attached to the bridging position (silicon atom) of the fused rings and nitrogen atom of the pyrrolopyrroledione groups. We demonstrate that the alkyl groups do not perturb the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels, π-delocalized backbone structure, and UV–Vis absorption spectrum when they are placed at the least steric effect positions.

  5. Rational design and characterization of high-efficiency planar A–π–D–π–A type electron donors in small molecule organic solar cells: A quantum chemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dongmei; Ding, Weilu; Geng, Zhiyuan; Wang, Li; Geng, Yun; Su, Zhongmin; Yu, Hailing

    2014-01-01

    Taking the reported donor DR3TBDT as reference, a series of A–π–D–π–A type donor molecules involving different planar donor cores were designed and investigated by using density functional theory (DFT)/time-dependent DFT methods. Preliminary calculations on geometries, energy levels and spectrum properties show that four of the designed molecules (4, 5, 12 and 13) could become potential donor replacements of DR3TBDT due to their good planarity, larger light harvesting efficiencies and similar exciton migration capability. Additionally, several factors influencing on short-circuit current density (J sc ) were analyzed by in-depth quantum chemical investigations on the transition density matrix, charge transfer indexes, exciton binding energy and Gibbs free energy loss in charge dissociation process. Comparative analyses demonstrate that 4 with indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b′]dithiophene donor core has more significant electron transfer character and favorable exciton dissociation capability for enhancing the J sc , and would be potentially promising donor material in organic solar cells. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A series of A–π–D–π–A type donors with different donor core for OSC were designed. • The relationship between donor properties and device performance is explored by DFT. • An In-depth quantum chemical investigation on the affecting factors on J sc . • The efficiency of new donor 4 may surpass the reported donor DR3TBDT

  6. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  7. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  8. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  9. Effects of a donor on the bond property of quantum-dot molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Min; Luo Ying; Ma Ben-Kun; Duan Su-Qing; Zhao Xian-Geng

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of effective mass approximation, we have calculated the electronic structure of the two laterally coupled quantum dots with a donor by the finite element method. The calculated results show that the bond states of quantum-dot molecules are quite sensitive to the donor positions. By varying the donor position, the transition from covalent to ionic bond state is realized for some electronic states. Some extreme cases are also discussed for comparison.

  10. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  11. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  12. Perylene-Diimide Based Donor-Acceptor-Donor Type Small-Molecule Acceptors for Solution-Processable Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesamoorthy, Ramasamy; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan; Sakthivel, Pachagounder

    2017-12-01

    Development of nonfullerene acceptors plays an important role in the commercial availability of plastic solar cells. We report herein synthesis of bay-substituted donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D)-type perylene diimide (PDI)-based small molecules (SM-1 to SM-4) by Suzuki coupling method and their use as acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs) with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer donor. We varied the number of electron-rich thiophene units and the solubilizing side chains and also evaluated the optical and electrochemical properties of the small molecules. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (HR-MS). The small molecules showed extensive and strong absorption in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region up to 750 nm, with bandgap (E_{{g}}^{{opt}} ) reduced below use as electron-accepting materials. The small molecules showed good thermal stability up to 300°C. BHJ-OSCs with SM-1 and P3HT polymer donor showed maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.19% with V oc of 0.30 V, J sc of 1.72 mA cm-2, and fill factor (FF) of 37%. The PCE decreased with the number of thiophene units. The PCE of SM-2 was lower than that of SM-1. This difference in PCE can be explained by the higher aggregation tendency of the bithiophene compared with the thiophene unit. Introduction of the solubilizing group in the bay position increased the aggregation property, leading to much lower PCE than for the small molecules without solubilizing group.

  13. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure and properties (includingreactivt'ty) - both static (independent of time) and ... Furthermore, since the energy of H2 + in the ground state must be lower than that of .... (Figure 2b); note also that dp is positive in parts of the antibinding regions behind the two ... But, now both the sizes and shapes of molecules enter into.

  14. Medium-Bandgap Small-Molecule Donors Compatible with Both Fullerene and Nonfullerene Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yong; Yan, Cenqi; Kan, Bin; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Li-Chuan; Hu, Chen-Xia; Lau, Tsz-Ki; Lu, Xinhui; Sun, Chun-Lin; Shao, Xiangfeng; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2018-03-21

    Much effort has been devoted to the development of new donor materials for small-molecule organic solar cells due to their inherent advantages of well-defined molecular weight, easy purification, and good reproducibility in photovoltaic performance. Herein, we report two small-molecule donors that are compatible with both fullerene and nonfullerene acceptors. Both molecules consist of an (E)-1,2-di(thiophen-2-yl)ethane-substituted (TVT-substituted) benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) as the central unit, and two rhodanine units as the terminal electron-withdrawing groups. The central units are modified with either alkyl side chains (DRBDT-TVT) or alkylthio side chains (DRBDT-STVT). Both molecules exhibit a medium bandgap with complementary absorption and proper energy level offset with typical acceptors like PC 71 BM and IDIC. The optimized devices show a decent power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.87% for small-molecule organic solar cells and 6.63% for nonfullerene all small-molecule organic solar cells. Our results reveal that rationally designed medium-bandgap small-molecule donors can be applied in high-performance small-molecule organic solar cells with different types of acceptors.

  15. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  16. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. Observing electron motion in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelkowski, S; Yudin, G L; Bandrauk, A D

    2006-01-01

    We study analytically the possibility for monitoring electron motion in a molecule using two ultrashort laser pulses. The first prepares a coherent superposition of two electronic molecular states whereas the second (attosecond pulse) photoionizes the molecule. We show that interesting information about electron dynamics can be obtained from measurement of the photoelectron spectra as a function of the time delay between two pulses. In particular, asymmetries in photoelectron angular distribution provide a simple signature of the electron motion within the initial time-dependent coherently coupled two molecular states. Both asymmetries and electron spectra show very strong two-centre interference patterns. We illustrate these effects using as an example a dissociating hydrogen molecular ion probed by the attosecond pulses

  18. Impact of Thermal Annealing on Organic Photovoltaic Cells Using Regioisomeric Donor-Acceptor-Acceptor Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Han, Han; Zou, Yunlong; Lee, Ying-Chi; Oshima, Hiroya; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Holmes, Russell J

    2017-08-02

    We report a promising set of donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) electron-donor materials based on coplanar thieno[3,2-b]/[2,3-b]indole, benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole, and dicyanovinylene, which are found to show broadband absorption with high extinction coefficients. The role of the regioisomeric electron-donating thienoindole moiety on the physical and structural properties is examined. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) based on the thieno[2,3-b]indole-based electron donor NTU-2, using C 70 as an electron acceptor, show a champion power conversion efficiency of 5.2% under AM 1.5G solar simulated illumination. This efficiency is limited by a low fill factor (FF), as has previously been the case in D-A-A systems. In order to identify the origin of the limited FF, further insight into donor layer charge-transport behavior is realized by examining planar heterojunction OPVs, with emphasis on the evolution of film morphology with thermal annealing. Compared to as-deposited OPVs that exhibit insufficient donor crystallinity, crystalline OPVs based on annealed thin films show an increase in the short-circuit current density, FF, and power conversion efficiency. These results suggest that that the crystallization of D-A-A molecules might not be realized spontaneously at room temperature and that further processing is needed to realize efficient charge transport in these materials.

  19. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. New donor-acceptor-donor molecules based on quinoline acceptor unit with Schiff base bridge: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowicz, Sonia [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Siwy, Mariola [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Str., 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Filapek, Michal; Malecki, Jan G. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Smolarek, Karolina; Grzelak, Justyna; Mackowski, Sebastian [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 5 Grudziadzka Str., 87-100 Torun (Poland); Slodek, Aneta, E-mail: aneta.slodek@us.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa, E-mail: ewa.schab-balcerzak@us.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Str., 41-819 Zabrze (Poland)

    2017-03-15

    Three solution-processable small organic molecules bearing quinoline as electron-accepting moiety were synthesized via condensation reaction of novel 6-amino-2-(2,2’-bithiophen-5-yl)-4-phenylquinoline with 2,2’-bithiophene-5-carboxaldehyde, 9-ethyl-9H-carbazole-3-carbaldehyde and 9-phenanthrenecarboxaldehyde. The presence of alternating electron-donating and accepting units results in a donor-acceptor-donor architecture of these molecular systems. Thermal, photophysical, and electrochemical properties of these small molecules were examined and the experimental results were supported by the density functional theory calculations. The obtained molecular systems exhibited high thermal stability with decomposition temperatures (5% weight loss) exceeding 330 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. It was found, based on DSC measurements, that investigated Schiff bases form amorphous material with glass transition temperatures between 88 and 190 °C. They also showed a UV–vis absorption in the range of 250–500 nm both in solution and in solid state as film and blend with PMMA and PVK. Photoluminescence measurements revealed moderately strong blue-light emission of the imines in solution as well as in PMMA blend with quantum yields in the range of 2–26%. In the case of imines dispersed in PVK matrix the emission of green light was mainly observed. In addition, when mixed with plasmonically active silver nanowires, the compounds exhibit relatively strong electroluminescence signal, associated with plasmonics enhancement, as evidenced by high-resolution photoluminescence imaging. The energy band gap estimated based on cyclic voltammetry was between 2.38 and 2.61 eV. - Highlights: • New Schiff bases possess donor-acceptor-imine-bridge-donor architecture were synthesized and examined. • Thorough characterization of optical and electrochemical properties of novel Schiff bases has been carried out. • Optical and electrochemical measurements were compared with DFT

  1. Nanographenes as electron-deficient cores of donor-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Min; Hou, Hao; Zhou, Yan-Zhen; Zhao, Xin-Jing; Tang, Chun; Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Müllen, Klaus

    2018-05-15

    Conjugation of nanographenes (NGs) with electro-active molecules can establish donor-acceptor π-systems in which the former generally serve as the electron-donating moieties due to their electronic-rich nature. In contrast, here we report a series of reversed donor-acceptor structures are obtained by C-N coupling of electron-deficient perchlorinated NGs with electron-rich anilines. Selective amination at the vertexes of the NGs is unambiguously shown through X-ray crystallography. By varying the donating ability of the anilino groups, the optical and assembly properties of donor-acceptor NGs can be finely modulated. The electron-deficient concave core of the resulting conjugates can host electron-rich guest molecules by intermolecular donor-acceptor interactions and gives rise to charge-transfer supramolecular architectures.

  2. Electron interactions with polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a number of the features of discrete and continuous spectra of electrons interacting with polar molecules. Attention is focused on the extent to which theoretical predictions concerning cross sections, resonances, and bound states are strongly influenced by the various approximations that are so ubiquitous in the treatment of such problems. Similarly, threshold scattering and photodetachment processes are examined for the case of weakly bound dipole states whose higher members overlap the continuum

  3. A naphthodithiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole donor molecule for efficient solution-processed solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loser, Stephen; Bruns, Carson J; Miyauchi, Hiroyuki; Ortiz, Rocío Ponce; Facchetti, Antonio; Stupp, Samuel I; Marks, Tobin J

    2011-06-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and first implementation of a naphtho[2,3-b:6,7-b']dithiophene (NDT)-based donor molecule in highly efficient organic photovoltaics (OPVs). When NDT(TDPP)(2) (TDPP = thiophene-capped diketopyrrolopyrrole) is combined with the electron acceptor PC(61)BM, a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.06 ± 0.06% is achieved-a record for a PC(61)BM-based small-molecule OPV. The substantial PCE is attributed to the broad, high oscillator strength visible absorption, the ordered molecular packing, and an exceptional hole mobility of NDT(TDPP)(2). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  5. Density functional theory design D-D-A type small molecule with 1.03 eV narrow band gap: effect of electron donor unit for organic photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sıdır, İsa

    2017-10-01

    Six new low-band-gap copolymers of donor-donor-acceptor (D-D-A) architecture have been designed using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory methods in order to use them in organic photovoltaic cell (OPVC). Phenanthro[3,4-d:9,10-d‧]bis([1,2,3]thiadiazole)-10,12-dicarbonitrile moiety has been used as an acceptor for all compounds. We insert benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophene and N,N-diphenylbenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophen-2-amine units as donor to complete designing of copolymers. In order to tuning the optical and electronic properties, we have modified the donor unit by substituted with amine, methoxyamine, N-methylenethiophen-2-amine, methoxy, alkoxy moieties. The band gap (Eg), HOMO and LUMO values and plots, open circuit voltage (VOC) as well as optical properties have been analysed for designed copolymers. The optimised copolymers exhibit low-band-gap lying in the range of 1.03-2.24 eV. DPTD-6 copolymer presents the optimal properties to be used as an active layer due to its low Eg (1.03 eV) and a moderate VOC (0.56 eV). Thus, OPVC based on this copolymer in bulk-heterojunction composites with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as an acceptor has been modelled. Eg and VOC values of composite material DPTD-6:PCBM are found as 1.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively. A model band diagram has been established for OPVC, simulating the energy transfer between active layers.

  6. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  7. Pendant unit effect on electron tunneling in U-shaped molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Chakrabarti, Subhasis; Waldeck, David H.; Oliver, Anna M.; Paddon-Row, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    The electron transfer reactions of three U-shaped donor-bridge-acceptor molecules with different pendant groups have been studied in different solvents as a function of temperature. Analysis of the electron transfer kinetics in nonpolar and weakly polar solvents provides experimental reaction Gibbs energies that are used to parameterize a molecular solvation model. This solvation model is then used to predict energetic parameters in the electron transfer rate constant expression and allow the electronic coupling between the electron donor and electron acceptor groups to be determined from the rate data. The U-shaped molecules differ by alkylation of the aromatic pendant group, which lies in the 'line-of-sight' between the donor and acceptor groups. The findings show that the electronic coupling through the pendant group is similar for these molecules

  8. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  9. Electron affinities of atoms, molecules, and radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, A.A.; McCorkle, D.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    We review briefly but comprehensively the theoretical, semiempirical and experimental methods employed to determine electron affinities (EAs) of atoms, molecules and radicals, and summarize the EA data obtained by these methods. The detailed processes underlying the principles of the experimental methods are discussed very briefly. It is, nonetheless, instructive to recapitulate the definition of EA and those of the related quantities, namely, the vertical detachment energy, VDE, and the vertical attachment energy, VAE. The EA of an atom is defined as the difference in total energy between the ground state of the neutral atom (plus the electron at rest at infinity) and its negative ion. The EA of a molecule is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion when both, the neutral molecules and the negative ion, are in their ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states. The VDE is defined as the minimum energy required to eject the electron from the negative ion (in its ground electronic and nuclear state) without changing the internuclear separation; since the vertical transition may leave the neutral molecule in an excited vibrational/rotational state, the VDE, although the same as the EA for atoms is, in general, different (larger than), from the EA for molecules. Similarly, the VAE is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule in its ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion formed by addition of an electron to the neutral molecule without allowing a change in the intermolecular separation of the constituent nuclei; it is a quantity appropriate to those cases where the lowest negative ion state lies above the ground states of the neutral species and is less or equal to EA

  10. Donors in Semiconductors - are they Understood in Electronic Era?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmochowski, Janusz E

    2007-01-01

    The physics of semiconductors and contemporary electronics cannot be understood without impurities. The hydrogen-like shallow donor (and acceptor) state of electron (hole) bound by Coulomb electrostatic force of excess charge of impurity is used to control conductivity of semiconductors and construct semiconductor diodes, transistors and numerous types of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices, including lasers. Recently, surprisingly, the physics of impurity donors appeared to be much reacher. Experimental evidence has been provided for universal existence of other types of electronic states of the same donor impurity: i) mysterious, deep, DX-type state resulting in metastability - slow hysteresis phenomena - understood as two-electron, acceptor-like state of donor impurity, formed upon large lattice distortion or rearrangement around impurity and accompanying capture of second electron, resulting in negative electron correlation energy U; ii) deep, localized, fully symmetric, A1, one-electron donor state of substitutional impurity. The latter state can be formed from the 'ordinary' shallow hydrogen-like state in the process of strong localization of electron by short range, local potential of impurity core, preserving full (A 1 ) symmetry of the substitutional impurity in the host lattice. The 'anticrossing' of the two A 1 (shallow hydrogenic and deep localized) energy levels upon transformation is observed. All types of electronic states of impurity can be universally observed for the same donor impurity and mutual transformation between different states occur upon changing experimental conditions. The knowledge about existence and properties of these n ew , molecular type, donor states in semiconductors seems still await general recognition and positive application in contemporary material and device science and engineering

  11. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  12. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  13. Sensing single electrons with single molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakhotnik, Taras

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for probing transport of just one electron, a process of great importance both in nature and in artificial devices. Our idea for locating a single electron is analogues to the conventional GPS where signals from several satellites are used to locate a macro object. Using fluorescent molecules as tiny sensors, it is possible to determine 3D displacement vector of an electron

  14. Nature of chalcogen hor ellipsis chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Williams, J.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The nature of chalcogen{hor ellipsis}chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts was examined by performing ab initio SCF-MO/MP2 calculations on H{sub 2}X{hor ellipsis}XH{sub 2}(X = O, S, SE, Te) and MM2 calculations on donor dimers (TXF){sub 2} (X = S, SE, Te) and (BEDX-TTF){sub 2} (X = O, S). 14 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  16. Attosecond electron dynamics in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    WöRner, Hans Jakob

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss some of our recent experiments that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. Using high-harmonic spectroscopy, we resolve the migration of an electron hole across the molecule with a resolution of 100 as and simultaneously demonstrate extensive control over charge migration. In the second class of experiments, we use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from molecules in the gas phase and from a liquid-water microjet, resolving electron transport through liquid water on the attosecond time scale.

  17. Ground-state thermodynamics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Cao, Dennis; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-09-18

    Fashioned through billions of years of evolution, biological molecular machines, such as ATP synthase, myosin, and kinesin, use the intricate relative motions of their components to drive some of life's most essential processes. Having control over the motions in molecules is imperative for life to function, and many chemists have designed, synthesized, and investigated artificial molecular systems that also express controllable motions within molecules. Using bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), based on donor-acceptor recognition motifs, we have sought to imitate the sophisticated nanoscale machines present in living systems. In this Account, we analyze the thermodynamic characteristics of a series of redox-switchable [2]rotaxanes and [2]catenanes. Control and understanding of the relative intramolecular movements of components in MIMs have been vital in the development of a variety of applications of these compounds ranging from molecular electronic devices to drug delivery systems. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs undergo redox-activated switching between two isomeric states. Under ambient conditions, the dominant translational isomer, the ground-state coconformation (GSCC), is in equilibrium with the less favored translational isomer, the metastable-state coconformation (MSCC). By manipulating the redox state of the recognition site associated with the GSCC, we can stimulate the relative movements of the components in these bistable MIMs. The thermodynamic parameters of model host-guest complexes provide a good starting point to rationalize the ratio of GSCC to MSCC at equilibrium. The bistable [2]rotaxanes show a strong correlation between the relative free energies of model complexes and the ground-state distribution constants (K(GS)). This relationship does not always hold for bistable [2]catenanes, most likely because of the additional steric and electronic constraints present when the two rings are mechanically interlocked with each other

  18. Crystal growth of new charge-transfer salts based on π-conjugated donor molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morherr, Antonia, E-mail: morherr@stud.uni-frankfurt.de [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Witt, Sebastian [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Chernenkaya, Alisa [Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Bäcker, Jan-Peter [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Schönhense, Gerd [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Bolte, Michael [Institut für anorganische Chemie, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Krellner, Cornelius [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    New charge transfer crystals of π-conjugated, aromatic molecules (phenanthrene and picene) as donors were obtained by physical vapor transport. The melting behavior, optimization of crystal growth and the crystal structure are reported for charge transfer salts with (fluorinated) tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ-F{sub x}, x=0, 2, 4), which was used as acceptor material. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Growth conditions for different vapor pressures in closed ampules were applied and the effect of these starting conditions for crystal size and quality is reported. The process of charge transfer was investigated by geometrical analysis of the crystal structure and by infrared spectroscopy on single crystals. With these three different acceptor strengths and the two sets of donor materials, it is possible to investigate the distribution of the charge transfer systematically. This helps to understand the charge transfer process in this class of materials with π-conjugated donor molecules.

  19. Biotechnological aspects of sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sulfate reduction can be used for the removal and recovery of oxidized sulfur compounds and metals from waste streams. However, the costs of conventional electron donors, like hydrogen and ethanol, limit the application possibilities. Methane from natural gas or biogas would be a more

  20. Electron attachment to the phthalide molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asfandiarov, N. L. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Bashkir State Pedagogical University, Oktyabrskoy Revolutsii St., 3a, 450000 Ufa (Russian Federation); Pshenichnyuk, S. A. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); St.-Petersburg State University, Uljanovskaja, 1, 198504 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vorob’ev, A. S.; Nafikova, E. P. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Lachinov, A. N. [Bashkir State Pedagogical University, Oktyabrskoy Revolutsii St., 3a, 450000 Ufa (Russian Federation); Kraikin, V. A. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 59, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Modelli, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Universitá di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali (CIRSA), Universitá di Bologna, Via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    Phthalide, the simplest chain of conductive polymer thin film, was investigated by means of Electron Transmission Spectroscopy, Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry, and density functional theory quantum chemistry. It has been found that formation of gas-phase long-lived molecular anions of phthalide around 0.7 eV takes place through cleavage of a C–O bond of the pentacyclic ring of the parent molecular anion to give a vibrationally excited (electronically more stable) open-ring molecular anion. The energy of the transition state for ring opening of the parent negative ion is calculated to be 0.65 eV above the neutral ground state of the molecule. The energy (2.64 eV) evaluated for the corresponding transition state in the neutral molecule is much higher, so that the process of electron detachment from the anion must lead to a neutral molecule with its initial pentacyclic structure. The average lifetime of the molecular negative ions formed at an electron energy of 0.75 eV and 80 °C is measured to be about 100 μs. The known switching effect of thin phthalide films could stem from the presence of a similar open/closed transition state also in the polymer.

  1. Electron Impact Excitation-Ionization of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Esam Abobakr A.

    In the last few decades, the study of atomic collisions by electron-impact has made significant advances. The most difficult case to study is electron impact ionization of molecules for which many approximations have to be made and the validity of these approximations can only be checked by comparing with experiment. In this thesis, I have examined the Molecular three-body distorted wave (M3DW) or Molecular four-body distorted wave (M4DW) approximations for electron-impact ionization. These models use a fully quantum mechanical approach where all particles are treated quantum mechanically and the post collision interaction (PCI) is treated to all orders of perturbation. These electron impact ionization collisions play central roles in the physics and chemistry of upper atmosphere, biofuel, the operation of discharges and lasers, radiation induced damage in biological material like damage to DNA by secondary electrons, and plasma etching processes. For the M3DW model, I will present results for electron impact single ionization of small molecules such as Water, Ethane, and Carbon Dioxide and the much larger molecules Tetrahydrofuran, phenol, furfural, 1-4 Benzoquinone. I will also present results for the four-body problem in which there are two target electrons involved in the collision. M4DW results will be presented for dissociative excitation-ionization of orientated D2. I will show that M4DW calculations using a variational wave function for the ground state that included s- and p- orbital states give better agreement to the experimental measurements than a ground state approximated as a product of two 1s-type Dyson orbitals.

  2. Electron correlation in molecules and condensed phases

    CERN Document Server

    March, N H

    1996-01-01

    This reference describes the latest research on correlation effects in the multicenter problems of atoms, molecules, and solids The author utilizes first- and second-order matrices, including the important observable electron density rho(r), and the Green function for discussing quantum computer simulations With its focus on concepts and theories, this volume will benefit experimental physicists, materials scientists, and physical and inorganic chemists as well as graduate students

  3. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  4. Design of butterfly type organic dye sensitizers with double electron donors: The first principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenqing; Shao, Di; Li, Juan; Tang, Lian; Shao, Changjin

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we designed a series of butterfly type organic dyes, named ME07-ME13 by introducing such as triphenylamine, phenothiazine, coumarin groups etc. as electron donors and further investigated their absorption spectra using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT). All designed dyes cover the entire visible absorption spectrum from 300 to 800 nm. It's fascinating that ME13 molecule has two absorption peak and the molar coefficient of two absorption peaks are above 4.645 × 104 M-1·cm-1. The light absorption area of ME13 exhibits an increment of 16.5-19.1% compared to ME07-ME12. Furthermore, we performed a detailed analysis on their geometrical and electronic properties, including molecular structures, energy levels, light harvesting efficiency (LHE), driving force (ΔGinject), regeneration (ΔGregen),electron dipole moments (μnormal), intermolecular electron transfer and dye/(TiO2)38 system electron transitions. The results of calculation reveal that double coumarin donors in ME13 are promising functional groups for butterfly type organic dye sensitizers. It is expected that the design of double donors can provide a new strategy and guidance for the investigation in high efficiency dye-sensitized devices.

  5. Electron microscope autoradiography of isolated DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delain, Etienne; Bouteille, Michel

    1980-01-01

    Autoradiographs of 3 H-thymidine-labelled DNA molecules were observed with an electron microscope. After ten months of exposure significant labelling was obtained with tritiated T7 DNA molecules which had a specific activity of 630,000 cpm/μg. Although isolated DNA molecules were not stretched out to such an extent that they could be rigorously compared to straight 'hot lines', the resolution was estimated and found to be similar to that obtained by autoradiography on thin plastic sections. The H.D. value was of the order of 1600A. From the known specific activity of the macromolecules, it was possible to compare the expected number of disintegrations from the samples to the number of grains obtained on the autoradiograms. This enabled us to calculate 1/ The absolute autoradiographic efficiency and 2/ The per cent ratio of thymidine residues labelled with tritium. These results throw some light on the resolution and sensitivity of electron microscope autoradiography of shadowed isolated macromolecules as compared to thin plastic sections

  6. Theoretical characterization and design of small molecule donor material containing naphthodithiophene central unit for efficient organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yu-Ai; Geng, Yun; Li, Hai-Bin; Jin, Jun-Ling; Wu, Yong; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-07-15

    To seek for high-performance small molecule donor materials used in heterojunction solar cell, six acceptor-donor-acceptor small molecules based on naphtho[2,3-b:6,7-b']dithiophene (NDT) units with different acceptor units were designed and characterized using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Their geometries, electronic structures, photophysical, and charge transport properties have been scrutinized comparing with the reported donor material NDT(TDPP)2 (TDPP  =  thiophene-capped diketopyrrolopyrrole). The open circuit voltage (V(oc)), energetic driving force(ΔE(L-L)), and exciton binding energy (E(b)) were also provided to give an elementary understanding on their cell performance. The results reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals of 3-7 match well with the acceptor material PC61 BM, and compounds 3-5 were found to exhibit the comparable performances to 1 and show promising potential in organic solar cells. In particular, comparing with 1, system 7 with naphthobisthiadiazole acceptor unit displays broader absorption spectrum, higher V(oc), lower E(b), and similar carrier mobility. An in-depth insight into the nature of the involved excited states based on transition density matrix and charge density difference indicates that all S1 states are mainly intramolecular charge transfer states with the charge transfer from central NDT unit to bilateral acceptor units, and also imply that the exciton of 7 can be dissociated easily due to its large extent of the charge transfer. In a word, 7 maybe superior to 1 and may act as a promising donor candidate for organic solar cell. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Electron donor-acceptor interactions, August 5-10 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  8. Radiation produced by electrons incident on molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlman, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with light intensity measurements of emission spectra (1850-9000 A) produced by a continuous or pulsed beam of monoenergetic electrons (0 - 2000 eV) incident on a variety of molecular gases like H 2 , D 2 , H 2 O, HCl, NH 3 and several hydrocarbons. The emission spectra are dominated by fluorescence from excited fragments produced via dissociative excitation, besides fluorescence from excited parent molecules themselves. The experimental results thus obtained are expressed in terms of emission cross sections and lifetimes

  9. Highly solvatochromic emission of electron donor-acceptor compounds containing propanedioato boron electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Bakker, N.A.C.; Wiering, P.G.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Light-induced electron transfer occurs in bifunctional compounds consisting of 1,3-diphenylpropanedioato boron oxalate or fluoride electron acceptors and simple aromatic electron-donor groups, linked by a methylene bridge; fluorescence from the highly polar charge-transfer excited state is

  10. Ground-state kinetics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Li, Hao; Trabolsi, Ali; Coskun, Ali; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-02-18

    The ability to design and confer control over the kinetics of theprocesses involved in the mechanisms of artificial molecular machines is at the heart of the challenge to create ones that can carry out useful work on their environment, just as Nature is wont to do. As one of the more promising forerunners of prototypical artificial molecular machines, chemists have developed bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) over the past couple of decades. These bistable MIMs generally come in the form of [2]rotaxanes, molecular compounds that constitute a ring mechanically interlocked around a dumbbell-shaped component, or [2]catenanes, which are composed of two mechanically interlocked rings. As a result of their interlocked nature, bistable MIMs possess the inherent propensity to express controllable intramolecular, large-amplitude, and reversible motions in response to redox stimuli. In this Account, we rationalize the kinetic behavior in the ground state for a large assortment of these types of bistable MIMs, including both rotaxanes and catenanes. These structures have proven useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to molecular electronic devices. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs can switch between two different isomeric states. The favored isomer, known as the ground-state co-conformation (GSCC) is in equilibrium with the less favored metastable state co-conformation (MSCC). The forward (kf) and backward (kb) rate constants associated with this ground-state equilibrium are intimately connected to each other through the ground-state distribution constant, KGS. Knowing the rate constants that govern the kinetics and bring about the equilibration between the MSCC and GSCC, allows researchers to understand the operation of these bistable MIMs in a device setting and apply them toward the construction of artificial molecular machines. The three biggest influences on the ground-state rate constants arise from

  11. Electronic messaging and communication with living kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruck, Jessica M; Zhou, Sheng; Thomas, Alvin G; Cramm, Shannon L; Massie, Allan B; Montgomery, John R; Berger, Jonathan C; Henderson, Macey L; Segev, Dorry L

    2018-02-01

    New regulations require living kidney donor (LKD) follow-up for 2 years, but donor retention remains poor. Electronic communication (eg, text messaging and e-mail) might improve donor retention. To explore the possible impact of electronic communication, we recruited LKDs to participate in an exploratory study of communication via telephone, e-mail, or text messaging postdonation; communication through this study was purely optional and did not replace standard follow-up. Of 69 LKDs recruited, 3% requested telephone call, 52% e-mail, and 45% text messaging. Telephone response rate was 0%; these LKDs were subsequently excluded from analysis. Overall response rates with e-mail or text messaging at 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 94%, 87%, 81%, 72%, and 72%. Lower response rates were seen in African Americans, even after adjusting for age, sex, and contact method (incidence rate ratio (IRR) nonresponse 2.07 5.81 16.36 , P = .001). Text messaging had higher response rates than e-mail (IRR nonresponse 0.11 0.28 0.71 , P = .007). Rates of nonresponse were similar by sex (IRR 0.68, P = .4) and age (IRR 1.00, P > .9). In summary, LKDs strongly preferred electronic messaging over telephone and were highly responsive 2 years postdonation, even in this nonrequired, nonincentivized exploratory research study. These electronic communication tools can be automated and may improve regulatory compliance and postdonation care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Small molecule solution-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells with inverted structure using porphyrin donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Hatano, Junichi; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing tetraethynyl porphyrin derivative (TE-Por) as a small molecule donor material, we fabricated a small molecule solution-processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell with inverted structure, which exhibited 1.6% power conversion efficiency (JSC (short-circuit current) = 4.6 mA/cm2, VOC (open-circuit voltage) = 0.90 V, and FF (fill factor) = 0.39) in the device configuration indium tin oxide/TiOx (titanium sub-oxide)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester:TE-Por (5:1)/MoOx (molybdenum sub-oxide)/Au under AM1.5 G illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Without encapsulation, the small molecule solution-processed inverted BHJ solar cell also showed remarkable durability to air, where it kept over 73% of its initial power conversion efficiency after storage for 28 days under ambient atmosphere in the dark.

  13. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  14. Electron attachment to indole and related molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modelli, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.modelli@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Universitá di Bologna, via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali (CIRSA), Universitá di Bologna, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); Jones, Derek, E-mail: d.jones@isof.cnr.it [ISOF, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, C.N.R., via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A., E-mail: sapsh@anrb.ru [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-14

    Gas-phase formation of temporary negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0–6 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals of indoline (I), indene (II), indole (III), 2-methylen-1,3,3-trimethylindoline (IV), and 2,3,3-trimethyl-indolenine (V) was investigated for the first time by electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS). The description of their empty-level structures was supported by density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculations, using empirically calibrated linear equations to scale the calculated virtual orbital energies. Dissociative electron attachment spectroscopy (DEAS) was used to measure the fragment anion yields generated through dissociative decay channels of the parent molecular anions of compounds I-V, detected with a mass filter as a function of the incident electron energy in the 0–14 eV energy range. The vertical and adiabatic electron affinities were evaluated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level as the anion/neutral total energy difference. The same theoretical method is also used for evaluation of the thermodynamic energy thresholds for production of the negative fragments observed in the DEA spectra. The loss of a hydrogen atom from the parent molecular anion ([M-H]{sup −}) provides the most intense signal in compounds I-IV. The gas-phase DEAS data can provide support for biochemical reaction mechanisms in vivo involving initial hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen atom of the indole moiety, present in a variety of biologically important molecules.

  15. Electron collisions with F2CO molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Thiago Corrêa; Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio Henrique Franco

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for electron collisions with carbonyl fluoride (F2CO ) molecules for the incident electron's energy from 0.5 eV to 20 eV. The Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials was employed to obtain the cross sections in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations. The present results were compared with the available data in the literature, in particular, with the results of Kaur, Mason, and Antony [Phys. Rev. A 92, 052702 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.052702] for the differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections. We have found a π* shape resonance centered at 2.6 eV in the B1 symmetry and other resonance, in the B2 symmetry, located at around 9.7 eV. A systematic study of the inclusion of polarization effects was performed in order to have a well balanced description of this negative-ion transient state. The effects of the long-range electric dipole potential were included by the Born closure scheme. Electronic structure calculations were also performed to help in the interpretation of the scattering results, and associate the transient states to the unoccupied orbitals.

  16. Conjugated donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) molecule for organic nonvolatile resistor memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Guangwu; Yu, An-Dih; Bo, Zhishan; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2014-12-01

    A new donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) type of conjugated molecule, N-(4-(N',N'-diphenyl)phenylamine)-4-(4'-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)phenyl) naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic monoimide (TPA-NI-DCN), consisting of triphenylamine (TPA) donors and naphthalimide (NI)/dicyanovinylene (DCN) acceptors was synthesized and characterized. In conjunction with previously reported D-A based materials, the additional DCN moiety attached as end group in the D-A-A configuration can result in a stable charge transfer (CT) and charge-separated state to maintain the ON state current. The vacuum-deposited TPA-NI-DCN device fabricated as an active memory layer was demonstrated to exhibit write-once-read-many (WORM) switching characteristics of organic nonvolatile memory due to the strong polarity of the TPA-NI-DCN moiety. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Bond of donor-acceptor interaction in metal-ligand system with energies of Fermi electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, Yu.V.; Khentov, V.Ya.; Velikanova, L.N.; Semchenko, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Role of quantum nature of metal (W, Mo and others) in donor-acceptor interaction of metal salicylalaniline - aprotic solvent was discussed. The dependence of dissolution rate and activation energy of donor-acceptor interaction on electron energy was established

  18. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  19. Toward Additive-Free Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells: Roles of the Donor Crystallization Pathway and Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelsamie, Maged

    2015-09-29

    The ease with which small-molecule donors crystallize during solution processing is directly linked to the need for solvent additives. Donor molecules that get trapped in disordered (H1) or liquid crystalline (T1) mesophases require additive processing to promote crystallization, phase separation, and efficient light harvesting. A donor material (X2) that crystallizes directly from solution yields additive-free solar cells with an efficiency of 7.6%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  1. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer interaction of anthraquinones with aniline quenchers: Influence of methyl substitution in aniline donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, V.; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Hussein, Yasser H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between triplet state of 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and its two derivatives: 2-chloro-9,10-anthraquinone (CAQ) and sodium anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and ground state aniline (AN) and its dimethyl substitutions: 2,3-dimethylaniline (2,3-DMA), 2,6-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA), 3,5-dimethylaniline (3,5-DMA) and N,N-dimethylaniline (N,N-DMA) is studied using nanosecond laser flash photolysis at room temperature. Detection of radical bands of quinone anions and aniline cations along with their formation and/or decay kinetics are used to confirm the electron transfer (ET) process. In MeCN medium, AN quenches the triplet state of CAQ (CAQT) but not the triplets AQT or AQST. However in aqueous medium, AN quenches AQST and forms radical ion pair. All the DMAs can react through ET with all the triplet quinones at different degrees of efficiency in MeCN medium. Noticeably, the ring substituted DMAs are less efficient in electron donation to AQT or AQST while the N,N-DMA shows high efficiency in donating electron to all triplet quinones in MeCN medium. Charge distribution of donor molecules, in MeCN medium is calculated using density functional theory (DFT), and shows an enhancement of electron density of the ring of N,N-DMA, making it an ideal electron donor for ET studies compared to other DMAs. This systematic selection and usage of anilines with electrochemically tunable quinones can be viewed as a working model of donor-acceptor system that can be utilized in photoinduced ET applications.

  3. Control of charge transfer by conformational and electronic effects: Donor-donor and donor-acceptor phenyl pyrroles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, Antje; Bendig, Juergen; Rettig, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Derivatives of N-pyrrolobenzene with a para-donor and a para-acceptor substituent on the benzene ring are compared. It is shown that by a suitable increase of the donor strength of the pyrrolo group, CT fluorescence can be achieved even for donor-donor-substituted benzenes. The ICT emission for sterically hindered compounds is more forbidden than that of unhindered phenyl pyrroles. This suggests conformational effects which induce a narrower twist angle distribution around a perpendicular minimum in the excited state.

  4. Study on Effects of Electron Donors on Phosphine Production from Anaerobic Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Cao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different types and concentrations of electron donors (glucose, starch, methanol and sodium acetate on the formation of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge that has been domesticated for a prolonged period were studied in small batch experiments. The results show that types and concentrations of electron donor have significant effects on the production of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge. Among them, glucose was the most favourable electron donor, whereas sodium acetate was the least favourable electron donor for the removal of phosphorus and the production of phosphine. Higher concentrations of electron donors were more favourable for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine, and supplying more than nine times the amount of electron donor as theoretically required for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine was favourable for the production of phosphine.

  5. Electron transport through a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Electron transport through a diatomic molecular tunnel junction shows wave like interference phenomenon. By using Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory, we have explicitly presented current and differential conductance calculation for a diatomic molecular and two isolated atoms (two atoms having zero hybridization between their energy orbitals) tunnel junctions. In case of a diatomic molecular tunnel junction, Green's function propagators entering into current and differential conductance formula interfere constructively for a molecular anti-bonding state and destructively for bonding state. Consequently, conductance through a molecular bonding state is suppressed, and to conserve current, conductance through anti-bonding state is enhanced. Therefore, current steps and differential conductance peaks amplitude show asymmetric correspondence between molecular bonding and anti-bonding states. Interestingly, for a diatomic molecule, comprising of two atoms of same energy level, these propagators interfere completely destructively for molecular bonding state and constructively for molecular anti-bonding state. Hence under such condition, a single step or a single peak is shown up in current versus voltage or differential conductance versus voltage studies.

  6. The interaction of low-energy electrons with fructose molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontrosh, E. E.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2017-11-01

    Using a hypocycloidal electronic spectrometer, the interactions of low energy electrons (0-8.50 eV) with fructose molecules, namely, electron scattering and dissociative attachment, are studied. The results of these studies showed that the fragmentation of fructose molecules occurs effectively even at an electron energy close to zero. In the total electron-scattering cross section by molecules, resonance features (at energies 3.10 and 5.00 eV) were first observed near the formation thresholds of light ion fragments OH- and H-. The correlation of the features observed in the cross sections of electron scattering and dissociative attachment is analyzed.

  7. Recent progress in electron scattering from atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunger, M. J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, CAPS, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia and Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Buckman, S. J. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, AMPL, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Sullivan, J. P.; Palihawadana, P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, AMPL, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Chiari, L.; Pettifer, Z. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, CAPS, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Silva, G. B. da [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, CAPS, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia and Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, CAPS, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Duque, H. V. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Masin, Z.; Gorfinkiel, J. D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo, 102-8554 (Japan); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-03-05

    We present and discuss recent results, both experimental and theoretical (where possible), for electron impact excitation of the 3s[3/2 ]{sub 1} and 3s′[1/2 ]{sub 1} electronic states in neon, elastic electron scattering from the structurally similar molecules benzene, pyrazine, and 1,4-dioxane and excitation of the electronic states of the important bio-molecule analogue α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol. While comparison between theoretical and experimental results suggests that benchmarked cross sections for electron scattering from atoms is feasible in the near-term, significant further theoretical development for electron-molecule collisions, particularly in respect to discrete excitation processes, is still required.

  8. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  9. Electron--molecule scattering in momentum space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.

    1979-01-01

    We examine the Fourier transform of the Schroedinger equation for electron--molecule scattering, treated as potential scattering from a multicenter distribution of charged fixed in space. When the angle theta between R,the internuclear vector of a diatomic target, and q, the momentum transfer, is held fixed during the collision, then the directions of incidence and scattering are fixed relative to R. The process is then described as having a dynamical dependence on the magnitude of q, q, from which the scattering angle is determined, and a parametric dependence on q's direction relative to R. This approximation is used routinely at high energies in the calculation of the Born amplitude. Fixed--nuclei coordinate--space studies suggest that this approximation can be extended to low energies, provided the amplitude is taken from the solution of the integral equation of momentum space rather than from its inhomogeneity, proportional to the Born amplitude. We constrain R to be in the same direction relative to q', a virtual momentum transfer belonging to the kernel, as it is to q.Calculations are performed for the e, H 2 scattering in the static approximation, and cross sections averaged over theta/sub R/ are shown to be in good agreement with cross sections calculated by use of coupled spherical and coupled spheroidal partial wave theories. The angular distribution in the static approximation is also calculated at an incident energy close to 7 eV, where exchange is relatively unimportant. This result is in reasonably good agreement with that of R matrix theory in the static--exchange approximation. The extension of the theory to treat exchange is formulated and discussed. Also its extension to treat more complicated molecular targets is discussed

  10. Effect of donor orientation on ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer in coumarin-amine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P. K.; Nath, S.; Bhasikuttan, A. C.; Kumbhakar, M.; Mohanty, J.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mukherjee, T.; Pal, H.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of donor amine orientation on nondiffusive ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in coumarin-amine systems has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion measurements. Intermolecular ET from different aromatic and aliphatic amines used as donor solvents to the excited coumarin-151 (C151) acceptor occurs with ultrafast rates such that the shortest fluorescence lifetime component (τ 1 ) is the measure of the fastest ET rate (τ 1 =τ ET fast =(k ET fast ) -1 ), assigned to the C151-amine contact pairs in which amine donors are properly oriented with respect to C151 to maximize the acceptor-donor electronic coupling (V el ). It is interestingly observed that as the amine solvents are diluted by suitable diluents (either keeping solvent dielectric constant similar or with increasing dielectric constant), the τ 1 remains almost in the similar range as long as the amine dilution does not cross a certain critical limit, which in terms of the amine mole fraction (x A ) is found to be ∼0.4 for aromatic amines and ∼0.8 for aliphatic amines. Beyond these dilutions in the two respective cases of the amine systems, the τ 1 values are seen to increase very sharply. The large difference in the critical x A values involving aromatic and aliphatic amine donors has been rationalized in terms of the largely different orientational restrictions for the ET reactions as imposed by the aliphatic (n-type) and aromatic (π-type) nature of the amine donors [A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008)]. Since the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the n-type aliphatic amines is mostly centralized at the amino nitrogen, only some specific orientations of these amines with respect to the close-contact acceptor dye [also of π-character; A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008) and E. W. Castner et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2869 (2000)] can give suitable V el and thus ultrafast ET reaction. In contrary, the

  11. Steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic investigations on the photoreactions involved within the electronically excited electron acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene in presence of benzotriazole and benzimidazole donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Bardhan, Munmun; Ganguly, Tapan

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical, 'steady-state' and 'time-resolved' spectroscopic investigations were made on the well-known electron acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) when interacted with the electron donors benzotriazole (BZT) and benzimidazole (BMI) molecules. Though electrochemical measurements indicate the thermodynamical possibility of occurrences of photoinduced electron transfer reactions within these reacting systems in the lowest excited singlet state (S 1 ) of the acceptor CNA but the steady-state and time-resolved measurements clearly demonstrate only the triplet-initiated charge separation reactions. It was reported earlier that in the cases of disubstituted indole molecules the occurrences of photoinduced electron transfer reactions were apparent both in the excited singlet and triplet states of the acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene, but the similarly structured present donor molecules benzotriazole (and benzimidazole) behave differently from indoles. The weak ground state complex formations within the presently studied reacting systems appear to be responsible for the observed static quenching phenomena as evidenced from the time-resolved fluorescence studies. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations demonstrate the formation of the ground state of the reacting components (donor and acceptor) through recombination of triplet ion-pairs via formations of contact neutral radical produced by H-abstraction mechanism.

  12. Challenges for single molecule electronic devices with nanographene and organic molecules. Do single molecules offer potential as elements of electronic devices in the next generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Interest in utilizing organic molecules to fabricate electronic materials has existed ever since organic (molecular) semiconductors were first discovered in the 1950s. Since then, scientists have devoted serious effort to the creation of various molecule-based electronic systems, such as molecular metals and molecular superconductors. Single-molecule electronics and the associated basic science have emerged over the past two decades and provided hope for the development of highly integrated molecule-based electronic devices in the future (after the Si-based technology era has ended). Here, nanographenes (nano-sized graphene) with atomically precise structures are among the most promising molecules that can be utilized for electronic/spintronic devices. To manipulate single small molecules for an electronic device, a single molecular junction has been developed. It is a powerful tool that allows even small molecules to be utilized. External electric, magnetic, chemical, and mechanical perturbations can change the physical and chemical properties of molecules in a way that is different from bulk materials. Therefore, the various functionalities of molecules, along with changes induced by external perturbations, allows us to create electronic devices that we cannot create using current top-down Si-based technology. Future challenges that involve the incorporation of condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry calculations, organic synthetic chemistry, and electronic device engineering are expected to open a new era in single-molecule device electronic technology.

  13. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    redox reactions of substrates like biological molecules,11,12 dyes,13,14 alcohols15,16 etc. Colloidal ... state which is characterised by a phenomenon of dual fluorescence. In the present ... The dried solid was transferred to quartz cell under vacuum ... Recently Grätzel et al34 have developed the dye-sensitized meso-.

  15. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  16. Influence of substitution of the proton donor and proton acceptor abilities of molecules. 1. The development method of definition proton donor and proton acceptor abilities A-H containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurulloev, M.; Narziev, B.N.; Islomov, Z.; Fayzieva, M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of nature of the assistant is investigated in work, it is quantity and a site on proton donor and proton acceptor abilities. A-H containing organic connections and ways, of definition of these abilities are developed by the method, of IR spectroscopy. It is developed model and it offered a technique of definition of these abilities. It is shown that the proton donor and proton acceptor is abilities of molecules as constants, are one of individual physical and chemical characteristics A-H of containing organic connections. These sizes determine the abilities of molecules, to form the intermolecular hydrogen connections, disabilities of the H-complexes formed in condensed, environments concerning to the non replaced molecule

  17. Linear algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.I.; Collins, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    The various levels of sophistication of the linear algebraic method are discussed and its application to electron-molecule collisions of H 2 , N 2 LiH, LiF and HCl is described. 13 references, 2 tables

  18. Dithienosilolothiophene: A New Polyfused Donor for Organic Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Schroeder, Bob C.

    2015-08-13

    We report the synthesis of a novel pentacyclic donor moiety, dithienosilolothiophene, and its incorporation into low bandgap semiconducting polymers. The unique geometry of this new donor allowed attaching four solubilizing side chains on the same side of the fused ring system, thus ensuring sufficient solubility when incorporated into conjugated polymers while simultaneously reducing the steric hindrance between adjacent polymer chains. The optoelectronic properties of three new polymers comprising the novel pentacyclic donor were investigated and compared to structurally similar thieno[3,2-b]thienobis(silolothiophene) polymers. Organic solar cells were fabricated in order to evaluate the new materials’ potential as donor polymers in bulk heterojunction solar cells and gain further insight into how the single-sided side-chain arrangement affects the active layer blend morphology.

  19. Dithienosilolothiophene: A New Polyfused Donor for Organic Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Schroeder, Bob C.; Kirkus, Mindaugas; Nielsen, Christian B.; Ashraf, Raja Shahid; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel pentacyclic donor moiety, dithienosilolothiophene, and its incorporation into low bandgap semiconducting polymers. The unique geometry of this new donor allowed attaching four solubilizing side chains on the same side of the fused ring system, thus ensuring sufficient solubility when incorporated into conjugated polymers while simultaneously reducing the steric hindrance between adjacent polymer chains. The optoelectronic properties of three new polymers comprising the novel pentacyclic donor were investigated and compared to structurally similar thieno[3,2-b]thienobis(silolothiophene) polymers. Organic solar cells were fabricated in order to evaluate the new materials’ potential as donor polymers in bulk heterojunction solar cells and gain further insight into how the single-sided side-chain arrangement affects the active layer blend morphology.

  20. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houfek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  1. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houfek, Karel, E-mail: karel.houfek@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-15

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  2. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons by hydrogen molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, L.C.G.; Mu-Tao, L.; Botelho, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The coherent version of the Renormalized Multiple-Centre Potential Model (RMPM) has been extended to treat the elastic scattering of low energy electrons by H2 molecule. The intramolecular Multiple Scattering (MS) effect has also been included. The comparison against the experimental data shows that the inclusion of the MS improves significantly with experiment. The extension of the present method to study electron-polyatomic molecule interaction is also discussed. (author) [pt

  3. Influence of substitution on the proton donor and proton acceptor abilities of molecules. III. Study of chlorine and ftorine substitution alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurulloev, M.; Narziev, B.N.; Islomov, Z.; Fayzieva, M.

    2006-01-01

    This work gives the study of influence of chlorine and ftorine atoms as substitutions to proton donor and proton acceptor ability of primary, secondary and tertiary alifatic alcohol. In accordance to developed method the proton donor ability of studied substances are determined. It is shown that the quantity of proton donor ability of reactionary center of the molecules depend on substitution nature and its proton acceptor quantity. Proposed that substitution influence of these molecule mainly transferred by inductive effect

  4. Study of chemical shifts of the chloroform complexes with cyclic donors of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaszkiewicz, B.; Pajak, Z.

    1973-01-01

    Chemical shifts of chloroform complexes with the heterocyclic electron donors: pyridine, piperidine, alpha-picoline and gamma-picoline have been studied using the high resolution (5.10 -9 ) spectrometer operating at 80 MHz. An attempt has also been made to study the three - component solutions of : chloroform, a heterocyclic donor of electrons and carbon tetrachloride. The results, which have been obtained, indicate that the complex-forming power of pyridine and other electron donors is greater in carbon tetrachloride than in other solvents. (S.B.)

  5. Cross sections for collisions of subexcitation electrons with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A short review is given on the present knowledge about the collision processes of subexcitation electrons (i.e., electrons whose energy is below the threshold of the first electronically excited state) with molecules. The processes considered are: vibrational and rotational excitations and elastic scattering. As an example, stopping cross sections for those processes (and electronic excitation and ionization, for comparison) are shown graphically for N 2 and H 2 O. 21 references, 2 figures

  6. Spectrophotometric investigation into iodine-electron donor systems at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodyskij, V.A.; Morachevskij, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Iodine-sec. butanol (n-donor) and iodine - hexene - 1 (π-donor) have been investigated for the first time by the spectrophotometric method in the wide temeprature range (77-293 K). The existence of complexes with a charge transfer of the type, which is characterized by the long-wave absorption band in electron spectra, is determined in the systems

  7. Conformational dynamics of semiflexibly bridged electron donor-acceptor systems comprising long aliphatic tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleisteiner, B.; Marian, T.; Schneider, S.; Brouwer, A.M.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    In continuation of our previous work on the conformational dynamics (harpooning mechanism) of semiflexibly bridged electron donor-acceptor systems we have studied a derivative with two long aliphatic chains tethered to the donor and acceptor moieties, respectively. The fitting of the time- and

  8. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  9. Multiply excited molecules produced by photon and electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, T.; Kouchi, N.

    2006-01-01

    The photon and electron interactions with molecules resulting in the formation of multiply excited molecules and the subsequent decay are subjects of great interest because the independent electron model and Born-Oppenheimer approximation are much less reliable for the multiply excited states of molecules than for the ground and lower excited electronic states. We have three methods to observe and investigate multiply excited molecules: 1) Measurements of the cross sections for the emission of fluorescence emitted by neutral fragments in the photoexcitation of molecules as a function of incident photon energy [1-3], 2) Measurements of the electron energy-loss spectra tagged with the fluorescence photons emitted by neutral fragments [4], 3) Measurements of the cross sections for generating a pair of photons in absorption of a single photon by a molecule as a function of incident photon energy [5-7]. Multiply excited states degenerate with ionization continua, which make a large contribution in the cross section curve involving ionization processes. The key point of our methods is hence that we measure cross sections free from ionization. The feature of multiply excited states is noticeable in such a cross section curve. Recently we have measured: i) the cross sections for the emission of the Lyman- fluorescence in the photoexcitation of CH 4 as a function of incident photon energy in the range 18-51 eV, ii) the electron energy-loss spectrum of CH 4 tagged with the Lyman-photons at 80 eV incident electron energy and 10 electron scattering angle in the range of the energy loss 20-45 eV, in order to understand the formation and decay of the doubly excited methane in photon and electron interactions. [8] The results are summarized in this paper and the simultaneous excitation of two electrons by electron interaction is compared with that by photon interaction in terms of the oscillator strength. (authors)

  10. Donor and Acceptor Unit Sequences Influence Material Performance in Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-6,7-Difluoroquinoxaline Small Molecule Donors for BHJ Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Kai; Liang, Ru-Ze; Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Saleem, Qasim; Babics, Maxime; Wucher, Philipp; Abdelsamie, Maged; Amassian, Aram; Hansen, Michael Ryan; Beaujuge, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Well-defined small molecule (SM) donors can be used as alternatives to π-conjugated polymers in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with fullerene acceptors (e.g., PC61/71BM). Taking advantage of their synthetic tunability, combinations of various donor and acceptor motifs can lead to a wide range of optical, electronic, and self-assembling properties that, in turn, may impact material performance in BHJ solar cells. In this report, it is shown that changing the sequence of donor and acceptor units along the π-extended backbone of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-6,7-difluoroquinoxaline SM donors critically impacts (i) molecular packing, (ii) propensity to order and preferential aggregate orientations in thin-films, and (iii) charge transport in BHJ solar cells. In these systems (SM1-3), it is found that 6,7-difluoroquinoxaline ([2F]Q) motifs directly appended to the central benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) unit yield a lower-bandgap analogue (SM1) with favorable molecular packing and aggregation patterns in thin films, and optimized BHJ solar cell efficiencies of ≈6.6%. 1H-1H DQ-SQ NMR analyses indicate that SM1 and its counterpart with [2F]Q motifs substituted as end-group SM3 possess distinct self-assembly patterns, correlating with the significant charge transport and BHJ device efficiency differences observed for the two analogous SM donors (avg. 6.3% vs 2.0%, respectively). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Donor and Acceptor Unit Sequences Influence Material Performance in Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-6,7-Difluoroquinoxaline Small Molecule Donors for BHJ Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Kai

    2016-08-22

    Well-defined small molecule (SM) donors can be used as alternatives to π-conjugated polymers in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with fullerene acceptors (e.g., PC61/71BM). Taking advantage of their synthetic tunability, combinations of various donor and acceptor motifs can lead to a wide range of optical, electronic, and self-assembling properties that, in turn, may impact material performance in BHJ solar cells. In this report, it is shown that changing the sequence of donor and acceptor units along the π-extended backbone of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b\\']dithiophene-6,7-difluoroquinoxaline SM donors critically impacts (i) molecular packing, (ii) propensity to order and preferential aggregate orientations in thin-films, and (iii) charge transport in BHJ solar cells. In these systems (SM1-3), it is found that 6,7-difluoroquinoxaline ([2F]Q) motifs directly appended to the central benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b\\']dithiophene (BDT) unit yield a lower-bandgap analogue (SM1) with favorable molecular packing and aggregation patterns in thin films, and optimized BHJ solar cell efficiencies of ≈6.6%. 1H-1H DQ-SQ NMR analyses indicate that SM1 and its counterpart with [2F]Q motifs substituted as end-group SM3 possess distinct self-assembly patterns, correlating with the significant charge transport and BHJ device efficiency differences observed for the two analogous SM donors (avg. 6.3% vs 2.0%, respectively). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A linear algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schnieder, B.I.

    1982-01-01

    The linear algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions is examined by firstly deriving the general set of coupled integrodifferential equations that describe electron collisional processes and then describing the linear algebraic approach for obtaining a solution to the coupled equations. Application of the linear algebraic method to static-exchange, separable exchange and effective optical potential, is examined. (U.K.)

  13. Applications of cross sections for electron-molecule collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of electron-molecule collision cross sections is discussed for the study of the ionospheric and auroral processes in planetary atmospheres and of discharge-pumped lasers. These two areas emphasize the importance of further theoretical and experimental studies concerning electron-impact processes. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Dechlorinating ability of TCE-fed microcosms with different electron donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagiotakis, Iraklis; Mamais, Daniel; Pantazidou, Marina; Marneri, Matina; Parapouli, Maria; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Tandoi, Valter

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of the work presented herein is to assess the effect of different electron donors (butyric acid and methanol) on the dechlorinating activity of two microbial cultures where active methanogenic populations are present, in an effort to evaluate the importance of the electron donor selection process. The ability of each anaerobic culture to dechlorinate TCE, when enriched with either butyric acid or methanol, was verified based on the results of gas chromatography. In addition, the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods gave positive results for the presence of Dehalococcoides spp. According to results of the batch tests conducted in this study, it appears that the selection of the electron donor for stimulating TCE dechlorination depends on microbial culture composition; therefore, the decision on the appropriate electron donor should be based on site-specific microcosm studies

  15. Electronic structure and properties of uranyl compounds. Problems of electron-donor conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of the series of the ligand mutual substitution in the uranyl compounds with the ligand series of d-elements and with the uranyl ''covalent model'', is made. The data on ionization potentials of the ligand higher valent levels and on the structure of some uranyl nitrate compounds are considered. It is concluded that the mechanism of the ligand effect on the properties of uranyl grouping is more complex, than it is supposed in the traditional representations on the nature of electron-donor interactions in the uranyl compounds

  16. Methanol as electron donor for thermophilic biological sulfate and sulfite reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Weijma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur oxyanions (e.g. sulfate, sulfite) can be removed from aqueous waste- and process streams by biological reduction with a suitable electron donor to sulfide, followed by partial chemical or biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The aim of the research described in this thesis was to make this biological process more broadly applicable for desulfurization of flue-gases and ground- and wastewaters by using the cheap chemical methanol as electron donor for the reduct...

  17. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biowaste. Use of methanol in chain elongation integrates the lignocellulosic feedstocks and the thermochemical platform technologies into chain elongation. After ...

  18. Effects of keV electron irradiation on the avalanche-electron generation rates of three donors on oxidized silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, C.; Sun, J.Y.; Tzou, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    After keV electron beam irradiation of oxidized silicon, the avalanche-electron-injection generation rates and densities of the bulk compensating donor, the interface states, and the turnaround trap all increase. Heating at 200 0 C can anneal out these three donor-like traps, however, it cannot restore the generation rates back to their original and lower pre-keV electron irradiation values. The experimental results also indicate that all three traps may be related to the same mobile impurity species whose bonds are loosened by the keV electrons and then broken or released by the avalanche injected electrons

  19. Observing the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1981-07-01

    The dynamic electronic structure of atoms and molecules can be directly observed by means of the (e,2e) reaction, which measures the distribution of energies and momenta of two electrons in coincidence after a knockout reaction initiated by an electron beam of known momentum incident on a molecular gas target. The molecular state for each event is identified by the electron separation energy. The recoil momentum for each event is known from the difference of measured initial and final momenta. It has been verified that values of this momentum are equal under suitable conditions to the momentum of the electron in the target immediately before knockout. Thus the spherically-averaged electron momentum distribution for each molecular orbital is measured. This is directly related to molecular orbitals calculated by the methods of quantum chemistry. Properties of different types of molecules obtained by this method are discussed

  20. Electron attachment to the SF{sub 6} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com; Kosarim, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Various models for transition between electron and nuclear subsystems are compared in the case of electron attachment to the SF{sub 6} molecule. Experimental data, including the cross section of electron attachment to this molecule as a function of the electron energy and vibrational temperature, the rate constants of this process in swarm experiments, and the rates of the chemionization process involving Rydberg atoms and the SF{sub 6} molecule, are collected and treated. Based on the data and on the resonant character of electron capture into an autodetachment ion state in accordance with the Breit–Wigner formula, we find that intersection of the molecule and negative ion electron terms proceeds above the potential well bottom of the molecule with the barrier height 0.05–0.1 eV, and the transition between these electron terms has both the tunnel and abovebarrier character. The limit of small electron energies e for the electron attachment cross section at room vibrational temperature takes place at ε ≪ 2 meV, while in the range 2 meV ≪ ε ≪ 80 meV, the cross section is inversely proportional to ε. In considering the attachment process as a result of the interaction between the electron and vibrational degrees of freedom, we find the coupling factor f between them to be f = aT at low vibrational temperatures T with a ≈ 3 × 10{sup −4} K{sup −1}. The coupling factor is independent of the temperature at T > 400 K.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of TCE-dechlorinating consortia enriched on a variety of electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeborn, Ryan A; West, Kimberlee A; Bhupathiraju, Vishvesh K; Chauhan, Sadhana; Rahm, Brian G; Richardson, Ruth E; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2005-11-01

    Two rapidly fermented electron donors, lactate and methanol, and two slowly fermented electron donors, propionate and butyrate, were selected for enrichment studies to evaluate the characteristics of anaerobic microbial consortia that reductively dechlorinate TCE to ethene. Each electron donor enrichment subculture demonstrated the ability to dechlorinate TCE to ethene through several serial transfers. Microbial community analyses based upon 16S rDNA, including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library/sequencing, were performed to assess major changes in microbial community structure associated with electron donors capable of stimulating reductive dechlorination. Results demonstrated that five phylogenic subgroups or genera of bacteria were present in all consortia, including Dehalococcoides sp., low G+C Gram-positives (mostly Clostridium and Eubacterium sp.), Bacteroides sp., Citrobacter sp., and delta Proteobacteria (mostly Desulfovibrio sp.). Phylogenetic association indicates that only minor shifts in the microbial community structure occurred between the four alternate electron donor enrichments and the parent consortium. Inconsistent detection of Dehalococcoides spp. in clone libraries and T-RFLP of enrichment subcultures was resolved using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Q-PCR with primers specific to Dehalococcoides 16S rDNA resulted in positive detection of this species in all enrichments. Our results suggest that TCE-dechlorinating consortia can be stably maintained on a variety of electron donors and that quantities of Dehalococcoides cells detected with Dehalococcoides specific 16S rDNA primer/probe sets do not necessarily correlate well with solvent degradation rates.

  2. Electron Transfer in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Systems and Derived Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbaan, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Some aspects of photoinduced electron transfer (ET) in (electron donor)-bridge-(electron acceptor) compounds (D-B-A) and derived materials are investigated. Aim I is to determine how and to which extent non-conjugated double bonds in an otherwise saturated hydrocarbon bridge affect the rate of

  3. Recombinational laser employing electron transitions of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biriukov, A S; Prokhorov, A M; Shelepin, L A; Shirokov, N N

    1974-12-01

    Conditions are established for obtaining laser action in the visible and uv regions of the spectrum, using transitions between electronic states of diatomic molecules during recombination of a dissociated gas. The mechanism of population inversion was studied for the oxygen molecule, and gain estimates were obtained for laser action at a wavelength of 4881 A. The feasibility of laser action at other wavelengths was examined.

  4. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  5. Low energy electron attachment to the uracil molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, G.; Gstir, B.; Denifl, S.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using a recently constructed high resolution crossed beam apparatus involving a hemispherical electron monochromator, electron attachment to the uracil molecule C 4 H 4 N 2 O 2 was studied. The electron energy range investigated was in the region between 0 and 12 eV. What will happen when slow electrons are colliding with the cellular RNA compound uracil was the objective of this investigation. The following anion fragments were detected: (C 4 H 3 N 2 O 2 ) - , OCN - , (H 2 C 3 NO) - , CN - , O - . The most important result was that within the detection efficiency any traces of the parent anion were observed. The most intense fragment anion appeared on a mass to charge ratio 111 amu., it corresponds to a uracil molecule missing one hydrogen. Another observation was whereas the parent minus H anion is observed at zero electron energy, all other fragments appear in other range. (nevyjel)

  6. Lessons on electronic decoherence in molecules from exact modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenxiang; Gu, Bing; Franco, Ignacio

    2018-04-01

    Electronic decoherence processes in molecules and materials are usually thought and modeled via schemes for the system-bath evolution in which the bath is treated either implicitly or approximately. Here we present computations of the electronic decoherence dynamics of a model many-body molecular system described by the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian with Hubbard electron-electron interactions using an exact method in which both electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom are taken into account explicitly and fully quantum mechanically. To represent the electron-nuclear Hamiltonian in matrix form and propagate the dynamics, the computations employ the Jordan-Wigner transformation for the fermionic creation/annihilation operators and the discrete variable representation for the nuclear operators. The simulations offer a standard for electronic decoherence that can be used to test approximations. They also provide a useful platform to answer fundamental questions about electronic decoherence that cannot be addressed through approximate or implicit schemes. Specifically, through simulations, we isolate basic mechanisms for electronic coherence loss and demonstrate that electronic decoherence is possible even for one-dimensional nuclear bath. Furthermore, we show that (i) decreasing the mass of the bath generally leads to faster electronic decoherence; (ii) electron-electron interactions strongly affect the electronic decoherence when the electron-nuclear dynamics is not pure-dephasing; (iii) classical bath models with initial conditions sampled from the Wigner distribution accurately capture the short-time electronic decoherence dynamics; (iv) model separable initial superpositions often used to understand decoherence after photoexcitation are only relevant in experiments that employ delta-like laser pulses to initiate the dynamics. These insights can be employed to interpret and properly model coherence phenomena in molecules.

  7. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  8. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaskey, A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Warnock, M.; Burzuri, E.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Park, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters,

  9. Study of the electronic properties of organic molecules within a metal-molecule-metal junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mathieu

    2003-01-01

    This ph-D thesis is about electronic transport through organic molecules inserted in a metal molecule-metal junction. We describe first a simple process to prepare sub-3 nm gaps by controllable breakage (under an electrical stress) of gold wires lithographed on a SiO 2 Si substrate at low temperature (4.2 K). We show that the involved mechanism is thermally assisted electromigration. We observe that current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of resulting electrodes are stable up to ∼5 V. which gives access to the well-known Fowler-Nordheim regime in the I-V, allowing an accurate characterisation of the gap size. The average gap is found lo be between 1.5 nm in width and 2.5 eV in height. Molecules and nanoparticles have then been inserted in the junction in the case of nanoparticles for example. The resulting IV clearly shows the suppression of electrical current at low bias known as Coulomb blockade. Characteristic of single-electron tunnelling through nanometer-sized structures, finally we fabricated a single-electron tunneling device based on Au nanoparticles connected to the electrodes via terthiophene (T3) molecule. We use the silicon substrate, separated from the planar structure by a silicon oxide of 200 nm, as an electrostatic gate and observed clear current modulation with possible signature of the transport properties of the terthiophene molecules. (author) [fr

  10. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  11. Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Yuji; Mandal, Swapan K; Hu, Chunping; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Goedecker, Stefan; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Gimzewski, James K; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-06-01

    Key to single-molecule electronics is connecting functional molecules to each other using conductive nanowires. This involves two issues: how to create conductive nanowires at designated positions, and how to ensure chemical bonding between the nanowires and functional molecules. Here, we present a novel method that solves both issues. Relevant functional molecules are placed on a self-assembled monolayer of diacetylene compound. A probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is then positioned on the molecular row of the diacetylene compound to which the functional molecule is adsorbed, and a conductive polydiacetylene nanowire is fabricated by initiating chain polymerization by stimulation with the tip. Since the front edge of chain polymerization necessarily has a reactive chemical species, the created polymer nanowire forms chemical bonding with an encountered molecular element. We name this spontaneous reaction "chemical soldering". First-principles theoretical calculations are used to investigate the structures and electronic properties of the connection. We demonstrate that two conductive polymer nanowires are connected to a single phthalocyanine molecule. A resonant tunneling diode formed by this method is discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Electron scattering resonances and dissociative attachment in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olthoff, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively new technique, electron transmission spectroscopic, is now being used to investigate the unoccupied valence molecular orbitals of many chemical compounds. Electron-transmission spectroscopy measures the energy of negative ion states that arise from electron capture into unoccupied molecular orbitals. Additional information about the unoccupied orbitals may be obtained if the negative ion decays by way of dissociation. Determination of the identity, kinetic energy, and production rates of stable ion fragments supplies information about the shape and position of the potential energy curves which describe the electronic states of the molecule and the anion. Used together, photoelectron, electron transmission, and dissociation data can produce a complete picture of a molecule's valence electronic structure. For this work, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was attached to an electron transmission spectrometer to observe negative ion fragments due to dissociative attachment. The mass spectrometer measures the identify and kinetic energy of stable negative ions as a function of incident electron energy. Electron transmission spectra and ion production data were acquired for many compounds in four chemical categories

  13. Metabolic response of Geobacter sulfurreducens towards electron donor/acceptor variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter sulfurreducens is capable of coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to iron reduction. The metabolic response of G. sulfurreducens towards variations in electron donors (acetate, hydrogen and acceptors (Fe(III, fumarate was investigated via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. We examined the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids obtained from G. sulfurreducens cultured with 13C-acetate. Results Using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, we observed that donor and acceptor variations gave rise to differences in gluconeogenetic initiation, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Culturing G. sulfurreducens cells with Fe(III as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor resulted in pyruvate as the primary carbon source for gluconeogenesis. When fumarate was provided as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor, the flux analysis suggested that fumarate served as both an electron acceptor and, in conjunction with acetate, a carbon source. Growth on fumarate and acetate resulted in the initiation of gluconeogenesis by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and a slightly elevated flux through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle as compared to growth with Fe(III as the electron acceptor. In addition, the direction of net flux between acetyl-CoA and pyruvate was reversed during growth on fumarate relative to Fe(III, while growth in the presence of Fe(III and acetate which provided hydrogen as an electron donor, resulted in decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Conclusions We gained detailed insight into the metabolism of G. sulfurreducens cells under various electron donor/acceptor conditions using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Our results can be used for the development of G. sulfurreducens as a chassis for a variety of applications including bioremediation and renewable biofuel production.

  14. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2016-01-01

    , electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance

  15. Radiation from nitrogen molecule due to electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, S P; Kumar, A

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of the experimental results of the collisional cross sections of the nitrogen molecules due to electron impact which give rise to radiations in the 3,000 Angstrom to 10,500 Angstron wavelength region. Calculations of the fluorescence efficiencies are described and are compared with experimental data. (GHT)

  16. Influence of the replacement of alkoxyl with alkylthienyl on photovoltaic properties of two small molecule donors for organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoqing Zhang; Liyan Yang; Delong Liu; Chang He; Jianqi Zhang; Yun Zhang; Jianhui Hou

    2017-01-01

    Two benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT)-based small molecule (SM) donor materials with identical conjugated backbones but different substitution groups,named as DRTB-O and DRTB-T,were well explored to demonstrate the influence of the replacement of alkoxy with alkylthienyl on their photovoltaic properties in fullerene-based and fullerene-free organic solar cells (OSCs).The study shows that the two SM donors possess similar absorption spectra and energy levels but different crystalline structures in solid films.The carrier transport property and phase separation morphologies of the blend films have also been fully investigated.By employing PC71BM as the acceptor,the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DRTB-O:PC71BM and DRTB-T:PC71BM based devices were 4.91% and 7.08%,respectively.However,by blending with IDIC,the two SM donors exhibited distinctly different photovoltaic properties in fullerene-free OSCs,and the PCE of DRTB-O:IDIC and DRTB-T:IDIC based devices were 0.15% and 9.06%,respectively.These results indicate that the replacement of alkoxyl with alkylthienyl in designing SM donor materials plays an important role in the application of fullerene-free OSCs.

  17. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  18. Modification of indole by electron-rich atoms and their application in novel electron donor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Maolin; Qin, Guangjiong; Liu, Jialei; Zhen, Zhen; Fedorchuk, A. A.; Lakshminarayana, G.; Albassam, A. A.; El-Naggar, A. M.; Ozga, Katarzyna; Kityk, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    Novel nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophore based on 6-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1H-indole as the electron donor group was designed and synthesized. The molecular structure of this chromophore was characterized by 1H NMR spectra, 13C NMR spectra, and MS spectra. The delocalized energy level was estimated by UV-Vis. spectra. The thermal property was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The poled films containing chromophores ZML-1 with a loading density of 10 wt% in amorphous polycarbonate (APC) afford an average electro-optic (EO) coefficient (r33) of 19 pm/V at 1310 nm. Compared to the reported aniline-based chromophore (r33 = 12 pm/V) analogues, chromophore ZML-1 exhibits enhanced electro-optical activity.

  19. Correlating substituent parameter values to electron transport properties of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedova-Brook, Natalie; Matsunaga, Nikita; Sohlberg, Karl

    2004-01-01

    There are a vast number of organic compounds that could be considered for use in molecular electronics. Because of this, the need for efficient and economical screening tools has emerged. We demonstrate that the substituent parameter values (σ), commonly found in advanced organic chemistry textbooks, correlate strongly with features of the charge migration process, establishing them as useful indicators of electronic properties. Specifically, we report that ab initio derived electronic charge transfer values for 16 different substituted aromatic molecules for molecular junctions correlate to the σ values with a correlation coefficient squared (R 2 ) of 0.863

  20. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    In this review an approach is outlined for studying molecules containing heavy atoms with the use of relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's). These potentials play the dual roles of (1) replacing the chemically-inert core electrons and (2) incorporating the mass velocity and Darwin term into a one-electron effective potential. This reduces the problem to a valence-electron problem and avoids computation of additional matrix elements involving relativistic operators. The spin-orbit effects are subsequently included using the molecular orbitals derived from the RECP calculation as a basis

  1. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  2. Electron spin exchange of shallow donor muonium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, Masayoshi

    2005-01-01

    Shallow donor muonium states with small hyperfine frequencies, recently observed in II-VI semiconductor compounds, have a number of unique features that present both opportunities and challenges in understanding muon spin dynamics in the presence of Heisenberg spin exchange. First, the shallow muonium state in CdSe with hyperfine frequency ω 0 /2π ∼ 0.1 MHz is already in the high field regime even in the earth's magnetic field, where only two precession frequencies are observable by the muon spin rotation (μSR) technique. Second, unlike in the case of more conventional muonium species with a larger hyperfine frequency, the μSR signal of shallow muonium states can be observed even in the transition region, between the slow spin-flip regime and the fast spin-flip regime, where the spin-flip rate and the hyperfine frequency are comparable. The muon spin dynamics in the transition region has not been theoretically explored previously, mainly because normal muonium in vacuum gives no observable signal in this region. Third, in the case of shallow muonium states, the incoherent process defined to be those spin-flip collisions that cause changes in muon spin precession frequencies, becomes crucially important in the transition region, where the incoherent process is entirely negligible in more conventional muonium species. By taking incoherent multiple collisions into account, an analytical expression for the time evolution of the muon spin polarization in Mu is derived, where Mu undergoes repeated spin-flip collisions. Comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations show that the analytical expression obtained in this work can reliably be used to analyse experimental data for shallow donor states not only in the slow spin-flip regime, but also in the transition region up to the onset of the fast regime. The present work confirms a recent experimental finding that, in the transition region, the initial phases of the two precession components of shallow donor states

  3. Application of time release electron donors and electron acceptors for accelerated bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovich, V.; Koenigsberg, S.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, there are limited options for cost effective approaches to soil and groundwater contamination. One technology that has proven its potential involves the use of time release electron acceptors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of aerobically degradable compounds and time release electron donors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of anaerobic compounds. This technology enjoys its reputations as a sensible strategy for engineering accelerated bioattenuation, because it delivers results while 1) limiting or eliminating design, capital and management costs and 2) allowing for the engineering of a low-impact application and a subsequently invisible remediation process. Oxygen Release Compound (ORC ) is proprietary formulation of intercalated magnesium peroxide that releases oxygen slowly, for about a year, and facilitates the aerobic degradation of a range of environmental contaminants including petroleum hydrocarbons, certain chlorinated hydrocarbons, ether oxygenates and nitroaromatics. The history of ORC's introduction and acceptance represents a model for the evolution of an innovative technology. This statement comes by virtue of the fact that since 1994 ORC has been used on over 7000 sites worldwide and has been the subject of an extensive body of literature. Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) is also a proprietary polylactate ester that is food grade and, upon being deposited into the aquifer, is slowly hydrolyzed to release lactic acid and other organic acid derivatives for about one to two years. The organic acids are fermented to hydrogen, which in turn donates electrons that drive reductive bioattenuation processes. This is primarily directed at a wide range of chlorinated hydrocarbons, but can be applied to the remediation of metals by redox induced precipitation. HRC has now been used on over 220 sites, which we believe make it the most widely used electron donor for accelerating bioattenuation. ORC and HRC can be configured as a

  4. Electron collision cross sections and electron swarm parameters for gas molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic electron collision cross sections for molecules which interest in radiation research have been determined from available electron beam and electron swarm data by utilizing the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation method. Electron drift velocity data which interest in radiation Pysics have been discussed and some calculated results of electron drift velocity data for CF 4 and CF 4 -inert gases mixtures will be presented. (author)

  5. Spin-orbit coupling induced two-electron relaxation in silicon donor pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-09-01

    We unravel theoretically a key intrinsic relaxation mechanism among the low-lying singlet and triplet donor-pair states in silicon, an important element in the fast-developing field of spintronics and quantum computation. Despite the perceived weak spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in Si, we find that our discovered relaxation mechanism, combined with the electron-phonon and interdonor interactions, drives the transitions in the two-electron states over a large range of donor coupling regimes. The scaling of the relaxation rate with interdonor exchange interaction J goes from J5 to J4 at the low to high temperature limits. Our analytical study draws on the symmetry analysis over combined band, donor envelope, and valley configurations. It uncovers naturally the dependence on the donor-alignment direction and triplet spin orientation, and especially on the dominant SOC source from donor impurities. While a magnetic field is not necessary for this relaxation, unlike in the single-donor spin relaxation, we discuss the crossover behavior with increasing Zeeman energy in order to facilitate comparison with experiments.

  6. Donor-acceptor properties of a single-molecule altered by on-surface complex formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meier, T.; Pawlak, R.; Kawai, S.; Geng, Y.; Liu, X.; Decurtins, S.; Hapala, Prokop; Baratoff, A.; Liu, S.X.; Jelínek, Pavel; Meyer, E.; Glatzel, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2017), s. 8413-8420 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nc AFM * DFT * acceptor donor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  7. All electron ab initio investigations of the electronic states of the FeC molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1999-01-01

    The low lying electronic states of the molecule FeC have been investigated by performing all electron ab initio multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) and multi reference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. The relativistic corrections for the one electron Darwin contact term...

  8. All Electron ab initio Investigations of the Electronic States of the MoN Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1999-01-01

    The low lying electronic states of the molecule MoN have been investigated by performing all electron ab initio multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) calculations. The relativistic corrections for the one electron Darwin contact term and the relativistic mass-velocity correction have...

  9. Attosecond dynamics of electrons in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Hans Jakob

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss two recent experiments carried out in our group that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18 s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. We advance high-harmonic spectroscopy to resolve spatially and temporally the migration of an electron hole immediately following ionization of iodoacetylene, while simultaneously demonstrating extensive control over the process. A multidimensional approach, based on the measurement of both even and odd harmonic orders, enables us to reconstruct both quantum amplitudes and phases of the electronic states with a resolution of ~ 100 as. We separately reconstruct quasi-field-free and laser-controlled charge migration as a function of the spatial orientation of the molecule and determine the shape of the hole created by ionization. The second experiment is carried out on a free-flowing microjet of liquid water. We use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from liquid water using the RABBIT technique. We measure a delay on the order of 50 as between electrons emitted from the HOMO of liquid water compared to that of gas-phase water and a substantially reduced modulation contrast of the corresponding sidebands. Since our measurements on solvated water molecules are referenced to isolated ones, the measured delays reflect (i) the photoionization delays caused by electron transport through the aqueous environment and (ii) the effect of solvation on the parent molecule. The relative modulation contrast, in turn, contains information on (iii) the modification of transition amplitudes and (iv) dephasing processes. These experiments make the liquid phase and its fascinating

  10. Two-dimensional electron states bound to an off-plane donor in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno-Alfonso, A; Candido, L; Hai, G-Q

    2010-01-01

    The states of an electron confined in a two-dimensional (2D) plane and bound to an off-plane donor impurity center, in the presence of a magnetic field, are investigated. The energy levels of the ground state and the first three excited states are calculated variationally. The binding energy and the mean orbital radius of these states are obtained as a function of the donor center position and the magnetic field strength. The limiting cases are discussed for an in-plane donor impurity (i.e. a 2D hydrogen atom) as well as for the donor center far away from the 2D plane in strong magnetic fields, which corresponds to a 2D harmonic oscillator.

  11. Electronic states of on- and off-center donors in quantum rings of finite width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R.P.A.; Amado, M.

    2008-01-01

    The electronic states of a hydrogenic donor in two-dimensional quantum rings are calculated by taking into account the finite width of the potential well in the ring. In addition, a strong magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the quantum ring. Using the effective-mass approximation at the Γ valley, the radial Hamiltonian for the envelope-function is exactly diagonalized in the case of on-center donors. The corresponding energy levels for different angular momenta are studied as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the case of off-center donors, a perturbation approach is considered and its limitations are discussed. Finally, we calculate the absorption spectra and oscillator strength for different intraband transitions, specifically for on-center donors

  12. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron injection into organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Li-Ping; Qiu Yu; Tong Guo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    We numerically investigate the injection process of electrons from metal electrodes to one-dimensional organic molecules by combining the extended Su—Schrieffer—Heeger (SSH) model with a nonadiabatic dynamics method. It is found that a match between the Fermi level of electrodes and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) or the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of organic molecules can be greatly affected by the length of the organic chains, which has a great impact on electron injection. The correlation between oligomers and electrodes is found to open more efficient channels for electron injection as compared with that in polymer/electrode structures. For oligomer/electrode structures, we show that the Schottky barrier essentially does not affect the electron injection as the electrode work function is smaller than a critical value. This means that the Schottky barrier is pinned for a small work-function electrode. For polymer/electrode structures, we find that it is possible for the Fermi level of electrodes to be pinned to the polaronic level. The condition under which the Fermi level of electrodes exceeds the polaronic level of polymers is shown to not always lead to spontaneous electron transfer from electrodes to polymers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Semiclassical theory of resonance inelastic electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskij, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Semiclassical approach to the theory of resonance electron-molecule collisions, unlocal with respect to interatomic distance was developed. Two problems were considered: modified adiabatic approach for sigle-pole approximation of R-matrix and Fano-Feshbach-Bardsley theory. It is shown that these problems are similar in semiclassical approximation. A simple equation system with coefficients expressed in quadratures was obtained. It enables to determine amplitudes of all processes (including dissociation adhesion, association ejection, free-free and free-bound transitions) in energetic representation with respect to nucleus vibrations in molecule with allowance for both descrete and continuous spectra of nucleus motion in molecule. Quantitative investigation of the system results to the notion of dynamic energy curve of intermediate state, generalizing the motion of such curve in boomerang theory

  14. Autotrophic antimonate bio-reduction using hydrogen as the electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun-Yu; Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Ying; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ran; Yang, Xiaoe; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb), a toxic metalloid, is soluble as antimonate (Sb(V)). While bio-reduction of Sb(V) is an effective Sb-removal approach, its bio-reduction has been coupled to oxidation of only organic electron donors. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of autotrophic microbial Sb(V) reduction using hydrogen gas (H2) as the electron donor without extra organic carbon source. SEM and EDS analysis confirmed the production of the mineral precipitate Sb2O3. When H2 was utilized as the electron donor, the consortium was able to fully reduce 650 μM of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in 10 days, a rate comparable to the culture using lactate as the electron donor. The H2-fed culture directed a much larger fraction of it donor electrons to Sb(V) reduction than did the lactate-fed culture. While 98% of the electrons from H2 were used to reduce Sb(V) by the H2-fed culture, only 12% of the electrons from lactate was used to reduce Sb(V) by the lactate-fed culture. The rest of the electrons from lactate went to acetate and propionate through fermentation, to methane through methanogenesis, and to biomass synthesis. High-throughput sequencing confirmed that the microbial community for the lactate-fed culture was much more diverse than that for the H2-fed culture, which was dominated by a short rod-shaped phylotype of Rhizobium (α-Protobacteria) that may have been active in Sb(V) reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rationalizing the photophysical properties of BODIPY laser dyes via aromaticity and electron-donor-based structural perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, Paul G.; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Teng; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-05-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of six boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) laser dyes with simple non-aromatic substituents are rationalized by relating them to observable structural perturbations within the molecules of the dyes. An empirical relationship involving the structure and the optical properties is derived using a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, quantum chemical calculations and electronic constants: i.e. the tendency of the pyrrole bond lengths towards aromaticity and the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence wavelengths correlating with the electron-donor properties of the substituents. The effect of molecular conformation on the solid-state optical properties of the dyes is also discussed. The findings in this study also demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of using crystal structure data to develop structure-property relationships in this class of optical materials, contributing to the growing effort to design optoelectronic materials with tunable properties via molecular engineering.

  16. Total cross sections for electron scattering with halocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghma, Rahla; Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A quantum mechanical model to find elastic, inelastic and total CS by e{sup −} impact. • Spherical complex optical potential formalism is used to find total CS. • Result shows consistency and good agreement with previous data wherever available. • Maiden attempt to find CS for CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3}, CBr{sub 4} and C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules. • Interesting correlation observed between total CS and polarizability of the molecule. - Abstract: A theoretical study on electron collision with chlorinated methanes: CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3}, brominated methanes: CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3} and CBr{sub 4} and some mono chloroalkanes: C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules in gaseous ground state is undertaken to report elastic, inelastic and total cross sections in the 20–5000 eV energy range. The target molecule is represented as a sum of various scattering centres, which are assumed to scatter electrons independently. The spherical complex optical potential (SCOP) is formulated to represent the interaction dynamics between the electron and the constituent scattering centres. Using SCOP, the quantum mechanical scattering problem is solved through partial wave analysis. The results obtained for CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3} are compared with the available experimental and theoretical values. The elastic cross section for CBr{sub 4} shows satisfactory agreement with the previous available data. The cross sections for CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3}, and C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules presented in this work are reported for the first time.

  17. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies

  18. The Use of Electron Donors to Increase Stereospecificity in Ziegler-Natta Propylene Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Nouri-Ahangarani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different chemical components in traditional Ziegler–Natta catalytic system include: (1 titanium and vanadium containing compounds, mostly TiCl4, as an active centre, (2 trialkylaluminium-based Lewis acid compounds, especially triethylaluminium, as precatalyst and alkylating agent, and (3 inorganic compounds, specifically MgCl2 and silica, as catalyst supports. Besides these compounds, shortly after the first discovery of Ziegler-Natta catalysts, electron donors have been considered as the key components for MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts, as they improve the stereospecificity and activity of these types of catalysts. Most electron donor compounds have oxygen atom and only a few contain nitrogen atom in their structure. Starting from benzoate for third-generation Ziegler–Natta catalysts, the discovery of new donors has always updated the performance of Ziegler–Natta catalysts. Since the first discovery of these compounds numerous efforts have been devoted in both industry and academic laboratories, not only to discover new electron donors but also to understand their roles in Ziegler–Natta olefin polymerization and suitable MgCl2-alcohol adducts formation. This article reviews the history of such research and development efforts. The first part of the article describes the historical developments of catalyst, with a special focus on donors of industrial importance, followed by an account given on recent trends in the latest donors developed. The next part of the article covers the historical progress toward mechanistic understanding of how donors improve the performance of Ziegler–Natta catalysts and how they undergo decomposition by interaction with Lewis acidic species such as the AlEt3 and TiCl.

  19. Improvements of fill factor in solar cells based on blends of polyfluorene copolymers as electron donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadisa, Abay; Zhang, Fengling; Sharma, Deepak; Svensson, Mattias; Andersson, Mats R.; Inganaes, Olle

    2007-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of solar cells based on alternating polyfluorene copolymers, poly(2,7-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene)-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3' -benzothia diazole)) (APFO-3), and poly(2,7-(9,9-didodecyl-fluorene)-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3' -benzothiadiazole)) (APFO-4), blended with an electron acceptor fullerene molecule [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), have been investigated and compared. The two copolymers have the same aromatic backbone structure but differ by the length of their alkyl side chain. The overall photovoltaic performance of the solar cells is comparable irrespective of the copolymer used in the active layer. However, the fill factor (FF) values of the devices are strongly affected by the copolymer type. Higher FF values were realized in solar cells with APFO-4 (with longer alkyl side chain)/PCBM bulk heterojunction active layer. On the other hand, devices with blends of APFO-3/APFO-4/PCBM were found to render fill factor values that are intermediate between the values obtained in solar cells with APFO-3/PCBM and APFO-4/PCBM active film. Upon using APFO-3/APFO-4 blends as electron donors, the cell efficiency can be enhanced by about 16% as compared to cells with either APFO-3 or APFO-4. The transport of holes in each polymer obeys the model of hopping transport in disordered media. However, the degree of energetic barrier against hopping was found to be larger in APFO-3. The tuning of the photovoltaic parameters will be discussed based on studies of hole transport in the pure polymer films, and morphology of blend layers. The effect of bipolar transport in PCBM will also be discussed

  20. A study of vibrational relaxation of electronically-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datsyuk, V.V.; Izmailov, I.A.; Kochelap, V.A.

    1992-09-01

    The time kinetics of the vibrational relaxation of excimers is studied in the diffusional approximation. Simple formulae for functions of nonstationary vibrational distribution are found for the electronically excited molecules. Some spectral-kinetic dependencies of the excimer luminescence are explained in a new way. The possibilities of the determination of excimer parameters are discussed. The dependence of energetical characteristics of excimer lasers on these parameters is particularly emphasized. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  1. Electrons from fixed in space molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.; Jahnke, T.; Czasch, A.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt-Boecking; Kreidi, K.; Knapp, A.; Schmidt, L.; Schoeffler, M.; Foucar, L.; Cocke, C.L.; Osipov, T.; Alnaser, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We use modern multi particle momentum imaging techniques (COLTRIMS) to measure the vector momenta of all charged fragments, ions, photoelectrons and Auger electrons for small molecules excited by synchrotron radiation. These complete images of the fragmentation give an umprecedented detailed insight in the molecular photoionization and Auger process. Also latest results on molecular double ionisation and on cluster fragmentation unveiling interatomic coulomb decay will be presented

  2. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive...... theory of charge transfer in polar media offers convenient tools for the treatment of experimental data for such systems, with due account of large-amplitude strongly anharmonic intramolecular reorganization. Equations for the activation barrier and free energy relationships are provided, incorporating...

  3. Spin Measurements of an Electron Bound to a Single Phosphorous Donor in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, D. R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S. M.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Lilly, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    The spin of an electron bound to a single donor implanted in silicon is potentially useful for quantum information processing. We report on our efforts to measure and manipulate the spin of an electron bound to a single P donor in silicon. A low number of P donors are implanted using a self-aligned process into a silicon substrate in close proximity to a single-electron-transistor (SET) defined by lithographically patterned polysilicon gates. The SET is used to sense the occupancy of the electron on the donor and for spin read-out. An adjacent transmission line allows the application of microwave pulses to rotate the spin of the electron. We will present data from various experiments designed to exploit these capabilities. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  5. Resonant electron capture by aspartame and aspartic acid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftakhov, M V; Shchukin, P V

    2016-12-30

    The processes for dissociative electron capture are the key mechanisms for decomposition of biomolecules, proteins in particular, under interaction with low-energy electrons. Molecules of aspartic acid and aspartame, i.e. modified dipeptides, were studied herein to define the impact of the side functional groups on peptide chain decomposition in resonant electron-molecular reactions. The processes of formation and decomposition of negative ions of both aspartame and aspartic acid were studied by mass spectrometry of negative ions under resonant electron capture. The obtained mass spectra were interpreted under thermochemical analysis by quantum chemical calculations. Main channels of negative molecular ions fragmentation were found and characteristic fragment ions were identified. The СООН fragment of the side chain in aspartic acid is shown to play a key role like the carboxyl group in amino acids and aliphatic oligopeptides. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Path-integral approach to resonant electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterstetter, M.; Domcke, W.

    1993-01-01

    A path-integral formulation of resonant electron-molecule scattering is developed within the framework of the projection-operator formalism of scattering theory. The formation and decay of resonances is treated in real time as a quantum-mechanical electronic-tunneling process, modified by the coupling of the electronic motion with the nuclear degrees of freedom. It is shown that the electronic continuum can be summed over in the path-integral formulation, resulting formally in the path integral for an effective two-state system with coupling to vibrations. The harmonic-oscillator approximation is adopted for the vibrational motion in the present work. Approximation methods are introduced which render the numerical evaluation of the sum over paths feasible for up to ∼10 3 elementary time slices. The theory is numerically realized for simple but nontrivial models representing the 2 Π g d-wave shape resonance in e - +N 2 collisions and the 2 Σ u + p-wave shape resonance in e - +H 2 collisions, respectively. The accuracy of the path-integral results is assessed by comparison with exact numerical reference data for these models. The essential virtue of the path-integral approach is the fact that the computational effort scales at most linearly with the number of vibrational degrees of freedom. The path-integral method is thus well suited to treat electron collisions with polyatomic molecules and molecular aggregates

  7. DFT Study of Electronic and Optical Properties of Small Oligothiophenes Based on Terthiophene End-capped by Several Donor Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Alamy Aziz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eight small molecules based on terthiophene end-capped by several donor groups have been carried out using density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent (TDDFT methods in neutral and doped states. The theoretical ground-state geometry, electronic structure and optical properties of the studied molecules were obtained by the DFT and TD-DFT methods at the B3LYP level with 6-31G(d basis set. Theoretical knowledge of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO energy levels the gap energy (Eg and the open-circuit voltage (Voc of the studied compounds are calculated and discussed. The effects of the donor group substituents on the geometries and optoelectronic properties of these materials are discussed to investigate the relationship between molecular structure and optoelectronic properties. The results of this work suggest some of these materials as a good candidate for organic solar cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i3.995

  8. Methanol as electron donor for thermophilic biological sulfate and sulfite reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur oxyanions (e.g. sulfate, sulfite) can be removed from aqueous waste- and process streams by biological reduction with a suitable electron donor to sulfide, followed by partial chemical or biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The aim of the research described in this

  9. Alcohol production through volatile fatty acids reduction with hydrogen as electron donor by mixed cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this research we demonstrated a new method to produce alcohols. It was experimentally feasible to produce ethanol, propanol and butanol from solely volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with hydrogen as electron donor. In batch tests, VFAs such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids were reduced by mixed

  10. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Photochromic molecules as building blocks for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Belser

    2010-01-01

    Energy and electron transfer processes can be easily induced by a photonic excitation of a donor metal complex ([Ru(bpy)3]2), which is connected via a wire-type molecular fragment to an acceptor metal complex ([Os(bpy)3]2+). The rate constant for the transfer process can be determined by emission measurements of the two connected metal complexes. The system can be modified by incorporation of a switching unit or an interrupter into the wire, influencing the transfer process. Such a molecular device corresponds to an interrupter, mimic the same function applied in molecular electronics. We have used organic switches, which show photochromic properties. By irradiation with light of different wavelengths, the switch changes its functionality by a photochemical reaction from an OFF- to an ON-state and vice versa. The ON- respectively OFF-state is manifested by a color change but also in different conductivity properties for energy and electron transfer processes. Therefore, the mentioned molecular device can work as a simple interrupter, controlling the rate of the transfer processes.

  12. Ab initio methods for electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1987-01-01

    This review concentrates on the recent advances in treating the electronic aspect of the electron-molecule interaction and leaves to other articles the description of the rotational and vibrational motions. Those methods which give the most complete treatment of the direct, exchange, and correlation effects are focused on. Such full treatments are generally necessary at energies below a few Rydbergs (≅ 60 eV). This choice unfortunately necessitates omission of those active and vital areas devoted to the development of model potentials and approximate scattering formulations. The ab initio and model approaches complement each other and are both extremely important to the full explication of the electron-scattering process. Due to the rapid developments of recent years, the approaches that provide the fullest treatment are concentrated on. 81 refs

  13. Molecular electronics--resonant transport through single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörtscher, Emanuel; Riel, Heike

    2010-01-01

    The mechanically controllable break-junction technique (MCBJ) enables us to investigate charge transport through an individually contacted and addressed molecule in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment at variable temperature ranging from room temperature down to 4 K. Using a statistical measurement and analysis approach, we acquire current-voltage (I-V) characteristics during the repeated formation, manipulation, and breaking of a molecular junction. At low temperatures, voltages accessing the first molecular orbitals in resonance can be applied, providing spectroscopic information about the junction's energy landscape, in particular about the molecular level alignment in respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. Thereby, we can investigate the non-linear transport properties of various types of functional molecules and explore their potential use as functional building blocks for future nano-electronics. An example will be given by the reversible and controllable switching between two distinct conductive states of a single molecule. As a proof-of-principle for functional molecular devices, a single-molecule memory element will be demonstrated.

  14. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Malcolm [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  15. All-electron ab initio investigation of the electronic states of the PdC molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, Karl A.

    2001-01-01

    The electronic structure of transition metal containing molecules are extremely complicated and extensive calculations are required for reliable descriptions. In spite of this the results can often be interpreted in simple terms. The electronic structure of PdC is consistent with the molecular or...

  16. Can time-dependent density functional theory predict intersystem crossing in organic chromophores? A case study on benzo(bis)-X-diazole based donor-acceptor-donor type molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Teck Lip Dexter; Lin, Ting Ting; Chua, Ming Hui

    2017-06-21

    Here we utilized new diagnostic tools in time-dependent density functional theory to explain the trend of intersystem crossing in benzo(bis)-X-diazole based donor-acceptor-donor type molecules. These molecules display a wide range of fluorescence quantum yields and triplet yields, making them excellent candidates for testing the validity of these diagnostic tools. We believe that these tools are cost-effective and can be applied to structurally similar organic chromophores to predict/explain the trends of intersystem crossing, and thus fluorescence quantum yields and triplet yields without the use of complex and expensive multireference configuration interaction or multireference pertubation theory methods.

  17. High resolution electron attachment to molecules of atmospheric relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senn, G.

    2000-10-01

    This Ph.D. thesis is divided into three parts. The first is an introduction into the field of electron attachment. In the second part the experimental apparatus is described, and in the third part the results are presented. In the present thesis molecules were chosen for our investigations that are not only of academic interest but that also play an important role for applications or even the life on this planet. All the molecules studied in this work are of atmospheric relevance. NO, and OClO, are involved in the ozone depletion of the stratosphere. The D-layer of the ionosphere is an upper boundary of the ozone layer, therefore the interaction of the electrons from the D-layer with O 3 might play an important role for the chemistry in that part of the atmosphere. Especially the interaction of slow electrons (that will be present in the D-layer in large numbers) with ozone was emphasized in the present study. The production of O - and O 2 - by dissociative electron attachment to ozone was measured for incident electron energies between 0 and 10eV. A previously unobserved sharp structure was discovered in the formation of O - ions for electrons with zero kinetic energy. This additional cross section peak has important consequences for the role of ozone in the anion formation process in the ionosphere. Since OClO is a night time reservoir for chlorine atoms (Cl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) both of which play a critical role in the depletion of the stratospheric ozone, we have studied negative ion formation following electron impact (0-10eV) to OClO. Despite its atmospheric relevance the mechanism of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to NO is still a matter of controversy. DEA was studied at high energy resolution and with a kinetic-energy analysis of the O - fragment in two independent crossed electron-molecular-beam experiments. The DEA cross section exhibits a vertical onset near 7.45eV that corresponds to the energy threshold of the DEA channel O - ( 2 P

  18. Ultrafast dynamics of electronically excited molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietard, Aude

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis investigated the ultrafast dynamics of photo-chromic molecules and argon clusters in the gas phase at the femtosecond timescale. Pump-probe experiments are performed in a set-up which associates a versatile pulsed molecular beam coupled to a photoelectron/photoion velocity map imager (VMI) and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Theses pump-probe experiments provides the temporal evolution of the electronic distribution for each system of interest. Besides, a modelization has been performed in order to characterize the density and the velocity distribution in the pulsed beam. Regarding the photo-chromic di-thienyl-ethene molecules, parallel electronic relaxation pathways were observed. This contrasts with the observation of sequential relaxation processes in most molecules studied so far. In the present case, the initial wave packet splits in two parts. One part is driven to the ground state at the femtosecond time scale through a conical intersection, and the second part remains for ps in the excited state and experiences oscillations in a suspended well. This study has shed light into the intrinsic dynamics of the molecules under study and a general relaxation mechanism has been proposed, which applies to the whole family of di-thienyl-ethene molecules whatever the state of matter (gas phase or solution) in which they have been investigated. Concerning argon clusters excited at about 14 eV, two behaviors of different time scale have been observed at different time scales. The first one occurs in the first picoseconds of the dynamics. It corresponds to the electronic relaxation of an excitonic state at a rate of 1 eV.ps -1 . The second phenomenon corresponds to the localization of the exciton on the excimer Ar 2 *. This phenomenon is observed 4-5 ps after the excitation. In this study, we also observed the ejection of excited argon atoms, addressing the lifetime of the delocalized excitonic state. This work provide additional informations

  19. Biocatalytic photosynthesis with water as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Nam, Dong Heon; Lee, Sahng Ha; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-09-15

    Efficient harvesting of unlimited solar energy and its conversion into valuable chemicals is one of the ultimate goals of scientists. With the ever-increasing concerns about sustainable growth and environmental issues, numerous efforts have been made to develop artificial photosynthetic process for the production of fuels and fine chemicals, thus mimicking natural photosynthesis. Despite the research progress made over the decades, the technology is still in its infancy because of the difficulties in kinetic coupling of whole photocatalytic cycles. Herein, we report a new type of artificial photosynthesis system that can avoid such problems by integrally coupling biocatalytic redox reactions with photocatalytic water splitting. We found that photocatalytic water splitting can be efficiently coupled with biocatalytic redox reactions by using tetracobalt polyoxometalate and Rh-based organometallic compound as hole and electron scavengers, respectively, for photoexcited [Ru(bpy)3](2+). Based on these results, we could successfully photosynthesize a model chiral compound (L-glutamate) using a model redox enzyme (glutamate dehydrogenase) upon in situ photoregeneration of cofactors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Halogen Bonding Involving CO and CS with Carbon as the Electron Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Del Bene

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available MP2/aug’-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out to investigate the halogen-bonded complexes formed when CO and CS act as electron-pair donors through C to ClF, ClNC, ClCl, ClOH, ClCN, ClCCH, and ClNH2. CO forms only complexes stabilized by traditional halogen bonds, and all ClY molecules form traditional halogen-bonded complexes with SC, except ClF which forms only an ion-pair complex. Ion-pair complexes are also found on the SC:ClNC and SC:ClCl surfaces. SC:ClY complexes stabilized by traditional halogen bonds have greater binding energies than the corresponding OC:ClY complexes. The largest binding energies are found for the ion-pair SC–Cl+:−Y complexes. The transition structures which connect the complex and the ion pair on SC:ClNC and SC:ClCl potential surfaces provide the barriers for inter-converting these structures. Charge-transfer from the lone pair on C to the σ-hole on Cl is the primary charge-transfer interaction stabilizing OC:ClY and SC:ClY complexes with traditional halogen bonds. A secondary charge-transfer occurs from the lone pairs on Cl to the in-plane and out-of-plane π antibonding orbitals of ClY. This secondary interaction assumes increased importance in the SC:ClNH2 complex, and is a factor leading to its unusual structure. C–O and C–S stretching frequencies and 13C chemical shieldings increase upon complex formation with ClY molecules. These two spectroscopic properties clearly differentiate between SC:ClY complexes and SC–Cl+:−Y ion pairs. Spin–spin coupling constants 1xJ(C–Cl for OC:ClY complexes increase with decreasing distance. As a function of the C–Cl distance, 1xJ(C–Cl and 1J(C–Cl provide a fingerprint of the evolution of the halogen bond from a traditional halogen bond in the complexes, to a chlorine-shared halogen bond in the transition structures, to a covalent bond in the ion pairs.

  1. Design of ortho-Substituted Donor-Acceptor Molecules as Highly Efficient Green Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae-Ryung; Gong, Myoung-Seon; Lee, Tak Jae; Ha, Tae Hoon; Lee, Chil Won

    2018-04-01

    The ortho-substituted donor-acceptor molecules 2-(4,6-diphenyl-1, 3, 5-triazin-2-yl)- N,Ndiphenylaniline (DPA- o-Trz) and 2-(4,6-diphenyl-1, 3, 5-triazine-2-yl)- N,N-di- p-tolylaniline (MPA- o-Trz) were designed, synthesized, and found to exhibit green fluorescence characteristics. Notably, the singlet-triplet energy gap was less than 0.1 eV, indicating that reverse intersystem crossing gave rise to thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). The organic light-emitting device performance of MPA- o-Trz showed a high external quantum efficiency of 16.3% and good color stability from 0.1 cd/m2 to 5000 cd/m2.

  2. Electronic spectrum of a deterministic single-donor device in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuechsle, Martin; Miwa, Jill A.; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a single-electron transistor (SET) based on an individual phosphorus dopant that is deterministically positioned between the dopant-based electrodes of a transport device in silicon. Electronic characterization at mK-temperatures reveals a charging energy that is very similar to the value expected for isolated P donors in a bulk Si environment. Furthermore, we find indications for bulk-like one-electron excited states in the co-tunneling spectrum of the device, in sharp contrast to previous reports on transport through single dopants

  3. Tuning the electronic structure and transport properties of graphene by noncovalent functionalization: effects of organic donor, acceptor and metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yonghui; Zhou Kaige; Xie Kefeng; Zeng Jing; Zhang Haoli; Peng Yong

    2010-01-01

    Using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism, we have theoretically investigated the binding of organic donor, acceptor and metal atoms on graphene sheets, and revealed the effects of the different noncovalent functionalizations on the electronic structure and transport properties of graphene. The adsorptions of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) induce hybridization between the molecular levels and the graphene valence bands, and transform the zero-gap semiconducting graphene into a metallic graphene. However, the current versus voltage (I-V) simulation indicates that the noncovalent modifications by organic molecules are not sufficient to significantly alter the transport property of the graphene for sensing applications. We found that the molecule/graphene interaction could be dramatically enhanced by introducing metal atoms to construct molecule/metal/graphene sandwich structures. A chemical sensor based on iron modified graphene shows a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than that of pristine graphene. The results of this work could help to design novel graphene-based sensing or switching devices.

  4. Low-Energy Electron Scattering by Sugarcane Lignocellulosic Biomass Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Eliane; Sanchez, Sergio; Bettega, Marcio; Lima, Marco; Varella, Marcio

    2012-06-01

    The use of second generation (SG) bioethanol instead of fossil fuels could be a good strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the efficient production of SG bioethanol has being a challenge to researchers around the world. The main barrier one must overcome is the pretreatment, a very important step in SG bioethanol aimed at breaking down the biomass and facilitates the extraction of sugars from the biomass. Plasma-based treatment, which can generate reactive species, could be an interesting possibility since involves low-cost atmospheric-pressure plasma. In order to offer theoretical support to this technique, the interaction of low-energy electrons from the plasma with biomass is investigated. This study was motived by several works developed by Sanche et al., in which they understood that DNA damage arises from dissociative electron attachment, a mechanism in which electrons are resonantly trapped by DNA subunits. We will present elastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by sugarcane biomass molecules, obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. Our calculations indicate the formation of π* shape resonances in the lignin subunits, while a series of broad and overlapping σ* resonances are found in cellulose and hemicellulose subunits. The presence of π* and σ* resonances could give rise to direct and indirect dissociation pathways in biomass. Then, theoretical resonance energies can be useful to guide the plasma-based pretreatment to break down specific linkages of interest in biomass.

  5. New technique for measurement of electron attachment to molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    One of the goals of this dissertation was to develop a faster method of measuring the attachment properties of molecules. An apparatus was successfully developed that employs a pair of coaxial cylindrical electrodes with the inner one serving also as a pulsed photoelectron source. An electron swarm is driven radially outward through a mixture of an attaching gas and a buffer gas. Both the electrons and resulting negative ions are detected as time-resolved currents by a cylindrical detector contained within the outer electrode as a Faraday cage. Data collection and analysis are handled by a minicomputer based data acquisition system with two independent digitizers. Data were obtained for oxygen in helium or nitrogen as a buffer gas and for sulfur dioxide in helium. Attaching gas percentage were generally below 1%. The electric field to number density ratio was in the range of 1.7 x 10 -19 to 3.8 X 10 -18 V cm 2 . Attachment coefficients were obtained firstly by treating the negative ion currents as a measure of electron attenuation through a gas mixture and secondly by reconstructing the spatial distribution of negative ions at the time of electron passage from the time-resolved currents

  6. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Carmona, Mercè; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Bañó, M Carmen; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2017-06-01

    The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  7. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Boronat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR. RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  8. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Halogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-12-01

    A bibliographies of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for halogen molecules (F 2 , Cl 2 , Br 2 , I 2 ). About 190(F 2 ), 360(Cl 2 ), 140(Br 2 ) and 240(I 2 ) papers were compiled respectively. A comprehensive author indexes for each molecule are included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for F 2 -I 2 . Finally, author's comments for F 2 -I 2 electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  9. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Hydrogen halide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2004-03-01

    Bibliographies of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for hydrogen halide molecules (HF, HCL, HBr, HI). About 330 (HF), 420 (HCl) 220 (HBr) and 150 (HI) papers were compiled respectively. Comprehensive author indexes for each molecule are included. The bibliography covers the period 1903 through 2000 for HF-HI. Finally, author's comments for HBr electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  10. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Park, Kyungwha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters, vibrational energies, and electron-vibron coupling strengths of the Fe4 are computed using DFT. A giant spin model is applied to the Fe4 with only two charge states, specifically a neutral state with a total spin S =5 and a singly charged state with S =9 /2 , which is consistent with our DFT result and experiments on Fe4 single-molecule transistors. In sequential electron tunneling, we find that the magnetic anisotropy gives rise to new features in the conductance peaks arising from vibrational excitations. In particular, the peak height shows a strong, unusual dependence on the direction as well as magnitude of applied B field. The magnetic anisotropy also introduces vibrational satellite peaks whose position and height are modified with the direction and magnitude of applied B field. Furthermore, when multiple vibrational modes with considerable electron-vibron coupling have energies close to one another, a low-bias current is suppressed, independently of gate voltage and applied B field, although that is not the case for a single mode with a similar electron-vibron coupling. In the former case, the conductance peaks reveal a stronger B -field dependence than in the latter case. The new features appear because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is of the same order of magnitude as the energies of vibrational modes with significant electron-vibron coupling. Our findings clearly show the interesting interplay between magnetic anisotropy and electron-vibron coupling in electron transport via the Fe4. Similar behavior can be observed in transport via other anisotropic magnetic molecules.

  11. Heterogeneous semiconductor photocatalysts for hydrogen production from aqueous solutions of electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, E. A.; Parmon, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    Current views on heterogeneous photocatalysts for visible- and near-UV-light-driven production of molecular hydrogen from water and aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic electron donors are analyzed and summarized. Main types of such photocatalysts and methods for their preparation are considered. Particular attention is paid to semiconductor photocatalysts based on sulfides that are known to be sensitive to visible light. The known methods for increasing the quantum efficiency of the target process are discussed, including design of the structure, composition and texture of semiconductor photocatalysts and variation of the medium pH and the substrate and photocatalyst concentrations. Some important aspects of the activation and deactivation of sulfide photocatalysts and the evolution of their properties in the course of hydrogen production processes in the presence of various types of electron donors are analyzed. The bibliography includes 276 references.

  12. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10 -6 that is below the error threshold of 10 -4 required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  13. Electronic excitation to low-lying states of GeF4 molecule by electron impact: A comparative study with CF4 and SiF4 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtomi, S; Matsui, M; Mochizuki, Y; Suga, A; Kato, H; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Duflot, D; Limão-Vieira, P

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurements of the electron impact electronic excitation cross sections for XF 4 (X = C, Si and Ge) molecules at 100 eV, 5° scattering angle and 30 eV, 30° in the electron energy loss range 8.0 - 18 eV. For a target of GeF 4 molecule, the optically-forbidden behavior has been observed in the lower electron energy loss range. (paper)

  14. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A., E-mail: jimfield@email.arizona.edu

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Algal biomass can serve as an electron donor to drive reduction of sulfate to sulfide. • Biogenic sulfide precipitates Cu{sup 2+} as stable sulfide mineral. • Cu{sup +2} removal in sulfidogenic bioreactors amended with algal biomass exceeded 99.5%. • Acidity in synthetic acid rock drainage was consumed by sulfate reduction. - Abstract: This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Cu{sup 2+}. Sulfate, sulfide, Cu{sup 2+} and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123 d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7 mg SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} d{sup −1}) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu{sup 2+} removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu{sup 2+} was precipitated with biogenic H{sub 2}S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  15. Interplay of alternative conjugated pathways and steric interactions on the electronic and optical properties of donor-acceptor conjugated polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Igo T.; Risko, Chad; Aziz, Saadullah Gary; Da Silva Filho, Demé trio A Da Silva; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Donor-acceptor π-conjugated copolymers are of interest for a wide range of electronic applications, including field-effect transistors and solar cells. Here, we present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the impact of varying the conjugation pathway on the geometric, electronic, and optical properties of donor-acceptor systems. We consider both linear ("in series"), traditional conjugation among the donor-acceptor moieties versus structures where the acceptor units are appended orthogonally to the linear, donor-only conjugated backbone. Long-range-corrected hybrid functionals are used in the investigation with the values of the tuned long-range separation parameters providing an estimate of the extent of conjugation as a function of the oligomer architecture. Considerable differences in the electronic and optical properties are determined as a function of the nature of the conjugation pathway, features that should be taken into account in the design of donor-acceptor copolymers.

  16. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl - repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O 2 is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO 2 is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed

  18. Two-electron spin correlations in precision placed donors in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, M A; Gorman, S K; House, M G; Hile, S J; Keizer, J G; Keith, D; Hill, C D; Watson, T F; Baker, W J; Hollenberg, L C L; Simmons, M Y

    2018-03-07

    Substitutional donor atoms in silicon are promising qubits for quantum computation with extremely long relaxation and dephasing times demonstrated. One of the critical challenges of scaling these systems is determining inter-donor distances to achieve controllable wavefunction overlap while at the same time performing high fidelity spin readout on each qubit. Here we achieve such a device by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy lithography. We measure anti-correlated spin states between two donor-based spin qubits in silicon separated by 16 ± 1 nm. By utilising an asymmetric system with two phosphorus donors at one qubit site and one on the other (2P-1P), we demonstrate that the exchange interaction can be turned on and off via electrical control of two in-plane phosphorus doped detuning gates. We determine the tunnel coupling between the 2P-1P system to be 200 MHz and provide a roadmap for the observation of two-electron coherent exchange oscillations.

  19. New directions in low energy electron molecule collision calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, P.G.; Noble, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    New theoretical and computational methods for studying low energy electron molecule collisions are discussed. Having considered the fixed-nuclei approximation and the form of the expansion of the total collision wavefunction, the various approximations which have been made are examined, including the static plus model exchange approximation, the static exchange approximation and the close coupling approximation, particular attention being paid to methods of including the molecular charge polarisation. Various ways which have been developed to solve the resultant equations are discussed and it is found that there is increasing emphasis being given to methods which combine the advantages of discrete multi-centre analytic bases with single centre numerical bases. (U.K.)

  20. Modulating Pathways for Electron and Energy Transfer Through Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro

    Energy transport efficiency and electric conductance are molecular properties that motivates the development of optoelectronic materials, energy storage, and electronic devices. Several experimental techniques allow measurement of these properties and regularly, modeling is employed to find...... correlations between chemical structure and molecular properties. This dissertation discusses the interplay between modeling and experiments toward the assessment of new relations between the molecular structure and properties. In particular, it has been shown how simulations can push the development of new...... experimental techniques, demonstrate the potential of already established techniques, and work in synergy with experiments. It is demonstrated how the use of modeling can expand our understanding of how chemical structure affects molecular properties, which will enable us to design molecules with specific...

  1. Competitive microbial reduction of perchlorate and nitrate with a cathode directly serving as the electron donor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Daohai; Yu, Hui; Li, Chenchen; Ren, Yuan; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Microbial reduction of perchlorate with an electrode as the electron donor represents an emerging technology for remediation of perchlorate contamination; it is important to know how perchlorate reduction behaves when nitrate, a co-contaminant of perchlorate is present. We reported that electrons derived from the electrode can be directly transferred to the bacteria with perchlorate or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. The presence of nitrate, even at the 0.07 mM level, can slow reduction of perchlorate (0.70 mM) as a poised potential of -0.50 V (vs. SCE) was applied to the inoculated cathode. Increasing the concentration of nitrate resulted in a noticeable inhibitory effect on perchlorate reduction. When the nitrate concentration was 2.10 mM, reduction of 0.70 mM perchlorate was totally inhibited. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rDNA gene analysis with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that most of the bacteria newly enriched on the nitrate and/or perchlorate biocathodes were the known electrochemically active denitrifiers, which possibly prefer to reduce nitrate over perchlorate. These results show that nitrate is a more favorable electron acceptor than perchlorate in the bioelectrochemical system where the cathode directly serves as the electron donor

  2. Linear-algebraic approach to electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1983-01-01

    A linear-algebraic method, based on an integral equations formulation, is applied to the excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact. Various schemes are devised for treating the one-electron terms that sometimes cause instabilities when directly incorporated into the solution matrix. These include introducing Lagrange undetermined multipliers and correlation terms. Good agreement between the method and other computational techniques is obtained for electron scattering for hydrogenic and Li-like atomic ions and for H 2 + in two- to five-state close-coupling calculations

  3. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  4. Rapid long range intramolecular electron transfer within a steroid molecule with two electron binding groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, R.K.; Miller, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer has been observed to have occurred in less than 100 ns in a steroid molecule having two distinct electron binding groups separated by distances distributed from 7--11 A. Experiments were carried out in organic glasses at 77 K with pulse radiolysis techniques to create trapped electrons which were captured by a group on one end of the steroid molecule. Although one of the groups, benzoate, is held to the steroid spacer by a flexible linkage, the rigidity of the glassy matrices prevented movement to alter the initial distance. Interestingly, no effects of distance were seen: all ET processes appeared to have occurred much faster than our 100 ns time resolution, consistent with measurements of the rate of intermolecular electron transfer between the same functional groups in random solutions. Solvation energetics, on the other hand, had a remarkable influence on the extent and direction of electron transfer. A change in solvent polarity was observed to reverse the direction of electron transfer. Evidence was obtained for a distribution of solvation environments for ions in glasses which may be as broad as 0.15 eV

  5. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2004-02-01

    Bibliographies of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for hydrogen molecules (H 2 , HD, HT, D 2 , DT, T 2 ). About 2200 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for H 2 . Finally, author's comments for H 2 electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  6. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Nitrogen molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-06-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for nitrogen molecule (N 2 ). About 2240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is include. The bibliography covers the period 1906 through 2000 for N 2 . Finally, author's comments for N 2 electron collision cross section are given. (author)

  7. Mixed Domains Enhance Charge Generation and Extraction in Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells with Small-Molecule Donors

    KAUST Repository

    Alqahtani, Obaid

    2018-03-25

    The interplay between nanomorphology and efficiency of polymer-fullerene bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells has been the subject of intense research, but the generality of these concepts for small-molecule (SM) BHJs remains unclear. Here, the relation between performance; charge generation, recombination, and extraction dynamics; and nanomorphology achievable with two SM donors benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b]dithiophene-pyrido[3,4-b]-pyrazine BDT(PPTh), namely SM1 and SM2, differing by their side-chains, are examined as a function of solution additive composition. The results show that the additive 1,8-diiodooctane acts as a plasticizer in the blends, increases domain size, and promotes ordering/crystallinity. Surprisingly, the system with high domain purity (SM1) exhibits both poor exciton harvesting and severe charge trapping, alleviated only slightly with increased crystallinity. In contrast, the system consisting of mixed domains and lower crystallinity (SM2) shows both excellent exciton harvesting and low charge recombination losses. Importantly, the onset of large, pure crystallites in the latter (SM2) system reduces efficiency, pointing to possible differences in the ideal morphologies for SM-based BHJ solar cells compared with polymer-fullerene devices. In polymer-based systems, tie chains between pure polymer crystals establish a continuous charge transport network, whereas SM-based active layers may in some cases require mixed domains that enable both aggregation and charge percolation to the electrodes.

  8. Mixed Domains Enhance Charge Generation and Extraction in Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells with Small-Molecule Donors

    KAUST Repository

    Alqahtani, Obaid; Babics, Maxime; Gorenflot, Julien; Savikhin, Victoria; Ferron, Thomas; Balawi, Ahmed H.; Paulke, Andreas; Kan, Zhipeng; Pope, Michael; Clulow, Andrew J.; Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Burn, Paul L.; Gentle, Ian R.; Neher, Dieter; Toney, Michael F.; Laquai, Fré dé ric; Beaujuge, Pierre; Collins, Brian A.

    2018-01-01

    The interplay between nanomorphology and efficiency of polymer-fullerene bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells has been the subject of intense research, but the generality of these concepts for small-molecule (SM) BHJs remains unclear. Here, the relation between performance; charge generation, recombination, and extraction dynamics; and nanomorphology achievable with two SM donors benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b]dithiophene-pyrido[3,4-b]-pyrazine BDT(PPTh), namely SM1 and SM2, differing by their side-chains, are examined as a function of solution additive composition. The results show that the additive 1,8-diiodooctane acts as a plasticizer in the blends, increases domain size, and promotes ordering/crystallinity. Surprisingly, the system with high domain purity (SM1) exhibits both poor exciton harvesting and severe charge trapping, alleviated only slightly with increased crystallinity. In contrast, the system consisting of mixed domains and lower crystallinity (SM2) shows both excellent exciton harvesting and low charge recombination losses. Importantly, the onset of large, pure crystallites in the latter (SM2) system reduces efficiency, pointing to possible differences in the ideal morphologies for SM-based BHJ solar cells compared with polymer-fullerene devices. In polymer-based systems, tie chains between pure polymer crystals establish a continuous charge transport network, whereas SM-based active layers may in some cases require mixed domains that enable both aggregation and charge percolation to the electrodes.

  9. Advances and challenges in electron-molecule scattering physics-A Report of the 14th International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakoo, M A [Department of Physics, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Lima, M A P [Departamento de Eletronica Quantica, Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' -UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6165, 13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Tennyson, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    A report is presented of the 13th International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions Physics (Instituto de Fisica, Unicamp, Campinas, Brazil, 27-30 July 2005). This workshop covered low-energy electron interactions with atoms, molecules and condensed matter systems. Several important aspects of this symposium were to bring together theory and experimental advances in this field for gaseous targets as well as showcasing the increasing diversity of electron-molecule collision applications in condensed matter and biological applications. A summary session was held wherein were discussed aspects of the future of the field, including the development of new theoretical and experimental capabilities.

  10. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  11. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  12. Electron molecule cross sections relevant to negative ion sources and divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Capitelli, M.; Lamanna, U.T.; Janev, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Electron-molecule cross sections for electronic transitions in H 2 and D 2 molecules vibrationally excited are presented, and a scaling law for the vibrational cross sections is discussed for the X 1 summation + g →B 1 summation + u electronic transition. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The author deals with excitation and dissociation processes which result from the interaction between low-energy (0.15 eV) electrons and molecules. Low-energy electron-impact spectroscopy is used to gain a better knowledge of the electronic structure of halomethanes, ethylene and some of its halogen substituted derivatives, and some more complex organic molecules. (Auth.)

  14. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Yan, Tingfen [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  15. Influence of bicarbonate, sulfate, and electron donors on biological reduction of uranium and microbial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Wensui [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Wu Wei-Min; Criddle, C.S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Yan Tingfen [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Jardine, P.M.; Gu Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Zhou Jizhong [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    2007-12-15

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low-bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high-bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and groundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction. (orig.)

  16. Electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact in a linear algebraic, separable potential approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The linear algebraic, separable potential approach is applied to the electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact. By representing the exchange and off-diagonal direct terms on a basis, the standard set of coupled inelastic equations is reduced to a set of elastic inhomogeneous equations. The procedure greatly simplifies the formulation by allowing a large portion of the problem to be handled by standard bound-state techniques and by greatly reducing the order of the scattering equations that must be solved. Application is made to the excitation of atomic hydrogen in the three-state close-coupling (1s, 2s, 2p) approximation. (author)

  17. One-electron densities of freely rotating Wigner molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2017-12-01

    A formalism enabling computation of the one-particle density of a freely rotating assembly of identical particles that vibrate about their equilibrium positions with amplitudes much smaller than their average distances is presented. It produces densities as finite sums of products of angular and radial functions, the length of the expansion being determined by the interplay between the point-group and permutational symmetries of the system in question. Obtaining from a convolution of the rotational and bosonic components of the parent wavefunction, the angular functions are state-dependent. On the other hand, the radial functions are Gaussians with maxima located at the equilibrium lengths of the position vectors of individual particles and exponents depending on the scalar products of these vectors and the eigenvectors of the corresponding Hessian as well as the respective eigenvalues. Although the new formalism is particularly useful for studies of the Wigner molecules formed by electrons subject to weak confining potentials, it is readily adaptable to species (such as ´balliums’ and Coulomb crystals) composed of identical particles with arbitrary spin statistics and permutational symmetry. Several examples of applications of the present approach to the harmonium atoms within the strong-correlation regime are given.

  18. Theoretical study of near-threshold electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have been engaged in carrying out a foundation study on problems pertaining to near-threshold nuclear excitations in e-H 2 scattering. The primary goals of this study are: to investigate the severity and nature of the anticipated breakdown of the adiabatic-nuclei (AN) approximation, first for rotation only (in the rigid-rotator approximation), and then for vibration; to determine a data base of accurate ab initio cross sections for this important system; to implement and test accurate, computationally-tractable model potentials for exchange and polarization effects; and to begin the exploration of alternative scattering theories for near-threshold collisions. This study has provided a well-defined theoretical context for our future investigations. Second, it has enabled us to identify and quantify several serious problems in the theory of near-threshold electron-molecule scattering that demand attention. And finally, it has led to the development of some of the theoretical and computational apparatus that will form the foundation of future work. In this report, we shall review our progress to date, emphasizing work completed during the current contract year. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of a fluorescent pyrrole derivative containing electron acceptor and donor groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A. K. A.; Monteiro, M. P.; Dias, J. M. M.; Omena, L.; da Silva, A. J. C.; Tonholo, J.; Mortimer, R. J.; Navarro, M.; Jacinto, C.; Ribeiro, A. S.; de Oliveira, I. N.

    2014-07-01

    The synthesis and fluorescence characterization of a new pyrrole derivative (PyPDG) containing the electron donor-acceptor dansyl substituent is reported. The effects of temperature and solvent polarity on the steady-state fluorescence of this compound are investigated. Our results show that PyPDG exhibits desirable fluorescent properties which makes it a promising candidate to be used as the photoactive material in optical thermometry and thermography applications. Further, the electrochemical and emission properties of polymeric films obtained from the oxidation polymerization of PyPDG are also analyzed.

  20. Study of microbial perchlorate reduction: Considering of multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xing [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Gao, Baoyu, E-mail: bygao@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin, Bo [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005,Australia (Australia); Zhen, Hu [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Xiaoyi [CSIRO Land and Water, Gate 5, Waite Road, Urrbrae, SA 5064 (Australia); Dai, Ming [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005,Australia (Australia)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Schemes of perchlorate reduction in ClO{sub 4}{sup −}/ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} e{sup −}acceptor systems. - Highlights: • We created a multiple electron acceptor/donor system for ClO{sub 4}{sup −} reduction. • Nitrate reduction was inhibited when using perchlorate-grown Azospira sp. KJ. • Reduction proceeded as an order of ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}and NO{sub 3}{sup −}. • Oxidation of acetate was inhibited by succinate in acetate–succinate series. - Abstract: Bioremediation of perchlorate-cotaminated water by a heterotrophic perchlorate reducing bacterium creates a multiple electron acceptor-donor system. We experimentally determined the perchlorate reduction by Azospira sp. KJ at multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors systems; this was the aim of this study. Perchlorate reduction was drastically inhibited at the pH 6.0, and the maximum reduction of perchlorate by Azospira sp. KJ was observed at pH value of 8.0. Perchlorate reduction was retarded in ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −},and ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} acceptor systems, while being completely inhibited by the additional O{sub 2} in the ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–O{sub 2} acceptor system. The reduction proceeded as an order of ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}, and NO{sub 3}{sup −} in the ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} system. K{sub S,}v{sub max}, and q{sub max} obtained at different e{sup −} acceptor and donor conditions are calculated as 140.5–190.6 mg/L, 8.7–13.2 mg-perchlorate/L-h, and 0.094–0.16 mg-perchlorate/mg-DW-h, respectively.

  1. Structural Ordering of Semiconducting Polymers and Small-Molecules for Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Kathryn Allison

    Semiconducting polymers and small-molecules can be readily incorporated into electronic devices such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), thermoelectrics (OTEs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Organic materials offer the advantage of being processable from solution to form flexible and lightweight thin films. The molecular design, processing, and resulting thin film morphology of semiconducting polymers drastically affect the optical and electronic properties. Charge transport within films of semiconducting polymers relies on the nanoscale organization to ensure electronic coupling through overlap of molecular orbitals and to provide continuous transport pathways. While the angstrom-scale packing details can be studied using X-ray scattering methods, an understanding of the mesoscale, or the length scale over which smaller ordered regions connect, is much harder to achieve. Grain boundaries play an important role in semiconducting polymer thin films where the average grain size is much smaller than the total distance which charges must traverse in order to reach the electrodes in a device. The majority of semiconducting polymers adopt a lamellar packing structure in which the conjugated backbones align in parallel pi-stacks separated by the alkyl side-chains. Only two directions of transport are possible--along the conjugated backbone and in the pi-stacking direction. Currently, the discussion of transport between crystallites is centered around the idea of tie-chains, or "bridging" polymer chains connecting two ordered regions. However, as molecular structures become increasingly complex with the development of new donor-acceptor copolymers, additional forms of connectivity between ordered domains should be considered. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is a powerful tool for directly imaging the crystalline grain boundaries in polymer and small-molecule thin films. Recently, structures

  2. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  3. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  4. Fine-tuning of electronic properties in donor-acceptor conjugated polymers based on oligothiophenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imae, Ichiro; Sagawa, Hitoshi; Harima, Yutaka

    2018-03-01

    A novel series of donor-acceptor conjugated polymers having oligothiophenes with well-defined structures were synthesized and their optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties were investigated. It was found that the absorption bands of polymers were red-shifted with increasing number of ethylenedioxy groups added to each oligothiophene unit and that their band edges reached over 1000 nm. The systematical fine-tuning of the electronic properties was achieved using the chemical structures of oligothiophene units. Photovoltaic cells based on polymer/(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) exhibited power conversion efficiencies in the range from 0.004 to 1.10%, reflecting the electronic properties of the polymers.

  5. Intermediate-Sized Conjugated Donor Molecules for Organic Solar Cells: Comparison of Benzodithiophene and Benzobisthiazole-Based Cores

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-09-05

    Two intermediate-sized donor molecules, BBTz-X and BDT-X, have been synthesized by the Stille coupling between 4-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-6-(trimethylstannyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophen-2-yl)-7-(5′-hexyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine and either 4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,6-diiodobenzo[1,2-d:4,5-d′]bis(thiazole) or 2,6-dibromo-4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene, respectively. Both oxidation and reduction potentials for BBTz-X are anodically shifted relative to those for BDT-X, but the oxidation potential is more sensitive to the identity of the core; this is consistent with what is seen for DFT-calculated HOMO and LUMO energies and with a slightly blue-shifted absorption maximum for BBTz-X. Although DFT calculations, along with crystal structures of related compounds, suggest more planar molecular structures for BBTz-X than for BDT-X, film structures and the effects of various annealing processes on these films, as revealed by GIWAXS, are similar. The performance of BDT-X:PC61BM bulk-heterojunction solar cells is more sensitive to annealing conditions than that of BBTz-X:PC61BM cells, but under appropriate conditions, both yield power conversion efficiencies of >7%.

  6. Intermediate-Sized Conjugated Donor Molecules for Organic Solar Cells: Comparison of Benzodithiophene and Benzobisthiazole-Based Cores

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Junxiang; Abdelsamie, Maged; Shi, Qinqin; Zhang, Yadong; Parker, Timothy C.; Jucov, Evgheni V.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Amassian, Aram; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Blakey, Simon B.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.

    2017-01-01

    Two intermediate-sized donor molecules, BBTz-X and BDT-X, have been synthesized by the Stille coupling between 4-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-6-(trimethylstannyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophen-2-yl)-7-(5′-hexyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine and either 4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,6-diiodobenzo[1,2-d:4,5-d′]bis(thiazole) or 2,6-dibromo-4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene, respectively. Both oxidation and reduction potentials for BBTz-X are anodically shifted relative to those for BDT-X, but the oxidation potential is more sensitive to the identity of the core; this is consistent with what is seen for DFT-calculated HOMO and LUMO energies and with a slightly blue-shifted absorption maximum for BBTz-X. Although DFT calculations, along with crystal structures of related compounds, suggest more planar molecular structures for BBTz-X than for BDT-X, film structures and the effects of various annealing processes on these films, as revealed by GIWAXS, are similar. The performance of BDT-X:PC61BM bulk-heterojunction solar cells is more sensitive to annealing conditions than that of BBTz-X:PC61BM cells, but under appropriate conditions, both yield power conversion efficiencies of >7%.

  7. A screening-corrected additivity rule for the calculation of electron scattering from macro-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F; Garcia, G

    2009-01-01

    A simplified form of the well-known screening-corrected additivity rule procedure for the calculation of electron-molecule cross sections is proposed for the treatment of some very large macro-molecules. While the comparison of the standard and simplified treatments for a DNA dodecamer reveals very similar results, the new treatment presents some important advantages for large molecules.

  8. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  9. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]Dithiophene-6,7-Difluoroquinoxaline Small Molecule Donors with >8% BHJ Solar Cell Efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze

    2017-07-14

    Solution-processable small molecule (SM) donors are promising alternatives to their polymer counterparts in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. While SM donors with favorable spectral absorption, self-assembly patterns, optimum thin-film morphologies, and high carrier mobilities in optimized donor–acceptor blends are required to further BHJ device efficiencies, material structure governs each one of those attributes. As a result, the rational design of SM donors with gradually improved BHJ solar cell efficiencies must concurrently address: (i) bandgap tuning and optimization of spectral absorption (inherent to the SM main chain) and (ii) pendant-group substitution promoting structural order and mediating morphological effects. In this paper, the rational pendant-group substitution in benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene–6,7-difluoroquinoxaline SMs is shown to be an effective approach to narrowing the optical gap (Eopt) of the SM donors (SM1 and SM2), without altering their propensity to order and form favorable thin-film BHJ morphologies with PC71BM. Systematic device examinations show that power conversion efficiencies >8% and open-circuit voltages (VOC) nearing 1 V can be achieved with the narrow-gap SM donor analog (SM2, Eopt = 1.6 eV) and that charge transport in optimized BHJ solar cells proceeds with minimal, nearly trap-free recombination. Detailed device simulations, light intensity dependence, and transient photocurrent analyses emphasize how carrier recombination impacts BHJ device performance upon optimization of active layer thickness and morphology.

  11. Organic molecules based on dithienyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole as new donor materials for solution-processed organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhonglian; Fan, Benhu; Ouyang, Jianyong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Xue, Feng [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117573 (Singapore); Adachi, Chihaya [Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Polymers based on dithienyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (TBT) have received strong attention as the donor materials of polymer photovoltaic cells (PVs), since they can have a low band gap. But soluble small organic molecules based on TBT have been rarely studied. This paper reports the synthesis of two small organic molecules based on TBT and their application as the donor materials of solution-processed bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). These compounds were soluble in common organic solvents, such as chloroform, chlorobenzene and tetrahydrofuran. They have band gaps comparable to poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and lower HOMO and LUMO (HOMO: highest occupied molecular orbital, LUMO: lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) levels than P3HT. These molecules and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were used as the donors and acceptor to fabricate bulk heterojunction OPVs through solution processing. After optimization of the experimental conditions, power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.66% was achieved on the solution-processed OPVs under AM 1.5G, 100 mW cm{sup -2} illumination. (author)

  12. Electron capture in ion-molecule collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress of theoretical charge transfer study in ion-molecule collisions at the intermediate energy is reviewed. Concept of close and distant collisions obtained from extensive ion-atom collision studies is identified so that it can be utilized to model two distinct collision processes. For a close collision, explicit representation of the whole collision complex is necessary to describe collision dynamics correctly, while a model potential approach for molecule is appropriate for a distant collision. It is shown that these two distinct models are indeed capable of reproducing experimental charge transfer cross sections. Some remarks for further theoretical study of ion-molecule collisions are also given. 21 refs., 8 figs

  13. Electron transfer dynamics of bistable single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, A.V; Kubatkin, S.; Kafanov, S. G.

    2006-01-01

    We present transport measurements of single-molecule junctions bridged by a molecule with three benzene rings connected by two double bonds and with thiol end-groups that allow chemical binding to gold electrodes. The I-V curves show switching behavior between two distinct states. By statistical ...... analysis of the switching events, we show that a 300 meV mode mediates the transition between the two states. We propose that breaking and reformation of a S-H bond in the contact zone between molecule and electrode explains the observed bistability....

  14. Second-order Born approximation for the ionization of molecules by electron and positron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Cappello, C. [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Institut Jean Barriol (FR2843), 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Rezkallah, Z.; Houamer, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Charpentier, I. [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux UMR 7554, Ile du Saulcy, F-57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Hervieux, P. A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, 23 Rue du Loess, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Ruiz-Lopez, M. F. [Nancy-University, Equipe de Chimie et Biochimie Theoriques, UMR CNRS-UHP 7565, BP 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Dey, R. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

    2011-09-15

    Second-order Born approximation is applied to study the ionization of molecules. The initial and final states are described by single-center wave functions. For the initial state a Gaussian wave function is used while for the ejected electron it is a distorted wave. Results of the present model are compared with recent (e,2e) experiments on the water molecule. Preliminary results are also presented for the ionization of the thymine molecule by electrons and positrons.

  15. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  16. Photon emission induced by impact of electrons on molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprang, H.A. van.

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses both the history and the present state of emission spectroscopy and presents several previously published papers giving experimental data on some diatomic molecules and for chloro-fluoro methanes. (G.T.H.)

  17. Inversion of the total cross sections for electron-molecule and electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lun, D.R.; Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Inverse scattering theory has been applied to construct the interaction potentials from total cross sections as a function of energy for electrons scattered off of atoms and molecules. The underlying potentials are assumed to be real and energy independent and are evaluated using the Eikonal approximation and with real phase shifts determined from the total cross sections. The inversion potentials have been determined using either a high energy limit approximation or by using a fixed energy inversion method at select energies. These procedures have been used to analyse e - - CH 4 , e - - SiH 4 , e - -Kr and e - -Xe scattering data in particular. 14 refs., 1 tabs., 3 figs

  18. The impact of alkali metal halide electron donor complexes in the photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuzwayo, Z., E-mail: zack.khuzwayo@up.ac.za; Chirwa, E.M.N

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Facilitation of photocatalysis using simple metal-halides as VB hole scavengers. • Recombination prevention by coupled valence and conduction band approaches. • Determination of anions critical levels beyond which process retardation occurs. • Determination of the photocatalytic process rate of reaction kinetics. - Abstract: The performance of photocatalytic oxidation of chemical pollutants is subjected to the presence of anion complexes in natural waters. This study investigated the influence of alkali metal (Na{sup +} (sodium), K{sup +} (potassium)) halides (Cl{sup −} (chloride), Br{sup −} (bromide), F{sup −} (fluoride)) as inorganic ion sources in the photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in batch systems. It was found that the exclusive presence of halides in the absence of an electron acceptor adequately facilitated the photocatalyst process below critical levels of anion populations, where beyond the critical point the process was significantly hindered. Below the determined critical point, the performance in some cases near matches that of the facilitation of the photocatalytic process by exclusive oxygen, acting as an electron scavenger. The coupling of halide ions and oxygenation presented significantly improved photo-oxidation of PCP, this was confirmed by the inclusion of formic acid as a comparative electron donor. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic expression was used to calculate the performance rate kinetics. The probable impact of the halide anions was discussed with regards to the process of electron hole pair recombination prevention.

  19. Photoinduced electron transfer in covalent ruthenium-anthraquinone dyads: relative importance of driving-force, solvent polarity, and donor-bridge energy gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankache, Jihane; Wenger, Oliver S

    2012-02-28

    Four rigid rod-like molecules comprised of a Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) photosensitizer, a 9,10-anthraquinone electron acceptor, and a molecular bridge connecting the two redox partners were synthesized and investigated by optical spectroscopic and electrochemical means. An attempt was made to assess the relative importance of driving-force, solvent polarity, and bridge variation on the rates of photoinduced electron transfer in these molecules. Expectedly, introduction of tert-butyl substituents in the bipyridine ligands of the ruthenium complex and a change in solvent from dichloromethane to acetonitrile lead to a significant acceleration of charge transfer rates. In dichloromethane, photoinduced electron transfer is not competitive with the inherent excited-state deactivation processes of the photosensitizer. In acetonitrile, an increase in driving-force by 0.2 eV through attachment of tert-butyl substituents to the bpy ancillary ligands causes an increase in electron transfer rates by an order of magnitude. Replacement of a p-xylene bridge by a p-dimethoxybenzene spacer entails an acceleration of charge transfer rates by a factor of 3.5. In the dyads from this study, the relative order of importance of individual influences on electron transfer rates is therefore as follows: solvent polarity ≥ driving-force > donor-bridge energy gap.

  20. Fluorescence quenching of derivatives of anthracene by organic electron donors and acceptors in acetonitrile. Electron and proton transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac, Marek; Najbar, Jan; Wirz, Jakob

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence quenching of anthracene derivatives by organic electron donors (amines) and acceptors was investigated using stationary fluorescence measurements. The dependence of log( kq) on Δ Get shows Rehm-Weller-type behavior. The formation of anion radicals of anthracene, bianthryl, and 9-cyanoanthracene was detected by flash photolysis in systems containing aromatic amines (aniline, 2-bromoaniline, 4-bromoaniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, 4-bromo-N,N-dimethylaniline, N,N-diethylaniline, and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). The radical yields decreased and triplet yields increased when bromo derivatives of amines were used as donor quenchers, indicating the heavy-atom effect on spin conversion within radical pairs. The importance of the heavy-atom effect decreased when the energy gap between the charge transfer and molecular triplet states was small. The formation of separated radicals decreased when primary amines were used as quenchers which indicated the existence of an additional path of deactivation of the radical pair. The behavior of amines as quenchers of bianthryl and anthracene is compared with that of inorganic anion quenchers.

  1. Vibrational frame transformation for electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, C.H.; Jungen, C.

    1985-01-01

    The frame-transformation theory of electron interaction with a vibrating diatomic core is extended to allow for energy dependence of its parameters. The Born-Oppenheimer separation of electron and nuclear motion is preserved when the electron penetrates the molecular core. The extended theory reproduces the boomerang-model treatment of vibrational excitation in resonant e-N 2 collisions

  2. Application of the method of continued fractions for electron scattering by linear molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Lara, O.; Brasilia Univ., DF

    1995-01-01

    The method of continued fractions (MCF) of Horacek and Sasakawa is adapted for the first time to study low-energy electron scattering by linear molecules. Particularly, we have calculated the reactance K-matrices for an electron scattered by hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion as well as by a polar LiH molecule in the static-exchange level. For all the applications studied herein. the calculated physical quantities converge rapidly, even for a strongly polar molecule such as LiH, to the correct values and in most cases the convergence is monotonic. Our study suggests that the MCF could be an efficient method for studying electron-molecule scattering and also photoionization of molecules. (Author)

  3. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  4. A Moessbauer study of the germanium two-electron donor centers in PbSe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terukov, E.I.; Khuzhakulov, Eh.S.

    2005-01-01

    The 73 As( 73 Ge) Moessbauer emission spectroscopy is used for identification of neutral and ionized two-electron germanium centers in PbSe. It is shown that the charge state of antistructural defect 73 Ge, generating in the anion sublattice after 73 As radioactive decay, does not depend on the Fermi level position. In contrast to this, the 73 Ge center in the cation PbSe sublattice represents the electrically active substitution impurity. The emission spectra correspond to the neutral state of the ( 73 Ge 2+ ) donor center in n-type conductors and to the double ionized state of this ( 73 Ge 4+ ) center in p-type conductors [ru

  5. Measurements of electron attachment by oxygen molecule in proportional counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, M., E-mail: tosaki.mitsuo.3v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kawano, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Isozumi, Y. [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    We present pulse height measurements for 5-keV Auger electrons from a radioactive {sup 55}Fe source mounted at the inner cathode surface of cylindrical proportional counter, which is operated with CH{sub 4} admixed dry air or N{sub 2}. A clear shift of the pulse height has been observed by varying the amount of the admixtures; the number of electrons, created in the primary ionization by Auger electrons, is decreased by the electron attachment of the admixtures during their drift from the place near the source to the anode wire. The large gas amplification (typically 10{sup 4}) in the secondary ionization of proportional counter makes it possible to investigate a small change in the number of primary electrons. The electron attenuation cross-section of O{sub 2} has been evaluated by analyzing the shifts of the pulse height caused by the electron attachment to dry air and N{sub 2}.

  6. Type IV pili of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can transfer electrons from extracellular electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongquan; Li, Hongyu

    2014-03-01

    Studies on Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans accepting electrons from Fe(II) have previously focused on cytochrome c. However, we have discovered that, besides cytochrome c, type IV pili (Tfp) can transfer electrons. Here, we report conduction by Tfp of A. ferrooxidans analyzed with a conducting-probe atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicate that the Tfp of A. ferrooxidans are highly conductive. The genome sequence of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 contains two genes, pilV and pilW, which code for pilin domain proteins with the conserved amino acids characteristic of Tfp. Multiple alignment analysis of the PilV and PilW (pilin) proteins indicated that pilV is the adhesin gene while pilW codes for the major protein element of Tfp. The likely function of Tfp is to complete the circuit between the cell surface and Fe(II) oxides. These results indicate that Tfp of A. ferrooxidans might serve as biological nanowires transferring electrons from the surface of Fe(II) oxides to the cell surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Interplay between barrier width and height in electron tunneling: photoinduced electron transfer in porphyrin-based donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Karin; Wiberg, Joanna; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Mårtensson, Jerker; Albinsson, Bo

    2006-01-12

    The rate of electron tunneling in molecular donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems is determined both by the tunneling barrier width and height, that is, both by the distance between the donor and acceptor as well as by the energy gap between the donor and bridge moieties. These factors are therefore important to control when designing functional electron transfer systems, such as constructs for photovoltaics, artificial photosynthesis, and molecular scale electronics. In this paper we have investigated a set of D-B-A systems in which the distance and the energy difference between the donor and bridge states (DeltaEDB) are systematically varied. Zinc(II) and gold(III) porphyrins were chosen as electron donor and acceptor because of their suitable driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (-0.9 eV in butyronitrile) and well-characterized photophysics. We have previously shown, in accordance with the superexchange mechanism for electron transfer, that the electron transfer rate is proportional to the inverse of DeltaEDB in a series of zinc/gold porphyrin D-B-A systems with bridges of constant edge to edge distance (19.6 A) and varying DeltaEDB (3900-17 600 cm(-1)). Here, we use the same donor and acceptor but the bridge is shortened or extended giving a set of oligo-p-phenyleneethynylene bridges (OPE) with four different edge to edge distances ranging from 12.7 to 33.4 A. These two sets of D-B-A systems-ZnP-RB-AuP+ and ZnP-nB-AuP+-have one bridge in common, and hence, for the first time both the distance and DeltaEDB dependence of electron transfer can be studied simultaneously in a systematic way.

  8. A Cu-Zn nanoparticle promoter for selective carbon dioxide reduction and its application in visible-light-active Z-scheme systems using water as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ge; Sako, Hiroshi; Gubbala, Ramesh V; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamaguchi, Akira; Abe, Hideki; Miyauchi, Masahiro

    2018-04-17

    Selective carbon dioxide photoreduction to produce formic acid was achieved under visible light irradiation using water molecules as electron donors, similar to natural plants, based on the construction of a Z-scheme light harvesting system modified with a Cu-Zn alloy nanoparticle co-catalyst. The faradaic efficiency of our Z-scheme system for HCOOH generation was over 50% under visible light irradiation.

  9. Recruitment of feces donors among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Jørgensen, Simon Mark; Erikstrup, Christian; Dinh, Khoa Manh

    2018-01-01

    As the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained momentum, an increasing need for continuous access to healthy feces donors has developed. Blood donors constitute a healthy subset of the general population and may serve as an appropriate group for recruitment. In this study, we...... investigated the suitability of blood donors as feces donors. In a prospective cohort study, we recruited blood donors onsite at a public Danish blood bank. Following their consent, the blood donors underwent a stepwise screening process: First, blood donors completed an electronic pre-screening questionnaire...... to rule out predisposing risk factors. Second, eligible blood donors had blood and fecal samples examined. Of 155 blood donors asked to participate, 137 (88%) completed the electronic pre-screening questionnaire, 16 declined, and 2 were excluded. Of the 137 donors who completed the questionnaire, 79 (58...

  10. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  11. Photoelectron diffraction from single oriented molecules: Towards ultrafast structure determination of molecules using x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Misato; Fujikawa, Takashi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Mizuno, Tomoya; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yagishita, Akira

    2013-06-01

    We provide a molecular structure determination method, based on multiple-scattering x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) calculations. This method is applied to our XPD data on several molecules having different equilibrium geometries. Then it is confirmed that, by our method, bond lengths and bond angles can be determined with a resolution of less than 0.1 Å and 10∘, respectively. Differently from any other scenario of ultrafast structure determination, we measure the two- or three-dimensional XPD of aligned or oriented molecules in the energy range from 100 to 200 eV with a 4π detection velocity map imaging spectrometer. Thanks to the intense and ultrashort pulse properties of x-ray free-electron lasers, our approach exhibits the most probable method for obtaining ultrafast real-time structural information on small to medium-sized molecules consisting of light elements, i.e., a “molecular movie.”

  12. Two-electron states of a group-V donor in silicon from atomistic full configuration interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankasala, Archana; Salfi, Joseph; Bocquel, Juanita; Voisin, Benoit; Usman, Muhammad; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Rogge, Sven; Rahman, Rajib

    2018-05-01

    Two-electron states bound to donors in silicon are important for both two-qubit gates and spin readout. We present a full configuration interaction technique in the atomistic tight-binding basis to capture multielectron exchange and correlation effects taking into account the full band structure of silicon and the atomic-scale granularity of a nanoscale device. Excited s -like states of A1 symmetry are found to strongly influence the charging energy of a negative donor center. We apply the technique on subsurface dopants subjected to gate electric fields and show that bound triplet states appear in the spectrum as a result of decreased charging energy. The exchange energy, obtained for the two-electron states in various confinement regimes, may enable engineering electrical control of spins in donor-dot hybrid qubits.

  13. Photochromic and electrochromic performances of new types of donor/acceptor systems based on crosslinked polyviologen film and electron donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Liping; Ding Guojing; Li Chaolong; Wang Yuechuan

    2011-01-01

    Viologen-functionalized copolymer COPV 2+ was synthesized by copolymer graft-modified, which was crosslinked by NH 3 .H 2 O gas-fumigated at 25 deg. C for 4 h due to the condensation of the siloxanes of COPV 2+ film. Simultaneously, different donor/acceptor systems had been prepared based on crosslinked polyviologen film (COPV 2+ ) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (TMPD) or hydroxyethylferrocene (HEFc) in order to shorten the response times and improve contrast ratios in response to external photo- and potential stimuli. The evolution of structures from COPO to COPV 2+ is carefully characterized. The COPV 2+ /TMPD and COPV 2+ /HEFc films exhibited both photochromic and electrochromic performances. After UV irradiations, COPV 2+ /TMPD and COPV 2+ /HEFc films changed their colors from colorless to deep blue, while optical transmissions at 610 nm decreased about 64% and 75%, respectively. When removing out from UV irradiation, the colored COPV 2+ /TMPD and COPV 2+ /HEFc films faded to the original colors within about 60 min. When COPV 2+ /TMPD and COPV 2+ /HEFc films were biased with negative voltage of -2.5 V, they changed their colors from colorless to deep blue in 4 s and 3 s, while the optical transmissions at 556 nm decreased about 81% and 75%, respectively. When electric impulse was switched off, the colored COPV 2+ /TMPD and COPV 2+ /HEFc films faded to the original colors within about 7 s and 6 s, respectively.

  14. Electronic energy loss of fast molecules in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.

    1975-06-01

    In high velocity collisions of molecular ions the correlated motion influence of the ion cores on the electronic energy loss is investigated. The stopping power in first Born approximation for a random arrangement of target atoms can be formulated in terms of the inelastic electronic structure factor. In treating the target atoms in Hartree-Fock approximation each electron can be regarded as stopping the ion independent of all other electrons without restriction by the Pauli principle. A second equivalent formulation of the stopping power leads to the dielectric function of the target. The results are applied to the stopping of H 2 + -ions. For vanishing distance between the two protons the stopping power per particle is twice that for single proton collisions. For distances in the order of the Bohr radius the correlated stopping power may even be smaller than for uncorrelated protons. With increasing distances the correlation influence vanishes. The stopping of H 2 + -ions in C, Si and Ge is discussed using Clementi wave functions for the core electrons and a free electron approximation with Lindhard's dielectric function for the valence electrons. The comparison with the only experimental result available for H 2 + in C at 300 keV yields qualitative agreement. (orig.) [de

  15. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes....... One derivative has additional methylene groups separating the thiols from the delocalized -electron system. The insertion of methylene groups changes the open state conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude and changes the transport mechanism from a coherent regime with finite zero-bias conductance...

  16. Correlation between LUMO offset of donor/acceptor molecules to an open circuit voltage in bulk heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola, Genene Tessema, E-mail: mola@ukzn.ac.za [School of. Chemistry and Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg Campus, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3209 (South Africa); Abera, Newayemedhin [Addis Ababa University, Department of Physics, P.O. BOX 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

    2014-07-15

    The correlation between the open circuit voltage and the LUMO offset of the donor and acceptor polymers in the bulkheterojunction solar cell was studied for three different thiophene derivatives. The HOMO levels of all the polymers in this investigation were chosen to be similar which results in close values of ΔE{sub DA}=E{sub HOMO}{sup D}−E{sub LUMO}{sup A}. However, the measured V{sub oc} was found to be increasing with decreasing value of the LUMO offset that exists between the donor polymer and fullerene.

  17. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Hunneman, P; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W; Doddema, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 mu M) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  18. Super electron donor-mediated reductive transformation of nitrobenzenes: a novel strategy to synthesize azobenzenes and phenazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Kumada, Kanako; Abe, Erina; Ito, Shungo; Shigeno, Masanori; Kondo, Yoshinori

    2018-05-02

    The transformation of nitrobenzenes into azobenzenes by pyridine-derived super electron donor 2 is described. This method provides an efficient synthesis of azobenzenes because of not requiring the use of expensive transition-metals, toxic or flammable reagents, or harsh conditions. Moreover, when using 2-fluoronitrobenzenes as substrates, phenazines were found to be obtained. The process affords a novel synthesis of phenazines.

  19. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  20. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  1. Materials Meets Concepts in Molecule-Based Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ortmann, Frank; Radke, K. Sebastian; Gü nther, Alrun; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, molecular materials are highlighted as an important topic in the diverse field of condensed matter physics, with focus on their particular electronic and transport properties. A better understanding of their performance

  2. Electron distributions of the first-row homonuclear diatomic molecules, A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, B.I.; Bielefeld Univ.

    1982-08-01

    Electron momentum density contour maps of the first-row homonuclear diatomic molecules, A 2 , are obtained from near Hartree-Fock wave functions. Both the total momentum density and momentum density difference (molecule - isolated atoms) maps present trends that may be related to the binding in the molecules. These results are compared with the corresponding charge density maps in position space (Bader, Henneker and Cade 1967). (author)

  3. Control of π-Electron Rotations in Chiral Aromatic Molecules Using Intense Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi

    Our recent theoretical studies on laser-induced π-electron rotations in chiral aromatic molecules are reviewed. π electrons of a chiral aromatic molecule can be rotated along its aromatic ring by a nonhelical, linearly polarized laser pulse. An ansa aromatic molecule with a six-membered ring, 2,5-dichloro[n](3,6) pyrazinophane, which belongs to a planar-chiral molecule group, and its simplified molecule 2,5-dichloropyrazine are taken as model molecules. Electron wavepacket simulations in the frozen-molecular-vibration approximation show that the initial direction of π-electron rotation depends on the polarization direction of a linearly polarized laser pulse applied. Consecutive unidirectional rotation can be achieved by applying a sequence of linearly polarized pump and dump pulses to prevent reverse rotation. Optimal control simulations of π-electron rotation show that another controlling factor for unidirectional rotation is the relative optical phase between the different frequency components of an incident pulse in addition to photon polarization direction. Effects of nonadiabatic coupling between π-electron rotation and molecular vibrations are also presented, where the constraints of the frozen approximation are removed. The angular momentum gradually decays mainly owing to nonadiabatic coupling, while the vibrational amplitudes greatly depend on their rotation direction. This suggests that the direction of π-electron rotation on an attosecond timescale can be identified by detecting femtosecond molecular vibrations.

  4. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, D.; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, J.; Mokhov, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation "sandwich method" (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 1017 cm-3 at T = 10-40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic "k1" and "k2" sites (Nk1,k2) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T9, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T1-1 for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal ("h") site (Nh) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (Tm-1) with the temperature increase for the Nh donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the Nk1,k2 donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time Tm for the Nk1,k2 donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at Nh and Nk1,k2 sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  5. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  6. Molecular orbital study of the primary electron donor P700 of photosystem I based on a recent X-ray single crystal structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plato, Martin; Krauss, Norbert; Fromme, Petra; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray structure analysis of photosystem (PS) I single crystals showed that the primary electron donor P700 is a heterodimer formed by one chlorophyll (Chl) a and one Chl a ' [Nature 411 (2001) 909]. The electronic structure of the cation radical P700 +· of the primary donor, which is created in the charge separation process, has been probed by semiempirical molecular orbital calculations including spin polarization effects (RHF-INDO/SP). The calculations, which were based on the X-ray structure, clearly show that P700 is a supermolecule formed by two chlorophyll species. They furthermore predict an asymmetrical charge and spin density distribution in favor of the monomeric Chl a half of this dimer in accordance with results from earlier EPR and ENDOR studies [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2000) 1225]. The stepwise inclusion of various electrostatic interactions of the dimer with its nearest surrounding (one threonine forming a hydrogen bond to the keto group of Chl a ' and two histidines liganding the Mg atoms of the two chlorophylls) leads to a systematic enhancement of this electronic asymmetry yielding a spin density ratio of almost 5:1 as also found experimentally. A large part of this value is caused by spin polarization effects. This result is only weakly affected by the electrostatic field of more remote amino acid residues and other pigment molecules ('accessory' Chl a molecules) present in PS I. A separate group of calculations involving local geometry optimizations by energy minimization techniques yields a further enhancement of the spin density asymmetry. A particularly strong effect is obtained by allowing for variations of the geometry of the vinyl groups on both chlorophylls of the P700 dimer. Theoretical results for individual isotropic proton and nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants, showing a satisfactory agreement with experimental findings, are also presented

  7. Toward Additive-Free Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells: Roles of the Donor Crystallization Pathway and Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelsamie, Maged; Treat, Neil D.; Zhao, Kui; McDowell, Caitlin; Burgers, Mark A.; Li, Ruipeng; Smilgies, Detlef M.; Stingelin, Natalie; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    processing to promote crystallization, phase separation, and efficient light harvesting. A donor material (X2) that crystallizes directly from solution yields additive-free solar cells with an efficiency of 7.6%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  8. Organic matter and hydrogen as electron donor for SRB and IRB activities in a clayey medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, C.; Mifsud, A.; Libert, M.; Marsal, F.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. According to the French concept for the disposal of High-Level radioactive Waste (HLW), waste will be emplaced in an environment with multiple metallic components into a geological clay formation. The presence of microorganisms has recently been evidenced in deep clayey environment. Therefore, neither the introduction of microbial species during the construction and operational phases nor the survival of bacteria after the disposal closure can be excluded. Indeed, microbial species may be able to tolerate specific environment with few nutrients to sustain life under high temperature, dry and highly radioactive conditions. Moreover, despite the low porosity of clays, cracks in the excavated disturbed zone and remaining void spaces between disposal components may be favorable for bacterial growth. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and Iron-Reducing Bacteria (IRB) activities are notably expected to influence iron-clay reactivity, including corrosion processes. Their potential development must be investigated in order to better assess their metabolism, which may in turn influence the evolution of metallic and clayey materials involved in a HLW disposal cell. More specifically, deep geological environments containing low amounts of biodegradable Organic Matter (OM) are generally nutrient poor for microbial development. However, the radiolysis of pore water and the corrosion of metallic components of HLW disposal cell in anoxic conditions will lead to the production of hydrogen, which may also be used as an electron donor for microbial activity. Thus, the purpose of the present work is to quantify the potential of bacterial growth stimulation due either to the production of hydrogen or the presence of OM. In a first step, characterization of DOM leached from Tournemire clay powder has been performed in order to identify and estimate the concentration of soluble organic matter available for bacteria activity which will

  9. Permanent and induced dipole requirements in ab initio calculations of electron affinities of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Through the use of a molecular pseudopotential method, we determine the a approximate magnitudes of errors that result when electron affinity determinations of polar negative ions are made through ab initio calculations in which the use of a given basis set yields inappropriate values for permanent and induced dipole moments of the neutral molecule. These results should prove useful in assessing the adequacy of basis sets in ab initio calculations of molecular electron affinities for simple linear polar molecules

  10. Electron collision data for polyatomic molecules in plasma processing and environmental processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Kitajima, M.; Cho, H.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental studies for electron-polyatomic molecule collision are reviewed in connection with the plasma processing and environmental issues. Recent developments in electron scattering experiments on the differential cross section measurements for various processes such as elastic scattering, vibrational, and electronic excitations are summarized from high to low energy regions (1-100 eV). The need for cross-section data for a broad variety of molecular species is also discussed because there is an urgent need to develop an international program to provide the scientific and technological communities with authoritative cross sections for electron-molecule interactions

  11. On chirality transfer in electron donor-acceptor complexes. A prediction for the sulfinimine···BF3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Joanna E; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2012-01-01

    Stabilization energies of the electron donor-acceptor sulfinimine···BF(3) complexes calculated at either the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ or the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level do not allow to judge, whether the N- or O-atom in sulfinimine is stronger electron-donor to BF(3) . The problem seems to be solvable because chirality transfer phenomenon between chiral sulfinimine and achiral BF(3) is expected to be vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) active. Moreover, the bands associated with the achiral BF(3) molecule are predicted to be the most intense in the entire spectrum. However, the VCD band robustness analyses show that most of the chirality transfer modes of BF(3) are unreliable. Conversely, variation of VCD intensity with change of intermolecular distance, angle, and selected dihedrals between the complex partners shows that to establish the robustness of chirality transfer mode. It is also necessary to determine the influence of the potential energy surface (PES) shape on the VCD intensity. At the moment, there is still no universal criterion for the chirality transfer mode robustness and the conclusions formulated based on one system cannot be directly transferred even to a quite similar one. However, it is certain that more attention should be focused on relation of PES shape and the VCD mode robustness problem. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Imaging the square of the correlated two-electron wave function of a hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, M; Bello, R Y; Metz, D; Lower, J; Trinter, F; Schober, C; Keiling, M; Lenz, U; Pitzer, M; Mertens, K; Martins, M; Viefhaus, J; Klumpp, S; Weber, T; Schmidt, L Ph H; Williams, J B; Schöffler, M S; Serov, V V; Kheifets, A S; Argenti, L; Palacios, A; Martín, F; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2017-12-22

    The toolbox for imaging molecules is well-equipped today. Some techniques visualize the geometrical structure, others the electron density or electron orbitals. Molecules are many-body systems for which the correlation between the constituents is decisive and the spatial and the momentum distribution of one electron depends on those of the other electrons and the nuclei. Such correlations have escaped direct observation by imaging techniques so far. Here, we implement an imaging scheme which visualizes correlations between electrons by coincident detection of the reaction fragments after high energy photofragmentation. With this technique, we examine the H 2 two-electron wave function in which electron-electron correlation beyond the mean-field level is prominent. We visualize the dependence of the wave function on the internuclear distance. High energy photoelectrons are shown to be a powerful tool for molecular imaging. Our study paves the way for future time resolved correlation imaging at FELs and laser based X-ray sources.

  13. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  14. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  15. Electronic states and optical properties of single donor in GaN conical quantum dot with spherical edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aouami, A.; Feddi, E.; El-Yadri, M.; Aghoutane, N.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.; Phuc, Huynh Vinh

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical investigation of quantum confinement effects on the electron and single donor states in GaN conical quantum dot with spherical edge. In the framework of the effective mass approximation, the Schrödinger equations of electron and donor have been solved analytically in an infinite potential barrier model. Our calculations show that the energies of electron and donor impurity are affected by the two characteristic parameters of the structure which are the angle Ω and the radial dimension R. We show that, despite the fact that the reduction of the two parameters Ω and R leads to the same confinement effects, the energy remains very sensitive to the variation of the radial part than the variation of the angular part. The analysis of the photoionization cross-section corresponding to optical transitions between the conduction band and the first donor energy level shows clearly that the reduction of the radius R causes a shift in resonance peaks towards the high energies. On the other hand, the optical transitions between 1 s - 1 p , 1 p - 1 d and 1 p - 2 s show that the increment of the conical aperture Ω (or reduction of R) implies a displacement of the excitation energy to higher energies.

  16. Simple molecules as benchmark systems for molecular electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djukić, Darko

    2006-01-01

    In society there is a constant urge to improve existing devices and the level of success is perhaps the easiest to observe in the world of electronic devices. The complexity, functionality and reliability of these machines has increased enormously, but it approaches its limits. A new giant step

  17. Electron spectroscopy for atoms, molecules and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegbahn, K.

    1981-12-01

    A review is given of the research performed at the Institute of Physics, Uppsala under the direction of Prof. Siegbahn. in the field of electron spectroscopy applied to solids, liquids and gases. The developemnt of the spectroscopic methods is the central theme of the review. (L.E.)

  18. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    Since the invention of the transistor in 1947 and the development of integrated circuits in the late 1950’s, there was a rapid progress in the development and miniaturization of the solid state devices and electronic circuit components. This miniaturization raises a question “How small do we have...

  19. Resonances in electron-molecule scattering and photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.I.; Collins, L.A.

    1984-05-01

    The development of reliable theoretical models for calculating the decay of quasi-stationary states of molecular systems has become an important endeavor for theoretical chemists. The understanding and analysis of a wide variety of physical and chemical phenomena depend on a knowledge of the behavior of these states in both collisional and photoionization problems. In this article we describe the theory and calculation of these cross sections using our Linear Algebraic/Optical Potential method. The theory makes optimal use of the numerical methods developed to solve large sets of coupled integral equations and the bound state techniques used by quantum chemists. Calculations are presented for a representative class of diatomic and triatomic molecules at varying levels of sophistication and for collisional and photoionization cross sections. 48 references, 11 figures

  20. Theoretical calculation of fully differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Junfang; Madison, D H; Peacher, J L

    2006-01-01

    We have recently proposed the orientation averaged molecular orbital (OAMO) approximation for calculating fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for electron-impact ionization of molecules averaged over all molecular orientations. Orientation averaged FDCS were calculated for electron-impact ionization of nitrogen molecules using the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the molecular three-body distorted wave (M3DW) approximation. In this paper, we use the same methods to examine the FDCS for ionization of hydrogen molecules. It is found that the DWIA yields reasonable results for high-energy incident electrons. While the DWIA breaks down for low-energy electrons, the M3DW gives reasonable results down to incident-electron energies around 35 eV

  1. Positron-Electron Annihilation Process in (2,2)-Difluoropropane Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Zhu, Ying-Hao

    2016-04-01

    The positron-electron annihilation process in (2,2)-difluoropropane molecule and the corresponding gamma-ray spectra are studied by quantum chemistry method. The positrophilic electrons in (2,2)-difluoropropane molecule are found for the first time. The theoretical predictions show that the outermost 2s electrons of fluoride atoms play an important role in positron-electron annihilation process of (2,2)-difiuoropropane. In the present scheme, the correlation coefficient between the theoretical gamma-ray spectra and the experiments can be 99%. The present study gives an alternative annihilation model for positron-electron pair in larger molecules. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11347011 and the Natural Science Foundation Project of Shandong Province under Grant No. ZR2011AM010 and 2014 Technology Innovation Fund of Ludong University under Grant Nos. 1d151007 and ld15l016

  2. Observing electron localization in a dissociating H2+ molecule in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Li, Zhichao; He, Feng; Wang, X; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2017-06-16

    Dissociation of diatomic molecules with odd number of electrons always causes the unpaired electron to localize on one of the two resulting atomic fragments. In the simplest diatomic molecule H 2 + dissociation yields a hydrogen atom and a proton with the sole electron ending up on one of the two nuclei. That is equivalent to breaking of a chemical bond-the most fundamental chemical process. Here we observe such electron localization in real time by performing a pump-probe experiment. We demonstrate that in H 2 + electron localization is complete in just 15 fs when the molecule's internuclear distance reaches 8 atomic units. The measurement is supported by a theoretical simulation based on numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This observation advances our understanding of detailed dynamics of molecular dissociation.

  3. Ab initio calculations on collisions of low energy electrons with polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Kohn variational method is one of simplest, and oldest, techniques for performing scattering calculations. Nevertheless, a number of formal problems, as well as practical difficulties associated with the computation of certain required matrix elements, delayed its application to electron--molecule scattering problems for many years. This paper will describe the recent theoretical and computational developments that have made the ''complex'' Kohn variational method a practical tool for carrying out calculations of low energy electron--molecule scattering. Recent calculations on a number of target molecules will also be summarized. 41 refs., 7 figs

  4. Ion and electron swarm studies of relevance to plasma processing: positive ion-molecule and electron-molecule studies of SF6 and derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atterbury, C.; Kennedy, R.A.; Critchley, A.D.J.; Mayhew, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Many sequential and parallel chemical reactions involving charged species occur in a plasma. Data needed to model plasma's chemical and physical environment includes cross-section, rate coefficients, and product ion distribution of electron-molecule and ion-molecule processes. Such reactions are studied by our group away from the complexity of the plasma environment, with experimental techniques that allow us to concentrate on a single process, where usually only one or two species are involved. A molecule commonly used in plasma etching applications is SF 6 1,2 . We have performed a series of positive ion-molecule and electron attachment studies on SF 6 and related molecules, including SeF 6 , TeF 6 (i.e. XF 6 molecules), SF 5 CF 3 and SF 5 Cl (i.e. SF 5 X molecules) 3- (. The studies of ion reactions with and electron attachment to SF 6 and physically similar molecules are of value when seeking to understand the ion and electron chemistry occurring in SF 6 containing plasma. The result of these studies are presented in this poster. Ion-molecule reactions. Rate coefficients and ion product branching ratios have been determined with the Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) at room temperature (300 K) for reactions of SF 5 X with the following twenty-two cations; Ne + , F + , Ar + , N 2 + , N + , CO + , CO 2 + , O + , N 2 O + , O 2 + , SF 4 + , CF 2 + , SF + , SF 2 + , NO 2 + , SF 5 + , NO + , CF + , CF 3 + , SF 3 + , and H 3 O + (listed in order of decreasing recombination energy). SF 2 + , NO 2 + , NO + , SF 3 + , and H 3 O + are found to be unreacted with both SF 5 CF 3 and SF 5 Cl. The majority of the other reactions proceed with rate coefficients that are close to the capture value. Those found to occur at rates significantly less than the capture mechanism value re the reactions of O 2 + , SF + , SF 5 + , and CF 3 + with SF 5 CF 3 , and SF 4 + and SF 5 + with SF 5 Cl. Several distinction processes are observed among the large number of reactions studied, including

  5. An effective Hamiltonian approach for Donor-Bridge-Acceptor electronic transitions: Exploring the role of bath memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Bittner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here a formally exact model for electronic transitions between an initial (donor and final (acceptor states linked by an intermediate (bridge state. Our model incorporates a common set of vibrational modes that are coupled to the donor, bridge, and acceptor states and serves as a dissipative bath that destroys quantum coherence between the donor and acceptor. Taking the memory time of the bath as a free parameter, we calculate transition rates for a heuristic 3-state/2 mode Hamiltonian system parameterized to represent the energetics and couplings in a typical organic photovoltaic system. Our results indicate that if the memory time of the bath is of the order of 10-100 fs, a two-state kinetic (i.e., incoherent hopping model will grossly underestimate overall transition rate.

  6. Tuning the Electronic and Dynamical Properties of a Molecule by Atom Trapping Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dong; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Abad, Enrique; Dappe, Yannick J; Smogunov, Alexander; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2017-11-28

    The ability to trap adatoms with an organic molecule on a surface has been used to obtain a range of molecular functionalities controlled by the choice of the molecular trapping site and local deprotonation. The tetraphenylporphyrin molecule used in this study contains three types of trapping sites: two carbon rings (phenyl and pyrrole) and the center of a macrocycle. Catching a gold adatom on the carbon rings leads to an electronic doping of the molecule, whereas trapping the adatom at the macrocycle center with single deprotonation leads to a molecular rotor and a second deprotonation leads to a molecular jumper. We call "atom trapping chemistry" the control of the structure, electronic, and dynamical properties of a molecule achieved by trapping metallic atoms with a molecule on a surface. In addition to the examples previously described, we show that more complex structures can be envisaged.

  7. Materials Meets Concepts in Molecule-Based Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ortmann, Frank

    2014-10-14

    In this contribution, molecular materials are highlighted as an important topic in the diverse field of condensed matter physics, with focus on their particular electronic and transport properties. A better understanding of their performance in various applications and devices demands for an extension of basic theoretical approaches to describe charge transport in molecular materials, including the accurate description of electron-phonon coupling. Starting with the simplest case of a molecular junction and moving on to larger aggregates of bulk organic semiconductors, charge-transport regimes from ballistic motion to incoherent hopping, which are frequently encountered in molecular systems under respective conditions, are discussed. Transport features of specific materials are described through ab initio material parameters whose determination is addressed. © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. Collisional-electron detachment of Cl- on diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, B.K.; Datz, S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results for collisional-electron detachment of Cl - by H 2 /D 2 , N 2 , O 2 , NO, and CO are discussed. The emphasis is on angular distributions and energy loss measurements for laboratory energies of a few hundred eV. Evidence for the possibility of bound excited states of N 2 Cl and COCl and the role of target negative-ion resonant states is presented

  9. Synthesis of an A-D-A type of molecule used as electron acceptor for improving charge transfer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao-Zhi, E-mail: chzhzhang@sohu.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Gu, Shu-Duo; Shen, Dan; Yuan, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Zhang, Mingdao, E-mail: matchlessjimmy@163.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China)

    2016-08-22

    Electron-accepting molecules play an important role in developing organic solar cells. A new type of A-D-A molecule, 3,6-di([7-(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-1,5,2,4,6,8-dithiotetrazocin-3-yl]thiophen -2-yl)-9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole, was synthesized. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels are −3.55 and −5.85 eV, respectively. Therefore, the A-D-A type of compound could be used as electron acceptor for fabricating organic solar cell with a high open circuit voltage. Gibbs free energy (−49.2 kJ/mol) reveals that the process of A-D-A acceptor accepting an electron from poly(3-hexylthiophene) at excited state is spontaneous. The value of entropy (118 J/mol) in the process of an electron transferring from P3HT to the A-D-A acceptor at organic interface suggests that electrons generated from separation of electron-hole pairs at donor/acceptor interface would be delocalized efficiently. Therefore, the A-D-A molecule would be a potential acceptor for efficient organic BHJ solar cells.

  10. Connections between molecular photoionization and electron-molecule scattering with emphasis on shape resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dill, D.

    1979-01-01

    Most of our detailed information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the electronic continuum of molecules is based on the complementary probes - photoionization and electron scattering. Though usually studied separately, it is most useful to appreciate the connections between these two processes since our understanding of one is often the key to interpreting or even generating new results in the other. We approach this subject in two steps. First, we very briefly outline the well-established connections, e.g., the Bethe-Born theory and comparisons of isoelectronic systems. Then we focus on a point of contact - the role of shape resonances in molecular photoionization and electron-molecule scattering - for which a substantial amount of new information has become available. Specific topics include mapping of resonances from the neutral (hν + molecule) to the negative ion (e + molecule) system, angular distributions, and interaction with vibration

  11. Physics of lateral triple quantum-dot molecules with controlled electron numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Shim, Yun-Pil; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2012-11-01

    We review the recent progress in theory and experiments with lateral triple quantum dots with controlled electron numbers down to one electron in each dot. The theory covers electronic and spin properties as a function of topology, number of electrons, gate voltage and external magnetic field. The orbital Hund's rules and Nagaoka ferromagnetism, magnetic frustration and chirality, interplay of quantum interference and electron-electron interactions and geometrical phases are described and related to charging and transport spectroscopy. Fabrication techniques and recent experiments are covered, as well as potential applications of triple quantum-dot molecule in coherent control, spin manipulation and quantum computation.

  12. Convergent Close-Coupling Calculations for Electron-Atom and Electron-Molecule Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fursa, Dmitry; Zammit, M.C.; Bostock, C.J.; Bray, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) method developed in our group has been applied extensively to study electron-atom/ion collisions and recently has been extended to electron collisions with diatomic molecules. This approach relies on the ability to represent the infinite number of target bound states and its continuum via a finite number of states obtained by a diagonalization of the target in a square-integrable (Sturmian) one-electron basis. We normally use a Laguerre basis though other choices are possible, for example a boxed-based basis or a B-spline basis. The choice of the basis is governed by the physical problem under consideration. As the size of a Sturmian basis increases the calculated negative energy states (relative to the corresponding ionization stage of the target) converge to the target true bound states and the positive energy states provide an increasingly dense representation of the target continuum. We then perform a multichannel expansion of the total (projectile plus target electrons) wave function and formulate a set of close-coupling equations. These equations are transformed into momentum space where they take the form of the Lippmann-Schwinger equations for the T-matrix. A solution of the T-matrix equations is obtained at each total energy E by converting them into a set of linear equations that are solved by standard techniques. We perform a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wave function and take into account the symmetry of the scattering system (e.g, total spin, parity, etc.) in order to reduce the size of the coupled equations and make calculations feasible. As soon as the T-matrix is obtained we can evaluate scattering amplitudes and cross sections for the transitions of interest. For the case of molecular targets the formulation is done within the fixed-nuclei approximation. We adopt a single-centre approach in CCC calculations. This allows us to utilize a great deal of computational development thoroughly tested for

  13. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    for comprehensive later theoretical work and data interpretation in many areas of chemistry, electrochemistry, and biology. We discuss here some new areas of theoretical electrochemical ET science, with focus on nanoscale electrochemical and bioelectrochemical sciences. Particular attention is given to in situ...... scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and single-electron tunneling (SET, or Coulomb blockade) in electrochemical. systems directly in aqueous electrolyte solution and at room temperature. We illustrate the new theoretical formalism and its perspectives by recent cases of electrochemical SET, negative...... differential resistance patterns, and by ET dynamics of organized assemblies of biological macromolecules, such as redox metalloproteins and oligonucleotides on single-crystal Au(III)-electrode surfaces....

  14. Observation and spectroscopy of a two-electron Wigner molecule in an ultraclean carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecker, S.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Secchi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two electrons on a string form a simple model system where Coulomb interactions are expected to play an interesting role. In the presence of strong interactions, these electrons are predicted to form a Wigner molecule, separating to the ends of the string. This spatial structure is believed to be...

  15. A series of luminescent Re(I) complexes with electron-donor/acceptor moieties: Synthesis, characterization, and photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Hu; Qing She; Lei Guo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we synthesize three Re(I) complexes of Re(CO) 3 (PPO)Br, Re(CO) 3 (PTO)Br, and Re(CO) 3 (PBI)Br, where PPO=2-phenyl-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole, PTO=2-(pyridin-2-yl)-5-p-tolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole, PBI=2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole. Their single crystals and photophysical properties are measured and discussed in detail. The correlation between ligand structure and corresponding PL characteristics of Re(I) complex has been investigated. It is found that a ligand with strong electron-donor can efficiently increase both absorption and emissive energy of Re(I) complex. In addition, electron-rich ligand can increase the electron density of the complex and thus enhance the oscillator strength of electronic transition, improving the photoluminescence performance. - Highlights: ► Three novel phosphorescent Re(I) complexes are synthesized. ► Molecular structures, photophysical, and electronic properties are studied. ► Strong electron-donor can increase emissive energy. ► Electron-rich ligand can enhance the oscillator strength of electronic transition.

  16. Ab initio and density functional theoretical design and screening of model crown ether based ligand (host) for extraction of lithium metal ion (guest): effect of donor and electronic induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Anil; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Rao, Hanmanth; Ghosh, Sandip K

    2012-08-01

    The structures, energetic and thermodynamic parameters of model crown ethers with different donor, cavity and electron donating/ withdrawing functional group have been determined with ab initio MP2 and density functional theory in gas and solvent phase. The calculated values of binding energy/ enthalpy for lithium ion complexation are marginally higher for hard donor based aza and oxa crown compared to soft donor based thia and phospha crown. The calculated values of binding enthalpy for lithium metal ion with 12C4 at MP2 level of theory is in good agreement with the available experimental result. The binding energy is altered due to the inductive effect imparted by the electron donating/ withdrawing group in crown ether, which is well correlated with the values of electron transfer. The role of entropy for extraction of hydrated lithium metal ion by different donor and functional group based ligand has been demonstrated. The HOMO-LUMO gap is decreased and dipole moment of the ligand is increased from gas phase to organic phase because of the dielectric constant of the solvent. The gas phase binding energy is reduced in solvent phase as the solvent molecules weaken the metal-ligand binding. The theoretical values of extraction energy for LiCl salt from aqueous solution in different organic solvent is validated by the experimental trend. The study presented here should contribute to the design of model host ligand and screening of solvent for metal ion recognition and thus can contribute in planning the experiments.

  17. Vibronic coupling effect on the electron transport through molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Masaru; Mitsutake, Kunihiro

    2007-03-01

    Electron transport through molecular bridges or molecular layers connected to nano-electrodes is determined by the combination of coherent and dissipative processes, controlled by the electron-vibron coupling, transfer integrals between the molecular orbitals, applied electric field and temperature. We propose a novel theoretical approach, which combines ab initio molecular orbital method with analytical many-boson model. As a case study, the long chain model of the thiophene oligomer is solved by a variation approach. Mixed states of moderately extended molecular orbital states mediated and localised by dress of vibron cloud are found as eigen-states. All the excited states accompanied by multiple quanta of vibration can be solved, and the overall carrier transport properties including the conductance, mobility, dissipation spectra are analyzed by solving the master equation with the transition rates estimated by the golden rule. We clarify obtained in a uniform systematic way, how the transport mode changes from a dominantly coherent transport to the dissipative hopping transport.

  18. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun

    2018-01-17

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I-V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed.

  19. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I–V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed. PMID:29342091

  20. Ground state of a hydrogen ion molecule immersed in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Valdes, J.; Gutierrez, F.A.; Matamala, A.R.; Denton, C.D.; Vargas, P.; Valdes, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we have calculated the ground state energy of the hydrogen molecule, H 2 + , immersed in the highly inhomogeneous electron gas around a metallic surface within the local density approximation. The molecule is perturbed by the electron density of a crystalline surface of Au with the internuclear axis parallel to the surface. The surface spatial electron density is calculated through a linearized band structure method (LMTO-DFT). The ground state of the molecule-ion was calculated using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a fixed-ion while the screening effects of the inhomogeneous electron gas are depicted by a Thomas-Fermi like electrostatic potential. We found that within our model the molecular ion dissociates at the critical distance of 2.35a.u. from the first atomic layer of the solid

  1. Two-site Hubbard molecule with a spinless electron-positron pair

    KAUST Repository

    Cossu, Fabrizio

    2012-12-19

    We determine the eigenvalues of the two-site Hubbard molecule with one electron and one positron to describe the characteristics of electron-positron interactions in solids. While the effect of hopping is, in general, opposite to the effect of on-site interaction, we find a complex scenario for the electron-positron pair with a non-vanishing potential drop. We give analytical solutions and discuss the combined effects of the model parameters.

  2. Two-site Hubbard molecule with a spinless electron-positron pair

    KAUST Repository

    Cossu, Fabrizio; Schuster, Cosima; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    We determine the eigenvalues of the two-site Hubbard molecule with one electron and one positron to describe the characteristics of electron-positron interactions in solids. While the effect of hopping is, in general, opposite to the effect of on-site interaction, we find a complex scenario for the electron-positron pair with a non-vanishing potential drop. We give analytical solutions and discuss the combined effects of the model parameters.

  3. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%.

  4. Electron re-scattering from aligned linear molecules using the R-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, A G; Tennyson, J

    2009-01-01

    Electron re-scattering in a strong laser field provides an important probe of molecular structure and processes. The laser field drives the ionization of the molecule, followed by acceleration and subsequent recollision of the electron with the parent molecular ion, the scattered electrons carry information about the nuclear geometry and electronic states of the molecular ion. It is advantageous in strong field experiments to work with aligned molecules, which introduces extra physics compared to the standard gas-phase, electron-molecule scattering problem. The formalism for scattering from oriented linear molecules is presented and applied to H 2 and CO 2 . Differential cross sections are presented for (re-)scattering by these systems concentrating on the most common, linear alignment. In H 2 these cross sections show significant angular structure which, particularly for a scattering angle of 90 deg., are predicted to vary significantly between re-collisions stimulated by an even or an odd number of photons. In CO 2 these cross sections are zero indicating the necessity of using non-parallel alignment with this molecule.

  5. ELECTRON ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS IN DISSOCIATIVE PHOTOIONIZATION OF THE HYDROGEN MOLECULE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon F. Pérez-Torres

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Se propone un método para calcular distribuciones angulares de electrones ionizados en la molécula de hidrógeno fija en el espacio sometida a pulsos láser intensos y ultracortos, basado en la solución desde primeros principios de la ecuación de Schrödinger dependiente del tiempo. Esta solución nos permite tener una visión temporal de la interferencias generadas en el canal de ionización disociativa (en el espectro de energía cinética de los protones debido a la presencia de la autoionización de estados doblemente excitados de la molécula de hidrógeno. Se muestra específicamente cómo la autoionización durante el proceso de fotoionización disociativa también puede inducir una asimetría en la distribución angular del electrón ionizado con respecto a la inversión nuclear, un efecto no intuitivo a pesar de estar tratando con un sistema homonuclear. 

  6. Physics of lateral triple quantum-dot molecules with controlled electron numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Shim, Yun-Pil; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    We review the recent progress in theory and experiments with lateral triple quantum dots with controlled electron numbers down to one electron in each dot. The theory covers electronic and spin properties as a function of topology, number of electrons, gate voltage and external magnetic field. The orbital Hund's rules and Nagaoka ferromagnetism, magnetic frustration and chirality, interplay of quantum interference and electron–electron interactions and geometrical phases are described and related to charging and transport spectroscopy. Fabrication techniques and recent experiments are covered, as well as potential applications of triple quantum-dot molecule in coherent control, spin manipulation and quantum computation. (review article)

  7. Synthesis, characterization of bay-substituted perylene diimide based D-A-D type small molecules and their applications as a non-fullerene electron acceptor in polymer solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Ganesamoorthy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a series of bay substituted perylene diimide based donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D type small molecule acceptor derivatives such as S-I, S-II, S-III and S-IV for small molecule based organic solar cell (SM-OSC applications. The electron rich thiophene derivatives such as thiophene, 2-hexylthiophene, 2,2′-bithiophene, and 5-hexyl-2,2′-bithiophene were used as a donor (D, and perylene diimide was used as an acceptor (A. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by FT-IR, NMR, and HR-MS. The small molecules showed wide and strong absorption in the UV-vis region up to 750 nm, which reduced the optical band gap to <2 eV. The calculated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO were comparable with those of the PC61BM. Scanning electron microscope (SEM studies confirmed the aggregation of the small molecules, S-I to S-IV. Small molecules showed thermal stability up to 300 °C. In bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs, the S-I based device showed a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE of 0.12% with P3HT polymer donor. The PCE was declined with respect to the number of thiophene units and the flexible alkyl chain in the bay position. Keywords: Perylene diimide, Donor–acceptor, Small molecule, Non-fullerene, Suzuki coupling

  8. Investigation of electron and hydrogenic-donor states confined in a permeable spherical box using B-splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nikbakht

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Effects of quantum size and potential shape on the spectra of an electron and a hydrogenic-donor at the center of a permeable spherical cavity have been calculated, using linear variational method. B-splines have been used as basis functions. By extensive convergence tests and comparing with other results given in the literature, the validity and efficiency of the method were confirmed.

  9. Coupling of the 4f Electrons in Lanthanide Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazhdan, Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    (C5Me5)2LnOTf where Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, and Yb have been synthesized and these derivatives are good starting materials for the synthesis of (C5Me5)2LnX derivatives. (C5Me5)2Ln(2,2'-bipyridine), where Ln = La, Ce, Sm, and Gd, along with several methylated bipyridine analogues have been synthesized and their magnetic moments have been measured as a function of temperature. In lanthanum, cerium, and gadolinium complexes the bipyridine ligand ligand is unequivocally the radical anion, and the observed magnetic moment is the result of intramolecular coupling of the unpaired electron on the lanthanide fragment with the unpaired electron on the bipyridine along with the intermolecular coupling between radicals. Comparison with the magnetic moments of the known compounds (C5Me5)2Sm(2,2'-bipyridine) and (C5Me5)2Yb(2,2'-bipyridine) leads to an understanding of the role of the SmII/SmIII and YbII/YbIII couple in the magnetic properties of (C5Me5)2Sm(2,2'-bipyridine) and (C5Me5)2Yb(2,2'-bipyridine). In addition, crystal structures of (C5Me5)2Ln(2,2'-bipyridine) and [(C5Me5)2Ln(2,2'-bipyridine)][BPh4](Ln= Ce and Gd), where the lanthanide is unequivocally in the +3 oxidation state, give the crystallographic characteristics of bipyridine as an anion and as a neutral ligand in the same coordination environment, respectively. Substituted bipyridine ligands coordinated to (C5Me5)2Yb are studied to further understand how the magnetic coupling in (C5Me5)2Yb(2,2'-bipyridine) changes with substitutions. In the cases of (C5Me5)2Yb(5,5&apos

  10. Laser Cooled YbF Molecules for Measuring the Electron's Electric Dipole Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J.; Almond, J. R.; Trigatzis, M. A.; Devlin, J. A.; Fitch, N. J.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.; Hinds, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional sub-Doppler laser cooling of a beam of YbF molecules to 100 μ K . This is a key step towards a measurement of the electron's electric dipole moment using ultracold molecules. We compare the effectiveness of magnetically assisted and polarization-gradient sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms. We model the experiment and find good agreement with our data.

  11. Bar-coded pyrosequencing reveals the responses of PBDE-degrading microbial communities to electron donor amendments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Xu

    Full Text Available Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs can be reductively degraded by microorganisms under anaerobic conditions. However, little is known about the effect of electron donors on microbial communities involved in PBDEs degradation. Here we employed 454 Titanium pyrosequencing to examine the phylogenetic diversity, composition, structure and dynamics of microbial communities from microcosms under the conditions of different electron donor amendments. The community structures in each of the five alternate electron donor enrichments were significantly shifted in comparison with those of the control microcosm. Commonly existing OTUs between the treatment and control consortia increased from 5 to 17 and more than 50% of OTUs increased around 13.7 to 186 times at least in one of the microcosms after 90-days enrichment. Although the microbial communities at different taxonomic levels were significantly changed by different environmental variable groups in redundancy analysis, significant correlations were observed between the microbial communities and PBDE congener profiles. The lesser-brominated PBDE congeners, tri-BDE congener (BDE-32 and hexa-BDE, were identified as the key factors shaping the microbial community structures at OTU level. Some rare populations, including the known dechlorinating bacterium, Dehalobacter, showed significant positive-correlation with the amounts of PBDE congeners in the consortia. The same results were also observed on some unclassified bacteria. These results suggest that PBDEs-degrading microbial communities can be successfully enriched, and their structures and compositions can be manipulated through adjusting the environmental parameters.

  12. Modeling molecule-plasmon interactions using quantized radiation fields within time-dependent electronic structure theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Daniel R.; DePrince, A. Eugene, E-mail: deprince@chem.fsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4390 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    We present a combined cavity quantum electrodynamics/ab initio electronic structure approach for simulating plasmon-molecule interactions in the time domain. The simple Jaynes-Cummings-type model Hamiltonian typically utilized in such simulations is replaced with one in which the molecular component of the coupled system is treated in a fully ab initio way, resulting in a computationally efficient description of general plasmon-molecule interactions. Mutual polarization effects are easily incorporated within a standard ground-state Hartree-Fock computation, and time-dependent simulations carry the same formal computational scaling as real-time time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. As a proof of principle, we apply this generalized method to the emergence of a Fano-like resonance in coupled molecule-plasmon systems; this feature is quite sensitive to the nanoparticle-molecule separation and the orientation of the molecule relative to the polarization of the external electric field.

  13. Digital technique for the study of narrow structure in electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paske, W.C.; Shadfar, S.; Lorentz, S.R.; Steph, N.C.; Golden, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A digital technique has been developed which allows the study of narrow structure in total electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering cross sections without requiring a highly monoenergetic electron beam, modulation of the electron gun, or phase sensitive detection. The electron current transmitted through a gas cell is digitized as the electron energy is stepped by ΔE through the energy range of interest. A transmitted electron difference signal is then obtained using a computer. As examples of this technique, the difference spectra are presented for He near 19.35 eV and for N 2 for the energy range from 10.3 to 15.0 eV. In the present case an instrumental resolution of 30 meV FWHM has been obtained

  14. Consistent quantum approach to new laser-electron-nuclear effects in diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A V; Malinovskaya, S V; Loboda, A V; Shpinareva, I M; Prepelitsa, G P

    2006-01-01

    We present a consistent, quantum approach to the calculation of electron-nuclear γ. spectra (set of vibrational and rotational satellites) for nuclei in diatomic molecules. The approach generelizes the well known Letokhov-Minogin model and is based on the Dunham model potential approximation for potential curves of diatomic molecules. The method is applied to the calculation of probabilities of the vibration-rotation-nuclear transitions in a case of emission and absorption spectrum for the nucleus 127 I (E γ (0) = 203 keV) linked with the molecule H 127 I

  15. Strong overtones modes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with cross-conjugated molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    . With this in mind, we investigate a spectroscopic method capable of providing insight into these junctions for cross-conjugated molecules: inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). IETS has the advantage that the molecule interface is probed directly by the tunneling current. Previously, it has been thought...... and leading to suppressed levels of elastic current. In most theoretical studies, only the elastic contributions to the current are taken into account. In this paper, we study the inelastic contributions to the current in cross-conjugated molecules and find that while the inelastic contribution to the current...

  16. (CryoTransmission Electron Microscopy of Phospholipid Model Membranes Interacting with Amphiphilic and Polyphilic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Meister

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid membranes can incorporate amphiphilic or polyphilic molecules leading to specific functionalities and to adaptable properties of the lipid bilayer host. The insertion of guest molecules into membranes frequently induces changes in the shape of the lipid matrix that can be visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Here, we review the use of stained and vitrified specimens in (cryoTEM to characterize the morphology of amphiphilic and polyphilic molecules upon insertion into phospholipid model membranes. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of novel synthetic amphiphilic and polyphilic bolalipids and polymers on membrane integrity and shape stability.

  17. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyszka, K.; Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Tabe, M.; Jabłoński, R.

    2015-01-01

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots

  18. Dynamics in ion-molecule collisions at high velocities: One- and two-electron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yudong.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the dynamic interactions in ion-molecule collisions. Theoretical methods are developed for single and multiple electron transitions in fast collisions with diatomic molecules by heavy-ion projectiles. Various theories and models are developed to treat the three basic inelastic processes (excitation, ionization and charge transfer) involving one and more electrons. The development, incorporating the understanding of ion-atom collision theories with some unique characteristics for molecular targets, provides new insights into phenomena that are absent from collisions with atomic targets. The influence from the multiple scattering centers on collision dynamics is assessed. For diatomic molecules, effects due to a fixed molecular orientation or alignment are calculated and compared with available experimental observations. Compared with excitation and ionization, electron capture, which probes deeper into the target, presents significant two-center interference and strong orientation dependence. Attention has been given in this dissertation to exploring mechanisms for two-and multiple electron transitions. Application of independent electron approximation to transfer excitation from molecular hydrogen is studied. Electron-electron interaction originated from projectile and target nuclear centers is studied in conjunction with the molecular nature of target. Limitations of the present theories and models as well as possible new areas for future theoretical and experimental applications are also discussed. This is the first attempt to describe multi-electron processes in molecular dynamics involving fast highly charged ions

  19. Donor-impurity-related optical response and electron Raman scattering in GaAs cone-like quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Corrales, A.; Morales, A. L.; Restrepo, R. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    The donor-impurity-related optical absorption, relative refractive index changes, and Raman scattering in GaAs cone-like quantum dots are theoretically investigated. Calculations are performed within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations, using the variational procedure to include the electron-impurity correlation effects. The study involves 1 s -like, 2px-like, and 2pz-like states. The conical structure is chosen in such a way that the cone height is large enough in comparison with the base radius thus allowing the use a quasi-analytic solution of the uncorrelated Schrödinger-like electron states.

  20. Calculations of electronic structure of UF6 molecule and crystal UO2 with relativistic pseudopotential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehvarestov, R.A.; Panin, A.I.; Bandura, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Account of relativistic effects on the properties of uranium hexafluoride is testified. Detailed comparison of single electron energies spectrum revealed in nonrelativistic (by Hartree-Fock method), relativistic (by Dirac-Fock method), and scalar-relativistic (using relativistic potential of atomic uranium frame) has been conducted. Optimization procedures of atomic basis in LCAO calculations of molecules and crystals permissive taking into account distortion of atomic orbitals when chemical bonding are discussed, and optimization effect of atomic basis on the results of scalar-relativistic calculations of UF 6 molecule properties is analyzed. Calculations of electronic structure and properties of UO 2 crystal having relativistic and nonrelativistic pseudopotentials have been realized [ru

  1. Multiple scattering approach to the vibrational excitation of molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukarev, G.

    1976-01-01

    Another approach to the problem of vibrational excitation of homonuclear two-atomic molecules by slow electrons possibly accompanied by rotational transitions is presented based on the picture of multiple scattering of an electron inside the molecule. The scattering of two fixed centers in the zero range potential model is considered. The results indicate that the multiple scattering determines the order of magnitude of the vibrational excitation cross sections in the energy region under consideration even if the zero range potential model is used. Also the connection between the multiple scattering approach and quasi-stationary molecular ion picture is established. 9 refs

  2. Optical excitation cross-sections for electron collisions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConkey, J.W.; Univ. of Windsor, Ontario)

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of the status of absolute electron-impact excitation cross-section measurements for atoms and molecules is presented. Some of the reasons for the wide discrepancies which exist in the published data are discussed. Tables are presented of recent publications in the field which are not included in the J.I.L.A. compilations. A tabular compilation of the existing data for e-impact on H 2 O is also given and discussed. Some recent experiments of particular interest to the development of the theory of electron-molecule excitation are mentioned. 112 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  3. The growth and electronic structure of azobenzene-based functional molecules on layered crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwicki, J; Ludwig, E; Buck, J; Kalläne, M; Kipp, L; Rossnagel, K; Köhler, F; Herges, R

    2012-01-01

    In situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the growth of ultrathin films of azobenzene-based functional molecules (azobenzene, Disperse Orange 3 and a triazatriangulenium platform with an attached functional azo-group) on the layered metal TiTe 2 and on the layered semiconductor HfS 2 at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Effects of intermolecular interactions, of the substrate electronic structure, and of the thermal energy of the sublimated molecules on the growth process and on the adsorbate electronic structure are identified and discussed. A weak adsorbate-substrate interaction is particularly observed for the layered semiconducting substrate, holding the promise of efficient molecular photoswitching.

  4. Timesaving techniques for decision of electron-molecule collisions in Monte Carlo simulation of electrical discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Hirotake; Mori, Naoki; Sakai, Yosuke; Suda, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Techniques to reduce the computational load for determination of electron-molecule collisions in Monte Carlo simulations of electrical discharges have been presented. By enhancing the detection efficiency of the no-collision case in the decision scheme of the collisional events, we can decrease the frequency of access to time-consuming subroutines to calculate the electron collision cross sections of the gas molecules for obtaining the collision probability. A benchmark test and an estimation to evaluate the present techniques have shown a practical timesaving efficiency

  5. Electronic structure of molecular Rydberg states of some small molecules and molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Biao; Li Jiaming

    1993-01-01

    Based on an independent-particle-approximation (i.e. the multiple scattering self-consistent-field theory), the electronic structures of Rydberg states of the small diatomic molecules H 2 , He 2 and the He 2 + molecular ion were studied. The principal quantum number of the first state of the Rydberg series is determined from a convention of the limit of the molecular electronic configuration. The dynamics of the excited molecules and molecular ion has been elucidated. The theoretical results are in fair agreement with the existing experimental measurements, thus they can serve as a reliable basis for future refined treatment such as the configuration interaction calculation

  6. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  7. A comprehensive study of extended tetrathiafulvalene cruciform molecules for molecular electronics: synthesis and electrical transport measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Christian R; Leary, Edmund; Frisenda, Riccardo; Wei, Zhongming; Jennum, Karsten S; Glibstrup, Emil; Abrahamsen, Peter Bæch; Santella, Marco; Christensen, Mikkel A; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Li, Tao; Gonzalez, Maria Teresa; Jiang, Xingbin; Morsing, Thorbjørn J; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Laursen, Bo W; Nørgaard, Kasper; van der Zant, Herre; Agrait, Nicolas; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2014-11-26

    Cruciform-like molecules with two orthogonally placed π-conjugated systems have in recent years attracted significant interest for their potential use as molecular wires in molecular electronics. Here we present synthetic protocols for a large selection of cruciform molecules based on oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (OPE) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) scaffolds, end-capped with acetyl-protected thiolates as electrode anchoring groups. The molecules were subjected to a comprehensive study of their conducting properties as well as their photophysical and electrochemical properties in solution. The complex nature of the molecules and their possible binding in different configurations in junctions called for different techniques of conductance measurements: (1) conducting-probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) measurements on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (2) mechanically controlled break-junction (MCBJ) measurements, and (3) scanning tunneling microscopy break-junction (STM-BJ) measurements. The CP-AFM measurements showed structure-property relationships from SAMs of series of OPE3 and OPE5 cruciform molecules; the conductance of the SAM increased with the number of dithiafulvene (DTF) units (0, 1, 2) along the wire, and it increased when substituting two arylethynyl end groups of the OPE3 backbone with two DTF units. The MCBJ and STM-BJ studies on single molecules both showed that DTFs decreased the junction formation probability, but, in contrast, no significant influence on the single-molecule conductance was observed. We suggest that the origins of the difference between SAM and single-molecule measurements lie in the nature of the molecule-electrode interface as well as in effects arising from molecular packing in the SAMs. This comprehensive study shows that for complex molecules care should be taken when directly comparing single-molecule measurements and measurements of SAMs and solid-state devices thereof.

  8. Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene-Pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine Small-Molecule Donors for Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Babics, Maxime; Wang, Kai; Saleem, Qasim; Liang, Ru-Ze; Hansen, Michael Ryan; Beaujuge, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis, material properties and BHJ solar cell characteristics of a set of π-conjugated small-molecule (SM) donors composed of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene (BDT) and pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine (PP) units – examining the perspectives of alkyl-substituted PP acceptor motifs in SM designs. In these systems (SM1-4), both the type of side chains derived from the PP motifs and the presence of ring-substituents on BDT critically impact (i) molecular packing, and (ii) thin-film morphologies and charge transport in BHJ solar cells. With the appropriate side-chain pattern, the ring-substituted analogue SM4 stands out: achieving efficiencies of ca. 6.5% with PC71BM, and fine-scale morphologies comparable to those obtained with some of the best-performing polymer donors in BHJ solar cells. 1H-1H DQ-SQ NMR analyses are used to examine the distinct self-assembly pattern of SM4, expected to factor into the development of the BHJ morphology.

  9. Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene-Pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine Small-Molecule Donors for Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wolf, Jannic Sebastian

    2016-01-22

    We report on the synthesis, material properties and BHJ solar cell characteristics of a set of π-conjugated small-molecule (SM) donors composed of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene (BDT) and pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine (PP) units – examining the perspectives of alkyl-substituted PP acceptor motifs in SM designs. In these systems (SM1-4), both the type of side chains derived from the PP motifs and the presence of ring-substituents on BDT critically impact (i) molecular packing, and (ii) thin-film morphologies and charge transport in BHJ solar cells. With the appropriate side-chain pattern, the ring-substituted analogue SM4 stands out: achieving efficiencies of ca. 6.5% with PC71BM, and fine-scale morphologies comparable to those obtained with some of the best-performing polymer donors in BHJ solar cells. 1H-1H DQ-SQ NMR analyses are used to examine the distinct self-assembly pattern of SM4, expected to factor into the development of the BHJ morphology.

  10. Continuum multiple-scattering approach to electron-molecule scattering and molecular photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dill, D.

    1979-01-01

    The multiple-scattering approach to the electronic continuum of molecules is described. The continuum multiple-scattering model (CMSM) was developed as a survey tool and, as such was required to satisfy two requirements. First, it had to have a very broad scope, which means (i) molecules of arbitrary geometry and complexity containing any atom in the periodic system, (ii) continuum electron energies from 0-1000 eV, and (iii) capability to treat a large range of processes involving both photoionization and electron scattering. Second, the structure of the theory was required to lend itself to transparent, physical interpretation of major spectral features such as shape resonances. A comprehensive theoretical framework for the continuum multiple scattering method is presented, as well as its applications to electron-molecule scattering and molecular photoionization. Highlights of recent applications in these two areas are reviewed. The major impact of the resulting studies over the last few years has been to establish the importance of shape resonances in electron collisions and photoionization of practically all (non-hydride) molecules

  11. Humin as an electron donor for enhancement of multiple microbial reduction reactions with different redox potentials in a consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Xiao, Zhixing; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase humin, acting as an electron donor, was able to enhance multiple reductive biotransformations, including dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP), dissimilatory reduction of amorphous Fe (III) oxide (FeOOH), and reduction of nitrate, in a consortium. Humin that was chemically reduced by NaBH4 served as an electron donor for these microbial reducing reactions, with electron donating capacities of 0.013 mmol e(-)/g for PCP dechlorination, 0.15 mmol e(-)/g for iron reduction, and 0.30 mmol e(-)/g for nitrate reduction. Two pairs of oxidation and reduction peaks within the humin were detected by cyclic voltammetry analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based microbial community analysis of the consortium incubated with different terminal electron acceptors, suggested that Dehalobacter sp., Bacteroides sp., and Sulfurospirillum sp. were involved in the PCP dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, respectively. These findings suggested that humin functioned as a versatile redox mediator, donating electrons for multiple respiration reactions with different redox potentials. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Momentum mapping spectrometer for probing the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raj; Bhatt, Pragya; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new experimental setup for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by the impact of keV electrons using the well-known technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of mainly a time- and position-sensitive multi-hit particle detector for ion analysis and a channel electron multiplier detector for detecting the ejected electrons. Different components of the setup and the relevant electronics for data acquisition are described in detail with their working principles. In order to verify the reliable performance of the setup, we have recorded the collision-induced ionic spectra of the CO 2 molecule by the impact of keV electrons. Information about the ion pairs of CO + :O + , C + :O + and O + :O + resulting from dissociative ionizing collisions of 20 and 26 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of CO 2 molecules has been obtained. Under conditions of the present experiment, the momentum resolutions of the spectrometer for the combined momenta of CO + and O + ions in the direction of the time-of-flight axis and perpendicular to the direction of an electron beam are found to be 10.0 ± 0.2 and 15.0 ± 0.3 au, respectively

  13. Electronic properties of single-molecule junction: Effect of the molecular distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    For a model system consisting of a benzenedithio (BDT) molecule sandwiched between two Au plates, the electronic properties as a function of different BDT geometry are investigated using density functional theory. The distorted BDT structures are got through stretching the electrode distance. The corresponding electronic properties, including the spatial distribution of the frontier orbits, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and density of states at the Fermi energy are determined. It reveals that the molecular distortion essentially determines electronic structures. The result should be beneficial to understand the stress-dependent or structure-dependent transport mechanism of electrons of the BDT junction.

  14. THE USE OF THE FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD FOR CALCULATION OF ELECTRONIC STATES IN MIS-STRUCTURE WITH SINGLE DONOR 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Levchuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of electronic state evolution due to non-uniform external electric field in the structure metal-insulator-semiconductor with solitary donor center is carried out. Considering a nanometer disc-shaped gate as a source of the electric field, the problem for the Laplace equation in multilayered medium is solved numerically to determine the distribution of the gate potential. The energy spectrum of a bound electron is calculated from the problem for the stationary Schrödinger equation. Finite difference schemes are constructed to solve both the problems. Difference scheme for the Schrödinger equation takes into account cusp condition for the wave function at the donor location. To solve the problem for the Laplace equation, asymptotic boundary conditions for approximating the external field potential at large distances from the gate in different layers are suggested. These conditions allow to reduce the calculation domain for the electrostatic problem essentially. The effect of the boundary conditions on the accuracy of calculating the potential and energies is investigated. Using the developed difference schemes, the dependences of the energy spectrum of the bound electron on the gate potential are calculated, and the values of critical potential at which the wave function of the electron is relocated are determined. It has been found on the basis of calculation results, that governing parameter for the description of electronic behavior is the potential difference between the donor and semiconductor surface. It has been shown that critical potential difference does not depend on dielectric thickness and permittivity.

  15. Electronic spectral study of interaction of electron donor – acceptor dyes in the ground and excited state with a metal ion. Effect of molecular structure of the dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardar, Sanjib Kr; Mandal, Prasun K.; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of manganese (II) ion with electron donor (D)–acceptor (A) dyes having symmetric D–A–D configuration of chromophores (ketocyanine dye) and the corresponding parent merocyanines (D–A configuration) in acetonitrile has been compared by monitoring the electronic absorption, and steady state and time resolved fluorescence characteristics of the dyes. Absorption spectral studies point to the formation of a 1:1 metal ion–dye (S 0 -state) complex. Equilibrium constant (K 0 ) and other thermodynamic parameters for complex formation have been determined for all the systems. Symmetric ketocyanine dyes (D–A–D) form stronger complex than the corresponding dye with D–A configuration. Quenching of fluorescence is caused due to complex formation with the cation. However, for very low concentration of salts, where complex formation is insignificant, an enhancement of fluorescence intensity takes place due to addition of salt. The absorption band of the dye undergoes a slight blue shift in the same concentration range of the metal ion. Fluorescence life time of the excited state also increases with an increase in salt concentration in that concentration range. Results have been explained in terms of formation of a weak association complex where one or more cations replace equivalent solvent molecules in the cybotatic region around the dye. The binding constant of the association complex involving cation and the dye (S 1 -state) has been determined. While the value of the binding constant is higher for a symmetric D–A–D dye relative to that for the corresponding dye with D–A configuration, the extent of fluorescence enhancement for the latter is larger. Values of decay constant for the different photophysical processes have been calculated. Formation of association complex in the S 1 -state is characterised by a slower nonradiative decay of S 1 -state of the dyes. -- Highlights: • A ketocyanine dye forms 1:1 complex with metal ions. • Slight

  16. Effects of different electron donor feeding patterns on TCE reductive dechlorination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakis, I; Antoniou, K; Mamais, D; Pantazidou, M

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates how the feeding pattern of e(-) donors might affect the efficiency of enhanced in situ bioremediation in TCE-contaminated aquifers. A series of lab-scale batch experiments were conducted using butyrate or hydrogen gas (H2) as e(-) donor and a TCE-dechlorinating microbial consortium dominated by Dehalococcoides spp. The results of these experiments demonstrate that butyrate is similarly efficient for TCE dechlorination whether it is injected once or in doses. Moreover, the present work indicates that the addition of butyrate in great excess cannot be avoided, since it most likely provide, even indirectly, significant part of the H2 required. Furthermore, methanogenesis appears to be the major ultimate e(-) accepting process in all experiments, regardless the e(-) donor used and the feeding pattern. Finally, the timing of injection of H2 seems to significantly affect dechlorination performance, since the injection during the early stages improves VC-to-ETH dechlorination and reduce methanogenic activity.

  17. Challenges regarding the start-up of an anaerobic biological sulphate reactor using H2 and CO2 as electron donor and carbon sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, SP

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Include neutralization and chemical precipitation as well as membrane dependent processes. Biological sulphate reduction is another, environmentally benign option but relies heavily on the availability of an economically viable electron donor...

  18. Difficulties in applying pure Kohn-Sham density functional theory electronic structure methods to protein molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudberg, Elias

    2012-02-01

    Self-consistency-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) electronic structure calculations with Gaussian basis sets are reported for a set of 17 protein-like molecules with geometries obtained from the Protein Data Bank. It is found that in many cases such calculations do not converge due to vanishing HOMO-LUMO gaps. A sequence of polyproline I helix molecules is also studied and it is found that self-consistency calculations using pure functionals fail to converge for helices longer than six proline units. Since the computed gap is strongly correlated to the fraction of Hartree-Fock exchange, test calculations using both pure and hybrid density functionals are reported. The tested methods include the pure functionals BLYP, PBE and LDA, as well as Hartree-Fock and the hybrid functionals BHandHLYP, B3LYP and PBE0. The effect of including solvent molecules in the calculations is studied, and it is found that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules around the protein fragment in many cases gives a larger gap, but that convergence problems due to vanishing gaps still occur in calculations with pure functionals. In order to achieve converged results, some modeling of the charge distribution of solvent water molecules outside the electronic structure calculation is needed. Representing solvent water molecules by a simple point charge distribution is found to give non-vanishing HOMO-LUMO gaps for the tested protein-like systems also for pure functionals.

  19. Site-Selection in Single-Molecule Junction for Highly Reproducible Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Murai, Daigo; Marqués-González, Santiago; Nakamura, Hisao; Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-02-03

    Adsorption sites of molecules critically determine the electric/photonic properties and the stability of heterogeneous molecule-metal interfaces. Then, selectivity of adsorption site is essential for development of the fields including organic electronics, catalysis, and biology. However, due to current technical limitations, site-selectivity, i.e., precise determination of the molecular adsorption site, remains a major challenge because of difficulty in precise selection of meaningful one among the sites. We have succeeded the single site-selection at a single-molecule junction by performing newly developed hybrid technique: simultaneous characterization of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The I-V response of 1,4-benzenedithiol junctions reveals the existence of three metastable states arising from different adsorption sites. Notably, correlated SERS measurements show selectivity toward one of the adsorption sites: "bridge sites". This site-selectivity represents an essential step toward the reliable integration of individual molecules on metallic surfaces. Furthermore, the hybrid spectro-electric technique reveals the dependence of the SERS intensity on the strength of the molecule-metal interaction, showing the interdependence between the optical and electronic properties in single-molecule junctions.

  20. Difficulties in applying pure Kohn-Sham density functional theory electronic structure methods to protein molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudberg, Elias

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistency-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) electronic structure calculations with Gaussian basis sets are reported for a set of 17 protein-like molecules with geometries obtained from the Protein Data Bank. It is found that in many cases such calculations do not converge due to vanishing HOMO-LUMO gaps. A sequence of polyproline I helix molecules is also studied and it is found that self-consistency calculations using pure functionals fail to converge for helices longer than six proline units. Since the computed gap is strongly correlated to the fraction of Hartree-Fock exchange, test calculations using both pure and hybrid density functionals are reported. The tested methods include the pure functionals BLYP, PBE and LDA, as well as Hartree-Fock and the hybrid functionals BHandHLYP, B3LYP and PBE0. The effect of including solvent molecules in the calculations is studied, and it is found that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules around the protein fragment in many cases gives a larger gap, but that convergence problems due to vanishing gaps still occur in calculations with pure functionals. In order to achieve converged results, some modeling of the charge distribution of solvent water molecules outside the electronic structure calculation is needed. Representing solvent water molecules by a simple point charge distribution is found to give non-vanishing HOMO-LUMO gaps for the tested protein-like systems also for pure functionals. (fast track communication)

  1. A new theoretical model for scattering of electrons by molecules. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, E.M.A.; Mu-tao, L.; Nogueira, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theoretical model for electron-molecule scattering is suggested. The e-H 2 scattering is studied and the superiority of the new model over the commonly used Independent Atom Model (IAM) is demonstrated. Comparing theoretical and experimental data for 40keV electrons scattered by H 2 utilizing the new model, its validity is proved, while Partial Wave and First Born calculations, employing the Independent Atom Model, strongly deviated from the experiment [pt

  2. Nonadiabatic Response Model of Laser-Induced Ultrafast π-Electron Rotations in Chiral Aromatic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Manabu; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Lin, Sheng H.

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the nonadiabatic couplings between optically induced π-electron rotations and molecular vibrations in a chiral aromatic molecule irradiated by a nonhelical, linearly polarized laser pulse. The results of wave packet dynamics simulation show that the vibrational amplitudes strongly depend on the initial rotation direction, clockwise or counterclockwise, which is controlled by the polarization direction of the incident pulse. This suggests that attosecond π-electron rotations can be observed by spectroscopic detection of femtosecond molecular vibrations.

  3. Cross sections and spin polarizations of electrons elastically scattered from oriented molecules (CH3I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, M.; Ross, A.W.; Fink, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and spin polarizations for electrons elastically scattered from CH 3 I are calculated using the independent atom model. Three molecular orientations with respect to the incident electron wavevector are considered - first, the molecule is oriented randomly, second, the electron wave front and molecular bond are parallel, and third, the wavefront and the bond axis are perpendicular. It will be seen to what extent orientational averaging weakens features of the cross section and spin polarization. The calculations show that cross section and spin polarization measurements are a possible tool for determining the degree of molecular orientation. There is no degeneracy between I-C and C-I in cross section and spin polarization measurements. The results presented here for 200 eV and 600 eV electrons scattered by CH 3 I should be considered as a case study and it should be possible to find molecules and electron energies for which even more dramatic differences between the various orientations between the molecules and the electrons can be expected. (orig.)

  4. Electronic states and nature of bonding of the molecule PdGe by all electron ab initio HF–CI calculations and mass spectrometric equilibrium experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Kingcade, Joseph E. , Jr.; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present work we present all-electron ab initio Hartree–Fock (HF) and configuration interaction (CI) calculations of six electronic states of the PdGe molecule. The molecule is predicted to have a 3Pi ground state and two low-lying excited states 3Sigma− and 1Sigma+. The electronic structure...

  5. Electron ionization of open/closed chain isocarbonic molecules relevant in plasma processing: Theoretical cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Umang R.; Joshipura, K. N.; Pandya, Siddharth H.; Kothari, Harshit N.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report theoretical electron impact ionization cross sections from threshold to 2000 eV for isocarbonic open chain molecules C 4 H 6 , C 4 H 8 , C 4 F 6 including their isomers, and closed chain molecules c-C 4 H 8 and c-C 4 F 8 . Theoretical formalism employed presently, viz., Complex Scattering Potential-ionization contribution method has been used successfully for a variety of polyatomic molecules. The present ionization calculations are very important since results available for the studied targets are either scarce or none. Our work affords comparison of C 4 containing hydrocarbon versus fluorocarbon molecules. Comparisons of the present ionization cross sections are made wherever possible, and new ionization data are also presented

  6. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba...

  7. Dissociative excitation of lithium atom in electron collisions with LiBr molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.M.

    1998-01-01

    Effective cross sections of the lithium atom dissociative excitation in electron collisions with the LiBr molecules are measured. The measurement error equals 5-12%. The optical functions of the lithium atom dissociative excitation are calculated on the basis of the data obtained

  8. UKRmol: a low-energy electron- and positron-molecule scattering suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. M.; Galiatsatos, P. G.; Gorfinkiel, J. D.; Harvey, A. G.; Lysaght, M. A.; Madden, D.; Mašín, Z.; Plummer, M.; Tennyson, J.; Varambhia, H. N.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the UK computational implementation of the R-matrix method for the treatment of electron and positron scattering from molecules. Recent developments in the UKRmol suite are detailed together with the collision processes it is enabling us to treat.

  9. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou...

  10. Enhanced Electron Attachment to Highly-Excited Molecules and Its Applications in Pulsed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.X.; Ma, C.Y.; McCorkle, D.L.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past several years have shown that electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules have extremely large cross sections. We will discuss the implications of this for pulsed discharges used for H - generation, material processing, and plasma remediation

  11. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions (updated 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1993-04-01

    Following our previous compilations [IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990)], bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1980-1992 are included. For easy finding references for particular combination of collision partners, a simple list is also provided. (author) 1542 refs

  12. Bibliography on electron collisions with molecules: rotational and vibrational excitations, 1980-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2001-04-01

    A list of papers reporting cross sections for electron-impact excitations of rotational and vibrational states of molecules is presented. The list includes both the theoretical and the experimental papers published in 1980-2000. An index by molecular species is provided at the end of the bibliography. (author)

  13. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular...

  14. Electron capture in collisions between O6+ ions and H2O molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D.; Hoekstra, R.

    By means of photon emission spectroscopy, state selective electron capture cross section for low energy (0.1-7.5 keV/amu) collisions of O6+ on H2O molecules have been measured. Over the range of interaction energies the state selective cross sections change strongly, i.e., by factors up to 5, while

  15. The effect of magnetic field and donor impurity on electron spectrum in spherical core-shell quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holovatsky, V. A.; Voitsekhivska, O. M.; Yakhnevych, M. Ya

    2018-04-01

    The effect of homogeneous magnetic field and location of donor impurity on the electron energy spectrum and distribution of its probability density in spherical core-shell quantum dot is investigated. In the framework of the effective mass approximation and rectangular infinitely deep potential well, the solutions of the Schrodinger equation are found using the matrix method. The wave functions are expanded over the complete set of exact functions obtained without the magnetic field and impurity. It is shown that when the induction of magnetic field increases, the ground state of electron in the nanostructure without impurity or on-center impurity is successively formed by the states with m = 0, -1, -2, … (Aharonov-Bohm effect). When donor impurity is located in the shell of the nanostructure the Aharonov-Bohm effect vanishes. The dependences of electron energy spectrum and its wave functions on the location of impurity, placed along the direction of magnetic field or perpendicularly to it, are studied. It is shown, that in the first case, the quantum states are characterized by the certain value of magnetic quantum number m and the expansion contains the wave functions of the states with it only. In the second case, the cylindrical symmetry of the problem is broken and the new quantum states are formed from the states with different values of all three quantum numbers n, l, m and electron energy spectrum weakly depends on the magnetic field induction.

  16. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchenko, D., E-mail: dariyasavchenko@gmail.com [Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute,” Kyiv 03056 (Ukraine); Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E. [V.E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NASU, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Pöppl, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics II, Leipzig University, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Lančok, J. [Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic); Mokhov, E. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Saint-Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 19710 (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-07

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation “sandwich method” (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} at T = 10–40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic “k1” and “k2” sites (N{sub k1,k2}) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T{sub 1}{sup −1}), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T{sup 9}, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T{sub 1}{sup −1} for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal (“h”) site (N{sub h}) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (T{sub m}{sup −1}) with the temperature increase for the N{sub h} donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the N{sub k1,k2} donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time T{sub m} for the N{sub k1,k2} donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at N{sub h} and N{sub k1,k2} sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  17. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GUILFORD JONES; S ST

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  18. All-electron ab initio investigations of the electronic states of the NiC molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, Karl. A.

    1999-01-01

    The low-lying electronic states of NiC are investigated by all-electron ab initio multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) calculations including relativistic corrections. The electronic structure of NiC is interpreted as perturbed antiferromagnetic couplings of the localized angular...

  19. Local spin torque induced by electron electric dipole moment in the YbF molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Senami, Masato; Ogiso, Yoji; Tachibana, Akitomo [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    In this study, we show the modification of the equation of motion of the electronic spin, which is derived by the quantum electron spin vorticity principle, by the effect of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To investigate the new contribution to spin torque by EDM, using first principle calculations, we visualize distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and local spin torque density of the YbF molecule on which the static electric field and magnetic field are applied at t = 0.

  20. Dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Leth, Henriette Astrup

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dissociative multiple ionization processes of diatomic molecules exposed to extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses is studied theoretically using the Monte Carlo wave packet approach. By simulated detection of the emitted electrons, the model reduces a full propagation...... of the system to propagations of the nuclear wave packet in one specific electronic charge state at a time. Suggested ionization channels can be examined, and kinetic energy release spectra for the nuclei can be calculated and compared with experiments. Double ionization of O2 is studied as an example, and good...

  1. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  2. Organic molecules deposited on graphene: A computational investigation of self-assembly and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, I. S. S. de; Miwa, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    We use ab initio simulations to investigate the adsorption and the self-assembly processes of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ), and tetrasodium 1,3,6,8-pyrenetetrasulfonic acid (TPA) on the graphene surface. We find that there are no chemical bonds at the molecule–graphene interface, even at the presence of grain boundaries on the graphene surface. The molecules bond to graphene through van der Waals interactions. In addition to the molecule–graphene interaction, we performed a detailed study of the role played by the (lateral) molecule–molecule interaction in the formation of the, experimentally verified, self-assembled layers of TCNQ and TPA on graphene. Regarding the electronic properties, we calculate the electronic charge transfer from the graphene sheet to the TCNQ and F4-TCNQ molecules, leading to a p-doping of graphene. Meanwhile, such charge transfer is reduced by an order of magnitude for TPA molecules on graphene. In this case, it is not expected a significant doping process upon the formation of self-assembled layer of TPA molecules on the graphene sheet

  3. Nano-fabrication of molecular electronic junctions by targeted modification of metal-molecule bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, S. Hassan M.; Löfås, Henrik; Blom, Tobias; Wallner, Andreas; Grigoriev, Anton; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ottosson, Henrik; Leifer, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Reproducibility, stability and the coupling between electrical and molecular properties are central challenges in the field of molecular electronics. The field not only needs devices that fulfill these criteria but they also need to be up-scalable to application size. In this work, few-molecule based electronics devices with reproducible electrical characteristics are demonstrated. Our previously reported 5 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) coated with ω-triphenylmethyl (trityl) protected 1,8-octanedithiol molecules are trapped in between sub-20 nm gap spacing gold nanoelectrodes forming AuNP-molecule network. When the trityl groups are removed, reproducible devices and stable Au-thiol junctions are established on both ends of the alkane segment. The resistance of more than 50 devices is reduced by orders of magnitude as well as a reduction of the spread in the resistance histogram is observed. By density functional theory calculations the orders of magnitude decrease in resistance can be explained and supported by TEM observations thus indicating that the resistance changes and strongly improved resistance spread are related to the establishment of reproducible and stable metal-molecule bonds. The same experimental sequence is carried out using 1,6-hexanedithiol functionalized AuNPs. The average resistances as a function of molecular length, demonstrated herein, are comparable to the one found in single molecule devices.

  4. Longitudinal and transverse spin dynamics of donor-bound electrons in fluorine-doped ZnSe: Spin inertia versus Hanle effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Zhukov, E. A.; Greilich, A.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Korenev, V. L.; Pawlis, A.; Bayer, M.

    2015-06-01

    The spin dynamics of strongly localized donor-bound electrons in fluorine-doped ZnSe epilayers is studied using pump-probe Kerr rotation techniques. A method exploiting the spin inertia is developed and used to measure the longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 in a wide range of magnetic fields, temperatures, and pump densities. The T1 time of the donor-bound electron spin of about 1.6 μ s remains nearly constant for external magnetic fields varied from zero up to 2.5 T (Faraday geometry) and in a temperature range 1.8-45 K. These findings impose severe restrictions on possible spin relaxation mechanisms. In our opinion they allow us to rule out scattering between free and donor-bound electrons, jumping of electrons between different donor centers, scattering between phonons and donor-bound electrons, and with less certainty charge fluctuations in the environment of the donors caused by the 1.5 ps pulsed laser excitation.

  5. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-01-01

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH 2 , treated in a 3–21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10 15 W/cm 2 ), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics

  6. Low energy electron-initiated ion-molecule reactions of ribose analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozejko, P.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments in which plasmid DNA samples were bombarded with low energy ( 2 O, DNA bases, and sugar-phosphate backbone analogues. To this end, the cyclic molecule tetrahydrofuran, and its derivatives, provide useful models for the sugar-like molecules contained in the backbone of DNA. In addition to LEE induced dissociation by processes such as dissociative electron attachment (DEA), molecules may be damaged by ions and neutral species of non-thermal energies created by LEE in the surrounding environment. In this contribution, we investigate with electron stimulated desorption techniques, LEE damage to films of desoxy-ribose analogues in the presence of various molecular coadsorbates, that simulate changes in local molecular environment. In one type of experiments tetrahydrofuran is deposited onto multilayer O2. A desorbed signal of OH - indicates ion-molecule reactions of the type O - + C 4 H 8 O -> OH - + C 4 H 7 O, where the O - was formed initially by DEA to O 2 . Further electron stimulated desorption measurements for tetrahydrofuran and derivatives adsorbed on H 2 O, Kr, N 2 O and CH 3 OH will be presented and discussed

  7. Mechanisms of molecular electronic rectification through electronic levels with strong vibrational coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2002-01-01

    We present a new view and an analytical formalism of electron flow through a donor-acceptor molecule inserted between a pair of metal electrodes. The donor and acceptor levels are strongly coupled to an environmental nuclear continuum. The formalism applies to molecular donor-acceptor systems bot...

  8. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high...... sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3- reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under...

  9. Wave packet formulation of the boomerang model for resonant electron--molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, C.W.; Turner, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent formulation of the boomerang model for resonant electron--molecule scattering is presented in terms of a wave packet propagating on the complex potential surface of the metastable anion. The results of calculations using efficient semiclassical techniques for propagating the wave packet are found to be in excellent agreement with full quantum-mechanical calculations of vibrational excitation cross sections in e - --N 2 scattering. The application of the wave packet formulation as a computational and conceptual approach to the problem of resonant collisions with polyatomic molecules is discussed in the light of recent wave packet calculations on polyatomic photodissociation and Raman spectra

  10. Antibonding intermediate state in the theory of vibrational excitation of diatomic molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskii, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    An exactly solvable model is constructed for the description of the processes that take place when a slow electron collides with a diatomic molecule (vibrational excitation, associative detachment, and dissociative attachment). As a particular model of the variant, the case of an antibonding (virtual) state of an intermediate state is considered, and a term of this state is parametrized in a very simple manner. The vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment are calculated for a system corresponding to the HCl molecule. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experiment

  11. Structure and conformational dynamics of molecules in the excited electronic states: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godunov, I.A.; Bataev, V.A.; Maslov, D.V.; Yakovlev, N.N.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of conformational non-rigid molecules in the excited electronic states are investigated by joint theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical part of work consist of two stages. In first stage the ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are carried out using high level methods. In second stage the vibrational problems of the various dimensions are solved by variational method for vibrations of large amplitude. In experimental part of work the vibronic spectra are investigated: gas-phase absorption and also, fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules. Some examples are considered.

  12. Analysis of Excitation and Ionization of Atoms and Molecules by Electron Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, Afzal

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of Excitation and Ionization of Atoms and Molecules by Electron Impact, by Afzal Chaudhry and Hans Kleinpoppen, describes in detail the measurements of the partial and total doubly differential cross sections for the multiple-ionization of rare gas atoms by electron impact. These measurements show, among other trends, the role of Auger transitions in the production of multiply ionized atoms in the region where the incident electron energy is sufficient to produce inner shell ionization. Other processes like Coster-Kronig transitions and shake off also contribute towards increasing the charge of the ions. As discussed in the book, an incident electron having energy of 6 keV, for example, in a collision with xenon atom can remove up to nine electrons! The measurements of doubly differential cross sections for the dissociative and non-dissociative ionization of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide and sulfur hexa fluoride molecular gases are also explored. The results of the measurements for the sulfur dioxide mole...

  13. Small Molecule Acceptor and Polymer Donor Crystallinity and Aggregation Effects on Microstructure Templating: Understanding Photovoltaic Response in Fullerene-Free Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastham, Nicholas D.; Dudnik, Alexander S.; Aldrich, Thomas J.; Manley, Eric F.; Fauvell, Thomas J.; Hartnett, Patrick E.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Chen, Lin X.; Melkonyan, Ferdinand S.; Facchetti, Antonio; Chang, Robert P. H.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2017-05-10

    Perylenediimide (PDI) small molecule acceptor (SMA) crystallinity and donor polymer aggregation and crystallinity effects on bulk-heterojunction microstructure and polymer solar cell (PSC) performance are systematically investigated. Two highperformance polymers, semicrystalline poly[5-(2-hexyldodecyl)-4Hthieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6(5H)-dione-1,3-yl-alt-4,4''dodecyl-2,2':5',2''- terthiophene-5,5''-diyl] (PTPD3T or D1) and amorphous poly{4,8- bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene- 2,6-diyl-alt-(4-(2-ethylhexyl)-3-fluorothieno[3,4-b]thiophene-2-carboxylate-2,6-diyl) (PBDTT-FTTE or D2), are paired with three PDI-based SMAs (A1-A3) of differing crystallinity (A1 is the most, A3 is the least crystalline). The resulting PSC performance trends are strikingly different from those of typical fullerene-based PSCs and are highly material-dependent. The present trends reflect synergistic aggregation propensities between the SMA and polymer components. Importantly, the active layer morphology is templated by the PDI in some blends and by the polymer in others, with the latter largely governed by the polymer aggregation. Thus, PTPD3T templating capacity increases as self-aggregation increases (greater Mn), optimizing PSC performance with A2, while A3-based cells exhibit an inverse relationship between polymer aggregation and performance, which is dramatically different from fullerene-based PSCs. For PBDTT-FTTE, A2-based cells again deliver the highest PCEs of ~5%, but here both A2 and PBDTT-FTTE (medium Mn) template the morphology. Overall, the present results underscore the importance of nonfullerene acceptor aggregation for optimizing PSC performance and offer guidelines for pairing SMAs with acceptable donor polymers.

  14. Grand Canonical adaptive resolution simulation for molecules with electrons: A theoretical framework based on physical consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Site, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for the treatment of an open molecular system with electrons and nuclei is proposed. The idea is based on the Grand Canonical description of a quantum region embedded in a classical reservoir of molecules. Electronic properties of the quantum region are calculated at constant electronic chemical potential equal to that of the corresponding (large) bulk system treated at full quantum level. Instead, the exchange of molecules between the quantum region and the classical environment occurs at the chemical potential of the macroscopic thermodynamic conditions. The Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Scheme is proposed for the treatment of the classical environment; such an approach can treat the exchange of molecules according to first principles of statistical mechanics and thermodynamic. The overall scheme is build on the basis of physical consistency, with the corresponding definition of numerical criteria of control of the approximations implied by the coupling. Given the wide range of expertise required, this work has the intention of providing guiding principles for the construction of a well founded computational protocol for actual multiscale simulations from the electronic to the mesoscopic scale.

  15. Independent center, independent electron approximation for dynamics of molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.H.; Straton, J.C.; Wang, J.; Wang, Y.D.; Weaver, O.L.; Corchs, S.E.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    A formalism is developed for evaluating probabilities and cross sections for multiple-electron transitions in scattering of molecules and clusters by charged collision partners. First, the molecule is divided into subclusters each made up of identical centers (atoms). Within each subcluster coherent scattering from identical centers may lead to observable phase terms and a geometrical structure factor. Then, using a mean field approximation to describe the interactions between centers we obtain A I ∼ summation k product ke iδ k I A Ik . Second, the independent electron approximation for each center may be obtained by neglecting the correlation between electrons in each center. The probability amplitude for each center is then a product of single electron transition probability amplitudes, a Ik i , i.e. A Ik ≅ product iaik i . Finally, the independent subcluster approximation is introduced by neglecting the interactions between different subclusters in the molecule or cluster. The total probability amplitude then reduces to a simple product of amplitudes for each subcluster, A≅ product IAI . Limitations of this simple approximation are discussed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Electron transport in disordered films of metal nanoparticles linked by organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K.H.; Wei, G.; Herrmann, J.; Raguse, B.; Baxter, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We have investigated theoretically and experimentally the mechanism of electron transport in films made of ∼10 nm sized gold nanoparticles linked by alkanedithiol molecules. Conduction in these films is due to linker-molecule assisted single-electron tunnelling between neighbouring nanoparticles where electrons have to overcome the Coulomb blockade energy. Strong disorder in our films in the form of separation gap fluctuations between adjacent nanoparticles and variations in Coulomb blockade energies cause electron current percolation. We have found that the dependence of the conduction on the length of the alkanedithiol molecules is affected by the degree of disorder. In addition, we have observed that percolation leads to a non-Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of the conduction and to a film-thickness dependent conductivity. I-V characteristics at low temperatures reveal Coulomb blockade effects. The strong dependence of the electrical conduction on the separation gaps between adjacent nanoparticles can be utilized in strain gauge and gas sensor applications

  17. Structure and electronic properties of Alq3 derivatives with electron acceptor/donor groups at the C4 positions of the quinolate ligands: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Joshi Laxmikanth; Bhanuprakash, Kotamarthi

    2011-12-01

    The molecular structures of the ground (S(0)) and first singlet excited (S(1)) states of Alq3 derivatives in which pyrazolyl and 3-methylpyrazolyl groups are substituted at the C4 positions of the 8-hydroxyquinolate ligands as electron acceptors, and piperidinyl and N-methylpiperazinyl groups are substituted at the same positions as electron donors, have been optimized using the B3LYP/6-31G and CIS/6-31G methods, respectively. In order to analyze the electronic transitions in these derivatives, the frontier molecular orbital characteristics were analyzed systematically, and it was found that the highest occupied molecular orbital is localized on the A ligand while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is localized on the B ligand in their ground states, similar to what is seen for mer-Alq3. The absorption and emission spectra were evaluated at the TD-PBE0/6-31G level, and it was observed that electron acceptor substitution causes a red-shift in the emission spectra, which is also seen experimentally. The reorganization energies were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G level and the results show that acceptor/donor substitution has a significant effect on the intrinsic charge mobilities of these derivatives as compared to mer-Alq3.

  18. Electron stereodynamics in coulomb explosion of molecules by slow highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, Atsushi; Ohyama-Yamaguchi, Tomoko

    2008-01-01

    The three-center Coulombic over-the-barrier model is developed for Coulomb explosion of a homonuclear diatomic molecule in collisions with a slow (∼10 eV/amu) highly charged ion. A conventional two-step picture of multiple electron transfer followed by Coulomb explosion is far from appropriate because the molecule sets out to dissociate before the incident ion approaches the closest distance. We treat the formation of a quasi-molecule and its decay into the three moving atomic ions. Charge-asymmetric population between fragment ions observed in a triple-coincidence measurement is suggested to reflect the bond elongation during a collision. Collisions of Kr 8+ + N 2 are analyzed. (author)

  19. A parallel algorithm for Hamiltonian matrix construction in electron-molecule collision calculations: MPI-SCATCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Refaie, Ahmed F.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Construction and diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix is the rate-limiting step in most low-energy electron - molecule collision calculations. Tennyson (1996) implemented a novel algorithm for Hamiltonian construction which took advantage of the structure of the wavefunction in such calculations. This algorithm is re-engineered to make use of modern computer architectures and the use of appropriate diagonalizers is considered. Test calculations demonstrate that significant speed-ups can be gained using multiple CPUs. This opens the way to calculations which consider higher collision energies, larger molecules and / or more target states. The methodology, which is implemented as part of the UK molecular R-matrix codes (UKRMol and UKRMol+) can also be used for studies of bound molecular Rydberg states, photoionization and positron-molecule collisions.

  20. Toward a muon-specific electronic structure theory: effective electronic Hartree-Fock equations for muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-02-07

    An effective set of Hartree-Fock (HF) equations are derived for electrons of muonic systems, i.e., molecules containing a positively charged muon, conceiving the muon as a quantum oscillator, which are completely equivalent to the usual two-component HF equations used to derive stationary states of the muonic molecules. In these effective equations, a non-Coulombic potential is added to the orthodox coulomb and exchange potential energy terms, which describes the interaction of the muon and the electrons effectively and is optimized during the self-consistent field cycles. While in the two-component HF equations a muon is treated as a quantum particle, in the effective HF equations it is absorbed into the effective potential and practically transformed into an effective potential field experienced by electrons. The explicit form of the effective potential depends on the nature of muon's vibrations and is derivable from the basis set used to expand the muonic spatial orbital. The resulting effective Hartree-Fock equations are implemented computationally and used successfully, as a proof of concept, in a series of muonic molecules containing all atoms from the second and third rows of the Periodic Table. To solve the algebraic version of the equations muon-specific Gaussian basis sets are designed for both muon and surrounding electrons and it is demonstrated that the optimized exponents are quite distinct from those derived for the hydrogen isotopes. The developed effective HF theory is quite general and in principle can be used for any muonic system while it is the starting point for a general effective electronic structure theory that incorporates various types of quantum correlations into the muonic systems beyond the HF equations.

  1. Evaluation of the Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current-Voltage and Thermopower Measurements: Application to C60 Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-16

    The electronic structure of molecular junctions has a significant impact on their transport properties. Despite the decisive role of the electronic structure, a complete characterization of the electronic structure remains a challenge. This is because there is no straightforward way of measuring electron spectroscopy for an individual molecule trapped in a nanoscale gap between two metal electrodes. Herein, a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the electronic structure in single-molecule junctions based on the analysis of current-voltage (I-V) and thermoelectric characteristics is described. It is shown that the electronic structure of the prototypical C 60 single-molecule junction can be resolved by analyzing complementary results of the I-V and thermoelectric measurement. This combined approach confirmed that the C 60 single-molecule junction was highly conductive with molecular electronic conductances of 0.033 and 0.003 G 0 and a molecular Seebeck coefficient of -12 μV K -1 . In addition, we revealed that charge transport was mediated by a LUMO whose energy level was located 0.5≈0.6 eV above the Fermi level of the Au electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H2 molecules involving the 2Σg+ resonant Rydberg electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R.K.; Wadehra, J.M.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v i = 0–5, 10 of the H 2 molecule. Highlights: ► We calculated electron–hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. ► Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. ► Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. ► The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. ► A comparison with the process involving the electron–hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H 2 molecule taking place via the 2 Σ g + Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v i = 0–14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v i , when the process proceeds via the X 2 Σ u + shape resonance of H 2 , for the 2 Σ g + Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v i = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v i ⩾ 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v i levels are also calculated in the 0.5–1000 eV temperature range.

  3. How to probe transverse magnetic anisotropy of a single-molecule magnet by electronic transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Burzuri, E.; Gaudenzi, R.; Park, K.; Leijnse, M.; Wegewijs, M.; Paaske, J.; Cornia, A.; van der Zant, H.

    We propose an approach for in-situ determination of the transverse magnetic anisotropy (TMA) of an individual molecule by electronic transport measurements, see Phys. Rev. B 91, 035442 (2015). We study a Fe4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) captured in a gateable junction, a unique tool for addressing the spin in different redox states of a molecule. We show that, due to mixing of the spin eigenstates of the SMM, the TMA significantly manifests itself in transport. We predict and experimentally observe the pronounced intensity modulation of the Coulomb peak amplitude with the magnetic field in the linear-response transport regime, from which the TMA parameter E can be estimated. Importantly, the method proposed here does not rely on the small induced tunnelling effects and, hence, works well at temperatures and electron tunnel broadenings by far exceeding the tunnel splittings and even E itself. We deduce that the TMA for a single Fe4 molecule captured in a junction is substantially larger than the bulk value. Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  4. Charge transport through image charged stabilized states in a single molecule single electron transistor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedegard, Per; Bjornholm, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present paper gives an elaborate theoretical description of a new molecular charge transport mechanism applying to a single molecule trapped between two macroscopic electrodes in a solid state device. It is shown by a Hubbard type model of the electronic and electrostatic interactions, that the close proximity of metal electrodes may allow electrons to tunnel from the electrode directly into very localized image charge stabilized states on the molecule. Due to this mechanism, an exceptionally large number of redox states may be visited within an energy scale which would normally not allow the molecular HOMO-LUMO gap to be transversed. With a reasonable set of parameters, a good fit to recent experimental values may be obtained. The theoretical model is furthermore used to search for the physical boundaries of this effect, and it is found that a rather narrow geometrical space is available for the new mechanism to work: in the specific case of oligophenylenevinylene molecules recently explored in such devices several atoms in the terminal benzene rings need to be at van der Waal's distance to the electrode in order for the mechanism to work. The model predicts, that chemisorption of the terminal benzene rings too gold electrodes will impede the image charge effect very significantly because the molecule is pushed away from the electrode by the covalent thiol-gold bond

  5. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  6. Suitability of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a feed batch operating bio-electrochemical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Fermoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil washing water derived from the two-phase manufacturing process was assessed as an electron donor in a bio-electrochemical system (BES operating at 35 ºC. Start-up was carried out by using acetate as a substrate for the BES, reaching a potential of around +680 mV. After day 54, BES was fed with olive oil washing water. The degradation of olive oil washing water in the BES generated a maximum voltage potential of around +520 mV and a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD removal efficiency of 41%. However, subsequent loads produced a decrease in the COD removal, while current and power density diminished greatly. The deterioration of these parameters could be a consequence of the accumulation of recalcitrant or inhibitory compounds, such as phenols. These results demonstrated that the use of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a BES is feasible, although it has to be further investigated in order to make it more suitable for a real application.

  7. Suitability of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a feed batch operating bio-electrochemical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermoso, F.G.; Fernández-Rodríguez, M.J.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, A.; Serrano, A.; Borja, R.

    2017-01-01

    Olive oil washing water derived from the two-phase manufacturing process was assessed as an electron donor in a bio-electrochemical system (BES) operating at 35 ºC. Start-up was carried out by using acetate as a substrate for the BES, reaching a potential of around +680 mV. After day 54, BES was fed with olive oil washing water. The degradation of olive oil washing water in the BES generated a maximum voltage potential of around +520 mV and a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency of 41%. However, subsequent loads produced a decrease in the COD removal, while current and power density diminished greatly. The deterioration of these parameters could be a consequence of the accumulation of recalcitrant or inhibitory compounds, such as phenols. These results demonstrated that the use of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a BES is feasible, although it has to be further investigated in order to make it more suitable for a real application. [es

  8. Ab Initio Calculations of the Electronic Structures and Biological Functions of Protein Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2003-04-01

    The self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) calculation method reduces the computational effort from M3 to about M1 (M is the number of atoms in the system) with unchanged calculation precision. So the ab initio, all-electron calculation of the electronic structure and biological function of protein molecule becomes a reality, which will promote new proteomics considerably. The calculated results of two real protein molecules, the trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of squash Cucurbita maxima (CMTI-I, 436 atoms) and the Ascaris trypsin inhibitor (912 atoms, two three-dimensional structures), are presented. The reactive sites of the inhibitors are determined and explained. The precision of structure determination of inhibitors are tested theoretically.

  9. A semi-empirical formula for total cross sections of electron scattering from diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yufang; Sun Jinfeng; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang

    1996-01-01

    A fitting formula based on the Born approximation is used to fit the total cross sections for electron scattering by diatomic molecules (CO, N 2 , NO, O 2 and HCl) in the intermediate- and high-energy range. By analyzing the fitted parameters and the total cross sections, we found that the internuclear distance of the constituent atoms plays an important role in the e-diatomic molecule collision process. Thus a new semi-empirical formula has been obtained. There is no free parameter in the formula, and the dependence of the total cross sections on the internuclear distance has been reflected clearly. The total cross sections for electron scattering by CO, N 2 , NO, O 2 and HCl have been calculated over an incident energy range of 10-4000 eV. The results agree well with other available experimental and calculation data. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-01-01

    -srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2......Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become...... and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC...

  11. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  12. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea; Ruocco, G.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  13. Electronic structure of molecules of substituted benzenes by x-ray spectroscopy. I. Nitrobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumatov, V.D.; Murakhtanov, V.V.; Salakhutdinov, N.F.; Okotrub, A.V.; Mazalov, L.N.; Logunova, L.G.; Koptyug, V.A.; Furin, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    The electronic structure of the nitrobenzene molecule has been studied by x-ray spectroscopy with the aid of quantum-chemical calculations. The structure of the molecular orbitals of nitrobenzene has been compared with the structure of benzene and nitrogen dioxide. It has been shown in the framework of a fragment-by-fragment analysis that the interaction of the highest occupied π orbitals of the benzene ring and the nitro group is weak

  14. Stability, structural and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on free standing Au layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoch, Neha, E-mail: nehakatoch2@gmail.com; Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Center for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, India, 151001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We report stability and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on the Au atomic layer within the framework of density function theory (DFT). Horizontal configuration of benzene on the top site of Au monolayer prefers energetically over other studied configurations. On the adsorption of benzene, the ballistic conductance of Au monolayer is found to decrease from 4G{sub 0} to 2G{sub 0} suggesting its applications for the fabrications of organic sensor devices based on the Au atomic layers.

  15. Nonspreading Wave Packets for Rydberg Electrons in Rotating Molecules with Electric Dipole Moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I.; Bialynicka-Birula, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Nonspreading wave packets for Rydberg electrons are predicted in rotating molecules with electric dipole moments. We have named them the Trojan wave packets since their stability is due to the same mechanism that governs the motion of the Trojan asteroids in the Sun-Jupiter system. Unlike all previously predicted Trojan wave packets in atoms, molecular Trojan states do not require external fields for their existence

  16. Graphene as a transparent conductive support for studying biological molecules by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, R. R.; Anissimova, S.; Novoselov, K. S.; Blake, P.; Blake, J. R.; Geim, A. K.; Zan, R.; Bangert, U.; Golovanov, A. P.; Morozov, S. V.; Latychevskaia, T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of graphene as a support for imaging individual biological molecules in transmission electron microscope (TEM). A simple procedure to produce free-standing graphene membranes has been designed. Such membranes are extremely robust and can support practically any submicrometer object. Tobacco mosaic virus has been deposited on graphene samples and observed in a TEM. High contrast has been achieved even though no staining has been applied.

  17. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions. Updated 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1997-04-01

    Following our previous compilations (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990), NIFS-DATA-20 (1993)), bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1954-1996 are listed in the order of the publication year. For easy finding of the references for a combination of collision partners, a simple list is provided. (author)

  18. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions, updated 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1990-08-01

    Following a previous compilation, new bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1989 are surveyed. For easy finding references for particular combination of collision partners, a simple list is also provided. Furthermore, for convenience, a copy of the previous compilation (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986)) is included. (author) 1363 refs

  19. Scattering of electrons by alkali-halide molecules: LiBr and CsCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, L.; Zuo, M.; Shen, G.F.; Stumpf, B.; Bederson, B.

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated small-angle electron scattering by highly polar molecules. Recoil experiments are performed at 5 and 20 eV for electrons scattered by LiBr and CsCl, within the shadow of the unscattered molecular beam. Low-angular-range scattering described by the Born approximation for rotating dipoles, combined with different theories for intermediate- and high-angle scattering, are compared with our results. Evaluated total scattering cross sections as well as momentum-transfer and viscosity cross sections are given. A general two-dimensional analysis of the recoil experiment is presented

  20. Electron tunnelling through single azurin molecules can be on/off switched by voltage pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, Chiara [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy); Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, CNR, I-05010 Porano (Italy); Kumar, Vivek; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore, E-mail: cannistr@unitus.it [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy)

    2015-05-04

    Redox metalloproteins are emerging as promising candidates for future bio-optoelectronic and nano-biomemory devices, and the control of their electron transfer properties through external signals is still a crucial task. Here, we show that a reversible on/off switching of the electron current tunnelling through a single protein can be achieved in azurin protein molecules adsorbed on gold surfaces, by applying appropriate voltage pulses through a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. The observed changes in the hybrid system tunnelling properties are discussed in terms of long-sustained charging of the protein milieu.

  1. Electronic structure of the Fe2 molecule in the local-spin-density approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.; Kestner, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio self-consistent all-electron spin-polarized calculations have been performed for the ground-state properties of the Fe 2 molecule using the local-spin-density approximation. A Gaussian orbital basis is employed and all the two-electron integrals are evaluated analytically. The matrix elements of the exchange-correlation potential are computed numerically. The total energy, the binding energy, the equilibrium distance, vibrational frequency, and the ground-state configurations are reported and compared with other calculations and experimental results

  2. Ionization of molecules by electron impact: Differential and total cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezkallah, Z. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Departement de physique, Faculte des sciences, Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Houamer, S., E-mail: hosalim@yahoo.com [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Departement de physique, Faculte des sciences, Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Dal Cappello, C. [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Institut de Physique, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Charpentier, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz UMR 7554, ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Roy, A.C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

    2011-12-01

    The first Born approximation is applied to calculate differential and total ionization cross sections of a set of small molecules, namely, HF, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by electron impact. The molecular targets are described by single center molecular orbitals consisting of linear combinations of atomic orbitals (MO-LCAO). First, we have considered electron momentum spectroscopy experiments to check the accuracy of the wave functions. The triply, doubly, singly differential and total cross sections are then evaluated in a systematic way for a variety of kinematics. The results are discussed and compared with experiments.

  3. Electron transfer and redox metalloenzyme catalysis at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    transfer (ET). Image interpretation requires, however, theoretical support, as STM represents both electronic and topographic features. Molecules with accessible redox levels offer other insight into electron tunneling mechanisms, addressed in detail for ET metalloproteins. We present here in situ STM...... of the blue redox metalloenzyme copper nitrite reductase (Achromobacter xylosoxidans, AxCuNiR) on Au(111) electrode surfaces modified by a self-assembled cysteamine monolayer. AxCuNiR displays strong nitrite reduction waves in this environment. AxCuNiR/cysteamine/ Au(111) surfaces were imaged at KNO2...

  4. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Yao, Fubing; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H 2 ) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H 2 on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H 2 as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  5. Development of collisional data base for elementary processes of electron scattering by atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinković, Bratislav P., E-mail: bratislav.marinkovic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Applied Studies, Vojvode Stepe 283, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vujčić, Veljko [Astronomical Observatory Belgade, Volgina 7, 11050 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Belgrade, Jove Ilića 154, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sushko, Gennady [MBN Research Center, Altenhöferallee 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vudragović, Dušan [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Marinković, Dara B. [Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Belgrade, Jove Ilića 154, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Đorđević, Stefan; Ivanović, Stefan; Nešić, Milutin [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Applied Studies, Vojvode Stepe 283, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jevremović, Darko [Astronomical Observatory Belgade, Volgina 7, 11050 Belgrade (Serbia); Solov’yov, Andrey V. [MBN Research Center, Altenhöferallee 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mason, Nigel J. [The Open University, Department of Physical Sciences, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • BEAMDB database maintaining electron/atom-molecule collisional data has been created. • The DB is MySQL, the web server is Nginx and Python application server is Gunicorn. • Only data that have been previously published and formally refereed are included. • Data protocol for exchanging and representing data is in the “xsams” xml format. • BEAMDB becomes a node within the VAMDC consortium and radiation damage RADAM basis. - Abstract: We present a progress report on the development of the Belgrade electron/molecule data base which is hosted by The Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade and The Astronomical Observatory Belgrade. The data base has been developed under the standards of Virtual Atomic Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project which provides a common portal for several European data bases that maintain atomic and molecular data. The Belgrade data base (BEAMDB) covers collisional data of electron interactions with atoms and molecules in the form of differential (DCS) and integrated cross sections as well as energy loss spectra. The final goal of BEAMDB becoming both a node within the VAMDC consortium and within the radiation damage RADAM data base has been achieved.

  6. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  7. Electronic and transport properties of Cobalt-based valence tautomeric molecules and polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifeng; Calzolari, Arrigo; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2011-03-01

    The advancement of molecular spintronics requires further understandings of the fundamental electronic structures and transport properties of prototypical spintronics molecules and polymers. Here we present a density functional based theoretical study of the electronic structures of Cobalt-based valence tautomeric molecules Co III (SQ)(Cat)L Co II (SQ)2 L and their polymers, where SQ refers to the semiquinone ligand, and Cat the catecholate ligand, while L is a redox innocent backbone ligand. The conversion from low-spin Co III ground state to high-spin Co II excited state is realized by imposing an on-site potential U on the Co atom and elongating the Co-N bond. Transport properties are subsequently calculated by extracting electronic Wannier functions from these systems and computing the charge transport in the ballistic regime using a Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) approach. Our transport results show distinct charge transport properties between low-spin ground state and high-spin excited state, hence suggesting potential spintronics devices from these molecules and polymers such as spin valves.

  8. Electron-molecule chemistry and charging processes on organic ices and Titan's icy aerosol surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirim, C.; Gann, R. D.; McLain, J. L.; Orlando, T. M.

    2015-09-01

    Electron-induced polymerization processes and charging events that can occur within Titan's atmosphere or on its surface were simulated using electron irradiation and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) studies of nitrogen-containing organic condensates. The DEA studies probe the desorption of H- from hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetonitrile (CH3CN), and aminoacetonitrile (NH2CH2CN) ices, as well as from synthesized tholin materials condensed or deposited onto a graphite substrate maintained at low temperature (90-130 K). The peak cross sections for H- desorption during low-energy (3-15 eV) electron irradiation were measured and range from 3 × 10-21 to 2 × 10-18 cm2. Chemical and structural transformations of HCN ice upon 2 keV electron irradiation were investigated using X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The electron-beam processed materials displayed optical properties very similar to tholins produced by conventional discharge methods. Electron and negative ion trapping lead to 1011 charges cm-2 on a flat surface which, assuming a radius of 0.05 μm for Titan aerosols, is ∼628 charges/radius (in μm). The facile charge trapping indicates that electron interactions with nitriles and complex tholin-like molecules could affect the conductivity of Titan's atmosphere due to the formation of large negative ion complexes. These negatively charged complexes can also precipitate onto Titan's surface and possibly contribute to surface reactions and the formation of dunes.

  9. Accurate donor electron wave functions from a multivalley effective mass theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendo, Luke; Hu, Xuedong

    Multivalley effective mass (MEM) theories combine physical intuition with a marginal need for computational resources, but they tend to be insensitive to variations in the wavefunction. However, recent papers suggest full Bloch functions and suitable central cell donor potential corrections are essential to replicating qualitative and quantitative features of the wavefunction. In this talk, we consider a variational MEM method that can accurately predict both spectrum and wavefunction of isolated phosphorus donors. As per Gamble et. al, we employ a truncated series representation of the Bloch function with a tetrahedrally symmetric central cell correction. We use a dynamic dielectric constant, a feature commonly seen in tight-binding methods. Uniquely, we use a freely extensible basis of either all Slater- or all Gaussian-type functions. With a large basis able to capture the influence of higher energy eigenstates, this method is well positioned to consider the influence of external perturbations, such as electric field or applied strain, on the charge density. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office (W911NF1210609).

  10. Benchmarking DFT and semi-empirical methods for a reliable and cost-efficient computational screening of benzofulvene derivatives as donor materials for small-molecule organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Sara; Talamo, Maurizio Mastropasqua; Cardone, Antonio; Pastore, Mariachiara; De Angelis, Filippo

    2016-02-24

    A systematic computational investigation on the optical properties of a group of novel benzofulvene derivatives (Martinelli 2014 Org. Lett. 16 3424-7), proposed as possible donor materials in small molecule organic photovoltaic (smOPV) devices, is presented. A benchmark evaluation against experimental results on the accuracy of different exchange and correlation functionals and semi-empirical methods in predicting both reliable ground state equilibrium geometries and electronic absorption spectra is carried out. The benchmark of the geometry optimization level indicated that the best agreement with x-ray data is achieved by using the B3LYP functional. Concerning the optical gap prediction, we found that, among the employed functionals, MPW1K provides the most accurate excitation energies over the entire set of benzofulvenes. Similarly reliable results were also obtained for range-separated hybrid functionals (CAM-B3LYP and wB97XD) and for global hybrid methods incorporating a large amount of non-local exchange (M06-2X and M06-HF). Density functional theory (DFT) hybrids with a moderate (about 20-30%) extent of Hartree-Fock exchange (HFexc) (PBE0, B3LYP and M06) were also found to deliver HOMO-LUMO energy gaps which compare well with the experimental absorption maxima, thus representing a valuable alternative for a prompt and predictive estimation of the optical gap. The possibility of using completely semi-empirical approaches (AM1/ZINDO) is also discussed.

  11. Benchmarking DFT and semi-empirical methods for a reliable and cost-efficient computational screening of benzofulvene derivatives as donor materials for small-molecule organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorella, Sara; Talamo, Maurizio Mastropasqua; Cardone, Antonio; Pastore, Mariachiara; De Angelis, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    A systematic computational investigation on the optical properties of a group of novel benzofulvene derivatives (Martinelli 2014 Org. Lett. 16 3424–7), proposed as possible donor materials in small molecule organic photovoltaic (smOPV) devices, is presented. A benchmark evaluation against experimental results on the accuracy of different exchange and correlation functionals and semi-empirical methods in predicting both reliable ground state equilibrium geometries and electronic absorption spectra is carried out. The benchmark of the geometry optimization level indicated that the best agreement with x-ray data is achieved by using the B3LYP functional. Concerning the optical gap prediction, we found that, among the employed functionals, MPW1K provides the most accurate excitation energies over the entire set of benzofulvenes. Similarly reliable results were also obtained for range-separated hybrid functionals (CAM-B3LYP and wB97XD) and for global hybrid methods incorporating a large amount of non-local exchange (M06-2X and M06-HF). Density functional theory (DFT) hybrids with a moderate (about 20–30%) extent of Hartree–Fock exchange (HFexc) (PBE0, B3LYP and M06) were also found to deliver HOMO–LUMO energy gaps which compare well with the experimental absorption maxima, thus representing a valuable alternative for a prompt and predictive estimation of the optical gap. The possibility of using completely semi-empirical approaches (AM1/ZINDO) is also discussed. (paper)

  12. Effect of the moment of inertia of an electron shell on the rotational g factor of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebane, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that electron currents induced by the rotation of a molecule make a contribution not only to the magnetic moment, but also to the angular momentum of a molecule and to its moment of inertia. An improved equation for the rotational g factor of a molecule, allowing for the contribution of electrons to the moment of inertia, is given. The B 1 summation + /sub u/ excited electronic state of the hydrogen molecule is used as an example to show that the electronic contribution to the moment of inertia amounts to 0.3 to 0.5% (for H 2 and D 2 molecules, respectively) of the value of the nuclear contribution, and its consideration in calculations of g factors is obligatory

  13. Tracking Electron Uptake from a Cathode into Shewanella Cells: Implications for Energy Acquisition from Solid-Substrate Electron Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette R. Rowe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While typically investigated as a microorganism capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals or anodes, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can also facilitate electron flow from a cathode to terminal electron acceptors, such as fumarate or oxygen, thereby providing a model system for a process that has significant environmental and technological implications. This work demonstrates that cathodic electrons enter the electron transport chain of S. oneidensis when oxygen is used as the terminal electron acceptor. The effect of electron transport chain inhibitors suggested that a proton gradient is generated during cathode oxidation, consistent with the higher cellular ATP levels measured in cathode-respiring cells than in controls. Cathode oxidation also correlated with an increase in the cellular redox (NADH/FMNH2 pool determined with a bioluminescence assay, a proton uncoupler, and a mutant of proton-pumping NADH oxidase complex I. This work suggested that the generation of NADH/FMNH2 under cathodic conditions was linked to reverse electron flow mediated by complex I. A decrease in cathodic electron uptake was observed in various mutant strains, including those lacking the extracellular electron transfer components necessary for anodic-current generation. While no cell growth was observed under these conditions, here we show that cathode oxidation is linked to cellular energy acquisition, resulting in a quantifiable reduction in the cellular decay rate. This work highlights a potential mechanism for cell survival and/or persistence on cathodes, which might extend to environments where growth and division are severely limited.

  14. Tracking Electron Uptake from a Cathode into Shewanella Cells: Implications for Energy Acquisition from Solid-Substrate Electron Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Pournami; Jain, Abhiney; Pirbadian, Sahand; Okamoto, Akihiro; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT While typically investigated as a microorganism capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals or anodes, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can also facilitate electron flow from a cathode to terminal electron acceptors, such as fumarate or oxygen, thereby providing a model system for a process that has significant environmental and technological implications. This work demonstrates that cathodic electrons enter the electron transport chain of S. oneidensis when oxygen is used as the terminal electron acceptor. The effect of electron transport chain inhibitors suggested that a proton gradient is generated during cathode oxidation, consistent with the higher cellular ATP levels measured in cathode-respiring cells than in controls. Cathode oxidation also correlated with an increase in the cellular redox (NADH/FMNH2) pool determined with a bioluminescence assay, a proton uncoupler, and a mutant of proton-pumping NADH oxidase complex I. This work suggested that the generation of NADH/FMNH2 under cathodic conditions was linked to reverse electron flow mediated by complex I. A decrease in cathodic electron uptake was observed in various mutant strains, including those lacking the extracellular electron transfer components necessary for anodic-current generation. While no cell growth was observed under these conditions, here we show that cathode oxidation is linked to cellular energy acquisition, resulting in a quantifiable reduction in the cellular decay rate. This work highlights a potential mechanism for cell survival and/or persistence on cathodes, which might extend to environments where growth and division are severely limited. PMID:29487241

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the high-electron donor character of pyrido-annelated N-heterocyclic carbenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nonnenmacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rh(CO2Cl(NHC complexes of dipyrido-annelated N-heterocyclic carbenes were prepared. From the C–H coupling constant of the respective imidazolium salts and the N–C–N angle of the N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC, a weaker σ-donor character than that of typical unsaturated NHCs is expected. However, the IR stretching frequencies of their Rh(CO2Cl complexes suggest an electron-donor character even stronger than that of saturated NHCs. We ascribe this to the extremely weak π-acceptor character of the dipyrido-annelated NHCs caused by the conjugated 14 πe− system that thus allows for an enhanced Rh–CO backbonding. This extremely low π-acceptor ability is also corroborated by the 77Se NMR chemical shift of −55.8 ppm for the respective selenourea, the lowest value ever measured for imidazole derived selenoureas. DFT-calculations of the free carbene confirm the low σ-donor character by the fact that the σ-orbital of the carbene is the HOMO−1 that lies 0.58 eV below the HOMO which is located at the π-system. Natural population analysis reveals the lowest occupation of the pπ-orbital for the saturated carbene carbon atom and the highest for the pyrido-annelated carbene. Going from the free carbene to the Rh(CO2Cl(NHC complexes, the increase in occupancy of the complete π-system of the carbene ligand upon coordination is lowest for the pyrido-annelated carbene and highest for the saturated carbene.

  16. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J; Bryce, Martin R; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for -OH and -CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  17. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J., E-mail: c.lambert@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Bryce, Martin R. [Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David [BP Exploration Operating Company Limited, Chertsey Road, Sunbury on Thames, Middlesex TW16 7BP (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for –OH and –CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  18. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J.; Bryce, Martin R.; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-01

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for -OH and -CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  19. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J.; Bryce, Martin R.; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-01-01

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for –OH and –CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains

  20. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Relativistic and Electron Correlation Effects in Molecules and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on "R@lativistic and Electron Correlation Effects in Molecules and Solids", co-sponsored by Simon Fraser University (SFU) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) was held Aug 10- 21, 1992 at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada. A total of 90 lecturers and students with backgrounds in Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and various interdisciplinary subjects attended the ASI. In my proposal submitted to NATO for financial support for this ASI, I pointed out that a NATO ASI on the effects of relativity in many-electron systems was held ten years ago, [See G.L. Malli, (ed) Relativistic Effects in Atoms, Molecules and Solids, Plenum Press, Vol B87, New York, 1983]. Moreover, at a NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on advanced methods for molecular electronic structure "an assessment of state-of­ the-art of Electron Correlation ... " was carried out [see C.E. Dykstra, (ed), Advanced Theories and Computational Approa...

  1. Carbon Electrode-Molecule Junctions: A Reliable Platform for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Xin, Na; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-15

    The development of reliable approaches to integrate individual or a small collection of molecules into electrical nanocircuits, often termed "molecular electronics", is currently a research focus because it can not only overcome the increasing difficulties and fundamental limitations of miniaturization of current silicon-based electronic devices, but can also enable us to probe and understand the intrinsic properties of materials at the atomic- and/or molecular-length scale. This development might also lead to direct observation of novel effects and fundamental discovery of physical phenomena that are not accessible by traditional materials or approaches. Therefore, researchers from a variety of backgrounds have been devoting great effort to this objective, which has started to move beyond simple descriptions of charge transport and branch out in different directions, reflecting the interdisciplinarity. This Account exemplifies our ongoing interest and great effort in developing efficient lithographic methodologies capable of creating molecular electronic devices through the combination of top-down micro/nanofabrication with bottom-up molecular assembly. These devices use nanogapped carbon nanomaterials (such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene), with a particular focus on graphene, as point contacts formed by electron beam lithography and precise oxygen plasma etching. Through robust amide linkages, functional molecular bridges terminated with diamine moieties are covalently wired into the carboxylic acid-functionalized nanogaps to form stable carbon electrode-molecule junctions with desired functionalities. At the macroscopic level, to improve the contact interface between electrodes and organic semiconductors and lower Schottky barriers, we used SWCNTs and graphene as efficient electrodes to explore the intrinsic properties of organic thin films, and then build functional high-performance organic nanotransistors with ultrahigh responsivities

  2. Long-range electron transfer in zinc-phthalocyanine-oligo(phenylene-ethynylene)-based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Erik; Boixel, Julien; Fortage, Jérôme; Jacquemin, Denis; Becker, Hans-Christian; Blart, Errol; Hammarström, Leif; Odobel, Fabrice

    2012-11-05

    In the context of long-range electron transfer for solar energy conversion, we present the synthesis, photophysical, and computational characterization of two new zinc(II) phthalocyanine oligophenylene-ethynylene based donor-bride-acceptor dyads: ZnPc-OPE-AuP(+) and ZnPc-OPE-C(60). A gold(III) porphyrin and a fullerene has been used as electron accepting moieties, and the results have been compared to a previously reported dyad with a tin(IV) dichloride porphyrin as the electron acceptor (Fortage et al. Chem. Commun. 2007, 4629). The results for ZnPc-OPE-AuP(+) indicate a remarkably strong electronic coupling over a distance of more than 3 nm. The electronic coupling is manifested in both the absorption spectrum and an ultrafast rate for photoinduced electron transfer (k(PET) = 1.0 × 10(12) s(-1)). The charge-shifted state in ZnPc-OPE-AuP(+) recombines with a relatively low rate (k(BET) = 1.0 × 10(9) s(-1)). In contrast, the rate for charge transfer in the other dyad, ZnPc-OPE-C(60), is relatively slow (k(PET) = 1.1 × 10(9) s(-1)), while the recombination is very fast (k(BET) ≈ 5 × 10(10) s(-1)). TD-DFT calculations support the hypothesis that the long-lived charge-shifted state of ZnPc-OPE-AuP(+) is due to relaxation of the reduced gold porphyrin from a porphyrin ring based reduction to a gold centered reduction. This is in contrast to the faster recombination in the tin(IV) porphyrin based system (k(BET) = 1.2 × 10(10) s(-1)), where the excess electron is instead delocalized over the porphyrin ring.

  3. Studies of electron collisions with polyatomic molecules using distributed-memory parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstead, C.; Hipes, P.G.; Lima, M.A.P.; McKoy, V.

    1991-01-01

    Elastic electron scattering cross sections from 5--30 eV are reported for the molecules C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 , Si 2 H 6 , and GeH 4 , obtained using an implementation of the Schwinger multichannel method for distributed-memory parallel computer architectures. These results, obtained within the static-exchange approximation, are in generally good agreement with the available experimental data. These calculations demonstrate the potential of highly parallel computation in the study of collisions between low-energy electrons and polyatomic gases. The computational methodology discussed is also directly applicable to the calculation of elastic cross sections at higher levels of approximation (target polarization) and of electronic excitation cross sections

  4. One- and two-electron processes in collisions between hydrogen molecules and slow highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, E.; Carnes, K.D.; Tawara, H.; Ali, R.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Illescas, Clara; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2005-01-01

    A coincidence time-of-flight technique coupled with projectile charge state analysis was used to study electron capture in collisions between slow highly charged ions and hydrogen molecules. We found single electron capture with no target excitation to be the dominant process for both C 6+ projectiles at a velocity of 0.8 atomic units and Ar 11+ projectiles at v 0.63 a.u. Double electron capture and transfer excitation, however, were found to be comparable and occur about 30% of the time relative to single capture. Most projectiles (96%) auto-ionize quickly following double capture into doubly excited states. The data are compared to classical and quantum mechanical model calculations

  5. Molecule@MOF: A New Class of Opto-electronic Materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Reese E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spataru, Dan Catalin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leonard, Francois Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); He, Yuping [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavila, Vitalie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hopkins, Patrick E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are extended, nanoporous crystalline compounds consisting of metal ions interconnected by organic ligands. Their synthetic versatility suggest a disruptive class of opto - electronic materials with a high degree of electrical tunability and without the property - degrading disorder of organic conductors. In this project we determined the factors controlling charge and energy transport in MOFs and evaluated their potential for thermoelectric energy conversion. Two strategies for a chieving electronic conductivity in MOFs were explored: 1) using redox active 'guest' molecules introduced into the pores to dope the framework via charge - transfer coupling (Guest@MOF), 2) metal organic graphene analogs (MOGs) with dispersive band structur es arising from strong electronic overlap between the MOG metal ions and its coordinating linker groups. Inkjet deposition methods were developed to facilitate integration of the guest@MOF and MOG materials into practical devices.

  6. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichienberger, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  7. Short-Lived Electronically-Excited Diatomic Molecules Cooled via Supersonic Expansion from a Plasma Microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlahan, Thomas J., Jr.; Su, Rui; Eden, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Using a pulsed plasma microjet to generate short-lived, electronically-excited diatomic molecules, and subsequently ejecting them into vacuum to cool via supersonic expansion, we are able to monitor the cooling of molecules having radiative lifetimes as low as 16 ns. Specifically, we report on the rotational cooling of He_2 molecules in the d^3Σ_u^+, e^3Π_g, and f^3Σ_u^+ states, which have lifetimes of 25 ns, 67 ns, and 16 ns, respectively. The plasma microjet is driven with a 2.6 kV, 140 ns high-voltage pulse (risetime of 20 ns) which, when combined with a high-speed optical imaging system, allows the nonequilibrium rotational distribution for these molecular states to be monitored as they cool from 1200 K to below 250 K with spatial and temporal resolutions of below 10 μm and 10 ns, respectively. The spatial and temporal resolution afforded by this system also allows the observation of excitation transfer between the f^3Σ_u^+ state and the lower lying d^3Σ_u^+ and e^3Π_g states. The extension of this method to other electronically excited diatomics with excitation energies >5 eV will also be discussed.

  8. Responses and mechanisms of positive electron affinity molecules in the N2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector and the electron-capture detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Very little knowledge has been acquired in the past on the mechanistic pathway by which molecules respond in the N 2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector. An attempt is made here to elucidate the response mechanism of the detector. The basic response mechanisms are known for the electron capture detector, and an attempt is made to identify the certain mechanism by which selected molecules respond. The resonance electron capture rate constant has been believed to be temperature independent, and investigations of the temperature dependence of electron capture responses are presented. Mechanisms for the N 2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector have been proposed by examining the detector response to positive electron affinity molecules and by measurement of the ions produced by the detector. Electron capture mechanisms for selected molecules have been proposed by examining their temperature dependent responses in the electron capture detector and negative ion mass spectra of the samples. In studies of the resonance electron capture rate constant, the relative responses of selected positive electron affinity molecules and their temperature dependent responses were investigated. Positive electron affinity did not guarantee large responses in the N 2 mode thermionic ionization detector. High mass ions were measured following ionization of samples in the detector. Responses in the electron capture detector varied with temperature and electron affinity

  9. Statistical Exploration of Electronic Structure of Molecules from Quantum Monte-Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhat, Mr; Zubarev, Dmitry; Lester, Jr., William A.

    2010-12-22

    In this report, we present results from analysis of Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulation data with the goal of determining internal structure of a 3N-dimensional phase space of an N-electron molecule. We are interested in mining the simulation data for patterns that might be indicative of the bond rearrangement as molecules change electronic states. We examined simulation output that tracks the positions of two coupled electrons in the singlet and triplet states of an H2 molecule. The electrons trace out a trajectory, which was analyzed with a number of statistical techniques. This project was intended to address the following scientific questions: (1) Do high-dimensional phase spaces characterizing electronic structure of molecules tend to cluster in any natural way? Do we see a change in clustering patterns as we explore different electronic states of the same molecule? (2) Since it is hard to understand the high-dimensional space of trajectories, can we project these trajectories to a lower dimensional subspace to gain a better understanding of patterns? (3) Do trajectories inherently lie in a lower-dimensional manifold? Can we recover that manifold? After extensive statistical analysis, we are now in a better position to respond to these questions. (1) We definitely see clustering patterns, and differences between the H2 and H2tri datasets. These are revealed by the pamk method in a fairly reliable manner and can potentially be used to distinguish bonded and non-bonded systems and get insight into the nature of bonding. (2) Projecting to a lower dimensional subspace ({approx}4-5) using PCA or Kernel PCA reveals interesting patterns in the distribution of scalar values, which can be related to the existing descriptors of electronic structure of molecules. Also, these results can be immediately used to develop robust tools for analysis of noisy data obtained during QMC simulations (3) All dimensionality reduction and estimation techniques that we tried seem to

  10. Correlation between the Inhibition of Positronium Formation by Scavenger Molecules, and Chemical Reaction Rate of Electrons with these Molecules in Nonpolar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (VOo)f electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found...... for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of Vo had a maximum for C2HsBr, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V, for CC14. The inhibition coefficient for C2H5Br in a 1:l molar tetramethylsilane......-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation...

  11. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  12. Electron attachment to molecules and clusters of atmospheric relevance: oxygen and ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejcik, S.; Cicman, P.; Skalny, J.; Kiendler, A.; Stampfli, P.; Maerk, T.D.; Illenberger, E.; Chu, Y.; Stamatovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    Highly monochromatized electrons are used in a crossed beams experiment to investigate electron attachment to oxygen clusters (O 2 )-n at electron energies from approximately zero eV up to 2 eV. At energies close to zero the attachment cross section for the reaction (O 2 ) n + e → O 2 - varies inversely with the electron energy, indicative of s-wave electron capture to (O 2 ) n . Peaks in the attachment cross section present at higher energies can be ascribed to vibrational levels of the oxygen anion. The vibrational spacings observed can be quantitatively accounted for. In addition electron attachment to ozone and mixed oxygen/ozone clusters has been studied in the energy range up to 4 eV. Absolute attachment cross sections for both fragment ions anions, O - and O 2 - , from ozone could be deduced. Moreover, despite the initially large excess of oxygen molecules in the neutral oxygen/ozone clusters the dominant attachment products are un-dissociated cluster ions (O 3 ) m - including the O 3 - monomer while oxygen cluster ions (O 2 ) n appear with comparatively low intensity. (authors)

  13. Effective electronic-only Kohn–Sham equations for the muonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    A set of effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham (EKS) equations are derived for the muonic molecules (containing a positively charged muon), which are completely equivalent to the coupled electronic-muonic Kohn-Sham equations derived previously within the framework of the Nuclear-Electronic Orbital density functional theory (NEO-DFT). The EKS equations contain effective non-coulombic external potentials depending on parameters describing muon vibration, which are optimized during the solution of the EKS equations making muon KS orbital reproducible. It is demonstrated that the EKS equations are derivable from a certain class of effective electronic Hamiltonians through applying the usual Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revealing a duality between the NEO-DFT and the effective electronic-only DFT methodologies. The EKS equations are computationally applied to a small set of muoniated organic radicals and it is demonstrated that a mean effective potential maybe derived for this class of muonic species while an electronic basis set is also designed for the muon. These computational ingredients are then applied to muoniated ferrocenyl radicals, which had been previously detected experimentally through adding muonium atom to ferrocene. In line with previous computational studies, from the six possible species the staggered conformer, where the muon is attached to the exo position of the cyclopentadienyl ring, is deduced to be the most stable ferrocenyl radical.

  14. Effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham equations for the muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-03-28

    A set of effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham (EKS) equations are derived for the muonic molecules (containing a positively charged muon), which are completely equivalent to the coupled electronic-muonic Kohn-Sham equations derived previously within the framework of the nuclear-electronic orbital density functional theory (NEO-DFT). The EKS equations contain effective non-coulombic external potentials depending on parameters describing the muon's vibration, which are optimized during the solution of the EKS equations making the muon's KS orbital reproducible. It is demonstrated that the EKS equations are derivable from a certain class of effective electronic Hamiltonians through applying the usual Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revealing a "duality" between the NEO-DFT and the effective electronic-only DFT methodologies. The EKS equations are computationally applied to a small set of muoniated organic radicals and it is demonstrated that a mean effective potential may be derived for this class of muonic species while an electronic basis set is also designed for the muon. These computational ingredients are then applied to muoniated ferrocenyl radicals, which had been previously detected experimentally through adding a muonium atom to ferrocene. In line with previous computational studies, from the six possible species, the staggered conformer, where the muon is attached to the exo position of the cyclopentadienyl ring, is deduced to be the most stable ferrocenyl radical.

  15. Calculations on Electron Capture in Low Energy Ion-Molecule Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancil, P.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zygelman, B. [W.M. Keck Lab. for Computational Physics, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Kirby, K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Recent progress on the application of a quantal, molecular-orbital, close-coupling approach to the calculation of electron capture in collisions of multiply charged ions with molecules is discussed. Preliminary results for single electron capture by N{sup 2+} with H{sub 2} are presented. Electron capture by multiply charged ions colliding with H{sub 2} is an important process in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It provides a recombination mechanism for multiply charged ions in x-ray ionized astronomical environments which may have sparse electron and atomic hydrogen abundances. In the divertor region of a tokamak fusion device, charge exchange of impurity ions with H{sub 2} plays a role in the ionization balance and the production of radiative energy loss leading to cooling, X-ray and ultraviolet auroral emission from Jupiter is believed to be due to charge exchange of O and S ions with H{sub 2} in the Jovian atmosphere. Solar wind ions interacting with cometary molecules may have produced the x-rays observed from Comet Hyakutake. In order to model and understand the behavior of these environments, it is necessary to obtain total, electronic state-selective (ESS), and vibrational (or rotational) state-selective (VSS) capture cross sections for collision energies as low as 10 meV/amu to as high as 100 keV/amu in some instances. Fortunately, charge transfer with molecular targets has received considerable experimental attention. Numerous measurements have been made with flow tubes, ion traps, and ion beams. Flow tube and ion trap studies generally provide information on rate coefficients for temperatures between 800 K and 20,000 K. In this article, we report on the progress of our group in implementing a quantum-mechanical Molecular Orbital Close Coupling (MOCC) approach to the study of electron capture by multiply charged ions in collisions with molecules. We illustrate this with a preliminary investigation of Single Electron Capture (SEC) by N{sup 2+} with H

  16. Nanotubule and Tour Molecule Based Molecular Electronics: Suggestion for a Hybrid Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical attempts and results indicate two distinct broad pathways towards future molecular electronic devices and architectures. The first is the approach via Tour type ladder molecules and their junctions which can be fabricated with solution phase chemical approaches. Second are fullerenes or nanotubules and their junctions which may have better conductance, switching and amplifying characteristics but can not be made through well controlled and defined chemical means. A hybrid approach combining the two pathways to take advantage of the characteristics of both is suggested. Dimension and scale of such devices would be somewhere in between isolated molecule and nanotubule based devices but it maybe possible to use self-assembly towards larger functional and logicalunits.

  17. Electron transport in liquids: effect of unbalancing the methane molecule by deuteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriano, M.A.; Freeman, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The mobility of electrons in nonpolar liquids is strongly dependent on the molecular shape. In spherelike methane the mobility is three orders of magnitude greater than in the rodlike ethane. To investigate the enormous gap between methane and ethane, the effect of slightly perturbing the symmetry of the methane molecule by progressive deuterium substitution was studied. At temperatures near the triple point (T/Tsub(c) approximately 0.48) and near the mobility maximum (T/Tsub(c) approximately 0.93) the mobilities change in the order: CH 4 > CH 3 D > CH 2 D 2 3 approximately CD 4 . The differences are related to the symmetries of the molecules and to the rotational motions. (Authors)

  18. Differential and total cross sections for the ionization of water molecule by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houamer, S.; Dal Cappello, C.; Mansouri, A.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical approach is presented to calculate multiply differential and total cross sections of the ionization of H 2 O molecule in the vapour phase. The wave function of the target is described by molecular orbitals consisting of a linear combination of slater type atomic orbitals centered on the heaviest atom which is the oxygen atom in this case. The calculations are carried out in the first Born approximation where the projectile is described by a plane wave while the ejected electron is described by a coulomb wave taking into account its interaction with the residual ion. The spherical average over the Euler solid angle due to the randomly oriented gaseous target molecule is carried out analytically using the rotation matrix properties. The differential and total cross sections are thus evaluated without any special difficulty and compared with experiments and distorted wave calculations. Fair agreements are observed

  19. Small molecules make big differences: molecular doping effects on electronic and optical properties of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Yu; Tang, Qing; He, Peng; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Panwen

    2015-01-01

    Systematical computations on the density functional theory were performed to investigate the adsorption of three typical organic molecules, tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), on the surface of phosphorene monolayers and thicker layers. There exist considerable charge transfer and strong non-covalent interaction between these molecules and phosphorene. In particular, the band gap of phosphorene decreases dramatically due to the molecular modification and can be further tuned by applying an external electric field. Meanwhile, surface molecular modification has proven to be an effective way to enhance the light harvesting of phosphorene in different directions. Our results predict a flexible method toward modulating the electronic and optical properties of phosphorene and shed light on its experimental applications. (paper)

  20. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  1. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  2. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  3. Kinematically complete study on electron impact ionisation of aligned hydrogen molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senftleben, Arne

    2009-10-28

    Within the work presented here, single ionisation of spatially aligned hydrogen molecules by 200 eV electrons was studied in a kinematically complete experiment. For the first time, a comprehensive set of fully differential cross sections (FDCS) was obtained for this process on a molecular target. The direction of the internuclear axis was derived from the fragment emission of post-collision dissociation of the residual H{sub 2}{sup +} ion. Therefore, a protonic fragment was detected in coincidence with the two final-state electrons using a dedicated reaction microscope and sophisticated data analysis. For direct ionisation into the ionic ground state, existing theoretical cross sections for aligned molecules were tested. Additionally, we observed molecular frame angular distributions of Auger electrons emitted through dissociative autoionisation of H{sub 2}. Earlier findings of kinematically incomplete experiments were reproduced, but the FDCS reveal structures so far unknown. Furthermore, for random alignment, differential cross sections at two distinct values of the mean internuclear distance were obtained, providing new arguments in the current discussion on the nature of discrepancies observed between atomic and molecular collisions. (orig.)

  4. Synthesis and Studies of Sulfur-Containing Heterocyclic Molecules for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzanti, Virginia

    This work describes the synthesis and studies of sulfur containing π conjugated heterocycles, which are considered interesting motifs in the field of molecular electronics. The first project, which is covered in Chapter 1, concerns the functionalization of tetracycle dibenzo[bc,fg][1,4]dithiapent......This work describes the synthesis and studies of sulfur containing π conjugated heterocycles, which are considered interesting motifs in the field of molecular electronics. The first project, which is covered in Chapter 1, concerns the functionalization of tetracycle dibenzo[bc,fg][1......,4]dithiapentalene (DDP). Attempts to prepare the S-O analog are also discussed. Chapter 2, focuses upon the studies performed on DDP and other sulfur containing π conjugated organic molecules. Organic Field Effect Transistor devices were fabricated and their performances were evaluated. Chapter 3 entails...... the synthesis of dimeric structures of redox active system tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Molecules with different conjugation pathways bridging two TTFs were synthesized and studied using CV and DPV in order to probe the electronic interaction between these two redox units. The last aspect of this thesis, which...

  5. Interaction of multicharged ions with molecules (CO2, C60) by coincident electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.

    2001-01-01

    First results for the investigation of electron capture processes in collisions between multicharged ions and molecule targets using electron spectroscopy in coincidence with charged fragments, are presented. It is shown that a much more detailed investigation of the capture reaction can be achieved using molecular instead of heavy atomic targets provided that an analysis of the target dissociation is made. The collisional systems 18 O 8+ +Ar, CO 2 and C 60 have been studied at 80 keV. Non coincident electron spectra as well as first results of double or triple coincidence experiments are discussed. Kinetic energy distributions of the C n + fragments (n=1 to 8) produced in multiple capture processes from C 60 target are given. A detailed investigation of the double capture process with CO 2 molecule allows the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions (KERD) which characterize the dissociation of CO 2 2+ molecular ions; our results are found to be very similar to those measured in double photoionisation experiments. (orig.)

  6. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C 2 H 2 S 2 −2 /C 2 H 2 S 2 •− ) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C 2 H 2 S 2 •− , whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol −1 lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V

  7. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: the importance of chemical intuition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Eric A C; Burns, Thomas D; Boyd, Russell J

    2014-05-14

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C2H2S2(-2)/C2H2S2(•-)) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C2H2S2(•-), whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71-2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

  8. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J., E-mail: russell.boyd@dal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup −2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}, whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol{sup −1} lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

  9. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of electrons in Au clusters capped with dodecanethiol molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamanaka, Y.; Fukagawa, K.; Tai, Y.; Murakami, J.; Nakamura, A.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated electron relaxation dynamics of size-selected Au clusters capped by dodecanethiol molecules in the cluster sizes of 28-142 atoms using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Absorption spectra of 28-71-atom clusters show discrete peaks due to the optical transitions between quantized states, while an absorption band due to the surface plasmon is observed in 142-atom clusters. In the differential absorption spectra measured by the pump-probe experiments, a large redshift of 140 meV lasting over 10 ps and absorption bleaching decaying within 2 ps are observed at the absorption peaks of 28-atom clusters. The redshift is ascribed to a charge transfer between Au clusters and dodecanethiol molecules adsorbed on the cluster surface, and the bleaching is due to blocking of the optical transitions between the ground state and the occupied electronic states due to the Pauli's-exclusion principle. Such behavior is in contrast to the 142-atom clusters, where the cooling of hot electrons generated by photo-excitation determines the relaxation dynamics. These results indicate molecular properties of the 28-atom Au cluster-dodecanethiol system

  10. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  11. An ultrafast spectroscopic and quantum mechanical investigation of multiple emissions in push-pull pyridinium derivatives bearing different electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, B; Benassi, E; Cesaretti, A; Fortuna, C G; Spalletti, A; Barone, V; Elisei, F

    2015-08-28

    A joint experimental and theoretical approach, involving state-of-the-art femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion measurements and quantum mechanical computations including vibronic effects, was employed to get a deep insight into the excited state dynamics of two cationic dipolar chromophores (Donor-π-Acceptor(+)) where the electron deficient portion is a N-methyl pyridinium and the electron donor a trimethoxyphenyl or a pyrene, respectively. The ultrafast spectroscopic investigation, and the time resolved area normalised emission spectra in particular, revealed a peculiar multiple emissive behaviour and allowed the distinct emitting states to be remarkably distinguished from solvation dynamics, occurring in water in a similar timescale. The two and three emissions experimentally detected for the trimethoxyphenyl and pyrene derivatives, respectively, were associated with specific local emissive minima in the potential energy surface of S1 on the ground of quantum-mechanical calculations. A low polar and planar Locally Excited (LE) state together with a highly polar and Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) state is identified to be responsible for the dual emission of the trimethoxyphenyl compound. Interestingly, the more complex photobehaviour of the pyrenyl derivative was explained considering the contribution to the fluorescence coming not only from the LE and TICT states but also from a nearly Planar Intramolecular Charge Transfer (PICT) state, with both the TICT and the PICT generated from LE by progressive torsion around the quasi-single bond between the methylpyridinium and the ethene bridge. These findings point to an interconversion between rotamers for the pyrene compound taking place in its excited state against the Non-equilibrated Excited Rotamers (NEER) principle.

  12. Measurement and control of detailed electronic properties in a single molecule break junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Hamill, Joseph; Zhou, Jianfeng; Guo, Cunlan; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-01-01

    The lack of detailed experimental controls has been one of the major obstacles hindering progress in molecular electronics. While large fluctuations have been occurring in the experimental data, specific details, related mechanisms, and data analysis techniques are in high demand to promote our physical understanding at the single-molecule level. A series of modulations we recently developed, based on traditional scanning probe microscopy break junctions (SPMBJs), have helped to discover significant properties in detail which are hidden in the contact interfaces of a single-molecule break junction (SMBJ). For example, in the past we have shown that the correlated force and conductance changes under the saw tooth modulation and stretch-hold mode of PZT movement revealed inherent differences in the contact geometries of a molecular junction. In this paper, using a bias-modulated SPMBJ and utilizing emerging data analysis techniques, we report on the measurement of the altered alignment of the HOMO of benzene molecules with changing the anchoring group which coupled the molecule to metal electrodes. Further calculations based on Landauer fitting and transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) demonstrated the effects of modulated bias on the location of the frontier molecular orbitals. Understanding the alignment of the molecular orbitals with the Fermi level of the electrodes is essential for understanding the behaviour of SMBJs and for the future design of more complex devices. With these modulations and analysis techniques, fruitful information has been found about the nature of the metal-molecule junction, providing us insightful clues towards the next step for in-depth study.

  13. Simulation of solution phase electron transfer in a compact donor-acceptor dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Wang, Lee-Ping; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2011-10-27

    Charge separation (CS) and charge recombination (CR) rates in photosynthetic architectures are difficult to control, yet their ratio can make or break photon-to-current conversion efficiencies. A rational design approach to the enhancement of CS over CR requires a mechanistic understanding of the underlying electron-transfer (ET) process, including the role of the environment. Toward this goal, we introduce a QM/MM protocol for ET simulations and use it to characterize CR in the formanilide-anthraquinone dyad (FAAQ). Our simulations predict fast recombination of the charge-transfer excited state, in agreement with recent experiments. The computed electronic couplings show an electronic state dependence and are weaker in solution than in the gas phase. We explore the role of cis-trans isomerization on the CR kinetics, and we find strong correlation between the vertical energy gaps of the full simulations and a collective solvent polarization coordinate. Our approach relies on constrained density functional theory to obtain accurate diabatic electronic states on the fly for molecular dynamics simulations, while orientational and electronic polarization of the solvent is captured by a polarizable force field based on a Drude oscillator model. The method offers a unified approach to the characterization of driving forces, reorganization energies, electronic couplings, and nonlinear solvent effects in light-harvesting systems.

  14. A step towards molecular electronics. The ferrocene molecule on a metal-semiconductor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeidel, Jedrzej Piotr

    2012-05-14

    In the first part, the domain walls on Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) are investigated and structural and electronic model are introduced and discussed. Furthermore, the temperature dependence is investigated, showing the Peierls-type transition along the domain wall chain. In the second part, the high resolution STM data of the local adsorption geometry of FDT on Ag {radical}(3)< x {radical}(3) are presented. The comparison of theoretical results obtained for the molecule, on Ag(lll) and Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) surfaces, with STM measurement at RT, support the chemisorption with thiolate bonds to the Ag trimers on the HCT surface. The molecule is aligned with the Cp-Fe-Cp axis parallel to the surface, while the rotational freedom of the molecule is limited due to chemisorption. The presented adsorption model is supported by experiment and simulation. In the third part, the perfect Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) is prepared and investigated by means of STM, focusing on structural and electronic characteristics. The different reconstructions and amounts of Ag on Si are investigated; the submonolayer amounts, Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) wetting layers, perfect epitaxial layers and multilayer systems. The influence of wetting layer on electronic character of deposited Ag nanostructures is studied. The occurrence of effective single and double barriers in tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy for the Ag {radical}(3) x <{radical}(3) system is investigated in the monolayer regime by varying the measurement and preparation conditions. The Coulomb Blockade oscillations are found for granular multilayer Ag films, whereas similar structures with existence of Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) show only a single barrier characteristic. The vertical transport properties in this metal/ semiconductor system depend on the structure and bonding on the atomic scale and on the lateral two-dimensional properties of the interface.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy study of vertical quantum dots molecules grown by droplet epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, D., E-mail: david.hernandez@uca.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Herrera, M.; Sales, D.L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alonso-Gonzalez, P.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8 (PTM), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P.L. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Molina, S.I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    The compositional distribution of InAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs capped InAs quantum dots has been studied in this work. Upper quantum dots are nucleated preferentially on top of the quantum dots underneath, which have been nucleated by droplet epitaxy. The growth process of these nanostructures, which are usually called as quantum dots molecules, has been explained. In order to understand this growth process, the analysis of the strain has been carried out from a 3D model of the nanostructure built from transmission electron microscopy images sensitive to the composition.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy study of vertical quantum dots molecules grown by droplet epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, D.; Herrera, M.; Sales, D.L.; Alonso-Gonzalez, P.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P.L.; Molina, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    The compositional distribution of InAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs capped InAs quantum dots has been studied in this work. Upper quantum dots are nucleated preferentially on top of the quantum dots underneath, which have been nucleated by droplet epitaxy. The growth process of these nanostructures, which are usually called as quantum dots molecules, has been explained. In order to understand this growth process, the analysis of the strain has been carried out from a 3D model of the nanostructure built from transmission electron microscopy images sensitive to the composition.

  17. Valence electronic structure of the indene molecule: Experiment vs. GW calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umari, P.; Stenuit, G. [CNR-IOM DEMOCRITOS Theory Elettra Group, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Castellarin-Cudia, C.; Feyer, V.; Di Santo, G.; Goldoni, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Borghetti, P.; Sangaletti, L. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Brescia (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    We investigate the valence electronic properties in the gas phase of the indene molecule, which is one of the simplest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron light and through first-principles calculations using a many-body perturbation theory GW approach. We found an excellent agreement between theory and experiment. This allows us to assign to the peaks appearing in the photoemission spectrum the calculated molecular orbitals. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Electronic excitation and ionic dissociation of the vanillin molecule: photoionization with flavor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt, A Moreno; De Souza, G G B; Bernini, R B; Coutinho, L H

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of vanillin molecule were investigated by different excitation and ionization techniques. The Ionic fragmentation mechanisms were studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a function of the energy of the incident radiation in the valence energy region and the inner and core levels. It was stablished as a general feature that the ruptures related to the oxygen atoms are predominant at all energies. The resonances and ionization potential of the oxygen 1s was also determined by NEXAFS spectra. (paper)

  19. Soluble Electrochromic Polymers Incorporating Benzoselenadiazole and Electron Donor Units (Carbazole or Fluorene: Synthesis and Electronic-Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Xu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of π-conjugated polymers containing alternating benzoselenadiazole (BSe-bi(thiophene derivative-carbazole or benzoththiadiazole (BSe-bi(thiophene derivative-fluorene units were designed and synthesized. Thiophene derivatives, namely 3-hexylthiophene, 3,4-bihexyloxythiophene, and 3,4-bioctyloxythiophene, were used as the π-bridges of the polymers. The polymers were characterized in detail in terms of their thermal stabilities, cyclic voltammograms, UV-Vis absorption, spectroelectrochemistry, dynamic switching property and so forth. The alkoxy thiophene π-bridged polymers have lower onset oxidation potentials and bandgaps than that of their corresponding alkyl thiophene π-bridged polymers. The selection of the donor units between the carbazole and the fluorene units has nearly no effect on the bandgaps and colors as well as the onset oxidation potentials of the polymers. The increase in the length of the side alkyl chains on the thiophene ring caused a slight increase in the polymer bandgap, which may be caused by the space hindrance effect. The dynamic switching abilities of the polymers were obtained by the chronoabsorptometry method, and the results also suggested that the alkoxy thiophene-containing polymers (as π-bridges have higher contrast ratios than the corresponding alkyl thiophene-containing polymers. Furthermore, the increase in the length of the side alkyl chain might have a detrimental effect on the optical contrast ratios of the polymers.

  20. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  1. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yao, Fubing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H{sub 2} on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H{sub 2} as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  2. Correlation of paramagnetic states and molecular structure in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: The symmetry of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; Budil, D.E.; Gast, P.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The orientation of the principal axes of the primary electron donor triplet state measured in single crystals of photosynthetic reaction centers is compared to the x-ray structures of the bacteria Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26 and Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis. The primary donor of Rps. viridis is significantly different from that of Rb. sphaeroides. The measured directions of the axes indicate that triplet excitation is almost completely localized on the L-subunit half of the dimer in Rps. viridis but is more symmetrically distributed on the dimeric donor in Rb. sphaeroides R-26. The large reduction of the zero field splitting parameters relative to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll triplet in vitro suggests significant participation of asymmetrical charge transfer electronic configurations in the special pair triplet state of both organisms

  3. Comparison of two screening corrections to the additivity rule for the calculation of electron scattering from polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Rosado, J.; Illana, A.; Garcia, G.

    2010-01-01

    The SCAR and EGAR procedures have been proposed in order to extend to lower energies the applicability of the additivity rule for calculation of electron-molecule total cross sections. Both those approximate treatments arise after considering geometrical screening corrections due to partial overlapping of atoms in the molecule, as seen by the incident electrons. The main features, results and limitations of both treatments are put here in comparison by means of their application to some different sized species.

  4. Electron-impact ionization of oriented molecules using the time-dependent close-coupling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, J [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pindzola, M S, E-mail: jcolgan@lanl.gov [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    An overview is given on recent progress on computing triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of the hydrogen molecule using a time-dependent close-coupling approach. Our calculations, when averaged over all molecular orientations, are generally in very good agreement with (e,2e) measurements made on H{sub 2}, where the molecular orientation is unknown, for a range of incident energies and outgoing electron angles and energies. In this paper, we present TDCS for ionization of H{sub 2} at specific molecular orientations. It is hoped that this study will help stimulate future measurements of TDCS from oriented H{sub 2} at medium impact energies.

  5. The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China)

    2008-06-02

    The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule is studied theoretically in this work. Brenner's 'second generation' empirical potential is used to describe the many-body short-range interatomic interactions for C{sub 60} in the molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that C{sub 60} can be compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31 before collapsing. Electronic transport under an applied bias is calculated by using a self-consistent field approach coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The transmission probability, conductance gap, and conductance spectrum are found to be sensitive to the compression. The peak value of conductance decreases with the increase of strain until the C{sub 60} is compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31.

  6. Time delay for resonant vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauyacq, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the time delay associated with vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collision is presented. It consists of a direct study of the time dependence of the process for three model systems. An electron wave packet, that is narrow in time, is sent on the target and the amplitudes in the different inelastic channels are studied as functions of time. The time delay is found to correspond to very different time effects: broadenings, shifts in time of the wave packet, but also complex distortions that cannot be represented by a time delay. The direct analysis of the scattered wave also provides new insights into the vibrational excitation process. It should be a useful tool to analyze complex collision processes

  7. Percolation model for electron conduction in films of metal nanoparticles linked by organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, K.H.; Herrmann, J.; Raguse, B.; Baxter, G.; Reda, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We have investigated theoretically and experimentally the temperature dependence of the conductance of films of Au nanoparticles linked by alkane dithiol molecules in the temperature range between 5 K and 300 K. Conduction in these films is due to tunneling of single electrons between neighbouring metal nanoparticles. During tunnelling an electron has to overcome the Coulomb charging energy. We find that the observed temperature dependence of the conductance is non-Arrhenius like and can be described in terms of a percolation theory which takes account of disorder in the system. Disorder in our nanoparticle films is caused by variations in the nanoparticle size, fluctuations in the separation gaps between adjacent nanoparticles and by offset charges. To explain in detail our experimental data, a wide distribution of separation gaps and charging energies is needed. We find that a wide Coulomb charging energy distribution can arise from random offset charges even if the nanoparticle size distribution is narrow

  8. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized...... electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...

  9. Parent state swapping of resonances in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stibbe, D.T.

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio R-matrix scattering calculations are presented for electron-H 2 as a function of H 2 bond length. It is found that 2 Σ u + and 2Π u resonances in the 10 eV region appear to be associated with multiple 'parent' target states and that the resonances can swap parents as a function of internuclear separation. It is shown how these phenomena provide an explanation for the inconsistencies in previous assignments of resonances in this region and other anomalies such as pronounced isotopic effects. It is suggested that this parent swapping behaviour is likely to be a common feature of electron-impact excitation of other molecules and is particularly important for any models that include nuclear motion. (author)

  10. Influence of excited molecules on electron swarm transport coefficients and gas discharge kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Z.L.; Jovanovic, J.V.; Raspopovic, Z.M.; Bzenic, S.A.; Vrhovac, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we study different effects of excited molecules on swarm parameters, electron energy distribution functions and gas discharge modeling. First we discuss a possible experiment in parahydrogen to resolve the discrepancy in hydrogen vibrational excitation cross section data. Negative differential conductivity (NDC) is a kinetic phenomenon which manifests itself in a particular dependence of the drift velocity on E=N and it is affected by superelastic collisions with excited states. A complete kinetic scheme for argon required to model excited state densities in gas discharges is also described. These results are used to explain experiments in capacitively and inductively coupled RF plasmas used for processing. The paper illustrates the application of atomic and molecular collision data, swarm data and the theoretical techniques in modeling of gas discharges with large abundances of excited molecules. It is pointed out that swarm experiments with excited molecules are lacking and that there is a shortage of reliable data, while the numerical procedures are sufficiently developed to include all the important effects. (authors). 59 refs., 12 figs

  11. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE3, while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc, methyl sulfide (SMe, pyridyl (Py and amine (NH2. The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current–voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green’s function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings.

  12. Quasiclassical R-matrix theory of inelastic processes in collisions of electrons with HCl molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    The R-matrix theory for the vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment in e-HCl collisions is developed. Only one pole in the R-matrix expansion is included. This allows for making a connection between the R-matrix and the nonlocal-complex-potential theories, and for obtaining the expression for the dissociative-attachment cross section without using the R-matrix radius in the internuclear coordinate. All matrix elements in the equation for the vibrational-excitation and dissociative-attachment amplitudes are calculated using the quasiclassical approach. We study how the results depend on the number of vibrational levels of the neutral molecule included in the theory and show how to exclude the vibrational continuum by a modification of the nonlocal-complex potential. The results for the vibrational-excitation cross sections are extremely sensitive to the behavior of the R-matrix potential curve near the point of crossing this curve with the potential curve of the neutral molecule. Particularly in some cases the cross section at the threshold peak exhibits the boomerang oscillations earlier found for HCl by Domcke [in Aspects of Electron-Molecule Scattering and Photoionization, edited by A. Herzenberg (AIP, New Haven, 1989), p. 169]. The dissociative-attachment cross sections are in reasonable agreement with experiment and with other theories

  13. The Role of Low-Energy Electrons in Astrochemistry: A Tale of Two Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumainayagam, Chris; Cambell, Jyoti; Leon Sanche, Michael Boyer, and Petra Swiderek.

    2016-06-01

    In the interstellar medium, UV photolysis of ice mantles encasing dust grains is thought to be the mechanism that drives the synthesis of “complex” molecules. The source of this reaction-initiating UV light is assumed to be local because externally-sourced UV radiation cannot pass through the ice-containing dark, dense molecular clouds. Externally sourced cosmic rays (Emax ~ 1020 eV), in addition to producing UV light within these clouds, also produce large numbers of low-energy (≤ 20 eV) secondary electrons. The goal of our studies is to understand the low-energy electron-induced processes that occur when high-energy cosmic rays interact with interstellar ices. Using electron stimulated desorption (ESD), post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), we have investigated the radiolysis initiated by electrons in condensed methanol and ammonia at ~ 90 K under ultrahigh vacuum (1×10-9 Torr) conditions. We have identified fifteen low-energy (≤ 20 eV) electron-induced methanol radiolysis products, many of which have been previously identified as being formed by methanol UV photolysis in the interstellar medium. We have also found evidence for the electron-induced formation from ammonia of hydrazine (N2H4), diazene (N2H2), cyclotriazane/triazene (N3H3) and triazane (N3H5). We have investigated the reaction yields’ dependence on film thickness, irradiation time, incident current, electron energy, and metal substrate. These results provide a basis from which we can begin to understand the mechanisms by which methanol and ammonia can form more complex species in cosmic ices. Studies such as ours may ultimately help us better understand the initial stages of the genesis of life.

  14. Limitations of superfluid helium droplets as host system revealed by electronic spectroscopy of embedded molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premke, Tobias

    2016-02-19

    Superfluid helium nanodroplets serve a unique cryogenic host system ideal to prepare cold molecules and clusters. Structures as well as dynamic processes can be examined by means of high resolution spectroscopy. Dopant spectra are accompanied by helium-induced spectroscopic features which reveal information on the dopant to helium interaction. For this reason the experimental research focuses on the investigation of such helium-induced effects in order to provide new information on the microsolvation inside the droplets. Since the quantitative understanding of helium-induced spectral features is essential to interpret molecular spectra recorded in helium droplets, this study contributes further experimental details on microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. For this purpose two contrary systems were examined by means of high resolution electronic spectroscopy. The first one, phthalocyanine (Pc), is a planar organic molecule offering a huge and planar surface to the helium atoms and thus, the non-superfluid helium solvation layer can form different structures. The second system is iodine and in contrast to Pc it is of simple molecular shape. That means that in this case different complex structures of the non-superfluid helium solvation layer and the dopant can be expected to be avoided. Thus, both molecules should show clear differences in their microsolvation behavior. In this work a detailed examination of different spectroscopic properties of phthalocyanine is given by means of fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectroscopy. It raises legitimate doubts about the assignment of experimentally observed signals to features predicted by the model of the microsolvation. Even though there are no experimental observations which disprove the empirical model for the solvation in helium droplets, an unambiguous assignment of the helium-induced spectroscopic structures is often not possible. In the second part of this work, the investigation of the

  15. Boltzmann equation analysis of electron-molecule collision cross sections in water vapor and ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousfi, M.; Benabdessadok, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    Sets of electron-molecule collision cross sections for H 2 O and NH 3 have been determined from a classical technique of electron swarm parameter unfolding. This deconvolution method is based on a simplex algorithm using a powerful multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis established in the framework of the classical hydrodynamic approximation. It is well adapted for the simulation of the different classes of swarm experiments (i.e., time resolved, time of flight, and steady state experiments). The sets of collision cross sections that exist in the literature are reviewed and analyzed. Fitted sets of cross sections are determined for H 2 O and NH 3 which exhibit features characteristic of polar molecules such as high rotational excitation collision cross sections. The hydrodynamic swarm parameters (i.e., drift velocity, longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients, ionization and attachment coefficients) calculated from the fitted sets are in excellent agreement with the measured ones. These sets are finally used to calculate the transport and reaction coefficients needed for discharge modeling in two cases of typical gas mixtures for which experimental swarm data are very sparse or nonexistent (i.e., flue gas mixtures and gas mixtures for rf plasma surface treatment). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Visualizing electron dynamics in organic materials: Charge transport through molecules and angular resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Stephan

    Being able to visualize the dynamics of electrons in organic materials is a fascinating perspective. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory allow to realize this hope, as they visualize the flow of charge through molecular structures in real-space and real-time. We here present results on two fundamental processes: Photoemission from organic semiconductor molecules and charge transport through molecular structures. In the first part we demonstrate that angular resolved photoemission intensities - from both theory and experiment - can often be interpreted as a visualization of molecular orbitals. However, counter-intuitive quantum-mechanical electron dynamics such as emission perpendicular to the direction of the electrical field can substantially alter the picture, adding surprising features to the molecular orbital interpretation. In a second study we calculate the flow of charge through conjugated molecules. The calculations show in real time how breaks in the conjugation can lead to a local buildup of charge and the formation of local electrical dipoles. These can interact with neighboring molecular chains. As a consequence, collections of ''molecular electrical wires'' can show distinctly different characteristics than ''classical electrical wires''. German Science Foundation GRK 1640.

  17. 5' modification of duplex DNA with a ruthenium electron donor-acceptor pair using solid-phase DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Natia L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Incorporation of metalated nucleosides into DNA through covalent modification is crucial to measurement of thermal electron-transfer rates and the dependence of these rates with structure, distance, and position. Here, we report the first synthesis of an electron donor-acceptor pair of 5' metallonucleosides and their subsequent incorporation into oligonucleotides using solid-phase DNA synthesis techniques. Large-scale syntheses of metal-containing oligonucleotides are achieved using 5' modified phosporamidites containing [Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (acac is acetylacetonato; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (3) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (4). Duplexes formed with the metal-containing oligonucleotides exhibit thermal stability comparable to the corresponding unmetalated duplexes (T(m) of modified duplex = 49 degrees C vs T(m) of unmodified duplex = 47 degrees C). Electrochemical (3, E(1/2) = -0.04 V vs NHE; 4, E(1/2) = 1.12 V vs NHE), absorption (3, lambda(max) = 568, 369 nm; 4, lambda(max) = 480 nm), and emission (4, lambda(max) = 720 nm, tau = 55 ns, Phi = 1.2 x 10(-)(4)) data for the ruthenium-modified nucleosides and oligonucleotides indicate that incorporation into an oligonucleotide does not perturb the electronic properties of the ruthenium complex or the DNA significantly. In addition, the absence of any change in the emission properties upon metalated duplex formation suggests that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+)[Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) pair will provide a valuable probe for DNA-mediated electron-transfer studies.

  18. Spin noise spectroscopy of donor-bound electrons in ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, H.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.; Oestreich, M.; Hübner, J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the intrinsic spin dynamics of electrons bound to Al impurities in bulk ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. Spin noise spectroscopy enables us to investigate the longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation time with respect to nuclear and external magnetic fields in a single spectrum. On one hand, the spin dynamic is dominated by the intrinsic hyperfine interaction with the nuclear spins of the naturally occurring 67Zn isotope. We measure a typical spin dephasing time of 23 ns, in agreement with the expected theoretical values. On the other hand, we measure a third, very high spin dephasing rate which is attributed to a high defect density of the investigated ZnO material. Measurements of the spin dynamics under the influence of transverse as well as longitudinal external magnetic fields unambiguously reveal the intriguing connections of the electron spin with its nuclear and structural environment.

  19. Functional pyruvate formate lyase pathway expressed with two different electron donors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Dai, Zongjie; Krivoruchko, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    pyruvate decarboxylase and having a reduced glucose uptake rate due to a mutation in the transcriptional regulator Mth1, IMI076 (Pdc-MTH1-ΔT ura3-52). PFL was expressed with two different electron donors, reduced ferredoxin or reduced flavodoxin, respectively, and it was found that the coexpression...

  20. Electronic coupling effects and charge transfer between organic molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, Roman

    2010-07-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is grown on graphite. We even achieve an efficient electronic decoupling from the subjacent Au(111) by inserting an atomically thin organic spacer layer consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) with a noticeably dissimilar electronic behavior. These observations are further consolidated by a systematic variation of the metal substrate (Au, Ag, and Al), ranging from inert to rather reactive. For this purpose, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) is chosen to ensure comparability of the molecular film structures on the different metals, and also because its electronic alignment on various metal surfaces has previously been studied with great intensity. We present evidence for ionized PTCDA at several interfaces and propose the charge transfer to be related to the electronic level alignment governed by interface dipole formation on the respective metals. (orig.)

  1. The estimation of the G-values for ionization and excitation of ten-electron molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Kiyoshi; Sato, Shin; Ohno, Shin-ichi.

    1976-01-01

    The binary-encounter collision theory is applied to calculate the G-values for the ionization and excitation of methane, ammonia, and water irradiated by 100 keV electrons. Double collision of the incident electron in a molecule is also taken into account. On the assumption of the occurrence of certain reactions in the systems, the G-values for electrons, various radicals, and several final products were estimated. Some of the results are as follows: the G-values for electrons were 3.60 for methane, 3.56 for ammonia, and 3.00 for water. These values are in fair agreement with the experimental values: 3.6 for methane, 3.8 for ammonia, and 3.3 for water. The calculated G-value for hot hydrogen atoms was about 1.0 for all three compounds. The ratios of the G-value for excitation to that for electons are 1.1 for methane, 1.5 for ammonia, and 1.7 for water. An estimation was also made of the G-value for the emission of highly-excited hydrogen atoms using reported cross sections. The G-values are 0.1 for methane and ammonia, and 0.2 for water. (auth.)

  2. Resonant Auger electron-photoion coincidence study of the fragmentation dynamics of an acrylonitrile molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooser, K; Ha, D T; Granroth, S; Itaelae, E; Nommiste, E; Kukk, E [Department of Physics, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Partanen, L; Aksela, H, E-mail: kunkoo@utu.f [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-12-14

    Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to promote K-shell electrons of nitrogen and carbon from the cyano group (C {identical_to} N) of gaseous acrylonitrile (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}-CN) to the unoccupied antibonding {pi}*{sub C} {sub {identical_to} N} orbital. Photofragmentation of acrylonitrile molecules following selective resonant core excitations of carbon and nitrogen core electrons to the {pi}*{sub C} {sub {identical_to} N} orbital was investigated using the electron-energy-resolved photoelecton-photoion coincidence technique. The fragment ion mass spectra were recorded in coincidence with the resonant Auger electrons, emitted in the decay process of the core-excited states. Singly and triply deuterated samples were used for fragment identification. The results showed the initial core-hole localization to be of minor importance in determining the dissociation pattern of the molecular cation. The participator and spectator Auger transitions produce entirely different fragmentation patterns and the latter indicates that complex nuclear rearrangements take place. It is suggested that the calculated kinetic energy releases are caused by the existence of metastable states, which appear with the opening of the spectator Auger channels.

  3. Optical transition probabilities in electron-vibration-rotation spectra of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, L.A.; Kuz'menko, N.E.; Kuzyakov, Yu.Ya.; Plastinin, Yu.A.

    1974-01-01

    The present review systematizes the data on the absolute probabilities of electron transitions in diatomic molecules, which have been published since the beginning of 1961 and up to the end of 1973, and those on the relative transition probabilities, which have been published since the beginning of 1966 till the end of 1973. The review discussed the theoretical relationships underlying the experimental techniques of determining the absolute transition probabilities. Modifications of the techniques under discussion are not specially examined; the details of interest can be found, however, in the references cited. The factual material-, such as the values of the absolute probabilities of electron transitions, the dependences of the electron transition moments on the internuclear distance and the values of the Franck-Condon factors,- is presented in tables 1, 2 and 4, respectively, embracing all the relevant works known to the present authors. Along with a complete systematization of the transition probability data, the authors have attempted a critical analysis of the available data in order to select the most reliable results. The recommended values of the squared matrix elements of the electron transition dipole moments are given in table 3. The last chaper of the work compares the results of calculations of the Franck-Condon factors obtained with the different milecular potentials [ru

  4. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium alligator clips for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been performed to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol (DT) self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S, whatever the tunneling conditions

  5. Tellurium rings as electron pair donors in cluster compounds and coordination polymers; Tellurringe als Elektronenpaardonoren in Clusterverbindungen und Koordinationspolymeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anja

    2011-11-08

    In this dissertation novel and already known molecular tellurium rings are presented in cluster compounds and quasi-one-dimensional coordination polymers. The cyclic, homonuclear units are always stabilized by coordination to electron-rich transition metal atoms, with the coordinating tellurium atoms acting as two-electron donors. As a synthesis route, the solid-state reaction in quartz glass vials was used uniformly. In addition to structural determination, the focus was on the characterization of the resulting compounds. For this purpose, resistance measurements were carried out on selected compounds, the magnetic behavior and the thermal degradation reactions were investigated and accompanying quantum chemical calculations were carried out. [German] In dieser Dissertation werden neuartige sowie bereits bekannte molekulare Tellurringe in Clusterverbindungen und quasi-eindimensionalen Koordinationspolymeren vorgestellt. Die Stabilisierung der zyklischen, homonuklearen Einheiten erfolgt dabei stets durch die Koordination an elektronenreiche Uebergangsmetallatome, wobei die koordinierenden Telluratome gegenueber diesen als Zwei-Elektronendonoren fungieren. Als Syntheseroute wurde dabei einheitlich auf die Festkoerperreaktion in Quarzglasampullen zurueckgegriffen. Neben der Strukturaufklaerung stand die Charakterisierung der erhaltenden Verbindungen im Fokus der Arbeit. Dazu wurden an ausgewaehlten Verbindungen Widerstandsmessungen durchgefuehrt, das magnetische Verhalten sowie die thermischen Abbaureaktionen untersucht und begleitende quantenchemische Rechnungen durchgefuehrt.

  6. Magnetic field enhanced electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniya, Sangita; Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; McLaughlin, Ryan; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    2016-03-01

    A useful process for light harvesting from injected electron-hole pairs in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) is the transfer from triplet excitons (T) to singlet excitons (S) via reverse intersystem crossing (RISC). This process adds a delayed electro-luminescence (EL) emission component that is known as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). We have studied electron donor (D)/acceptor(A) blends that form an exciplex manifold in which the energy difference, ΔEST between the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) levels is relatively small (exciplex blend is enhanced up to 40% by applying a relatively weak magnetic field of 50 mT at ambient. Moreover the MEL response is activated with activation energy similar that of the EL emission. This suggests that the large magneto-EL originates from an additional spin-mixing channel between singlet and triplet states of the generated exciplexes, which is due to TADF. We will report on the MEL dependencies on the temperature, bias voltage, and D-A materials for optimum OLED performance. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  7. [Potential Carbon Fixation Capability of Non-photosynthetic Microbial Community at Different Depth of the South China Sea and Its Response to Different Electron Donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Xi, Xue-fei; Hu, Jia-jun; Fu, Xiao-hua; Lu, Bing; Xu, Dian-sheng

    2015-05-01

    The seawater samples collected from many different areas with different depth in the South China Sea were cultivated using different electron donors respectively. And the variation in the potential carbon fixation capability ( PCFC ) of non-photosynthetic microbial community (NPMC) in seawater with different depth was determined after a cycle of cultivation through the statistic analysis. In addition, the cause for the variation was clarified through analyzing key gene abundance regarding CO2 fixation and characteristics of seawater with different depth. The result showed that the PCFCs of NPMC in seawater with different depth were generally low and had no significant difference when using NaNO2 as the electron donor. The PCFC of NPMC in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater when using H2 as the electron donor, on the contrary, the PCFC of NPMC in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater when using Na2S2O3 as the electron donor. The abundance of the main CO2 fixation gene cbbL in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater while the cbbM gene abundance in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater. Most hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria had the cbbL gene, and most sulfur bacteria had the cbbM gene. The tendency of seawater cbbL/cbbM gene abundance with the change of depth revealed that there were different kinds of bacteria accounting for the majority in NPMC fixing CO2 at different depth of ocean, which led to different response of PCFC of NPMC at different depth of the sea to different electron donors. The distributions of dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon concentration with the change of the depth of the sea might be an important reason leading to the difference of NPMC structure and even the difference of PCFC at different depth of the sea.

  8. Identification of the 2-hydroxyglutarate and isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenases as alternative electron donors linking lysine catabolism to the electron transport chain of Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Wagner L; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Larson, Tony R; Tohge, Takayuki; Krahnert, Ina; Witt, Sandra; Obata, Toshihiro; Schauer, Nicolas; Graham, Ian A; Leaver, Christopher J; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2010-05-01

    The process of dark-induced senescence in plants is relatively poorly understood, but a functional electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF/ETFQO) complex, which supports respiration during carbon starvation, has recently been identified. Here, we studied the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in the expression of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase to extended darkness and other environmental stresses. Evaluations of the mutant phenotypes following carbon starvation induced by extended darkness identify similarities to those exhibited by mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex. Metabolic profiling and isotope tracer experimentation revealed that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is involved in degradation of the branched-chain amino acids, phytol, and Lys, while 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase is involved exclusively in Lys degradation. These results suggest that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is the more critical for alternative respiration and that a series of enzymes, including 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase, plays a role in Lys degradation. Both physiological and metabolic phenotypes of the isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase mutants were not as severe as those observed for mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex, indicating some functional redundancy of the enzymes within the process. Our results aid in the elucidation of the pathway of plant Lys catabolism and demonstrate that both isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase act as electron donors to the ubiquinol pool via an ETF/ETFQO-mediated route.

  9. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  10. An Effort to Increase Organ Donor Registration Through Intergroup Competition and Electronic Word of Mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sandi W; Hitt, Rose; Park, Hee Sun; Walther, Joseph; Liang, Yuhua Jake; Hsieh, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The effort to increase Web organ donation registrations in Michigan by enhancing 2 types of university campaigns with social media strategies informed by social identity theory is the focus of this research. The two campaigns focused on either ingroup or rivalry outgroup social identification, and each was enhanced with individually focused social media in the first year of the campaign and with electronic word of mouth in Year 2 of the campaign. Results indicated that individually focused social media such as Facebook ads worked well in rivalry campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) but not in ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations decreased significantly over baseline when ads were introduced in the first year of each type of campaign). Electronic word-of-mouth strategies worked well in both ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) and rivalry campaigns (in which registrations rose almost eight times over baseline, when strategies were introduced in the second year of each type of campaign).

  11. Deconvolution of overlapping features in electron energy-loss spectra: the determination of absolute differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of electronic states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Brunger, M.J.; Teubner, O.J.P.; Mojarrabi, B.

    1996-06-01

    A set of three computer programs is reported which allow for the deconvolution of overlapping molecular electronic state structure in electron energy-loss spectra, even in highly perturbed systems. This procedure enables extraction of absolute differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of electronic states of diatomic molecules from electron energy-loss spectra. The first code in the sequence uses the Rydberg-Klein-Rees procedure to generate potential energy curves from spectroscopic constants, while the second calculates Franck-Condon factors by numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation, given the potential energy curves. The third, given these Franck-Condon factors, the previously calculated relevant energies for the vibrational levels of the respective electronic states and the experimental energy-loss spectra, extracts the differential cross sections for each state. Each program can be run independently, or the three can run in sequence to determine these cross sections from the spectroscopic constants and the experimental energy-loss spectra. The application of these programs to the specific case of electron scattering from nitric oxide (NO) is demonstrated. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Solvent Annealing Effects in Dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole–5,6-Difluorobenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole Small Molecule Donors for BHJ Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Kai; Azouz, Mehdi; Babics, Maxime; Cruciani, Federico; Marszalek, Tomasz; Saleem, Qasim; Pisula, Wojciech; Beaujuge, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Low-bandgap small molecule (SM) donors that can be solution-processed with fullerene acceptors (e.g. PC61/71BM) are proving particularly promising in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Compared to their π-conjugated polymer counterparts, SM donors are well defined (monodispersed) and more synthetically modular –with relatively wide ranges of bandgaps achievable in stepwise couplings of various donor and acceptor motifs. However, the optimization of SM-fullerene morphologies and BHJ device efficiencies relies more specifically on the use of processing additives, post-processing thermal or solvent vapor annealing (SVA) approaches, and achieving adequate interpenetrating networks and structural order in BHJ thin films can be challenging. In this report, we examine the correlated effects of molecular structure and post-processing SVA on the BHJ solar cell performance of a set of π-extended SM donors composed of dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole (DTP) and 5,6-difluorobenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole ([2F]BT) units. In these systems (SM1-3), the introduction of additional alkyl substituents and unsubstituted thiophene rings on the peripheral unit groups critically impacts the effects of SVA steps on BHJ solar cell efficiency. We show that the more π-extended and alkyl-substituted analogue SM3 stands out –with BHJ device efficiencies of ca. 6% obtained from SVA with CS2– while SVA-treated SM3-based active layers also show the most favorable ordering and carrier mobility patterns. However, unlike numbers of SM donors reported in recent years, DTP–[2F]BT SM analogues are in general not prone to dramatic performance variations in BHJ thin films cast with processing additives. Our results indicate that the role of SVA steps is not independent of the molecular structure of the SM donors used in the BHJ solar cells.

  13. Solvent Annealing Effects in Dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole–5,6-Difluorobenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole Small Molecule Donors for BHJ Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Kai

    2016-06-17

    Low-bandgap small molecule (SM) donors that can be solution-processed with fullerene acceptors (e.g. PC61/71BM) are proving particularly promising in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Compared to their π-conjugated polymer counterparts, SM donors are well defined (monodispersed) and more synthetically modular –with relatively wide ranges of bandgaps achievable in stepwise couplings of various donor and acceptor motifs. However, the optimization of SM-fullerene morphologies and BHJ device efficiencies relies more specifically on the use of processing additives, post-processing thermal or solvent vapor annealing (SVA) approaches, and achieving adequate interpenetrating networks and structural order in BHJ thin films can be challenging. In this report, we examine the correlated effects of molecular structure and post-processing SVA on the BHJ solar cell performance of a set of π-extended SM donors composed of dithieno[3,2-b:2\\',3\\'-d]pyrrole (DTP) and 5,6-difluorobenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole ([2F]BT) units. In these systems (SM1-3), the introduction of additional alkyl substituents and unsubstituted thiophene rings on the peripheral unit groups critically impacts the effects of SVA steps on BHJ solar cell efficiency. We show that the more π-extended and alkyl-substituted analogue SM3 stands out –with BHJ device efficiencies of ca. 6% obtained from SVA with CS2– while SVA-treated SM3-based active layers also show the most favorable ordering and carrier mobility patterns. However, unlike numbers of SM donors reported in recent years, DTP–[2F]BT SM analogues are in general not prone to dramatic performance variations in BHJ thin films cast with processing additives. Our results indicate that the role of SVA steps is not independent of the molecular structure of the SM donors used in the BHJ solar cells.

  14. Coulomb Repulsion Effect in Two-electron Non-adiabatic Tunneling through a One-level redox Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medvedev, Igor M.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We investigated Coulomb repulsion effects in nonadiabatic (diabatic) two-electron tunneling through a redox molecule with a single electronic level in a symmetric electrochemical contact under ambient conditions, i.e., room temperature and condensed matter environment. The electrochemical contact...

  15. Ultrafast Processes in Atoms and Molecules: Integrated treatment of electronic and nuclear motion in ultrashort XUV pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCurdy, C. William [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of

    2017-12-14

    This project made use of Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock method developed earlier in the McCurdy group in a series of novel applications of the method to ultrafast spectroscopic processes. MCTDHF treats the dynamics of a molecule or atom under the influence of an external field in manner that has all electrons active. That property distinguishes this method from the more popular (and much less computationally demanding) approaches for treating the electron dynamics of atoms and molecules in fields, such as the time-dependent “Configuration Interaction Singles” approximation or approaches that limit the treatment to either one or two-electron models.

  16. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Ammonia and phosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2004-08-01

    Bibliographies of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for ammonia (NH 3 ) and phosphine (PH 3 ). About 820 (NH 3 ) and 190 (PH 3 ) papers were compiled respectively. Comprehensive author indexes for each molecule are included. The bibliography covers the period 1922 through 2000 for NH 3 and 1928 through 2000 for PH 3 . Finally, author's comments for NH 3 electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  17. Rotational and fine structure of open-shell molecules in nearly degenerate electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2018-03-01

    An effective Hamiltonian without symmetry restriction has been developed to model the rotational and fine structure of two nearly degenerate electronic states of an open-shell molecule. In addition to the rotational Hamiltonian for an asymmetric top, this spectroscopic model includes the energy separation between the two states due to difference potential and zero-point energy difference, as well as the spin-orbit (SO), Coriolis, and electron spin-molecular rotation (SR) interactions. Hamiltonian matrices are computed using orbitally and fully symmetrized case (a) and case (b) basis sets. Intensity formulae and selection rules for rotational transitions between a pair of nearly degenerate states and a nondegenerate state have also been derived using all four basis sets. It is demonstrated using real examples of free radicals that the fine structure of a single electronic state can be simulated with either a SR tensor or a combination of SO and Coriolis constants. The related molecular constants can be determined precisely only when all interacting levels are simulated simultaneously. The present study suggests that analysis of rotational and fine structure can provide quantitative insights into vibronic interactions and related effects.

  18. Production of excited nitrogen atoms and ions by electron impact on nitrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rall, D.L.A.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, C.C.; Sharpton, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Emission lines of the N atoms and N ions are produced by electron-beam dissociative excitation of N 2 molecules. The ns→3 /sub p/ (n=5 to 9), np→3s (n=3 to 7), nd→3 /sub p/ (n=4 to 8), nf→3d (n=4,5) transitions of N and the 3 /sub p/ →3s, 3d→3p, 4s→3p, 4p→3d, 4f→3d transitions of N + have been observed and optical emission cross sections at various incident electron energies have been measured. The energy dependence of the cross sections of the N emission lines is similar to that of the N + lines at high incident electron energies, but the low-energy behaviors are quite different. These features are explained by the mechanisms involved in the production of the excited N atoms and N + ions. Absolute optical emission cross sections for the N and N + lines are presented

  19. Fluctuation in Interface and Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Investigated by Current versus Bias Voltage Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-14

    Structural and electronic detail at the metal-molecule interface has a significant impact on the charge transport across the molecular junctions, but its precise understanding and control still remain elusive. On the single-molecule scale, the metal-molecule interface structures and relevant charge transport properties are subject to fluctuation, which contain the fundamental science of single-molecule transport and implication for manipulability of the transport properties in electronic devices. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to investigate the fluctuation in the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage ( I- V) measurements in combination with first-principles simulation. Contrary to conventional molecular conductance studies, this I- V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface and the molecular orbital energy level. This statistical approach was employed to study fluctuation in single-molecule junctions of 1,4-butanediamine (DAB), pyrazine (PY), 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), and fullerene (C 60 ). We demonstrate that molecular-dependent fluctuation of σ-, π-, and π-plane-type interfaces can be captured by analyzing the molecular orbital (MO) energy level under mechanical perturbation. While the MO level of DAB with the σ-type interface shows weak distance dependence and fluctuation, the MO level of PY, BPY, and C 60 features unique distance dependence and molecular-dependent fluctuation against the mechanical perturbation. The MO level of PY and BPY with the σ+π-type interface increases with the increase in the stretch distance. In contrast, the MO level of C 60 with the π-plane-type interface decreases with the increase in the stretching perturbation. This study provides an approach to resolve the structural and electronic fluctuation in the single-molecule junctions and insight into the molecular-dependent fluctuation in

  20. Effects of electron-withdrawing group and electron-donating core combinations on physical properties and photovoltaic performance in D-pi-A star-shaped small molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luponosov, Yuriy N.; Min, Jie; Solodukhin, Alexander N.; Kozlov, Oleg V.; Obrezkova, Marina A.; Peregudova, Svetlana M.; Ameri, Tayebeh; Chvalun, Sergei N.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Brabec, Christoph J.; Ponomarenko, Sergei A.

    The first representatives of star-shaped molecules having 3-alkylrhodanine (alkyl-Rh) electron-withdrawing groups, linked through bithiophene pi-spacer with electron-donating either triphenylamine (TPA) or tris(2-methoxyphenyl)amine (m-TPA) core were synthesized. The physical properties and

  1. User's manual for EXALPHA (a code for calculating electronic properties of molecules). [Muscatel code, multiply scattered electron approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.D.

    1976-06-01

    The EXALPHA procedures provide a simplified method for running the MUSCATEL computer code, which in turn is used for calculating electronic properties of simple molecules and atomic clusters, based on the multiply scattered electron approximation for the wave equations. The use of the EXALPHA procedures to set up a run of MUSCATEL is described.

  2. Electronic Transport in Single-Stranded DNA Molecule Related to Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Silva, R. N. O.; Madeira, M. P.; Frazão, N. F.; Sousa, J. O.; Macedo-Filho, A.

    2018-04-01

    We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in single chain DNA molecule consisting of 182 nucleotides. The DNA chains studied were extracted from a segment of the human chromosome 4p16.3, which were modified by expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats to mimics Huntington's disease. The mutated DNA chains were connected between two platinum electrodes to analyze the relationship between charge propagation in the molecule and Huntington's disease. The computations were performed within a tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, to investigate the current-voltage (I-V) of 23 types of DNA sequence and compare them with the distributions of the related CAG repeat numbers with the disease. All DNA sequences studied have a characteristic behavior of a semiconductor. In addition, the results showed a direct correlation between the current-voltage curves and the distributions of the CAG repeat numbers, suggesting possible applications in the development of DNA-based biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  3. Exchange-correlation energy in the orbital occupancy method: electronic structure of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oszwaldowski, R; Vazquez, H; Pou, P; Ortega, J; Perez, R; Flores, F

    2003-01-01

    A new DF-LCAO (density functional with local combination of atomic orbitals) method is used to calculate the electronic properties of 3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), C 6 H 6 , CH 4 , and CO. The method, called the OO (orbital occupancy) method, is a DF-based theory, which uses the OOs instead of ρ(r) to calculate the exchange and correlation energies. In our calculations, we compare the OO method with the conventional local density approximation approach. Our results show that, using a minimal basis set, we obtain equilibrium bond lengths and binding energies for PTCDA, C 6 H 6 , and CH 4 which are respectively within 6, and 10-15% of the experimental values. We have also calculated the affinity and ionization levels, as well as the optical gap, for benzene and PTCDA and have found that a variant of Koopmans' theorem works well for these molecules. Using this theorem we calculate the Koopmans relaxation energies of the σ- and π-orbitals for PTCDA and have obtained this molecule's density of states which compares well with experimental evidence

  4. Linear-algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions: General formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1981-01-01

    We present a linear-algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions based on an integral equations form with either logarithmic or asymptotic boundary conditions. The introduction of exchange effects does not alter the basic form or order of the linear-algebraic equations for a local potential. In addition to the standard procedure of directly evaluating the exchange integrals by numerical quadrature, we also incorporate exchange effects through a separable-potential approximation. Efficient schemes are developed for reducing the number of points and channels that must be included. The method is applied at the static-exchange level to a number of molecular systems including H 2 , N 2 , LiH, and CO 2

  5. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  6. Ab initio study of low-energy electrons interacting with HCN molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.; Norcross, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Our earlier study of low-energy electron scattering with HCN molecules is further improved by treating exchange exactly (in a separable exchange approximation 2 ) in Σ, π and Δ symmetries: the 3.8 eV π resonance is shifted towards lower energy (2.56 eV, the experimental position is around 2.26 eV 3 ), while in Σ and the Δ symmetries the difference is within 15%. We also study possible negative ion states of HCN by calculating potential energy curves with respect to C-H and C-N stretches. For example, there is evidence of an avoiding crossing between a 1Σ + and a 2Σ + state (C-H stretch) of HCN -

  7. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.

    2016-01-01

    We study the electronic structure of C 60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C 60 -pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C 60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  8. Theoretical study of electronic absorption spectroscopy of propadienylidene molecule vis-â-vis the observed diffuse interstellar bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Samala Nagaprasad; Mahapatra, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theoretical study of spectroscopy and dynamics of electronically excited l-C 3 H 2 . ► Construction of ab initio electronic potential energy and diabatic coupling surfaces. ► First principles study of nuclear dynamics on excited electronic states. ► Findings reveal l-C 3 H 2 is a potential molecular carrier of diffuse interstellar bands. ► Electronically excited l-C 3 H 2 decays by ultrafast nonradiative internal conversion. -- Abstract: Observation of broad and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 Å and 5440 Å assigned to the optical absorption spectrum of Y-shaped propadienylidene (H 2 C=C=C:) molecule is theoretically examined in this paper. This molecule apparently absorbs in the same wavelength region as the observed DIBs and was suggested to be a potential carrier of these DIBs. This assignment mostly relied on the experimental data from radioastronomy and laboratory measurements. Motivated by these available experimental data we attempt here a theoretical study and investigate the detailed electronic structure and nuclear dynamics underlying the electronic absorption bands of propadienylidene molecule. Our results show that this molecule indeed absorbs in the wavelength region of the recorded DIBs. Strong nonadiabatic coupling between its energetically low-lying electronic states plays major role, initiates ultrafast internal conversion and contributes to the spectral broadening. Theoretical findings are finally compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and discussed in connection with the recorded DIBs.

  9. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules. Published in the 20th century. Methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2004-10-01

    Bibliographies of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for methane (CH 4 ). About 1050 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1924 through 2000 for CH 4 . Finally, author's comments for CH 4 electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  10. Cross sections and oscillator strengths for electron-impact excitation of electronic states in polyatomic molecules. Application examples of the BEf- scaling model in optically-allowed transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Kawahara, H.; Hoshino, M.

    2009-12-01

    Integral cross sections for optically allowed electronic-state excitations by electron impact, are reviewed for polyatomic molecules by applying the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) scaling model. Following the context of the present review, the scaling model originally proposed by Yong-Ki Kim to determine electron-impact cross sections for ionization of atoms and molecules is also summarized briefly for its wide range of applications [Electron-Impact Cross Section Database, NIST, Y.-K. Kim]. The present report not only focuses on the need for the cross-section data, but also elucidates the verification of the scaling model in the general application for atoms and molecules. Since this report is for a data base, it is summarized for data base users by citing (copying) the descriptions in the original papers and the references within those papers in the style of a textbook. (author)

  11. On the electronic structure of Barrelene-based rigid organic donor-acceptor systems. An INDO model study including solvent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, T.; Kotzian, M.; Roesch, N.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present an INDO/S Molecular-orbital investigation of organic molecules containing a barrelene moiety that provides a rigid link between an aromatic donor and a maleic ester acceptor group. Molecules of this type have recently been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. The authors discuss the ground state and various excited states both in vacuo and in solution. Solvent effects are incorporated by use of an electrostatic cavity model which is not restricted to a spherical cavity, but allows for a cavity shape that is adapted to the solute molecule. The calculations indicate low-lying charge-transfer (CT) excitations in the region of the first aromatic transitions, even in the gas phase

  12. A novel signal-on photoelectrochemical immunosensor for detection of alpha-fetoprotein by in situ releasing electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiexia; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2017-12-15

    A signal-on photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor was constructed for detecting tumor marker in this work. α-fetoprotein (AFP) was chosen as a model analyte to investigate the prepared procedure and the analytical performance of the exploited sensor. In order to construct the sensor, CdSe QDs were used as photoactive material, biotin conjugated AFP antibody (Bio-anti-AFP) as detecting probe, streptavidin (SA) as signal capturing unit, biotin functionalized apoferritin encapsulated ascorbic acid (Bio-APOAA) as amplification unit, which were assembled onto the electrodes. The sensing strategy was based on in situ enzymatic hydrolysis of Bio-APOAA to release ascorbic acid (AA) as sacrificial electron donor to produce photocurrent. The photocurrent from the immunosensor was monitored as a result of AFP concentrations. The constructed sensing platform displayed high selectivity and good sensitivity for detecting AFP. Under optimal conditions, a wide linear range from 0.001 to 1000ng/mL and a low detection limit of 0.31pg/mL were obtained. The developed immunosensor is expected to be used to determine AFP and other tumor markers in human plasma in clinical laboratories either for pre-cancer screening or cancer monitoring. Moreover, this sensing platform further has the potential to use for the detection of trypsin activity and the corresponding inhibitor-screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Pannonibacter phragmitetus LSSE-09 stimulated with external electron donors under alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lin; Luo Mingfang; Li Wangliang; Wei Xuetuan; Xie Keng; Liu Lijun; Jiang Chengying; Liu Huizhou

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Growing cells have high Cr (VI) resistant and reducing ability aerobically. → Resting cells show strong anaerobic-reduction potential. → Acetate can highly stimulate both aerobic and anaerobic reduction process. - Abstract: A novel Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strain LSSE-09, identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus, was isolated from industrial sludge. It has strong aerobic and anaerobic Cr (VI)-reduction potential under alkaline conditions. At 37 o C and pH 9.0, growing cells of strain LSSE-09 could completely reduce 100 and 1000 mg L -1 Cr (VI)-Cr (III) within 9 and 24 h, respectively under aerobic condition. Resting cells showed higher anaerobic reduction potential with the rate of 1.46 mg g -1 (dryweight) min -1 , comparing with their aerobic reduction rate, 0.21 mg g -1 min -1 . External electron donors, such as lactate, acetate, formate, pyruvate, citrate and glucose could highly increase the reduction rate, especially for aerobic reduction. The presence of 3000 mg L -1 acetate enhanced anaerobic and aerobic Cr (VI)-reduction rates up to 9.47 mg g -1 min -1 and 4.42 mg g -1 min -1 , respectively, which were 5 and 20 times faster than those without it. Strain LSSE-09 retained high activities over six batch cycles and NO 3 - and SO 4 2- had slightly negative effects on Cr (VI)-reduction rates. The results suggest that strain LSSE-09 has potential application for Cr (VI) detoxification in alkaline wastewater.

  14. Test-beds for molecular electronics: metal-molecules-metal junctions based on Hg electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Felice Carlo; Rampi, Maria Anita

    2010-01-01

    Junctions based on mesoscopic Hg electrodes are used to characterize the electrical properties of the organic molecules organized in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The junctions M-SAM//SAM-Hg are formed by one electrode based on metals (M) such as Hg, Ag, Au, covered by a SAM, and by a second electrode always formed by a Hg drop carrying also a SAM. The electrodes, brought together by using a micromanipulator, sandwich SAMs of different nature at the contact area (approximately = 0.7 microm2). The high versatility of the system allows a series of both electrical and electrochemical junctions to be assembled and characterized: (i) The compliant nature of the Hg electrodes allows incorporation into the junction and measurement of the electrical behavior of a large number of molecular systems and correlation of their electronic structure to the electrical behavior; (ii) by functionalizing both electrodes with SAMs exposing different functional groups, X and Y, it is possible to compare the rate of electron transfer through different X...Y molecular interactions; (iii) when the junction incorporates one of the electrode formed by a semitransparent film of Au, it allows electrical measurements under irradiation of the sandwiched SAMs. In this case the junction behaves as a photoswitch; iv) incorporation of redox centres with low lying, easily reachable energy levels, provides electron stations as indicated by the hopping mechanism dominating the current flow; (v) electrochemical junctions incorporating redox centres by both covalent and electrostatic interactions permit control of the potential of the electrodes with respect to that of the redox state by means of an external reference electrode. Both these junctions show an electrical behavior similar to that of conventional diodes, even though the mechanism generating the current flow is different. These systems, demonstrating high mechanical stability and reproducibility, easy assembly, and a wide variety of

  15. Electronic-excitation energy transfer in heterogeneous dye solutions under laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshin, L.V.; Mukushev, B.T.; Saletskii, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of electronic-excitation energy transfer (EEET) among dye molecules of different types for different exciting-fight wavelengths and temperatures. Upon selective laser excitation of the donor, the inhomogeneous broadening of molecular levels increases the probability of EEET from the donor to acceptor molecules. The efficiency of this process is directly proportional to the acceptor molecule concentration and is temperature dependent. The EEET is accompanied by the spectral migration of energy among donor molecules, which reduces the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the donor. Increasing the frequency of the exciting light decreases in the donor fluorescence quantum efficiency. An increase in the acceptor molecule concentration results in a decrease of the spectral migration of excitation in the donor molecule system. 5 refs., 5 figs

  16. Third version of a program for calculating the static interaction potential between an electron and a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raseev, G.

    1980-01-01

    This program calculates the one-centre expansion of a two-centre wave function of a diatomic molecule and also the multipole expansion of its static interaction with a point charge. It is an extension to some classes of open-shell targets of the previous versions and it provides both the wave function and the potential in a form suitable for use in an electron-molecule scattering program. (orig./HSI)

  17. Study of electron impact inelastic scattering of chlorine molecule (Cl2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Hitesh; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Limbachiya, Chetan; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2018-02-01

    A theoretical study is carried out for electron interactions with the chlorine molecule (Cl2) for incident energies ranging from 0.01 to 5000 eV. This wide range of energy has allowed us to investigate a variety of processes and report data on symmetric excitation energies, dissociative electron attachment (DEA), total excitation cross sections, and ionization cross section (Q ion) along with total inelastic cross sections (Q inel). The present study is important since Cl2 is a prominent gas for plasma etching and its anionic atoms are important in the etching of semiconductor wafers. In order to compute the total inelastic cross sections, we have employed the ab initio R-matrix method (0.01 to 15 eV) together with the spherical complex optical potential method (∼15 to 5000 eV). The R-matrix calculations are performed using a close coupling method, and we have used DEA estimator via Quantemol-N to calculate the DEA fragmentation and cross sections. The present study finds overall good agreement with the available experimental data. Total excitation and inelastic cross sections of e-{{{Cl}}}2 scattering for a wide energy range (0.01 to 5 keV) are reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge.

  18. The boomerang effect in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering as determined by time-dependent calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Asher, Anael; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-05-01

    The appearance of oscillations in the energy-dependent cross sections of the vibrational excitation ν =0 →ν ≥3 of the hydrogen molecule in its electronic ground state as predicted by Mündel, Berman, and Domcke [Phys. Rev. A 32, 181 (1985)] was confirmed in the electron scattering experiments by Allan [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 18, L451 (1985)]. These unusual structures were obtained in spite of the extremely short lifetime of H2- in its ro-vibrational states. Based on the standard (Hermitian) time-independent scattering calculations, Horáček et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 022701 (2006)] associated these oscillations with the boomerang effect. Here, we show the boomerang effect as developed in time, based on our time-dependent nuclear wavepacket (WP) calculations. The nuclear WP dynamics of H2- is determined using the non-Hermitian quantum mechanics (NH-QM) which enables the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation with complex potential energy surfaces. This NH-QM approach, which enables us the association of the nuclear WP dynamics as obtained from the complex potential energy curve of H2- with the evolution of cross section in time, can enlighten the dynamics in other scattering experiments.

  19. Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy of free molecules: New experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Volker; Barth, Silko; Lischke, Toralf; Joshi, Sanjeev; Arion, Tiberiu; Mucke, Melanie; Foerstel, Marko; Bradshaw, Alex M.; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy probes the dicationic states produced by Auger decay following the photoionization of core or inner valence levels in atoms, molecules or clusters. Moreover, the technique provides valuable insight into the dynamics of core hole decay. This paper serves the dual purpose of demonstrating the additional information obtained by this technique compared to Auger spectroscopy alone as well as of describing the new IPP/FHI apparatus at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The distinguishing feature of the latter is the capability to record both the photoelectron and Auger electron with good energy and angle resolution, for which purpose a large hemispherical electrostatic analyser is combined with several linear time-of-flight spectrometers. New results are reported for the K-shell photoionization of oxygen (O 2 ) and the subsequent KVV Auger decay. Calculations in the literature for non-coincident O 2 Auger spectra are found to be in moderately good agreement with the new data.

  20. Effects of Electric Field on the Valence-Bond Property of an Electron in a Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立民; 罗莹; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of the quantum-dot molecules in an electric field is investigated by the finite element method with the effective mass approximation. The numerical calculation results show that the valence bond of the quantum-dot molecule alternates between covalent bonds and ionic bonds as the electric field increases. The valence-bond property can be reflected by the oscillator strength of the intraband transition. The bound state with the highest energy level in the quantum-dot molecule gradually changes into a quasibound state when the electric field increases.