WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron donor experiments

  1. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  2. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  4. Study on Effects of Electron Donors on Phosphine Production from Anaerobic Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Cao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different types and concentrations of electron donors (glucose, starch, methanol and sodium acetate on the formation of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge that has been domesticated for a prolonged period were studied in small batch experiments. The results show that types and concentrations of electron donor have significant effects on the production of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge. Among them, glucose was the most favourable electron donor, whereas sodium acetate was the least favourable electron donor for the removal of phosphorus and the production of phosphine. Higher concentrations of electron donors were more favourable for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine, and supplying more than nine times the amount of electron donor as theoretically required for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine was favourable for the production of phosphine.

  5. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The electron donor-acceptor interaction between drugs which act as electron donors and some electron-deficient compounds (π acceptors) has severally been utilized as an analytical tool for the quantitation and qualitative assessment of such drugs. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop an assay ...

  6. The Auckland experience with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Carl; McCall, John; Windsor, John; Harman, Richard; Dittmer, Ian; Smith, Pat; Munn, Stephen

    2003-07-25

    To examine the initial experience of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) in New Zealand and compare it with open donor nephrectomy (ODN). All LDNs performed between June 2000 and June 2002 were reviewed. An equal number of ODNs were reviewed. Data were also collected on the recipients of the grafts. Key clinical data were prospectively collected; remaining data were collected by retrospectively reviewing patient charts. Auckland Hospital databases were accessed for costing analysis. Thirty five cases of each procedure had been performed. There has been 100% LDN graft survival. There was no significant difference in graft function (serum creatinine) at one and 12 months (p = 0.25 and 0.35) between the two groups. There was no significant difference in donor morbidity (26% vs 31%, p = 0.59). LDN resulted in a shorter hospital stay (3 vs 6.5 days, p disadvantage of LDN is its higher cost compared with ODN.

  7. Initial experience with purely laparoscopic living-donor right hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S K; Lee, K W; Choi, Y; Kim, H S; Ahn, S W; Yoon, K C; Kim, H; Yi, N J; Suh, K S

    2018-03-26

    There may be concerns about purely laparoscopic donor right hepatectomy (PLDRH) compared with open donor right hepatectomy, especially when performed by surgeons accustomed to open surgery. This study aimed to describe technical tips and pitfalls in PLDRH. Data from donors who underwent PLDRH at Seoul National University Hospital between December 2015 and July 2017 were analysed retrospectively. Endpoints analysed included intraoperative events and postoperative complications. All operations were performed by a single surgeon with considerable experience in open living donor hepatectomy. A total of 26 donors underwent purely laparoscopic right hepatectomy in the study interval. No donor required transfusion during surgery, whereas two underwent reoperation. In two donors, the dissection plane at the right upper deep portion of the midplane was not correct. One donor experienced portal vein injury during caudate lobe transection, and one developed remnant left hepatic duct stenosis. One donor experienced remnant portal vein angulation owing to a different approach angle, and one experienced arterial damage associated with the use of a laparoscopic energy device. One donor had postoperative bleeding due to masking of potential bleeding foci owing to intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopy. Two donors experienced right liver surface damage caused by a xiphoid trocar. Purely laparoscopic donor hepatectomy differs from open donor hepatectomy in terms of angle and caudal view. Therefore, surgeons experienced in open donor hepatectomy must gain adequate experience in laparoscopic liver surgery and make adjustments when performing PLDRH. © 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Donors in Semiconductors - are they Understood in Electronic Era?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmochowski, Janusz E

    2007-01-01

    The physics of semiconductors and contemporary electronics cannot be understood without impurities. The hydrogen-like shallow donor (and acceptor) state of electron (hole) bound by Coulomb electrostatic force of excess charge of impurity is used to control conductivity of semiconductors and construct semiconductor diodes, transistors and numerous types of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices, including lasers. Recently, surprisingly, the physics of impurity donors appeared to be much reacher. Experimental evidence has been provided for universal existence of other types of electronic states of the same donor impurity: i) mysterious, deep, DX-type state resulting in metastability - slow hysteresis phenomena - understood as two-electron, acceptor-like state of donor impurity, formed upon large lattice distortion or rearrangement around impurity and accompanying capture of second electron, resulting in negative electron correlation energy U; ii) deep, localized, fully symmetric, A1, one-electron donor state of substitutional impurity. The latter state can be formed from the 'ordinary' shallow hydrogen-like state in the process of strong localization of electron by short range, local potential of impurity core, preserving full (A 1 ) symmetry of the substitutional impurity in the host lattice. The 'anticrossing' of the two A 1 (shallow hydrogenic and deep localized) energy levels upon transformation is observed. All types of electronic states of impurity can be universally observed for the same donor impurity and mutual transformation between different states occur upon changing experimental conditions. The knowledge about existence and properties of these n ew , molecular type, donor states in semiconductors seems still await general recognition and positive application in contemporary material and device science and engineering

  9. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  10. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  11. Accelerating Quinoline Biodegradation and Oxidation with Endogenous Electron Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qi; Yang, Lihui; Li, Rongjie; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Yongming; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-10-06

    Quinoline, a recalcitrant heterocyclic compound, is biodegraded by a series of reactions that begin with mono-oxygenations, which require an intracellular electron donor. Photolysis of quinoline can generate readily biodegradable products, such as oxalate, whose bio-oxidation can generate endogenous electron donors that ought to accelerate quinoline biodegradation and, ultimately, mineralization. To test this hypothesis, we compared three protocols for the biodegradation of quinoline: direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis of 1 h (P1h+B) or 2 h (P2h+B), and biodegradation by adding oxalate commensurate to the amount generated from photolysis of 1 h (O1+B) or 2 h (O2+B). The experimental results show that P1h+B and P2h+B accelerated quinoline biodegradation by 19% and 50%, respectively, compared to B. Protocols O1+B and O2+B also gave 19% and 50% increases, respectively. During quinoline biodegradation, its first intermediate, 2-hydroxyquinoline, accumulated gradually in parallel to quinoline loss but declined once quinoline was depleted. Mono-oxygenation of 2-hydroxyquinoline competed with mono-oxygenation of quinoline, but the inhibition was relieved when extra electrons donors were added from oxalate, whether formed by UV photolysis or added exogenously. Rapid oxalate oxidation stimulated both mono-oxygenations, which accelerated the overall quinoline oxidation that provided the bulk of the electron donor.

  12. Biotechnological aspects of sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sulfate reduction can be used for the removal and recovery of oxidized sulfur compounds and metals from waste streams. However, the costs of conventional electron donors, like hydrogen and ethanol, limit the application possibilities. Methane from natural gas or biogas would be a more

  13. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Electron donor-acceptor interactions, August 5-10 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  14. Highly solvatochromic emission of electron donor-acceptor compounds containing propanedioato boron electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Bakker, N.A.C.; Wiering, P.G.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Light-induced electron transfer occurs in bifunctional compounds consisting of 1,3-diphenylpropanedioato boron oxalate or fluoride electron acceptors and simple aromatic electron-donor groups, linked by a methylene bridge; fluorescence from the highly polar charge-transfer excited state is

  15. Spin Measurements of an Electron Bound to a Single Phosphorous Donor in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, D. R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S. M.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Lilly, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    The spin of an electron bound to a single donor implanted in silicon is potentially useful for quantum information processing. We report on our efforts to measure and manipulate the spin of an electron bound to a single P donor in silicon. A low number of P donors are implanted using a self-aligned process into a silicon substrate in close proximity to a single-electron-transistor (SET) defined by lithographically patterned polysilicon gates. The SET is used to sense the occupancy of the electron on the donor and for spin read-out. An adjacent transmission line allows the application of microwave pulses to rotate the spin of the electron. We will present data from various experiments designed to exploit these capabilities. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  17. Patient experiences in advertising for an egg donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowoweiski, Sarah; Matic, Hayley; Foster, Penelope

    2011-06-01

    Advertising is a commonly used means of recruiting an egg donor within Australia. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and outcomes of people's attempts to recruit an egg donor through advertising in a printed publication, Melbourne's Child. Individuals and couples who placed a new advertisement between July 2007 and December 2008 were invited to participate (n = 84), and those who expressed interest were mailed a questionnaire specifically designed for the purposes of this study. Thirty-one advertisers (37%) agreed to be sent the questionnaire and 28 were completed and returned (33%). Results showed that over half (56%) of respondents successfully recruited an egg donor through their advertisement in Melbourne's Child, 75% received at least one genuine reply and most people received a response within 2 weeks (50%) or 1-2 months (32%) after publication. At the time of completing the questionnaire, 48% had undergone a treatment cycle using donor eggs. Advertising was recalled as a stressful experience and 79% of respondents felt that more information about the success of advertising would have been helpful prior to embarking on this process. Results will be used to inform current clinical practice in assisting patients to recruit an egg donor. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Column experiments to assess the effects of electron donors on the efficiency of in situ precipitation of Zn, Cd, Co and Ni in contaminated groundwater applying the biological sulfate removal technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geets, Joke; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Borremans, Brigitte; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Diels, Ludo; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    In a previous study, we explored the use of acetate, lactate, molasses, Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC, which is based on a biodegradable poly-lactate ester), methanol and ethanol as carbon source and electron donor to promote bacterial sulfate reduction in batch experiments, this with regards to applying an in situ metal precipitation (ISMP) process as a remediation tool to treat heavy metal contaminated groundwater at the site of a nonferrous metal work company. Based on the results of these batch tests, column experiments were conducted with lactate, molasses and HRCI as the next step in our preliminary study for a go-no go decision for dimensioning an on site application of the ISMP process that applies the activity of the endogenous population of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Special attention was given to the sustainability of the metal precipitation process under circumstances of changing chemical oxygen demand (COD) to [SO4(2-)] ratios or disrupted substrate supply. To optimize the ISMP process, an insight is needed in the composition and activity of the indigenous SRB community, as well as information on the way its composition and activity are affected by process conditions such as the added type of C-source/ electron donor, or the presence of other prokaryotes (e.g. fermenting bacteria, methane producing Archaea, acetogens). Therefore, the biological sulfate reduction process in the column experiments was evaluated by combining classical analytical methods [measuring heavy metal concentration, SO4(2-)-concentration, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)] with molecular methods [denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and phylogenetic sequence analysis] based on either the 16S rRNA-gene or the dsr (dissimilatory sulfite reductase) gene, the latter being a specific biomarker for SRB. All carbon sources tested promoted SRB activity, which resulted within 8 weeks in a drastic reduction of the sulfate and heavy metal contents in the

  19. Why search for a sperm donor online? The experiences of women searching for and contacting sperm donors on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadva, Vasanti; Freeman, Tabitha; Tranfield, Erika; Golombok, Susan

    2017-04-28

    Whilst studies have examined the experiences of women who use clinic donors, to date there has been limited research investigating women's motivations and experiences of searching for a sperm donor online. A total of 429 women looking for a sperm donor on Pride Angel (a website that facilitates contact between donors and recipients) completed an online survey. Fifty-eight percent (249) saw advantages of obtaining donated sperm online with the most common advantage reported as being able to connect with and meet the donor (n = 50 (24%)). A third (n = 157 (37%)) of the participants gave disadvantages, the most common reported was encountering 'dishonest donors' (n = 63 (40%)). Most recipients (n = 181 (61%)) wanted the donor to be 'just a donor' (i.e. to provide sperm and have no further contact). Whilst it was important for recipients to know the identity of the donor, some did not see this as important for the child and thus the level of information that parents have about the donor, and that which the child has, can differ. Finding a donor online blurs the distinction between categories of 'anonymous', 'known' and 'identity release' donations. Whilst the survey had a large sample size, the representativeness of the sample is not known.

  20. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A., E-mail: jimfield@email.arizona.edu

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Algal biomass can serve as an electron donor to drive reduction of sulfate to sulfide. • Biogenic sulfide precipitates Cu{sup 2+} as stable sulfide mineral. • Cu{sup +2} removal in sulfidogenic bioreactors amended with algal biomass exceeded 99.5%. • Acidity in synthetic acid rock drainage was consumed by sulfate reduction. - Abstract: This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Cu{sup 2+}. Sulfate, sulfide, Cu{sup 2+} and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123 d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7 mg SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} d{sup −1}) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu{sup 2+} removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu{sup 2+} was precipitated with biogenic H{sub 2}S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  2. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Algal biomass can serve as an electron donor to drive reduction of sulfate to sulfide. • Biogenic sulfide precipitates Cu 2+ as stable sulfide mineral. • Cu +2 removal in sulfidogenic bioreactors amended with algal biomass exceeded 99.5%. • Acidity in synthetic acid rock drainage was consumed by sulfate reduction. - Abstract: This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H 2 SO 4 and Cu 2+ . Sulfate, sulfide, Cu 2+ and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123 d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7 mg SO 4 2− d −1 ) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu 2+ removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu 2+ was precipitated with biogenic H 2 S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  3. Initial Experience with ABO-incompatible Live Donor Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Kun Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious shortage of cadaveric organs has prompted the development of ABO-incompatible live donor renal transplantation. We report our experience of the initial two live donor ABO incompatible renal transplants at our hospital. The first patient was a 55-year-old type A female who received a kidney from her AB type husband. The second patient was a 27-year-old type O male who received renal transplantation from his type A father. Preconditioning immunosuppressive therapy in the two patients with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and methylprednisolone was started 7 days before transplantation. During the period of preconditioning, double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP was employed to remove anti-A and -B antibodies. Laparoscopic splenectomy and renal transplantation were performed after the anti-donor ABO antibodies were reduced to a titer of 1:4. Rituximab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, was administered to the second patient due to a rebound in the anti-A antibody titer during the preconditioning period. Under a tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimen, both patients recovered very well without any evidence of rejection. Serum creatinine levels were 1.0 and 1.4 mg/dL at 6 and 3 months after transplantation, respectively. These cases illustrate that with new immunosuppressive agents, DFPP and splenectomy, ABO-incompatible renal transplantation can be successfully conducted in end-stage renal disease patients whose only available live donors are blood group incompatible.

  4. Electronics for LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, Francois

    1995-01-01

    Full text: A major effort is being mounted to prepare the way handling the high interaction rates expected from CERN's new LHC proton-proton collider (see, for example, November, page 6). September saw the First Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments, organized by Lisbon's Particle Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (LIP) on behalf of CERN's LHC Electronics Review Board (LERB - March, page 2). Its purpose was not only for the LERB to have a thorough review of ongoing activities, but also to promote cross fertilization in the engineering community involved in electronics design for LHC experiments. The Workshop gathered 187 physicists and engineers from 20 countries including USA and Japan. The meeting comprised six sessions and 82 talks, with special focus on radiation-hard microelectronic processes, electronics for tracking, calorimetry and muon detectors, optoelectronics, trigger and data acquisition systems. Each topic was introduced by an invited speaker who reviewed the requirements set by the particular detector technology at LHC. At the end of each session, panel discussions were chaired by each invited speaker. Representatives from four major integrated circuit manufacturers covered advanced radiation hard processes. Two talks highlighted the importance of obsolescence and quality systems in the long-lived and demanding environment of LHC. The Workshop identified areas and encouraged efforts for rationalization and common developments within and between the different detector groups. As a result, it will also help ensure the reliability and the long term maintainability of installed equipment. The proceedings of the Workshop are available from LIP Lisbon*. The LERB Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments will become a regular event, with the second taking place in Hungary, by Lake Balaton, from 23-27 September 1996. The Hungarian institutes KFKIRMKI have taken up the challenge of being as successful as LIP Lisbon in the organization

  5. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the

  6. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  7. Dithienosilolothiophene: A New Polyfused Donor for Organic Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Schroeder, Bob C.

    2015-08-13

    We report the synthesis of a novel pentacyclic donor moiety, dithienosilolothiophene, and its incorporation into low bandgap semiconducting polymers. The unique geometry of this new donor allowed attaching four solubilizing side chains on the same side of the fused ring system, thus ensuring sufficient solubility when incorporated into conjugated polymers while simultaneously reducing the steric hindrance between adjacent polymer chains. The optoelectronic properties of three new polymers comprising the novel pentacyclic donor were investigated and compared to structurally similar thieno[3,2-b]thienobis(silolothiophene) polymers. Organic solar cells were fabricated in order to evaluate the new materials’ potential as donor polymers in bulk heterojunction solar cells and gain further insight into how the single-sided side-chain arrangement affects the active layer blend morphology.

  8. Photochemical generation of strong one-electron reductants via light-induced electron transfer with reversible donors followed by cross reaction with sacrificial donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Schmehl, Russell

    2014-11-13

    This work illustrates a modified approach for employing photoinduced electron transfer reactions coupled to secondary irreversible electron transfer processes for the generation of strongly reducing equivalents in solution. Through irradiation of [Ru(LL)3](2+) (LL= diimine ligands) with tritolylamine (TTA) as quencher and various alkyl amines as sacrificial electron donors, yields in excess of 50% can be achieved for generation of reductants with E(0)(2+/1+) values between -1.0 and -1.2 V vs NHE. The key to the system is the fact that the TTA cation radical, formed in high yield in reaction with the photoexcited [Ru(LL)3](2+) complex, reacts irreversibly with various sacrificial electron donating amines that are kinetically unable to directly react with the photoexcited complex. The electron transfer between the TTA(+) and the sacrificial amine is an energetically uphill process. Kinetic analysis of these parallel competing reactions, consisting of bimolecular and pseudo first-order reactions, allows determination of electron transfer rate constants for the cross electron transfer reaction between the sacrificial donor and the TTA(+). A variety of amines were examined as potential sacrificial electron donors, and it was found that tertiary 1,2-diamines are most efficient among these amines for trapping the intermediate TTA(+). This electron-donating combination is capable of supplying a persistent reducing flux of electrons to catalysts used for hydrogen production.

  9. Towards sustainable feedstocks: A guide to electron donors for microbial carbon fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassens, Nico Joannes; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sousa, Diana Zita; Bar-Even, Arren

    2018-04-01

    The replacement of fossil and agricultural feedstocks with sustainable alternatives for the production of chemicals and fuels is a societal and environmental necessity. This challenge can be tackled by using inorganic or one-carbon compounds as electron donors for microbial CO 2 fixation and bioproduction. Yet, considering the wide array of microbial electron donors, which are the best suited for bioindustry? Here, we propose criteria to evaluate these compounds, considering factors such as production methods, physicochemical properties, and microbial utilization. H 2 , CO, and formate emerge as the most promising electron donors as they can be produced electrochemically at high efficiency and, importantly, have reduction potentials low enough to directly reduce the cellular electron carriers. Still, further research towards the production and utilization of other electron donors-especially phosphite-might unlock the full potential of microbial CO 2 fixation and bioproduction. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Significance of Accurate Electronic Structure Calculation Methods in Designing Silicon Donor Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd; Jakowski, Jacek; Huang, Jingsong; Ericson, Milton Nance; Britton, Charles; Curtis, Franklin; Dumitrescu, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby; Humble, Travis

    Recent demonstrations of long-lived spin qubits with high control fidelity have enhanced the potential of silicon donors in quantum computing. Verifying the design of prototype silicon qubit devices using computational models provides insight into their electrostatic potential landscape, donor electron wave functions, and spin dynamics. Here, we examine the sensitivity of device verification to the underlying electronic structure model used for the donor. Within the context of a computational workflow, we observe a significant discrepancy in the amplitude of the donor wave function computed using density-functional theory versus tight-binding methods for the case of doped silicon nanocrystals. While both methods can be used to match experimental values for the hyperfine coupling, differences in the calculated electronic amplitude at the donor site suggest that more complicated interactions, e.g., electron-exchange, may become unreliable. Hence, an accurate understanding of the donor wave function in the donor vicinity is critical to device design, as it serves as a handle to vital parameters in donor based quantum computer architectures.

  11. Donor-substituted phenyl-pi-chromones: electrochemiluminescence and intriguing electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Wen; Elangovan, Arumugasamy; Ho, Tong-Ing

    2005-04-01

    Phenylethynylchromones bearing different donor groups at the phenyl moiety have been prepared and their photophysical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) properties have been studied with respect to their structural features. Intriguingly, the presence and variation of donor groups do not much influence the absorption spectra, which can be compared with the spectrum of unsubstituted chromone, whereas the photoluminescence (PL) spectra show pronounced changes. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate enhancement of HOMO energy levels upon increasing the donor strength. The photophysical properties have also been studied in various solvents, and the PL spectra in particular show the anticipated trend. The introduction of pi-extension imparts ECL to the new molecules and the electronic coupling between the donor and the acceptor moieties through C-C triple bond influences ECL emission maxima. Weaker donors impart excimer ECL while stronger donors impart monomeric intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) ECL.

  12. Electronic structure and properties of uranyl compounds. Problems of electron-donor conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of the series of the ligand mutual substitution in the uranyl compounds with the ligand series of d-elements and with the uranyl ''covalent model'', is made. The data on ionization potentials of the ligand higher valent levels and on the structure of some uranyl nitrate compounds are considered. It is concluded that the mechanism of the ligand effect on the properties of uranyl grouping is more complex, than it is supposed in the traditional representations on the nature of electron-donor interactions in the uranyl compounds

  13. Substituent constant for drug design studies based on properties of organic electron donor--acceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, R; Hyde, R M; Livingstone, D J

    1978-09-01

    A new model chemical system based on organic electron donor--aceptor complexes is described. From values of equilibrium constants measured by an NMR technique, a predictable parameter for use in quantitative structure--activity relationship techiques is discussed.

  14. Peer-to-peer milk donors' and recipients' experiences and perceptions of donor milk banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Karleen D

    2013-07-01

    To explore the intersection of peer-to-peer milk sharing and donor milk banks. A descriptive survey design containing closed and open-ended questions was used to examine women's perceptions of peer-to-peer milk sharing and milk banking. Closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics and conventional qualitative content analysis was used to analyze open-ended responses. Participants were recruited via the Facebook sites of two online milk-sharing networks (Human Milk 4 Human Babies and Eats on Feet). Ninety-eight milk donors and 41 milk recipients who had donated or received breast milk in an arrangement that was facilitated via the Internet. One half of donor recipients could not donate to a milk bank because there were no banks local to them or they did not qualify as donors. Other respondents did not donate to a milk bank because they viewed the process as difficult, had philosophical objections to milk banking, or had a philosophical attraction to peer sharing. Most donor respondents felt it was important to know the circumstances of their milk recipients. No recipient respondents had obtained milk from a milk bank; it was recognized that they would not qualify for banked milk or that banked milk was cost prohibitive. Peer-to-peer milk donors and recipients may differ from milk bank donors and recipients in significant ways. Cooperation between milk banks and peer sharing networks could benefit both groups. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  15. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  16. Adverse reactions in voluntary whole blood donors: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: A prospective study was conducted and data collected from January 2006 to December 2012 at the National Blood Transfusion Centre in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. In this centre, all blood donors are voluntary and blood donation is only of whole blood. All donor events and ...

  17. Frequency of Finding Family Donors: A Single Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Solmaz, Soner; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Asma, Suheyl; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Boğa, Can; Özdoğu, Hakan; Baştürk, Bilkay

    2018-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is a curative treatment option for many hematologic diseases. The existence of a fully compatible donor for recipients is the first condition for minimized transplant-related mortality and morbidity. The best donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplant is an HLA-matched sibling donor. The possibility of finding an HLA-matched sibling is less than 30% worldwide. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is needed for an increasing number of patients every year, but the ability to find a fully compatible donor has limited its use. From August 2012 to May 2017, we screened 412 adult patients who required AHSCT and their families for HLA tissue groups who were seen at our center (Baskent University Adana Dr. Turgut Noyan Research and Medical Center Hematology Unit). To screen tissue groups at our center, we perform lowresolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB. If an HLA genotype cannot be identified, verification typing is done using highresolution testing. We found matched family donors in 227 (55%) of 412 patients screened at our center. The ratio of HLAmatched related donors was 83% for 279 patients who received allogeneic stem cell transplant. The likelihood of finding eligible unrelated donors has been gradually increasing, in part due to the development of the National Bone Marrow Bank. However, a careful screening for related donors is still important. Our findings indicate the importance of careful examination of family genealogy and of careful family screening in our region.

  18. Initial experience with hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Majken Højrup; Toft, Anja; Jahn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    -38 kg/m²) in males. The median intraoperative bleeding was 175 ml. The median warm ischaemia time was 3.2 min (1.5-6.7 min). The median operative time was 230 min (161-360 min). The median hospital stay was 4 days (2-10 days). Thirty donors (28%) had 34 early complications. Six donors (6%) needed...... recipients had a functional transplant after 1 year. CONCLUSION: Hand-assisted donor nephrectomy is a safe procedure. Potential candidates should be advised...

  19. Application of time release electron donors and electron acceptors for accelerated bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovich, V.; Koenigsberg, S.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, there are limited options for cost effective approaches to soil and groundwater contamination. One technology that has proven its potential involves the use of time release electron acceptors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of aerobically degradable compounds and time release electron donors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of anaerobic compounds. This technology enjoys its reputations as a sensible strategy for engineering accelerated bioattenuation, because it delivers results while 1) limiting or eliminating design, capital and management costs and 2) allowing for the engineering of a low-impact application and a subsequently invisible remediation process. Oxygen Release Compound (ORC ) is proprietary formulation of intercalated magnesium peroxide that releases oxygen slowly, for about a year, and facilitates the aerobic degradation of a range of environmental contaminants including petroleum hydrocarbons, certain chlorinated hydrocarbons, ether oxygenates and nitroaromatics. The history of ORC's introduction and acceptance represents a model for the evolution of an innovative technology. This statement comes by virtue of the fact that since 1994 ORC has been used on over 7000 sites worldwide and has been the subject of an extensive body of literature. Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) is also a proprietary polylactate ester that is food grade and, upon being deposited into the aquifer, is slowly hydrolyzed to release lactic acid and other organic acid derivatives for about one to two years. The organic acids are fermented to hydrogen, which in turn donates electrons that drive reductive bioattenuation processes. This is primarily directed at a wide range of chlorinated hydrocarbons, but can be applied to the remediation of metals by redox induced precipitation. HRC has now been used on over 220 sites, which we believe make it the most widely used electron donor for accelerating bioattenuation. ORC and HRC can be configured as a

  20. Living unrelated donor kidney transplantation: A fourteen-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In countries without a national organization for retrieval and distribution of organs of the deceased donors, problem of organ shortage is still not resolved. In order to increase the number of kidney transplantations we started with the program of living unrelated - spousal donors. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcome and renal graft function in patients receiving the graft from spousal and those receiving ghe graft from living related donors. Method. We retrospectively identified 14 patients who received renal allograft from spousal donors between 1996 and 2009 (group I. The control group consisted of 14 patients who got graft from related donor retrieved from the database and matched than with respect to sex, age, kidney disease, immunological and viral pretransplant status, the initial method of the end stage renal disease treatment and ABO compatibility. In the follow-up period of 41 ± 38 months we recorded immunosuppressive therapy, surgical complications, episodes of acute rejection, CMV infection and graft function, assessed by serum creatinine levels at the beginning and in the end of the follow-up period. All patients had pretransplant negative cross-match. In ABO incompatible patients pretransplant isoagglutinine titer was zero. Results. The patients with a spousal donor had worse HLA matching. There were no significant differences between the groups in surgical, infective, immunological complications and graft function. Two patients from the group I returned to hemodialysis after 82 and 22 months due to serious comorbidities. Conclusion. In spite of the worse HLA matching, graft survival and function of renal grafts from spousal donors were as good as those retrieved from related donors.

  1. A biomimetic approach to artificial photosynthesis: Ru(II)-polypyridine photo-sensitisers linked to tyrosine and manganese electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Leif; Sun, Licheng; Åkermark, Björn; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2001-09-01

    The paper describes recent advances towards the construction of functional mimics of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II (PSII) that are coupled to photoinduced charge separation. Some key principles of PSII and artificial systems for light-induced charge accumulation are discussed. Systems are described where biomimetic electron donors - manganese complexes and tyrosine - have been linked to a Ru(II)-polypyridine photosensitiser. Oxidation of the donors by intramolecular electron transfer from the photo-oxidised Ru(III) complex has been studied using optical flash photolysis and EPR experiments. A step-wise electron transfer Mn 2(III,III)→tyrosine→Ru(III) has been demonstrated, in analogy to the reaction on the donor side of PSII. Electron transfer from the tyrosine to Ru(III) was coupled to tyrosine deprotonation. This resulted in a large reorganisation energy and thus a slow reaction rate, unless the tyrosine was hydrogen bonded or already deprotonated. A comparison with analogous reactions in PSII is made. Finally, light-induced oxidation of a manganese dimer linked to a Ru(II)-photosensitiser has been observed. Preliminary results suggest the possibility of photo-oxidising manganese dimers in several steps, which is an important advancement towards water oxidation.

  2. [Evolution of living donor kidney transplantation: historic, statistical, national and own experience data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altes Ineva, María Pilar; Alonso Paz, Pastor; Abadia, Harry; Izquierdo Reyes, Laura; Oppenheimer, Federico; Alvarez-Vijande, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Despite representing a small percentage of the transplant activity in our country, living donor kidney transplantation is a good alternative for the future because the needs exceed the offer of cadaver donor organs. We present the evolution of living donor kidney transplantation in Spain from the beginning in accordance to the ONT (Organización Nacional de trasplantes), and our current situation in comparison with other countries, as well as data obtained from the experience in our hospital which began in 1965.

  3. Deceased donor uterus retrieval - The first Czech experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froněk, J; Janousek, L; Chmel, R

    Uterus transplantation is the youngest solid organ transplantation described in the literature. This procedure is the only treatment method for congenital or acquired Absolute Uterine Factor Infertility. The method is not recognised as standard clinical care yet, there were only some 13 cases performed worldwide so far. There is only one clinical trial worldwide, which has proven both feasibility and also healthy child delivery. Czech Republic Ministry of Health permitted the uterus transplant clinical trial in 2015. The first phase of the surgical part includes performance and description of the uterus retrieval from a deceased donor. The first uterus retrieval from a deceased donor as a part of multi-organ retrieval was performed in the Czech Republic on January 13th, 2016; the case is described in the paper. uterus - transplantation - deceased - donor - retrieval.

  4. The Use of Electron Donors to Increase Stereospecificity in Ziegler-Natta Propylene Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Nouri-Ahangarani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different chemical components in traditional Ziegler–Natta catalytic system include: (1 titanium and vanadium containing compounds, mostly TiCl4, as an active centre, (2 trialkylaluminium-based Lewis acid compounds, especially triethylaluminium, as precatalyst and alkylating agent, and (3 inorganic compounds, specifically MgCl2 and silica, as catalyst supports. Besides these compounds, shortly after the first discovery of Ziegler-Natta catalysts, electron donors have been considered as the key components for MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts, as they improve the stereospecificity and activity of these types of catalysts. Most electron donor compounds have oxygen atom and only a few contain nitrogen atom in their structure. Starting from benzoate for third-generation Ziegler–Natta catalysts, the discovery of new donors has always updated the performance of Ziegler–Natta catalysts. Since the first discovery of these compounds numerous efforts have been devoted in both industry and academic laboratories, not only to discover new electron donors but also to understand their roles in Ziegler–Natta olefin polymerization and suitable MgCl2-alcohol adducts formation. This article reviews the history of such research and development efforts. The first part of the article describes the historical developments of catalyst, with a special focus on donors of industrial importance, followed by an account given on recent trends in the latest donors developed. The next part of the article covers the historical progress toward mechanistic understanding of how donors improve the performance of Ziegler–Natta catalysts and how they undergo decomposition by interaction with Lewis acidic species such as the AlEt3 and TiCl.

  5. What's Mine is Yours: Long-Term Experiences of Good Samaritan Organ Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2018-03-01

    This study is a long-term follow-up on the health and quality of life of Good Samaritan living organ donors who donated an average of 10 years ago. Thirteen donors (kidney, liver, and lung) completed 2 surveys. Data from the RAND 36-Item Health Survey showed that for all domains, as well as the physical and mental component summary scales, the Good Samaritan donor outcomes were superior to the general population ( P good, very good, or excellent health status. Although donors overwhelmingly reported positivity about the donation experience, narrative comments about adverse events and recipient death must keep transplant teams alert to these critical areas. Good Samaritan organ donors come to the hospital healthy, give a gift to a stranger, and sometimes leave and linger disabled. Donor teams should be observing, questioning, and responding in an effort to maximize their welfare. This research is unique because investigation of the long-term health and psychosocial outcomes of Good Samaritan organ donors is rare. Existing studies that report long-term outcomes of kidney donors do not separately analyze Good Samaritan donor data from related living donors.

  6. Data analysis for electronic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, H.

    1981-01-01

    In this lecture I schell attempt to cover the principal off-line software aspects in electronic experiments. Of course, this is too ambitious an undertaking for two reasons: Firstly the field is vast, and some important aspect will certainly have escaped my attention. Secondly, the choice of methods, features, algorithms, and packages presented will be biased through my personal opinion and experience, although to some extent it is influenced as well by the opinion and experience of my colleagues, who, like myself, are working in this field at CERN. Therefore, beware. Whenever I shall claim something to be evident, a matter of experience -- a fact --it ain't necessarily so. On the other hand, it will not be entirely wrong, since our experience is based on something like 30 experiments in high-energy physics using electronic for other people, and although these people are of course misled, one has to admit their existence. (orig.)

  7. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...... otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...

  8. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its......% improved oxygenation. The median time to extubation, time in intensive care unit and the admission period were 1, 7 and 39 days, respectively. CONCLUSION: In the first year after the introduction of EVLP in Denmark, seven pairs of donor lungs that previously would have been rejected have been transplanted...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...

  9. Methanol as electron donor for thermophilic biological sulfate and sulfite reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur oxyanions (e.g. sulfate, sulfite) can be removed from aqueous waste- and process streams by biological reduction with a suitable electron donor to sulfide, followed by partial chemical or biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The aim of the research described in this

  10. Alcohol production through volatile fatty acids reduction with hydrogen as electron donor by mixed cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this research we demonstrated a new method to produce alcohols. It was experimentally feasible to produce ethanol, propanol and butanol from solely volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with hydrogen as electron donor. In batch tests, VFAs such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids were reduced by mixed

  11. Qualitative detection of some electron donor drugs on thin-layer plates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The detection reactions, which occurred instantaneously, were found to utilize the complex formation between chloranilic acid acting as the election acceptor and the drugs acting as the electron donors in non-aqueous media. Using the intensity of the purple coloration of the different complexes as a basis, it was possible to ...

  12. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Donors and Recipients of Living Kidney Donation: A Qualitative Metasummary of Their Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Ummel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the notable growth in the qualitative investigation of living kidney donation, there is value in aggregating results from this body of research to learn from accumulated experience. The present paper aims to draw a complete portrait of living donors' and recipients' experience of donation by metasummarizing published studies. We found that donors' experience, particularly the decision-making process, has been more extensively studied than the recipients' perspective. Donors differ in their initial level of motivation to donate but on the whole report positive experiences and personal benefits. They also identify difficult periods and the need for additional resources. Recipients report an often positive but more ambivalent reaction to donation. In terms of relational issues between dyads, while the topic remains understudied, the donor-recipient relationship and gift reciprocity have received the most attention. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future practice and research.

  14. Biocatalytic photosynthesis with water as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Nam, Dong Heon; Lee, Sahng Ha; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-09-15

    Efficient harvesting of unlimited solar energy and its conversion into valuable chemicals is one of the ultimate goals of scientists. With the ever-increasing concerns about sustainable growth and environmental issues, numerous efforts have been made to develop artificial photosynthetic process for the production of fuels and fine chemicals, thus mimicking natural photosynthesis. Despite the research progress made over the decades, the technology is still in its infancy because of the difficulties in kinetic coupling of whole photocatalytic cycles. Herein, we report a new type of artificial photosynthesis system that can avoid such problems by integrally coupling biocatalytic redox reactions with photocatalytic water splitting. We found that photocatalytic water splitting can be efficiently coupled with biocatalytic redox reactions by using tetracobalt polyoxometalate and Rh-based organometallic compound as hole and electron scavengers, respectively, for photoexcited [Ru(bpy)3](2+). Based on these results, we could successfully photosynthesize a model chiral compound (L-glutamate) using a model redox enzyme (glutamate dehydrogenase) upon in situ photoregeneration of cofactors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complex BH3NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Song, Lingchun; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Qianer

    2004-03-31

    As a simple yet strongly binding electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, BH(3)NH(3) serves as a good example to study the electron pair donor-acceptor complexes. We employed both the ab initio valence bond (VB) and block-localized wave function (BLW) methods to explore the electron transfer from NH(3) to BH(3). Conventionally, EDA complexes have been described by two diabatic states: one neutral state and one ionic charge-transferred state. Ab initio VB self-consistent field (VBSCF) computations generate the energy profiles of the two diabatic states together with the adiabatic (ground) state. Our calculations evidently demonstrated that the electron transfer between NH(3) and BH(3) falls in the abnormal regime where the reorganization energy is less than the exoergicity of the reaction. The nature of the NH(3)-BH(3) interaction is probed by an energy decomposition scheme based on the BLW method. We found that the variation of the charge-transfer energy with the donor-acceptor distance is insensitive to the computation levels and basis sets, but the estimation of the amount of electron transferred heavily depends on the population analysis procedures. The recent resurgence of interest in the nature of the rotation barrier in ethane prompted us to analyze the conformational change of BH(3)NH(3), which is an isoelectronic system with ethane. We found that the preference of the staggered structure over the eclipsed structure of BH(3)NH(3) is dominated by the Pauli exchange repulsion.

  16. Electronic spectrum of a deterministic single-donor device in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuechsle, Martin; Miwa, Jill A.; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a single-electron transistor (SET) based on an individual phosphorus dopant that is deterministically positioned between the dopant-based electrodes of a transport device in silicon. Electronic characterization at mK-temperatures reveals a charging energy that is very similar to the value expected for isolated P donors in a bulk Si environment. Furthermore, we find indications for bulk-like one-electron excited states in the co-tunneling spectrum of the device, in sharp contrast to previous reports on transport through single dopants

  17. Electron cooling experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, R.; Hardek, T.; Johnson, D.E.; Kells, W.; Kerner, V.; Lai, H.; Lennox, A.J.; Mills, F.; Miyahara, Y.; Oleksiuk, L.; Peters, R.; Rhoades, T.; Young, D.; McIntyre, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    A 115 Mev proton beam has been successfully cooled in the Electron Cooling Ring at Fermilab. Initial experiments have measured the longitudinal drag force, transverse damping rate, and equilibrium beam size. The proton beam was cooled by a factor of aproximately 50 in momentum spread in 5 sec, and by a factor of 3 in transverse size in 15 sec. Long term losses were consistent with single scattering from residual gas, with lifetime approximately 1000 sec. Using the measured electron beam temperature T/sub e/.0.8(2) ev, the observed cooling agrees well with expectations from cooling theory. 13 refs

  18. Autotrophic denitrification of nitrate and nitrite using thiosulfate as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Amin, Khurram; Kim, Seungjin; Yoon, Seungjoon; Kwon, Kiwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine the possibility of autotrophic denitritation using thiosulfate as an electron donor, compare the kinetics of autotrophic denitrification and denitritation, and to study the effects of pH and sulfur/nitrogen (S/N) ratio on the denitrification rate of nitrite. Both nitrate and nitrite were removed by autotrophic denitrification using thiosulfate as an electron donor at concentrations up to 800 mg-N/L. Denitrification required a S/N ratio of 5.1 for complete denitrification, but denitritation was complete at a S/N ratio of 2.5, which indicated an electron donor cost savings of 50%. Also, pH during denitrification decreased but increased with nitrite, implying additional alkalinity savings. Finally, the highest specific substrate utilization rate of nitrite was slightly higher than that of nitrate reduction, and biomass yield for denitrification was relatively higher than that of denitritation, showing less sludge production and resulting in lower sludge handling costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interplay of alternative conjugated pathways and steric interactions on the electronic and optical properties of donor-acceptor conjugated polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Igo T.

    2014-01-01

    Donor-acceptor π-conjugated copolymers are of interest for a wide range of electronic applications, including field-effect transistors and solar cells. Here, we present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the impact of varying the conjugation pathway on the geometric, electronic, and optical properties of donor-acceptor systems. We consider both linear ("in series"), traditional conjugation among the donor-acceptor moieties versus structures where the acceptor units are appended orthogonally to the linear, donor-only conjugated backbone. Long-range-corrected hybrid functionals are used in the investigation with the values of the tuned long-range separation parameters providing an estimate of the extent of conjugation as a function of the oligomer architecture. Considerable differences in the electronic and optical properties are determined as a function of the nature of the conjugation pathway, features that should be taken into account in the design of donor-acceptor copolymers.

  20. Survey of Living Organ Donors' Experience and Directions for Process Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Timmy; Dokus, M Katherine; Kelly, Kristin N; Ugoeke, Nene; Rogers, James R; Asham, George; Sharma, Venkatesh Abhishek; Cirillo, Dominic J; Robinson, Mary K; Venniro, Erika K; Taylor, Jeremy G; Orloff, Mark S; McIntosh, Scott; Kashyap, Randeep

    2017-09-01

    Understanding living organ donors' experience with donation and challenges faced during the process is necessary to guide the development of effective strategies to maximize donor benefit and increase the number of living donors. An anonymous self-administered survey, specifically designed for this population based on key informant interviews, was mailed to 426 individuals who donated a kidney or liver at our institution. Quantitative and qualitative methods including open and axial coding were used to analyze donor responses. Of the 141 survey respondents, 94% would encourage others to become donors; however, nearly half (44%) thought the donation process could be improved and offered numerous suggestions. Five major themes arose: (1) desire for greater convenience in testing and scheduling; (2) involvement of previous donors throughout the process; (3) education and promotion of donation through social media; (4) unanticipated difficulties, specifically pain; and (5) financial concerns. Donor feedback has been translated into performance improvements at our hospital, many of which are applicable to other institutions. Population-specific survey development helps to identify vital patient concerns and provides valuable feedback to enhance the delivery of care.

  1. Solid phase electron donors control denitrification in groundwater at agricultural sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Increased concentrations of nitrate in groundwater caused by agricultural use of chemical and organic fertilizers are a concern because of possible risks to environmental and human health. At many sites, these problems are mitigated by natural attenuation of nitrate as a result of microbially mediated denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas. Recent studies have clarified the factors affecting the rates and extents of denitrification in groundwater in agricultural areas. Intensive studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey to study agricultural chemicals in California, Nebraska, Washington, and Maryland using laboratory analyses, field measurements, and flow and transport modeling for monitoring well transects (0.5 to 2.5 km in length) and vertical profiles (0 to 50 m in depth). Groundwater analyses included major ion chemistry, dissolved gases, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, and atmospheric age-tracers. Sediments were analyzed for concentrations of potential electron donors for denitrification, including reduced iron and sulfur, and organic carbon. Geochemical data and mass balance calculations indicated that solid-phase electron donors were an important factor controlling denitrification at these sites. To examine the generality of this result, a mathematical model of vertical flux of water, oxygen, and nitrate was developed and applied at these study sites along with 2 new study sites in Iowa and Mississippi and 8 additional sites from previous studies in Nebraska, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Maryland (2 sites), and New York. Model results confirmed the importance of solid phase electron donors. The normalized reaction rates on an electron flux basis tended to increase with depth from the shallow oxygen reduction zone to the underlying nitrate reduction zone. The pattern of higher rates at depth is consistent with a reaction rate controlled by solid phase donors that are depleted under oxidizing conditions near the surface and in

  2. Organ Donation and Transplantation From Donors With Systemic Infection: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X; Chen, C; Zhou, J; Han, M; Wang, X; Wang, C; He, X

    2016-09-01

    Donors with bacteremia and sepsis are often considered to be controversial for organ retrieval due to potential transmission of an infectious agent to the recipient. Herein we report our initial experience of organ donation and transplantation results from donors with systemic infection. From January 2013 to December 2014, 125 cases of donation were completed in our organ procurement organization including 90 cases of donation after brain death (DBD) and 35 cases of donation after circulatory death (DCD). The results of bacterial culture of the donor's peripheral venous blood (PVB), blood from central venous catheter (BCVC), urine, bronchial aspiration, and tip of central venous catheter (TCVC; Maki's semiquantitative culture) were retrospectively reviewed. All liver transplant recipients received specific antibiotics according the susceptibility profiles of the PVB cultures, and all kidney transplant recipients received specific antibiotics according the susceptibility profiles of the PVB and urine cultures. Bacterial infection diseases transmission from donors of the liver and kidney transplant recipients were also retrospectively reviewed. The positive rates of the bacterial culture of the donor's bronchial aspiration, PVB, BCVC, TCVC, and urine were 46.4% (39/84), 20.2% (24/119), 15.8% (12/76), 11.1% (3/27), and 7.0% (8/115), respectively. Only 28.1% (9/32) of donors with positive cultures of PVB or urine received specific antimicrobial therapy before harvesting. Twenty-two livers and 46 kidneys from donors with systemic infection (positive PVB culture) were transplanted, and no case of bacterial infection diseases transmission occurred in the recipients. In the circumstance of donor systemic infection with positive bacterial culture of PVB, the liver and kidney can be transplanted safely with prophylactic antibiotics. Donors with systemic infection are not a contraindication for organ donation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlation between proteinuria level and renal morphology with special reference to electron microscopy in kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacar, Ahmet; Karabay, Gülten; Unlükal, Nejat; Yazici, Canan; Ozdemir, Handan

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between protein level in urine and renal morphology in kidney transplant donors, as well as to detect the role of electron microscopy. For this purpose, kidney biopsies of 10 donors with urine protein levels were evaluated. Seven patients were female and three were male. Two had physiologic proteinuria (150 mg/24h), four had non-significant proteinuria (150-300 mg/24h), and three had significant (> 300 mg/24h) proteinuria. Serum creatinine levels were in normal ranges in all patients except for one who had a slight increase (1.76 mg/dL). Seven cases were reported to have normal or nonspecific light microscopic findings. Two of those seven cases had physiologic proteinuria, three had non-significant proteinuria, and two had significant proteinuria. One case had IgA nephropathy with significant proteinuria. One donor had early stage focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with non-significant proteinuria, and one donor had focal interstitial fibrosis with normal urine protein level. There was no statistically significant difference between score means of ultrastructural morphology of the six patients with same patients' light microscopic results and score means of light microscopic results with urine protein levels of all patients. However, there was a significant difference between score means of ultrastructural morphology with urine protein levels of those six patients. In conclusion, urine protein levels and light microscopic findings did not always reflect the detailed morphology alone and together. Therefore, combining with electron microscopic examination could be more beneficial in relieving problems occurring in long-term prognoses.

  4. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  5. Pseudoazurin from Sinorhizobium meliloti as an electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase: influence of the redox partner on the reduction potentials of the enzyme copper centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Félix M; Marangon, Jacopo; Neuman, Nicolás I; Cristaldi, Julio C; Brambilla, Silvina M; Guerrero, Sergio A; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2014-08-01

    Pseudoazurin (Paz) is the physiological electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase (Nir), which catalyzes the reduction of NO2 (-) to NO. The Nir reaction mechanism involves the reduction of the type 1 (T1) copper electron transfer center by the external physiological electron donor, intramolecular electron transfer from the T1 copper center to the T2 copper center, and nitrite reduction at the type 2 (T2) copper catalytic center. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of Paz from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (SmPaz), the ability of SmPaz to act as an electron donor partner of S. meliloti 2011 Nir (SmNir), and the redox properties of the metal centers involved in the electron transfer chain. Gel filtration chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis together with UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies revealed that as-purified SmPaz is a mononuclear copper-containing protein that has a T1 copper site in a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry. The SmPaz/SmNir interaction investigated electrochemically showed that SmPaz serves as an efficient electron donor to SmNir. The formal reduction potentials of the T1 copper center in SmPaz and the T1 and T2 copper centers in SmNir, evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and by UV-vis- and EPR-mediated potentiometric titrations, are against an efficient Paz T1 center to Nir T1 center to Nir T2 center electron transfer. EPR experiments proved that as a result of the SmPaz/SmNir interaction in the presence of nitrite, the order of the reduction potentials of SmNir reversed, in line with T1 center to T2 center electron transfer being thermodynamically more favorable.

  6. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Yan, Tingfen [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  7. Influence of bicarbonate, sulfate, and electron donors on biological reduction of uranium and microbial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Wensui [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Wu Wei-Min; Criddle, C.S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Yan Tingfen [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Jardine, P.M.; Gu Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Zhou Jizhong [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    2007-12-15

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low-bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high-bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and groundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction. (orig.)

  8. Structure and reactivity in neutral organic electron donors derived from 4-dimethylaminopyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Garnier

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects on the redox properties of modifying the molecular skeleton of neutral bis-2-(4-dimethylaminopyridinylidene electron donors, derived from 4-dimethylaminopyridine (4-DMAP, have been explored, by varying two parameters: (i the length of a polymethylene chain linking the two pyridine-derived rings and (ii the nature of the nitrogen substituents on the 4 and 4′ positions of the precursor pyridines. Restricting the bridge length to two methylene units significantly altered the redox profile, while changes in the nitrogen-substituents at the 4 and 4′ positions led to only slight changes in the redox potentials.

  9. Reactive Black 5 as electron donor and/or electron acceptor in dual chamber of solar photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Voon, Chun-Hong; Wong, Yee-Shian; Yusuf, Sara Yasina; Yusoff, NikAthirah; Lee, Sin-Li

    2018-03-19

    The role of azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) as an electron donor and/or electron acceptor could be distinguished in dual chamber of photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC). The introduction of RB5 in anode chamber increased the voltage generation in the system since degradation of RB5 might produce electrons which also would transfer through external circuit to the cathode chamber. The removal efficiency of RB5 with open and closed circuit was 8.5% and 13.6%, respectively and removal efficiency for open circuit was low due to the fact that recombination of electron-hole pairs might happen in anode chamber since without connection to the cathode, electron cannot be transferred. The degradation of RB5 in cathode chamber with absence of oxygen showed that electrons from anode chamber was accepted by dye molecules to break its azo bond. The presence of oxygen in cathode chamber would improve the oxygen reduction rate which occurred at Platinum-loaded carbon (Pt/C) cathode electrode. The V oc , J sc and P max for different condition of ultrapure water at cathode chamber also affected their fill factor. The transportation of protons to cathode chamber through Nafion membrane could decrease the pH of ultrapure water in cathode chamber and undergo hydrogen evolution reaction in the absence of oxygen which then increased degradation rate of RB5 as well as its electricity generation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term experiences of Norwegian live kidney donors: qualitative in-depth interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Käthe B; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad; Lennerling, Annette; Andersen, Marit Helen

    2017-02-16

    Live kidney donation is generally viewed as a welcome treatment option for severe kidney disease. However, there is a disparity in the body of research on donor experiences and postdonation outcome, and lack of knowledge on long-term consequences described by the donors. This study was conducted to provide insight into donors' subjective meanings and interpretation of their experiences ∼10 years after donation. Qualitative explorative in-depth interviews. The sampling strategy employed maximum variation. Setting Oslo University Hospital is the national centre for organ transplantation and donation in Norway, and there are 26 local nephrology centres. 16 donors representing all parts of Norway who donated a kidney in 2001-2004 participated in the study. The interviews were analysed using an interpretative approach. The analysis resulted in 4 main themes; the recipient outcome justified long-term experiences, family dynamics-tension still under the surface, ambivalence-healthy versus the need for regular follow-up, and life must go on. These themes reflect the complexity of live kidney donation, which fluctuated from positive experiences such as pride and feeling privileged to adverse experiences such as altered family relationships or reduced health. Live kidney donors seemed to possess resilient qualities that enabled them to address the long-term consequences of donation. The challenge is to provide more uniform information about long-term consequences. In future research, resilient qualities could be a topic to explore in live donation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Spin noise spectroscopy on donors in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernien, Hannes; Mueller, Georg; Roemer, Michael; Huebner, Jens; Oestreich, Michael [Institute for Solid State Physics, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In recent experiments spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has proven to be a very sensitive technique to study electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at thermal equilibrium. Here we present SNS-measurements on donor bound electrons in very low doped bulk GaAs. In this environment the donors do not interact with each other and form artificial atoms. We discuss the detection of single donor bound electron spins, which should have extremely long spin relaxation times compared to ensemble spin relaxation times. In further experiments the electron bound to the donor will be used to probe and study the local nuclear magnetic field at the donor site.

  12. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  13. The impact of alkali metal halide electron donor complexes in the photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuzwayo, Z., E-mail: zack.khuzwayo@up.ac.za; Chirwa, E.M.N

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Facilitation of photocatalysis using simple metal-halides as VB hole scavengers. • Recombination prevention by coupled valence and conduction band approaches. • Determination of anions critical levels beyond which process retardation occurs. • Determination of the photocatalytic process rate of reaction kinetics. - Abstract: The performance of photocatalytic oxidation of chemical pollutants is subjected to the presence of anion complexes in natural waters. This study investigated the influence of alkali metal (Na{sup +} (sodium), K{sup +} (potassium)) halides (Cl{sup −} (chloride), Br{sup −} (bromide), F{sup −} (fluoride)) as inorganic ion sources in the photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in batch systems. It was found that the exclusive presence of halides in the absence of an electron acceptor adequately facilitated the photocatalyst process below critical levels of anion populations, where beyond the critical point the process was significantly hindered. Below the determined critical point, the performance in some cases near matches that of the facilitation of the photocatalytic process by exclusive oxygen, acting as an electron scavenger. The coupling of halide ions and oxygenation presented significantly improved photo-oxidation of PCP, this was confirmed by the inclusion of formic acid as a comparative electron donor. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic expression was used to calculate the performance rate kinetics. The probable impact of the halide anions was discussed with regards to the process of electron hole pair recombination prevention.

  14. Influence of Electron Donor Type and Concentration on Microbial Population Structure During Uranium Reduction and Remobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, R. A.; Brodie, E. L.; Kim, Y.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Desantis, T. Z.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Firestone, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    Enhanced reductive precipitation of U(VI) through stimulation of indigenous microorganisms is an attractive, low- cost strategy for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwaters and sediments. The rate of organic carbon (OC) supply determines not only the amount of electron donor available for bioreduction of U(VI), but also affects the resulting concentration of aqueous (bi)carbonate generated by microbial respiration. Increased (bi)carbonate concentrations drive aqueous U(VI) concentrations to higher levels and make U(IV) oxidation under reducing conditions favorable. We designed a long-term column study to investigate the effects of different OC forms and supply rates on the stability of bioreduced U and on the structure and dynamics of the microbial communities. OC was supplied as acetate or lactate at four different concentrations and columns were sampled at three time points. In the columns receiving high OC supply the time points correspond to a phases of net U-reduction, U(IV) reoxidation and U(VI) remobilization, and stable levels of U mobilization. DNA was extracted from column sediments, 16S rRNA genes were amplified and the communities analyzed using a high-density phylogenetic microarray (PhyloChip). Lactate and acetate supplied at equivalent rates had a similar impact on uranium mobility with higher OC resulting in re-oxidation of U(IV) after an initial period of U(VI) reduction. Similarly, organic carbon (OC) supply rate, not OC form, had the largest impact on microbial community structure. The diversity (richness) of bacterial and archaeal communities increased over time with those receiving lactate having higher initial richness. Known U-reducing bacteria were present in all columns and time points, however the dynamics of these organisms varied with both organic carbon supply rate and form. This data demonstrates that the initial rate of electron donor supply during heavy metal remediation strongly impacts microbial community development

  15. Effects of donor-acceptor electronic interactions on the rates of gas-phase metallocene electron-exchange reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, D.K.; Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S.; Weaver, M.J. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States))

    1991-05-30

    Rate constants for electron self-exchange, k{sub ex}, of five cobaltocenium-cobaltocene and ferrocenium-ferrocene couples in the gas phase have been measured by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in order to explore the possible effects of donor-acceptor electronic coupling on gas-phase redox reactivity. The systems studied, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0}, Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} (Cp = cyclopentadienyl), the decamethyl derivative Cp{prime}{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0}, carboxymethyl(cobaltocenium-cobaltocene) (Cp{sub 2}{sup e}Co{sup +/0}), and hydroxymethyl(ferrocenium-ferrocene) (HMFc{sup +/0}), were selected in view of the substantial variations in electronic coupling inferred on the basis of their solvent-dependent reactivities and theoretical grounds. The sequence of k{sub ex} values determined in the gas phase, Cp{sub 2}{sup e}Co{sup +/0} {approx} Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0} > Cp{prime}{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} > HMFc{sup +/0} > Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0}, is roughly similar to that observed in solution, although the magnitude (up to 5-fold) of the k{sub ex} variations is smaller in the former case. The likely origins of these differences in gas-phase reactivity are discussed in light of the known variations in the electronic coupling matrix element H{sub 12}, inner-shell reorganization energy {Delta}E*, and gas-phase ion-molecule interaction energy {Delta}E{sub w} extracted from solution-phase rates, structural data, and theoretical calculations. It is concluded that the observed variations in gas-phase k{sub ex} values, especially for Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} versus Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0}, arise predominantly from the presence of weaker donor-acceptor orbital overlap for the ferrocene couples, yielding inefficient electron tunneling for a substantial fraction of the gas-phase ion-molecule encounters. The anticipated differences as well as similarities of such nonadiabatic effects for gas-phase and solution electron-transfer processes are briefly outlined.

  16. Impact of the electron donor on in situ microbial nitrate reduction in Opalinus Clay: results from the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleyen, N.; Smets, S. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Small, J. [National Nuclear Laboratory NLL, Warrington (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-04-15

    At the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland), an in situ experiment is being carried out to examine the fate of nitrate leaching from nitrate-containing bituminized radioactive waste, in a clay host rock for geological disposal. Such a release of nitrate may cause a geochemical perturbation of the clay, possibly affecting some of the favorable characteristics of the host rock. In this in situ experiment, combined transport and reactivity of nitrate is studied inside anoxic and water-saturated chambers in a borehole in the Opalinus Clay. Continuous circulation of the solution from the borehole to the surface equipment allows a regular sampling and online monitoring of its chemical composition. In this paper, in situ microbial nitrate reduction in the Opalinus Clay is discussed, in the presence or absence of additional electron donors relevant for the disposal concept and likely to be released from nitrate-containing bituminized radioactive waste: acetate (simulating bitumen degradation products) and H{sub 2} (originating from radiolysis and corrosion in the repository). The results of these tests indicate that - in case microorganisms would be active in the repository or the surrounding clay - microbial nitrate reduction can occur using electron donors naturally present in the clay (e.g. pyrite, dissolved organic matter). Nevertheless, non-reactive transport of nitrate in the clay is expected to be the main process. In contrast, when easily oxidizable electron donors would be available (e.g. acetate and H{sub 2}), the microbial activity will be strongly stimulated. Both in the presence of H{sub 2} and acetate, nitrite and nitrogenous gases are predominantly produced, although some ammonium can also be formed when H{sub 2} is present. The reduction of nitrate in the clay could have an impact on the redox conditions in the pore-water and might also lead to a gas-related perturbation of the host rock, depending on the electron donor used during denitrification

  17. Phenothiazine-Anthraquinone Donor-Acceptor Molecules: Synthesis, Electronic Properties and DFT-TDDFT Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Mao, Wei-Li; Hu, Yun-Xia; Tian, Zi-Qi; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Meng, Qing-Jin

    2009-08-01

    Two donor-acceptor molecules with different π-electron conjugative units, 1-((10-methyl-10H-phenothiazin-3-yl)ethynyl)anthracene-9,10-dione (AqMp) and 1,1'-(10-methyl-10H-phenothiazine-3,7-diyl)bis(ethyne-2,1-diyl)dianthracene-9,10-dione (Aq2Mp), have been synthesized and investigated for their photochemical and electrochemical properties. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insights into their molecular geometry, electronic structures, and properties. These studies satisfactorily explain the electrochemistry of the two compounds and indicate that larger conjugative effect leads to smaller HOMO-LUMO gap (Eg) in Aq2Mp. Both compounds show ICT and π → π* transitions in the UV-visible range in solution, and Aq2Mp has a bathochromic shift and shows higher oscillator strength of the absorption, which has been verified by time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations. The differences between AqMp and Aq2Mp indicate that the structural and conjugative effects have great influence on the electronic properties of the molecules.

  18. Potential donor families' experiences of organ and tissue donation-related communication, processes and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marck, C H; Neate, S L; Skinner, M; Dwyer, B; Hickey, B B; Radford, S T; Weiland, T J; Jelinek, G A

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to describe the experiences of families of potential organ and tissue donors eligible for donation after circulatory death or brain death. Forty-nine family members of potential donors from four Melbourne hospitals were interviewed to assess their experiences of communication, processes and the outcomes of donation. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Families expressed a range of perspectives on themes of communication, hospital processes and care, the processes of consent and donation and reflected on decisions and outcomes. They expressed satisfaction overall with communication when receiving bad news, discussing death and donation. Honest and frank communication and being kept up-to-date and prepared for potential outcomes were important aspects for families, especially those of post circulatory death donors. Participants reported high levels of trust in healthcare professionals and satisfaction with the level of care received. Many donor families indicated the process was lengthy and stressful, but not significantly enough to adversely affect their satisfaction with the outcome. Both the decision itself and knowing others' lives had been saved provided them with consolation. No consenting families, and only some non-consenting families, regretted their decisions. Many expressed they would benefit from a follow-up opportunity to ask questions and clarify possible misunderstandings. Overall, while experiences varied, Australian families valued frank communication, trusted health professionals, were satisfied with the care their family member received and with donation processes, despite some apparent difficulties. Family satisfaction, infrequently assessed, is an important outcome and these findings may assist education for Australian organ donation professionals.

  19. Electron Spin Resonance Experiments on a Single Electron in Silicon Implanted with Phosphorous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, Dwight R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N.; Ten Eyck, G.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk we will discuss the results of our ongoing experiments involving electron spin resonance (ESR) on a single electron in a natural silicon sample. The sample consists of an SET, defined by lithographic polysilicon gates, coupled to nearby phosphorous donors. The SET is used to detect charge transitions and readout the spin of the electron being investigated with ESR. The measurements were done with the sample at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the presence of a 1.3 T magnetic field. We will present data demonstrating Rabi oscillations of a single electron in this system as well as measurements of the coherence time, T2. We will also discuss our results using these and various other pulsing schemes in the context of a donor-SET system. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Study on Hydrogen Sensitivity of Ziegler–Natta Catalysts with Novel Cycloalkoxy Silane Compounds as External Electron Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two novel cycloalkoxy silane compounds (ED1 and ED2 were synthesized and used as the external electron donors (EEDs in Ziegler–Natta catalysts with diethyl 2,3-diisopropylsuccinate as internal electron donor. The results indicated that the Ziegler–Natta catalysts using ED1 and ED2 as EEDs had high catalytic activities and good stereoselectivities. The melt flow rate (MFR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC results revealed that the obtained polypropylene has higher MFR and lower average molecular weights than the commercial EED cyclohexyl methyl dimethoxysilane. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results indicated that new isospecific active centers formed after the introduction of new external donors. The work implied that the novel EEDs could improve the hydrogen sensitivities of the catalyst system and obtain polymers with high melt flow rate.

  1. Recruitment of feces donors among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Jørgensen, Simon Mark; Erikstrup, Christian; Dinh, Khoa Manh

    2018-01-01

    As the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained momentum, an increasing need for continuous access to healthy feces donors has developed. Blood donors constitute a healthy subset of the general population and may serve as an appropriate group for recruitment. In this study, we...... investigated the suitability of blood donors as feces donors. In a prospective cohort study, we recruited blood donors onsite at a public Danish blood bank. Following their consent, the blood donors underwent a stepwise screening process: First, blood donors completed an electronic pre-screening questionnaire...... to rule out predisposing risk factors. Second, eligible blood donors had blood and fecal samples examined. Of 155 blood donors asked to participate, 137 (88%) completed the electronic pre-screening questionnaire, 16 declined, and 2 were excluded. Of the 137 donors who completed the questionnaire, 79 (58...

  2. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  3. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  4. Functional pyruvate formate lyase pathway expressed with two different electron donors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiming; Dai, Zongjie; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Pyruvate formate lyase (PFL) is characterized as an enzyme functional at anaerobic conditions, since the radical in the enzyme's active form is sensitive to oxygen. In this study, PFL and its activating enzyme from Escherichia coli were expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking pyruvate decarboxylase and having a reduced glucose uptake rate due to a mutation in the transcriptional regulator Mth1, IMI076 (Pdc(-) MTH1-ΔT ura3-52). PFL was expressed with two different electron donors, reduced ferredoxin or reduced flavodoxin, respectively, and it was found that the coexpression of either of these electron donors had a positive effect on growth under aerobic conditions, indicating increased activity of PFL. The positive effect on growth was manifested as a higher final biomass concentration and a significant increase in transcription of formate dehydrogenases. Among the two electron donors reduced flavodoxin was found to be a better electron donor than reduced ferredoxin. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The donor management algorithm in transplantation of a composite facial tissue allograft.. First experience in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Uyba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the period from 2005 to December 2015, 37 transplantations of vascularized composite facial tissue allografts (VCAs were performed in the world. A vascularized composite tissue allotransplantation has been recognized as a solid organ transplantation rather than a special kind of tissue transplantation. The recent classification of composite tissue allografts into the category of donor organs gave rise to a number of organizational, ethical, legal, technical, and economic problems. In May 2015, the first successful transplantation of a composite facial tissue allograft was performed in Russia. The article describes our experience of multiple team interactions at donor management stage when involved in the identification, conditioning, harvesting, and delivering donor organs to various hospitals. A man, aged 51 years old, diagnosed with traumatic brain injury became a donor after the diagnosis of brain deathhad been made, his death had been ascertained, and the requested consent for organ donation had been obtained from relatives. At donor management stage, a tracheostomy was performed and a posthumous facial mask was molded. The "face first, concurrent completion" algorithm was chosen for organ harvesting and facial VCA procurement; meanwhile, the facial allograft was procured as the "full face" category. The total surgery duration from the incision to completing the procurement (including that of solid organs made 8 hours 20 minutes. Immediately after the procurement, the facial VCA complex was sent to the St. Petersburg clinic by medical aircraft transportation, and was there transplanted 9 hours later. Donor kidneys were transported to Moscow bycivil aviation and transplanted 17 and 20 hours later. The authors believe that this clinical case report demonstrates the feasibility and safety of multiple harvesting of solid organs and a vascularized composite facial tissue allograft. However, this kind of surgery requires an essential

  6. Self-assembly properties of semiconducting donor-acceptor-donor bithienyl derivatives of tetrazine and thiadiazole-effect of the electron accepting central ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapala, Joanna; Knor, Marek; Jaroch, Tomasz; Maranda-Niedbala, Agnieszka; Kurach, Ewa; Kotwica, Kamil; Nowakowski, Robert; Djurado, David; Pecaut, Jacques; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Pron, Adam

    2013-11-26

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the effect of the electron-accepting unit and the alkyl substituent's position on the type and extent of 2D supramolecular organization of penta-ring donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) semiconductors, consisting of either tetrazine or thiadiazole central acceptor ring symmetrically attached to two bithienyl groups. Microscopic observations of monomolecular layers on HOPG of four alkyl derivatives of the studied adsorbates indicate significant differences in their 2D organizations. Ordered monolayers of thiadiazole derivatives are relatively loose and, independent of the position of alkyl substituents, characterized by large intermolecular separation of acceptor units in the adjacent molecules located in the face-to-face configuration. The 2D supramolecular architecture in both derivatives of thiadiazole is very sensitive to the alkyl substituent's position. Significantly different behavior is observed for derivatives of tetrazine (which is a stronger electron acceptor). Stronger intermolecular DA interactions in these adsorbates generate an intermolecular shift in the monolayer, which is a dominant factor determining the 2D structural organization. As a consequence of this molecular arrangement, tetrazine groups (A segments) face thiophene rings (D segments) of the neighboring molecules. Monolayers of tetrazine derivatives are therefore much more densely packed and characterized by similar π-stacking of molecules independently of the position of alkyl substituents. Moreover, a comparative study of 3D supramolecular organization, deduced from the X-ray diffraction patterns, is also presented clearly confirming the polymorphism of the studied adsorbates.

  7. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, D.; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, J.; Mokhov, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation "sandwich method" (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 1017 cm-3 at T = 10-40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic "k1" and "k2" sites (Nk1,k2) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T9, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T1-1 for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal ("h") site (Nh) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (Tm-1) with the temperature increase for the Nh donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the Nk1,k2 donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time Tm for the Nk1,k2 donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at Nh and Nk1,k2 sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  8. Outcome of deceased donor renal transplantation - A single-center experience from developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu V Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation (RTx is considered as the best therapeutic modality for patient suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Dearth of donor kidneys is a major problem everywhere, and deceased donor renal transplantation (DDRTx is seen as at least a partial solution. Even so, DDRTx accounts for only less than 4% of RTx in India. We report our 6-year single-center experience on DDRTx vis-à-vis patient/graft survival, graft function in terms of serum creatinine (SCr, rejection episodes, and delayed graft function (DGF. Between January 2005 and March 2011, 236 DDRTx were performed. Majority of the donors were those with brain death due to road traffic/cerebrovascular accidents. The commonest recipient diseases leading to ESRD were chronic glomerulonephritis (42.8%, diabetes (12.7%, and hypertension (10.6%. Mean recipient age was 36.2 ± 14.2 years; 162 were males and 74 were females. Mean donor age was 45.3 ± 17.13 years; 144 were males and 92 were females. Mean dialysis duration pre-transplantation was 18.5 ± 2.5 months. All recipients received single-dose rabbit-anti-thymocyte globulin induction and steroids, calcinueurin inhibitor, and mycophenolate mofetil/azathioprine for maintenance immunosuppression. Delayed graft function was observed in 29.6% patients and 22% had biopsy-proven acute rejection. Over the mean follow-up of 2.18 ± 1.75 years, patient and graft survival rates were 74.57% and 86.8%, respectively, with mean SCr of 1.42 ± 0.66 mg%. DDRTx achieves acceptable graft function with patient/graft survival, encouraging the use of this approach in view of organ shortage.

  9. Living Related Donor Kidney Transplantation in Libya: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elusta Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report the experience from a single center in Libya, on the prevailing live-related kidney transplantation program. The results of three years work on kidney transplantation at the Tripoli Central Hospital (National Organ Transplant Program in Libya were evaluated. The transplant program was launched on 17 th August, 2004 and 135 patients have been transplanted since then till 17 th August, 2007. All donors and recipients were screened thoroughly prior to transplant and monitored closely in the post-transplant period. Our immuno-suppressive protocol was cyclosporine-based. Among the 135 accepted pairs, donors and reci-pients were genetically-related in 133 cases (98.5% and emotionally-related in two others. The mean donor age was 37 ± 9.5 years (range 18-56 years and recipient age 37 ± 13.6 years (range 7-67 years. There were 95 males (70.4% and 40 females (29.6% among the recipients while among the donors, there were 102 males (75.6% and 33 females (24.4%. Delayed graft function was seen in three patients (2.2%, acute rejection in six (4.4%, post-transplant urinary tract infection in six (4.4%, pneumonia in three (2.2%, ureteric kink in two (1.5% and urine leak in four (3.0%. Graft survival at 36 months was 93.3% while patient survival at the same period was 96.3%. This report indicates that the results of our transplant program are good and comparable with other international programs.

  10. Electronic states and optical properties of single donor in GaN conical quantum dot with spherical edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aouami, A.; Feddi, E.; El-Yadri, M.; Aghoutane, N.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.; Phuc, Huynh Vinh

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical investigation of quantum confinement effects on the electron and single donor states in GaN conical quantum dot with spherical edge. In the framework of the effective mass approximation, the Schrödinger equations of electron and donor have been solved analytically in an infinite potential barrier model. Our calculations show that the energies of electron and donor impurity are affected by the two characteristic parameters of the structure which are the angle Ω and the radial dimension R. We show that, despite the fact that the reduction of the two parameters Ω and R leads to the same confinement effects, the energy remains very sensitive to the variation of the radial part than the variation of the angular part. The analysis of the photoionization cross-section corresponding to optical transitions between the conduction band and the first donor energy level shows clearly that the reduction of the radius R causes a shift in resonance peaks towards the high energies. On the other hand, the optical transitions between 1 s - 1 p , 1 p - 1 d and 1 p - 2 s show that the increment of the conical aperture Ω (or reduction of R) implies a displacement of the excitation energy to higher energies.

  11. Don't Take 'No' For An Answer: An Experiment With Actual Organ Donor Registrations

    OpenAIRE

    Judd B. Kessler; Alvin E. Roth

    2014-01-01

    Over 10,000 people in the U.S. die each year while waiting for an organ. Attempts to increase organ transplantation have focused on changing the registration question from an opt-in frame to an active choice frame. We analyze this change in California and show it decreased registration rates. Similarly, a "field in the lab" experiment run on actual organ donor registration decisions finds no increase in registrations resulting from an active choice frame. In addition, individuals are more lik...

  12. Experiences of donor families after consenting to organ donation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntzen, Helene; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the experience of Norwegian donor families during organ donation after brain death. This was a qualitative study using personal interviews. Twenty donor-family members from thirteen different situations were interviewed about their experience of being a close relative in an organ donation situation. The principles of qualitative content analysis were used. An experience of strain caused by the organ donation situation was identified. Lack of comprehension and awareness of the process of organ donation contributed to this, and continuing information after the consent was given appeared to be necessary. Reconciliation with the decision of organ donation and the subsequent situation was gained through understanding the organ donation process, through recognition of the increased strain and through satisfaction resulting from the contribution made by organ donation. Healthcare personnel were key persons in contributing to such understanding and recognition. When attending to families in an organ donation situation, the focus must be on ensuring comprehension of the situation both through information provided in the hospital and during follow-up. It seems essential to arrange for a period of parting that can contribute to reconciliation, and to offer follow-up according to individual needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An effective Hamiltonian approach for Donor-Bridge-Acceptor electronic transitions: Exploring the role of bath memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Bittner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here a formally exact model for electronic transitions between an initial (donor and final (acceptor states linked by an intermediate (bridge state. Our model incorporates a common set of vibrational modes that are coupled to the donor, bridge, and acceptor states and serves as a dissipative bath that destroys quantum coherence between the donor and acceptor. Taking the memory time of the bath as a free parameter, we calculate transition rates for a heuristic 3-state/2 mode Hamiltonian system parameterized to represent the energetics and couplings in a typical organic photovoltaic system. Our results indicate that if the memory time of the bath is of the order of 10-100 fs, a two-state kinetic (i.e., incoherent hopping model will grossly underestimate overall transition rate.

  14. Eight-Electron Silver and Mixed Gold/Silver Nanoclusters Stabilized by Selenium Donor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wan-Ting; Lee, Po-Yi; Liao, Jian-Hong; Chakrahari, Kiran Kumarvarma; Kahlal, Samia; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

    2017-08-14

    The first atomically and structurally precise silver-nanoclusters stabilized by Se-donor ligands, [Ag 20 {Se 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 12 ] (3) and [Ag 21 {Se 2 P(OEt) 2 } 12 ] + (4), were isolated by ligand replacement reaction of [Ag 20 {S 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 12 ] (1) and [Ag 21 {S 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 12 ] + (2), respectively. Furthermore, doping reactions of 4 with Au(PPh 3 )Cl resulted in the formation of [AuAg 20 {Se 2 P(OEt) 2 } 12 ] + (5). Structures of 3, 4, and 5 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The anatomy of cluster 3 with an Ag 20 core having C 3 symmetry is very similar to that of its dithiophosphate analogue 1. Clusters 4 and 5 exhibit an Ag 21 and Au@Ag 20 core of O h symmetry composed of eight silver capping atoms in a cubic arrangement and encapsulating an Ag 13 and Au@Ag 12 centered icosahedron, respectively. Both ligand exchange and heteroatom doping result in significant changes in optical and emissive properties for chalcogen-passivated silver nanoparticles, which have been theoretically confirmed as 8-electron superatoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Donor-Acceptor Interaction Determines the Mechanism of Photoinduced Electron Injection from Graphene Quantum Dots into TiO2: π-Stacking Supersedes Covalent Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Casanova, David; Fang, Wei-Hai; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2017-02-22

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) constitutes the key step in conversion of solar energy into electricity and fuels. Required for fast and efficient charge separation, strong donor-acceptor interaction is typically achieved through covalent chemical bonding and leads to fast, adiabatic ET. Focusing on interfaces of pyrene, coronene, and a graphene quantum dot (GQD) with TiO 2 , we demonstrate the opposite situation: covalent bonding leads to weak coupling and nonadiabatic (NA) ET, while through-space π-electron interaction produces adiabatic ET. Using real-time time-dependent density functional theory combined with NA molecular dynamics, we simulate photoinduced ET into TiO 2 from flat and vertically placed molecules and GQD containing commonly used carboxylic acid linkers. Both arrangements can be achieved experimentally with GQDs and other two-dimensional materials, such as MoS 2 . The weak through-bond donor-acceptor coupling is attributed to the π-electron withdrawing properties of the carboxylic acid group. The calculated ET time scales are in excellent agreement with pump-probe optical experiments. The simulations show that the ET proceeds faster than energy relaxation. The electron couples to a broad spectrum of vibrational modes, ranging from 100 cm -1 large-scale motions to 1600 cm -1 C-C stretches. Compared to graphene/TiO 2 heterojunctions, the molecule/TiO 2 and GQD/TiO 2 systems exhibit energy gaps, allowing for longer-lived excited states and hot electron injection, facilitating charge separation and higher voltage. The reported state-of-the-art simulations generate a detailed time-domain, atomistic description of the interfacial charge and energy transfer and relaxation processes, and demonstrate that the fundamental principles leading to efficient charge separation in nanoscale materials depend strongly and often unexpectedly on the type of donor-acceptor interaction. Understanding these principles is critical to the development of highly

  16. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  17. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  18. Improvements of fill factor in solar cells based on blends of polyfluorene copolymers as electron donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadisa, Abay; Zhang, Fengling; Sharma, Deepak; Svensson, Mattias; Andersson, Mats R.; Inganaes, Olle

    2007-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of solar cells based on alternating polyfluorene copolymers, poly(2,7-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene)-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3' -benzothia diazole)) (APFO-3), and poly(2,7-(9,9-didodecyl-fluorene)-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3' -benzothiadiazole)) (APFO-4), blended with an electron acceptor fullerene molecule [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), have been investigated and compared. The two copolymers have the same aromatic backbone structure but differ by the length of their alkyl side chain. The overall photovoltaic performance of the solar cells is comparable irrespective of the copolymer used in the active layer. However, the fill factor (FF) values of the devices are strongly affected by the copolymer type. Higher FF values were realized in solar cells with APFO-4 (with longer alkyl side chain)/PCBM bulk heterojunction active layer. On the other hand, devices with blends of APFO-3/APFO-4/PCBM were found to render fill factor values that are intermediate between the values obtained in solar cells with APFO-3/PCBM and APFO-4/PCBM active film. Upon using APFO-3/APFO-4 blends as electron donors, the cell efficiency can be enhanced by about 16% as compared to cells with either APFO-3 or APFO-4. The transport of holes in each polymer obeys the model of hopping transport in disordered media. However, the degree of energetic barrier against hopping was found to be larger in APFO-3. The tuning of the photovoltaic parameters will be discussed based on studies of hole transport in the pure polymer films, and morphology of blend layers. The effect of bipolar transport in PCBM will also be discussed

  19. A combined study of mesomorphism, optical, and electronic properties of donor-acceptor columnar liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichhorn, S.H.; Shuai, C.; Ahmida, M.; Demenev, A.; Kayal, H.; Raad, F.S.; Kaafarani, B.R.; Patwardhan, S.; Grozema, F.C.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.; Taerum, T.; Perepichka, D.F.; Klenkler, R.

    2011-01-01

    Donor-acceptor structures have recently gained great popularity for the design of low band gap polymeric organic semiconductors. Presented here is a first systematic study of organic semiconductors based on columnar liquid crystals that consist of discotic and board-shaped donor-acceptor structures.

  20. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  1. Transport experiments with Dirac electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkelsky, Joseph George

    This thesis presents transport experiments performed on solid state systems in which the behavior of the charge carriers can be described by the Dirac equation. Unlike the massive carriers in a typical material, in these systems the carriers behave like massless fermions with a photon-like dispersion predicted to greatly modify their spin and charge transport properties. The first system studied is graphene, a crystalline monolayer of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The band structure calculated from the hexagonal lattice has the form of the massless Dirac Hamiltonian. At the charge neutral Dirac point, we find that application of a magnetic field drives a transition to an insulating state. We also study the thermoelectric properties of graphene and find that the states near the Dirac point have a unique response compared to those at higher charge density. The second system is the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3, where a Dirac-like dispersion for states on the 2D surface of the insulating 3D crystal arises as a result of the topology of the 3D bands and time reversal symmetry. To access the transport properties of the 2D states, we suppress the remnant bulk conduction channel by chemical doping and electrostatic gating. In bulk crystals we find strong quantum corrections to transport at low temperature when the bulk conduction channel is maximally suppressed. In microscopic crystals we are able better to isolate the surface conduction channel properties. We identify in-gap conducting states that have relatively high mobility compared to the bulk and exhibit weak anti-localization, consistent with predictions for protected 2D surface states with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  2. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Y; Gatel, C; Snoeck, E; Houdellier, F

    2017-04-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of electron and hydrogenic-donor states confined in a permeable spherical box using B-splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nikbakht

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Effects of quantum size and potential shape on the spectra of an electron and a hydrogenic-donor at the center of a permeable spherical cavity have been calculated, using linear variational method. B-splines have been used as basis functions. By extensive convergence tests and comparing with other results given in the literature, the validity and efficiency of the method were confirmed.

  4. Blood Donor Test-Seeking Motivation and Prior HIV Testing Experiences in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Blatyta, Paula F; Santos, Fernanda M; Montebello, Sandra; Esposti, Sandra P D; Hangai, Fatima N; Salles, Nanci Alves; Mendrone, Alfredo; Sabino, Ester C; McFarland, Willi; Gonçalez, Thelma T

    2015-09-01

    HIV test-seeking behavior among blood donors has been observed worldwide and may pose a threat to the safety of the blood supply. We evaluated current test-seeking motivations and prior alternative HIV testing experiences among blood donors in São Paulo, Brazil. All candidate or potential blood donors were consecutively approached and recruited to participate in the study upon presentation at Fundação Pró-Sangue Hemocentro, the largest blood bank in Brazil. Participants were recruited between August 2012 and May 2013 after they were screened for donor eligibility. Questionnaires were administered through audio computer-assisted self-interview. Among 11,867 donors, 38 % previously tested for HIV apart from blood donation, of whom 47.7 % tested at public facilities and 2.7 % acknowledged getting tested for HIV as the primary reason for donating. Dissatisfaction with prior alternative testing experience was reported by 2.5 % of donors. Current test-seeking motivation was associated with dissatisfaction with prior alternative testing experience and testing at a public alternative facility. The most common reasons for dissatisfaction were too long of a wait to get tested and for results, counseling was too long, lack of privacy, and low confidence in the equipment and accuracy of the test. Lack of awareness about the availability of free and confidential public HIV testing services as well as dissatisfaction with past HIV testing and counseling experiences motivate some individuals to test at blood banks. Test-seeking behavior among blood donors may be best addressed by improving alternative testing programs, particularly with respect to time delays, privacy and perceptions about test accuracy. Educational campaigns on safe blood donation and HIV testing for diagnosis, risk counseling and referral to care are also needed for the general public and for health care providers.

  5. Humin as an electron donor for enhancement of multiple microbial reduction reactions with different redox potentials in a consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Xiao, Zhixing; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase humin, acting as an electron donor, was able to enhance multiple reductive biotransformations, including dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP), dissimilatory reduction of amorphous Fe (III) oxide (FeOOH), and reduction of nitrate, in a consortium. Humin that was chemically reduced by NaBH4 served as an electron donor for these microbial reducing reactions, with electron donating capacities of 0.013 mmol e(-)/g for PCP dechlorination, 0.15 mmol e(-)/g for iron reduction, and 0.30 mmol e(-)/g for nitrate reduction. Two pairs of oxidation and reduction peaks within the humin were detected by cyclic voltammetry analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based microbial community analysis of the consortium incubated with different terminal electron acceptors, suggested that Dehalobacter sp., Bacteroides sp., and Sulfurospirillum sp. were involved in the PCP dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, respectively. These findings suggested that humin functioned as a versatile redox mediator, donating electrons for multiple respiration reactions with different redox potentials. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bereaved donor families' experiences of organ and tissue donation, and perceived influences on their decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sque, Magi; Walker, Wendy; Long-Sutehall, Tracy; Morgan, Myfanwy; Randhawa, Gurch; Rodney, Amanda

    2018-01-16

    To elicit bereaved families' experiences of organ and tissue donation. A specific objective was to determine families' perceptions of how their experiences influenced donation decision-making. Retrospective, qualitative interviews were undertaken with 43 participants of 31 donor families to generate rich, informative data. Participant recruitment was via 10 National Health Service Trusts, representative of five regional organ donation services in the UK. Twelve families agreed to DBD, 18 agreed to DCD, 1 unknown. Participants' responses were contextualised using a temporal framework of 'The Past', which represented families' prior knowledge, experience, attitudes, beliefs, and intentions toward organ donation; 'The Present', which incorporated the moment in time when families experienced the potential for donation; and 'The Future', which corresponded to expectations and outcomes arising from the donation decision. Temporally interwoven experiences appeared to influence families' decisions to donate the organs of their deceased relative for transplantation. The influence of temporality on donation-decision making is worthy of consideration in the planning of future education, policy, practice, and research for improved rates of family consent to donation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Challenges regarding the start-up of an anaerobic biological sulphate reactor using H2 and CO2 as electron donor and carbon sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, SP

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Include neutralization and chemical precipitation as well as membrane dependent processes. Biological sulphate reduction is another, environmentally benign option but relies heavily on the availability of an economically viable electron donor...

  8. How to Recondition Ex Vivo Initially Rejected Donor Lungs for Clinical Transplantation: Clinical Experience from Lund University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Lindstedt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major problem in clinical lung transplantation is the shortage of donor lungs. Only about 20% of donor lungs are accepted for transplantation. We have recently reported the results of the first six double lung transplantations performed with donor lungs reconditioned ex vivo that had been deemed unsuitable for transplantation by the Scandiatransplant, Eurotransplant, and UK Transplant organizations because the arterial oxygen pressure was less than 40 kPa. The three-month survival of patients undergoing transplant with these lungs was 100%. One patient died due to sepsis after 95 days, and one due to rejection after 9 months. Four recipients are still alive and well 24 months after transplantation, with no signs of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The donor lungs were reconditioned ex vivo in an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit using STEEN solution mixed with erythrocytes, to dehydrate edematous lung tissue. Functional evaluation was performed with deoxygenated perfusate at different inspired fractions of oxygen. The arterial oxygen pressure was significantly improved in this model. This ex vivo evaluation model is thus a valuable addition to the armamentarium in increasing the number of acceptable lungs in a donor population with inferior arterial oxygen pressure values, thereby, increasing the lung donor pool for transplantation. In the following paper we present our clinical experience from the first six patients in the world. We also present the technique we used in detail with flowchart.

  9. Management of Pediatric Acute Liver Failure in a Region With Insufficient Deceased Donor Support: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankol, Yucel; Ertugrul, Mustafa; Kanmaz, Turan; Mecit, Nesimi; Ocak, Ilhan; Durmaz, Ozlem; Acarli, Koray; Kalayoglu, Munci

    2016-10-01

    Acute liver failure is a rapidly progressive and life-threatening disease in children, whose clinical features differ from those of adults. This is a review of a single center's experience with pediatric acute liver failure in a region with insufficient deceased donor support. The study is a retrospective review and analysis of 22 pediatric patients with acute liver failure between January 2007 and May 2013. The cause of acute liver failure was indeterminate in 45.4% of cases. Listing for liver transplant was required in 72.7% of patients, whereas 27.3% developed spontaneous remission. In the patients placed on the liver transplant wait list, 75% underwent liver transplant and 25% died before undergoing liver transplant. The presence of ascites, high-grade encephalopathy, and laboratory findings including high lactate dehydrogenase and phosphorous levels and international normalized ratio were significant parameters in selecting patients needing liver transplants. All liver transplants were from living donors. One- and 3-year patient survival rates after liver transplant were 75% and 75%. No serious donor complications occurred. Living-donor liver transplant may be the only option to save the lives of pediatric patients with acute liver failure, especially in regions with insufficient deceased-donor support. Timely referral to a multidisciplinary transplant center, expedient evaluation of living donors, and appropriate timing of transplant are crucial for a successful outcome.

  10. The effect of magnetic field and donor impurity on electron spectrum in spherical core-shell quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holovatsky, V. A.; Voitsekhivska, O. M.; Yakhnevych, M. Ya

    2018-04-01

    The effect of homogeneous magnetic field and location of donor impurity on the electron energy spectrum and distribution of its probability density in spherical core-shell quantum dot is investigated. In the framework of the effective mass approximation and rectangular infinitely deep potential well, the solutions of the Schrodinger equation are found using the matrix method. The wave functions are expanded over the complete set of exact functions obtained without the magnetic field and impurity. It is shown that when the induction of magnetic field increases, the ground state of electron in the nanostructure without impurity or on-center impurity is successively formed by the states with m = 0, -1, -2, … (Aharonov-Bohm effect). When donor impurity is located in the shell of the nanostructure the Aharonov-Bohm effect vanishes. The dependences of electron energy spectrum and its wave functions on the location of impurity, placed along the direction of magnetic field or perpendicularly to it, are studied. It is shown, that in the first case, the quantum states are characterized by the certain value of magnetic quantum number m and the expansion contains the wave functions of the states with it only. In the second case, the cylindrical symmetry of the problem is broken and the new quantum states are formed from the states with different values of all three quantum numbers n, l, m and electron energy spectrum weakly depends on the magnetic field induction.

  11. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  12. Impact of the valley degree of freedom on the control of donor electrons near a Si/SiO2 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Andre; Baena, Alejandra; Calderón, Maria; Koiller, Belita

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the valley composition of one electron bound to a shallow donor close to a Si/barrier interface as a function of an applied electric field within a multivalley effective mass model. Switching from low to high fields, the electron ground state is drawn from the donor site into the interface, leaving the donor partially ionized. Valley splitting at the interface occurs due to the valley-orbit coupling, VvoI = |VvoI | eiθ . At intermediate electric fields, close to a characteristic shuttling field, the electron states may constitute hybridized states with valley compositions different from the donor and the interface ground states. The full spectrum shows crossings and anticrossings as the field varies. The degree of level repulsion depends on the relative valley compositions, which vary with | VvoI | , θ and the interface-donor distance. We focus on the valley configurations of the states involved in the donor-interface tunneling process, given by the anticrossing of the three lowest levels. A sequence of two anticrossings takes place and the complex phase theta affects the symmetries of the eigenstates and level anticrossing gaps. Implications of our results on the practical manipulation of donor electrons in Si nanostructures are discussed. A.B. and M.J.C. were supported by FIS2009-08744 (MINECO, Spain). AS and BK's work is part of the Brazilian National Institute for Science and Technology on Quantum Information. AS and BK acknowledge partial support from FAPERJ, CNPq and CAPES.

  13. Organ donation from brain-dead and circulatory-dead donors: single-institution experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmochi, T; Nishiyama, S; Hayashi, M; Ito, T; Kato, Y; Hoshinaga, K

    2014-05-01

    Although the number of organ donations is extremely small in Japan, organ donation from brain dead (DBD) donors is increasing since the revised Law for Organ Transplantation was enacted on July 17, 2010. In our institution, organ donations had so far been performed from 247 donors (DCD 242, DBD 5), which is the largest number in Japan. In this study, we analyzed the status of organ donation before and after the enforcement of the revised law. After the enforcement of the revised law, the option of organ donation was shown to the more families of potential donors by the doctors or donor coordinators. However, the final number of donors was almost the same. The frequency of DBD donors of all donors increased (33.3%) as compared to 9.1% before the enforcement of the revised law. Reasons for rejection of donation from donor families were mainly based on the lack of understanding of brain death. To increase organ donation, we should promote social recognition of brain death, having the Organ Donation Card, and discussion of organ donation in each family. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experience and Security of the Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Nephrectomy of a Living Donor in a Public Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Covarrubias, L; Prieto-Olivares, P; Bahena-Portillo, A; Cicero-Lebrija, A; Hinojosa-Heredia, H; Fernández-Lopez, L J; Almeida-Nieto, C; Visag-Castillo, V J; Carrión-Barrera, J; Castro-Ñuco, I; Pedraza-Rojas, E; Rosas-Herrera, A; García-Covarrubias, A; Fernández-Angel, D; Diliz-Perez, H S

    2018-03-01

    Hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy (HALDN) is currently the procedure of choice for obtaining living donor kidneys for transplantation. In our institution, it has been the standard procedure for 5 years. Previous studies have shown the same function of the graft as that obtained by open surgery, with a lower rate of bleeding and no differences in complications. We sought to demonstrate the experience and safety of HALDN compared with open donor nephrectomy in healthy donors for kidney transplantation. A retrospective analytical observational study was conducted, reviewing the records of the living donors for kidney transplant undergoing open donor nephrectomy or HALDN in our center from March 1, 2009, to March 1, 2016. Renal function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease method before and after donation, as well as bleeding (mL), and complications (according to Clavien), performing a comparative analysis between the two techniques using parametric or nonparametric tests. A total of 179 living donor nephrectomies were performed during the study period-31 open donor nephrectomy (17.3%) and 148 HALDN (82.7%)-without relevant baseline differences, except for creatinine. HALDN has a shorter surgical time (156,473 ± 87.75 minutes vs 165,484 ± 69.95 minutes) and less bleeding (244.59 ± 416.08 mL vs 324.19 ± 197.986 mL) and a shorter duration of hospital stay (3.74 ± 1.336 days vs 4.75 ± 1.226 days). There were no significant differences in surgical complications at 30 days, or graft loss reported; there were 3 conversions (1.7%) from the HALDN to the open technique. There were no differences in renal function in the donors or recipients at the 5th day or the month after surgery. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has replaced open surgery as the gold standard for living kidney donors. HALDN is a safe and feasible procedure when compared with open donor nephrectomy, achieving a shorter surgical time with

  15. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high...... sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3- reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under...

  16. Functional pyruvate formate lyase pathway expressed with two different electron donors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Dai, Zongjie; Krivoruchko, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate formate lyase (PFL) is characterized as an enzyme functional at anaerobic conditions, since the radical in the enzyme's active form is sensitive to oxygen. In this study, PFL and its activating enzyme from Escherichia coli were expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking...... of either of these electron donors had a positive effect on growth under aerobic conditions, indicating increased activity of PFL. The positive effect on growth was manifested as a higher final biomass concentration and a significant increase in transcription of formate dehydrogenases. Among the two...

  17. [Guidelines for electronic-data-processing-controlled serial diagnosis of donor blood samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Fröhlich, C L; Stoll, T; Hanfland, P

    1990-01-01

    Increasing performance figures and the necessity to save expenses oblige transfusion services to automatize their donors' laboratory examination. Sufficient hard- and software for sample distribution and processing is now available. Following aspects should be regarded when switching to automatic serial screening: The identity of blood-donor, donation and laboratory result will be achieved by machine readable labeling and on-line communication between working-stations and central administration. Flexibility: Easy automatic selective laboratory screening will be possible using special barcodes including sample identification and working orders. A modular hardware concept with easily accessible programming control allows it to implement new devices or methods. Ergonomy: Automatic sample processing including selective screening and simultaneous operating robotic sample processors increase working quality, sample output and time benefits. Economy: Improved working conditions will result in saving reagents and compensating staff limitations.

  18. How do external donors influence national health policy processes? Experiences of domestic policy actors in Cambodia and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mishal S; Meghani, Ankita; Liverani, Marco; Roychowdhury, Imara; Parkhurst, Justin

    2018-03-01

    Although concerns have historically been raised about the influence of external donors on health policy process in recipient countries, remarkably few studies have investigated perspectives and experiences of domestic policymakers and advisers. This study examines donor influence at different stages of the health policy process (priority setting, policy formulation, policy implementation and monitoring and evaluation) in two aid-dependent LMICs, Cambodia and Pakistan. It identifies mechanisms through which asymmetries in influence between donors and domestic policy actors emerge. We conducted 24 key informant interviews-14 in Pakistan and 10 in Cambodia-with high-level decision-makers who inform or authorize health priority setting, allocate resources and/or are responsible for policy implementation, identifying three routes of influence: financial resources, technical expertise and indirect financial and political incentives. We used both inductive and deductive approaches to analyse the data. Our findings indicate that different routes of influence emerged depending on the stage of the policy process. Control of financial resources was the most commonly identified route by which donors influenced priority setting and policy implementation. Greater (perceived) technical expertise played an important role in donor influence at the policy formulation stage. Donors' power in influencing decisions, particularly during the final (monitoring and evaluation) stage of the policy process, was mediated by their ability to control indirect financial and political incentives as well as direct control of financial resources. This study thus helps unpack the nuances of donor influence over health policymaking in these settings, and can potentially indicate areas that require attention to increase the ownership of domestic actors of their countries' health policy processes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of

  19. Blood donor notification and counseling: Our experience from a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvershi Kotwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the response rate of transfusion-transmissible infection (TTI-reactive donors after notification of their abnormal test results for the year 2012. Materials and Methods: This study is an observational descriptive study performed in our department over a period of 1 year. We evaluated the response rate of TTI-reactive donors after notification of their abnormal test results over 1 year as per the existing strategy (three telephonic and two postal communications. Results: During the study period, among the annual donation of 15,322 units, 464 blood donors were found to be seroreactive. Of these 464 seroreactive cases, 47 were HIV positive, 284 were reactive for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, 49 were Hepatitis C (HCV positive and 84 were VDRL reactive. The TTI-reactive donors (464 for various markers were contacted: 229 (49.4% telephonically and the remaining 235 (50.6% not contacted on phone were informed by post. Of the 229 contacted donors, the response rate was 98.2% as only 225 donors reported (221 on the first, three on second and one on the third call for one to one counseling. The remaining four non-responders were - one HIV and three HBsAg reactive. The remaining 235 (50.6% reactive donors did not respond to any communication. Conclusion: Donor notification and post-donation counseling are an essential aspect of the blood bank that entails provision of information on serological status, assess the impact of test results on the donor and finally referral for medical care. As in our data only 49.4% of the blood donors could be contacted successfully, incomplete demographic details was the major limiting factor in communicating with rest. Of the 229 contacted donors, the response rate was 98.2%. A large majority (94.75% of the notified donors in our study contacted their health care provider when given clear instructions to do so. These results are encouraging because they indicate that a major element of the

  20. Liver transplantation using organs from deceased organ donors: a single organ transplant center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ming; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yuan, Xiao-Peng; Jiao, Xing-Yuan; Yang, Chun-Hua; Wang, Dong-Ping; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Wu, Lin-Wei; Hu, An-Bin; Tai, Qiang; Ma, Yi; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; He, Xiao-Shun

    2014-08-01

    In 2011, a pilot program for deceased organ donation was initiated in China. We describe the first successful series of liver transplants in the pilot program. From July 2011 to August 2012, our center performed 26 liver transplants from a pool of 29 deceased donors. All organ donation and allograft procurement were conducted according to the national protocol. The clinical data of donors and recipients were collected and summarized retrospectively. Among the 29 donors, 24 were China Category II donors (organ donation after cardiac death), and five were China Category III donors (organ donation after brain death followed by cardiac death). The recipients were mainly the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The one-year patient survival rate was 80.8% with a median follow-up of 422 (2-696) days. Among the five mortalities during the follow-up, three died of tumor recurrence. In terms of post-transplant complications, 9 recipients (34.6%) experienced early allograft dysfunction, 1 (3.8%) had non-anastomotic biliary stricture, and 1 (3.8%) was complicated with hepatic arterial thrombosis. None of these complications resulted in patient death. Notably, primary non-function was not observed in any of the grafts. With careful donor selection, liver transplant from deceased donors can be performed safely and plays a critical role in overcoming the extreme organ shortage in China.

  1. Intercity deceased donor renal transplantation: A single-center experience from a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a developing country such as India, deceased donor renal transplantation (DDRTx accounts for only about 1% of all renal transplants (RTx. Our institute initiated an intercity DDRTx in the year 2006, which significantly increased the number of RTx. We retrieved 74 kidneys from 37 deceased donors from various cities of Gujarat from January 2006 to December 2009. We transplanted the allografts in 66 recipients and a retrospective analysis of the donor profile and management and recipient outcome was performed. The mean age of the donors was 43.3 ± 18.8 years. The causes of death included road traffic accident in 51.35% of the donors and cerebrovascular stroke in 48.65% of the donors; 83.78% of the donors required ionotropes for hemodynamic stability in addition to vigorous intravenous fluid replacement. The average urine output of the donors was 350 ± 150 mL. The organs were perfused and stored in HTK solution. The mean cold ischemia time (CIT was 9.12 ± 5.25 h. The mean anastomosis time in the recipient was 30.8 ± 8.7 min. 57.6% of the recipients established urine output on the operating table and 42.4% developed delayed graft function. At the end of 1 month after transplantation, the mean serum creatinine was comparable to the Ahmadabad city DDRTx, although the CIT was significantly longer in the intercity patients. Intercity organ harvesting is a viable option to increase the donor pool. Distance may not be an impediment, and good recipient outcome is possible in spite of prolonged CIT in case of proper harvesting and preservation.

  2. Electron track reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tadel, Matevž; Clark, Allan

    2001-01-01

    Before entering the hardware production phase of a HEP experiment, the detector elements that have been chosen during the planning process need to be thoroughly tested. At the LHC, silicon detectors will operate in a high-rate environment which requires low-noise electronics with a shaping time of $25 s$. A prototype silicon-strip half-module equipped with the analogue read-out chip SCTA128-HC was put in a $200GeV$ pion beam. An analysis of the collected data is presented. The tested module was found to conform to the SCT-modules specification for the ATLAS experiment. Electron reconstruction in the ATLAS detector is compromised by the large amount of material in the tracking volume, which leads to frequent emissions of hard bremsstrahlung photons. This affects the measurement of the transverse projections of track parameters in the inner detector as well as the measurement of energy and azimuthal angle in the EM calorimeter for $p_T<20GeV$. Reconstruction and electron identification efficiencies are...

  3. Ab initio and density functional theoretical design and screening of model crown ether based ligand (host) for extraction of lithium metal ion (guest): effect of donor and electronic induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Anil; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Rao, Hanmanth; Ghosh, Sandip K

    2012-08-01

    The structures, energetic and thermodynamic parameters of model crown ethers with different donor, cavity and electron donating/ withdrawing functional group have been determined with ab initio MP2 and density functional theory in gas and solvent phase. The calculated values of binding energy/ enthalpy for lithium ion complexation are marginally higher for hard donor based aza and oxa crown compared to soft donor based thia and phospha crown. The calculated values of binding enthalpy for lithium metal ion with 12C4 at MP2 level of theory is in good agreement with the available experimental result. The binding energy is altered due to the inductive effect imparted by the electron donating/ withdrawing group in crown ether, which is well correlated with the values of electron transfer. The role of entropy for extraction of hydrated lithium metal ion by different donor and functional group based ligand has been demonstrated. The HOMO-LUMO gap is decreased and dipole moment of the ligand is increased from gas phase to organic phase because of the dielectric constant of the solvent. The gas phase binding energy is reduced in solvent phase as the solvent molecules weaken the metal-ligand binding. The theoretical values of extraction energy for LiCl salt from aqueous solution in different organic solvent is validated by the experimental trend. The study presented here should contribute to the design of model host ligand and screening of solvent for metal ion recognition and thus can contribute in planning the experiments.

  4. Suitability of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a feed batch operating bio-electrochemical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Fermoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil washing water derived from the two-phase manufacturing process was assessed as an electron donor in a bio-electrochemical system (BES operating at 35 ºC. Start-up was carried out by using acetate as a substrate for the BES, reaching a potential of around +680 mV. After day 54, BES was fed with olive oil washing water. The degradation of olive oil washing water in the BES generated a maximum voltage potential of around +520 mV and a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD removal efficiency of 41%. However, subsequent loads produced a decrease in the COD removal, while current and power density diminished greatly. The deterioration of these parameters could be a consequence of the accumulation of recalcitrant or inhibitory compounds, such as phenols. These results demonstrated that the use of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a BES is feasible, although it has to be further investigated in order to make it more suitable for a real application.

  5. Suitability of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a feed batch operating bio-electrochemical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermoso, F.G.; Fernández-Rodríguez, M.J.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, A.; Serrano, A.; Borja, R.

    2017-01-01

    Olive oil washing water derived from the two-phase manufacturing process was assessed as an electron donor in a bio-electrochemical system (BES) operating at 35 ºC. Start-up was carried out by using acetate as a substrate for the BES, reaching a potential of around +680 mV. After day 54, BES was fed with olive oil washing water. The degradation of olive oil washing water in the BES generated a maximum voltage potential of around +520 mV and a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency of 41%. However, subsequent loads produced a decrease in the COD removal, while current and power density diminished greatly. The deterioration of these parameters could be a consequence of the accumulation of recalcitrant or inhibitory compounds, such as phenols. These results demonstrated that the use of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a BES is feasible, although it has to be further investigated in order to make it more suitable for a real application. [es

  6. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Malcolm [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  7. Rationalizing the photophysical properties of BODIPY laser dyes via aromaticity and electron-donor-based structural perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, Paul G.; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Teng; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-05-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of six boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) laser dyes with simple non-aromatic substituents are rationalized by relating them to observable structural perturbations within the molecules of the dyes. An empirical relationship involving the structure and the optical properties is derived using a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, quantum chemical calculations and electronic constants: i.e. the tendency of the pyrrole bond lengths towards aromaticity and the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence wavelengths correlating with the electron-donor properties of the substituents. The effect of molecular conformation on the solid-state optical properties of the dyes is also discussed. The findings in this study also demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of using crystal structure data to develop structure-property relationships in this class of optical materials, contributing to the growing effort to design optoelectronic materials with tunable properties via molecular engineering.

  8. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Yao, Fubing; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H 2 ) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H 2 on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H 2 as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  9. Is Antibiotic Usage Necessary after Donor Nephrectomy? A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomorrodi Afshar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper management of living kidney donors is a very important aspect of all renal transplants. To date, approximately 60,000 living donor nephrectomies have been performed worldwide and about 20 deaths directly related to the operation have been reported. The most common cause of death has been pulmonary embolism. Wound infection following surgery is the third most common nosocomial infection, and is dependent on the surgeon and his/her team, the operating room, number and virulence of contaminated bacteria, patient characteristics (immunity and defense, as well as time and duration of administration of antibiotics. Approach to the prophylaxis of wound infection in kidney donors varies in different transplant centers. This study was conducted at the Emam Hospital, Tabriz, Iran in order to delineate the protocol regarding antibiotic usage after donor nephrectomy. One hundred kidney donors were enrolled in the study. They were classified randomly in two groups: Group-1, comprising 50 donors, who received antibiotics immediately following surgery and for at least seven days thereafter. Group-2, comprised of 50 donors, in whom one gram of cephazoline was injected intravenously before anesthesia and continued for 24 hours after surgery. The patients were followed-up for one month with particular emphasis on occurrence of wound infection. One patient in Group-1, and two in Group-2 had wound infection; the difference was not statistically significant (p = > 0.5. Our study suggests that antibiotic prophylaxis started before incision and continued for 24 hours after donor nephrectomy is safe and effective in preventing wound infection.

  10. Electronic trigger for the ASP experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The Anomalous Single Photon (ASP) electronic trigger is described. The experiments is based on an electromagnetic calorimeter composed of arrays of lead glass blocks, read out with photo-multiplier tubes, surrounding the interaction point at the PEP storage ring. The primary requirement of the trigger system is to be sensitive to low energy (approx. =0.5 GeV and above) photons whilst discriminating against high backgrounds at PEP. Analogue summing of the PMT signals and a sequence of programmable digital look-up tables produces a ''dead-timeless'' trigger for the beam collision rate of 408 kHz. 6 refs., 6 figs

  11. Electronic trigger for the ASP experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The ASP electronic trigger is described. The experiment is based on an electromagnetic calorimeter composed of arrays of lead glass blocks, read out with photo-multiplier tubes, surrounding the interaction point at the PEP storage ring. The primary requirement of the trigger system is to be sensitive to low energy (≅ 0.5 GeV and above) photons whilst discriminating against high rate backgrounds at PEP. Analogue summing of the PMT signals and a sequence of programmable digital look-up tables produces a ''dead-timeless'' trigger for the beam collision rate of 408 kHz

  12. Incidental kidney stones: a single center experience with kidney donor selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene K; Tan, Jane C; Lapasia, Jessica; Elihu, Arvand; Busque, Stephan; Melcher, Marc L

    2012-01-01

    The presence of kidney stones has been a relative contraindication for living donation. With the widespread use of more sensitive imaging techniques as part of the routine living donor workup, kidney stones are more frequently detected, and their clinical significance in this setting is largely unknown. Records from 325 potential kidney donors who underwent MRA or CT-angiography were reviewed; 294 proceeded to donation. The prevalence of kidney stones found incidentally during donor evaluation was 7.4% (24 of 325). Sixteen donors with stones proceeded with kidney donation. All incidental calculi were nonobstructing and small (median 2 mm; range 1-9 mm). Eleven recipients were transplanted with allografts containing stones. One recipient developed symptomatic nephrolithasis after transplantation. This recipient was found to have newly formed stones secondary to hyperoxaluria, suggesting a recipient-driven propensity for stone formation. The remaining ten recipients have stable graft function, postoperative ultrasound negative for nephrolithiasis, and no sequelae from stones. No donor developed symptomatic nephrolithiasis following donation. Judicious use of allografts with small stones in donors with normal metabolic studies may be acceptable, and careful follow-up in recipients of such allografts is warranted. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Tracking Electron Uptake from a Cathode into Shewanella Cells: Implications for Energy Acquisition from Solid-Substrate Electron Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette R. Rowe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While typically investigated as a microorganism capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals or anodes, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can also facilitate electron flow from a cathode to terminal electron acceptors, such as fumarate or oxygen, thereby providing a model system for a process that has significant environmental and technological implications. This work demonstrates that cathodic electrons enter the electron transport chain of S. oneidensis when oxygen is used as the terminal electron acceptor. The effect of electron transport chain inhibitors suggested that a proton gradient is generated during cathode oxidation, consistent with the higher cellular ATP levels measured in cathode-respiring cells than in controls. Cathode oxidation also correlated with an increase in the cellular redox (NADH/FMNH2 pool determined with a bioluminescence assay, a proton uncoupler, and a mutant of proton-pumping NADH oxidase complex I. This work suggested that the generation of NADH/FMNH2 under cathodic conditions was linked to reverse electron flow mediated by complex I. A decrease in cathodic electron uptake was observed in various mutant strains, including those lacking the extracellular electron transfer components necessary for anodic-current generation. While no cell growth was observed under these conditions, here we show that cathode oxidation is linked to cellular energy acquisition, resulting in a quantifiable reduction in the cellular decay rate. This work highlights a potential mechanism for cell survival and/or persistence on cathodes, which might extend to environments where growth and division are severely limited.

  14. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Jae Kwon

    Full Text Available Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown. The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the high-electron donor character of pyrido-annelated N-heterocyclic carbenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nonnenmacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rh(CO2Cl(NHC complexes of dipyrido-annelated N-heterocyclic carbenes were prepared. From the C–H coupling constant of the respective imidazolium salts and the N–C–N angle of the N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC, a weaker σ-donor character than that of typical unsaturated NHCs is expected. However, the IR stretching frequencies of their Rh(CO2Cl complexes suggest an electron-donor character even stronger than that of saturated NHCs. We ascribe this to the extremely weak π-acceptor character of the dipyrido-annelated NHCs caused by the conjugated 14 πe− system that thus allows for an enhanced Rh–CO backbonding. This extremely low π-acceptor ability is also corroborated by the 77Se NMR chemical shift of −55.8 ppm for the respective selenourea, the lowest value ever measured for imidazole derived selenoureas. DFT-calculations of the free carbene confirm the low σ-donor character by the fact that the σ-orbital of the carbene is the HOMO−1 that lies 0.58 eV below the HOMO which is located at the π-system. Natural population analysis reveals the lowest occupation of the pπ-orbital for the saturated carbene carbon atom and the highest for the pyrido-annelated carbene. Going from the free carbene to the Rh(CO2Cl(NHC complexes, the increase in occupancy of the complete π-system of the carbene ligand upon coordination is lowest for the pyrido-annelated carbene and highest for the saturated carbene.

  16. Photosystem I from plants as a bacterial cytochrome P450 surrogate electron donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz de

    2012-01-01

    The ability of cytochrome P450 enzymes to catalyze highly regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations makes them attractive alternatives to approaches based on chemical synthesis but they require expensive cofactors, e.g. NAD(P)H, which limits their commercial potential. Ferredoxin (Fdx) is a multif......The ability of cytochrome P450 enzymes to catalyze highly regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations makes them attractive alternatives to approaches based on chemical synthesis but they require expensive cofactors, e.g. NAD(P)H, which limits their commercial potential. Ferredoxin (Fdx......) is a multifunctional electron carrier that in plants accepts electrons from photosystem I (PSI) and facilitates photoreduction of NADP+ to NADPH mediated by ferredoxin-NAD(P)H oxidoreductase (FdR). In bacteria, the electron flow is reversed and Fdx accepts electrons from NADPH via FdR and serves as the direct electron...

  17. [Renal transplantation using a Maastricht category III non-heartbeating donor: First French experience and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchon, C; Long, J-A; Boudry, G; Terrier, N; Skowron, O; Badet, L; Descotes, J-L; Rambeaud, J-J; Malvezzi, P; Boillot, B; Thuillier, C; Arnoux, V; Fiard, G; Poncet, D; Dorez, D

    2015-09-01

    In 2015, Annecy Hospital was the first French hospital to perform non-heartbeating organ donation from a Maastricht category III donor (patient awaiting cardiac arrest after withdrawal of treatment). Non-heartbeating organ donation (NHBD), performed in France since 2006, had initially excluded this category, due to ethical questions concerning end of life and treatment withdrawal, as well as technical specificities linked to this procedure. Grenoble University Hospital and Edouard-Herriot Hospital in Lyon then performed the first kidney transplants, with satisfactory outcomes in both recipients. This article presents the details and results of this new experience, challenging both on a deontological and organizational level. Functional outcomes of kidney grafts from NHBD are now well known in the literature and confirm their benefit for patients, with similar results to those from heartbeating donors (HBD). International experiences concerning specifically Maastricht category III NHBD are encouraging and promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. DFT Study of Electronic and Optical Properties of Small Oligothiophenes Based on Terthiophene End-capped by Several Donor Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Alamy Aziz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eight small molecules based on terthiophene end-capped by several donor groups have been carried out using density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent (TDDFT methods in neutral and doped states. The theoretical ground-state geometry, electronic structure and optical properties of the studied molecules were obtained by the DFT and TD-DFT methods at the B3LYP level with 6-31G(d basis set. Theoretical knowledge of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO energy levels the gap energy (Eg and the open-circuit voltage (Voc of the studied compounds are calculated and discussed. The effects of the donor group substituents on the geometries and optoelectronic properties of these materials are discussed to investigate the relationship between molecular structure and optoelectronic properties. The results of this work suggest some of these materials as a good candidate for organic solar cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i3.995

  19. Comparison of outcomes from smoking and nonsmoking donors: thirteen-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Marius; Goldsmith, Kim; Jenkins, David; Sudarshan, Catherine; Catarino, Pedro; Sukumaran, Nair; Dunning, John; Sharples, Linda D; Tsui, Steven; Parmar, Jasvir

    2010-12-01

    Lung transplantation remains the best treatment option for a variety of end-stage lung diseases. Pressure on the limited donor pool has led to the use of extended criteria donors. One aspect of this has been the liberalization of the use of smoking donors (SmD). This study is a retrospective review of lung transplants performed between April 1995 and August 2008 at a single institute. We examined the impact of donor smoking on short-term and long-term survival in relationship to recipient and donor demographics such as ischemic time, cytomegalovirus status, rates of rejection and infection, ventilation, and intensive care stay. Endpoints were survival, infection, and rejection. During this 13-year period, 454 lung transplants were performed. Smoking history was available on 424 (93.4%) of these (SmD, n = 184; NSmD, n = 240). Seventy-one patients died within 3 months of transplant leaving 353 alive at 3 months posttransplant. Fatalities within the first 3 months were significantly higher in the SmD group (21% vs 13%, odds ratio 1.9, hazard ratio 3.3, p = 0.04). No significant difference in rejection and infection rates between recipients of lungs from SmD and NSmD at 3 months and at 1 year posttransplantation (p = 0.51 and 0.09) was found. Although recipients of lungs from SmD had higher odds of ventilation for more than 10 hours, the odds were only increased by 20%, which was not statistically significant. Recipients from SmD had significantly longer stays in the intensive care (odds ratio 1.9, p = 0.002). There was little evidence for an effect of SmD on the development of bronchiolitis obliterans. In this large cohort of patients, donor smoking history has an effect on early survival but no effect on long-term survival. The cause of this early mortality is independent of infection and rejection. However, these data suggest that overall outcomes from the use of donor lungs from smokers are acceptable, particularly in the current era with limited donor organs

  20. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  1. Sulfide as an alternative electron donor to glucose for power generation in mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Sakine; Ghoreyshi, Ali A; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Darzi, Ghasem Najafpour; Pant, Deepak

    2017-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the power generation in a dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). As one of the effective parameters, glucose concentration was studied in the range of 100-1000 mg/L. At the optimum concentration of 500 mg/L of glucose, maximum power generation was 186 mW/m 2 . As an alternative, sulfide was used as an electron donor and maximum power output was 401 mW/m 2 at the concentration of 100 mg/L; which was more than twice of power produced using glucose. Moreover, sulfide removal efficiencies of 70%, 66%, 60%, and 64% were obtained when initial sulfide concentrations of 10, 20, 80, and 100 mg/L were used, respectively.

  2. Electronic journal management systems experiences from the field

    CERN Document Server

    Ives, Gary W

    2013-01-01

    Discover how to manage your library's electronic journals?with tips from those who've already met the challenge!The explosive growth of electronic journals presents unique challenges for libraries. Electronic Journal Management Systems: Experiences from the Field comprehensively examines these complex topics, including explanations of the automated systems libraries have developed or adopted, licensing issues, and the provision of access to electronic journals. Respected library professionals discuss their own experiences in the implementation and use of electronic journal management systems,

  3. Deceased donor renal transplantation and the disruptive effect of commercial transplants: the experience of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, N; Al-Busaidy, Q; Al-Marhuby, H; Al-Lawati, J; Daar, A S

    2014-01-01

    The Oman Renal Transplantation Program was established in 1988 as a joint venture between Sultan Qaboos University and the Ministry of Health. It began with both living related donor (LRD) and deceased donor (DD) transplants. Over the next nine years, while the LRD programme progressed relatively well, there were only thirteen DD transplants. Two of the DD kidneys were obtained from overseas via an active collaboration with the Euro-transplant organisation, and one DD kidney was obtained from Saudi Arabia within the Gulf Cooperative Council exchange programme. The rest of the DD kidneys were obtained in Oman. The Omani DD programme, although it was a pioneering effort in the Gulf region at the time, was not entirely sustainable. In this paper we focus on the challenges we encountered. Among the major challenges was the absence of resources to establish a dedicated DD programme and particularly the failure to develop a cadre of dedicated transplant coordinators.

  4. Frequency of HIV type 2 infections among blood donor population from India: A 10-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannangai R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In India, HIV-2 epidemic is alongside with HIV-1. Blood banks are introducing nucleic acid testing (NAT for screening. The limitation of NAT systems is the inability to detect HIV-2. Materials and Method : An analysis of HIV screening of a blood bank at a tertiary care center from 1998 to 2007 was carried out. Results : A total of 175026 donors were screened by serological assays and 789 were reactive for HIV antibody. Only 478 (61% were confirmed positive by Western blot/immunoblot. There were 465 (97.2% donations positive for HIV-1, 6 (1.3% for HIV-2 (monotypic infection and 7 (1.5% for HIV-1 and HIV-2 (dual infection. Conclusion : We show the presence of HIV-2 infection among the blood donors and the need for incorporating HIV-2 detection also in the NAT systems.

  5. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...... of non-EVLP-related causes, but all other recipients were alive with normal graft function at the end of our registration period. All lungs showed an improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio from a median 23.1 kPa (8.8-38.9) within the donor to 58.8 kPa (34.9-76.5) (FiO2 = 1.0) after EVLP, which corresponds to a 155...

  6. 5' modification of duplex DNA with a ruthenium electron donor-acceptor pair using solid-phase DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Natia L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Incorporation of metalated nucleosides into DNA through covalent modification is crucial to measurement of thermal electron-transfer rates and the dependence of these rates with structure, distance, and position. Here, we report the first synthesis of an electron donor-acceptor pair of 5' metallonucleosides and their subsequent incorporation into oligonucleotides using solid-phase DNA synthesis techniques. Large-scale syntheses of metal-containing oligonucleotides are achieved using 5' modified phosporamidites containing [Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (acac is acetylacetonato; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (3) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (4). Duplexes formed with the metal-containing oligonucleotides exhibit thermal stability comparable to the corresponding unmetalated duplexes (T(m) of modified duplex = 49 degrees C vs T(m) of unmodified duplex = 47 degrees C). Electrochemical (3, E(1/2) = -0.04 V vs NHE; 4, E(1/2) = 1.12 V vs NHE), absorption (3, lambda(max) = 568, 369 nm; 4, lambda(max) = 480 nm), and emission (4, lambda(max) = 720 nm, tau = 55 ns, Phi = 1.2 x 10(-)(4)) data for the ruthenium-modified nucleosides and oligonucleotides indicate that incorporation into an oligonucleotide does not perturb the electronic properties of the ruthenium complex or the DNA significantly. In addition, the absence of any change in the emission properties upon metalated duplex formation suggests that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+)[Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) pair will provide a valuable probe for DNA-mediated electron-transfer studies.

  7. Cost analysis of living donor kidney transplantation in China: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Zhang, Lei; Han, Shu; Zhu, Youhua; Wang, Liming; Zhou, Meisheng; Zeng, Li

    2012-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most cost-effective option for the treatment of end-stage renal disease, but the financial aspects of kidney transplantation have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the hospital cost of living donor kidney transplantation in China and to identify factors associated with the high cost. Demographic and clinical data of 103 consecutive patients who underwent living donor kidney transplantation from January 2007 to January 2011 at our center were reviewed, and detailed hospital cost of initial admission for kidney transplantation was analyzed. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was computed to determine predictors affecting the total hospital cost. The median total hospital cost was US $10,531, of which 69.2% was for medications, 13.2% for surgical procedures, 11.4% for para clinics, 3.7% for accommodations, 0.5% for nursing care, and 2.0% for other miscellaneous medical services. A multivariate stepwise logistic regression model for overall cost of transplantation revealed that the length of hospital stay, induction therapy, steroid-resistant rejection, maintenance therapy, infection status and body weight were independent predictors affecting the total hospitalization cost. Although the cost of living donor kidney transplantation in China is much lower than that in developed countries, it is a heavy burden for both the government and the patients. As medications formed the greater proportion of the total hospitalization cost, efforts to reduce the cost of drugs should be addressed.

  8. The C-type Arabidopsis thioredoxin reductase ANTR-C acts as an electron donor to 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jeong Chan; Jang, Ho Hee; Chae, Ho Byoung; Lee, Jung Ro; Lee, Sun Yong; Jung, Young Jun; Shin, Mi Rim; Lim, Hye Song; Chung, Woo Sik; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2006-01-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs) play important roles in the antioxidative defense systems of plant chloroplasts. In order to determine the interaction partner for these proteins in Arabidopsis, we used a yeast two-hybrid screening procedure with a C175S-mutant of Arabidopsis 2-Cys Prx-A as bait. A cDNA encoding an NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) isotype C was identified and designated ANTR-C. We demonstrated that this protein effected efficient transfer of electrons from NADPH to the 2-Cys Prxs of chloroplasts. Interaction between 2-Cys Prx-A and ANTR-C was confirmed by a pull-down experiment. ANTR-C contained N-terminal TR and C-terminal Trx domains. It exhibited both TR and Trx activities and co-localized with 2-Cys Prx-A in chloroplasts. These results suggest that ANTR-C functions as an electron donor for plastidial 2-Cys Prxs and represents the NADPH-dependent TR/Trx system in chloroplasts

  9. Tellurium rings as electron pair donors in cluster compounds and coordination polymers; Tellurringe als Elektronenpaardonoren in Clusterverbindungen und Koordinationspolymeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anja

    2011-11-08

    In this dissertation novel and already known molecular tellurium rings are presented in cluster compounds and quasi-one-dimensional coordination polymers. The cyclic, homonuclear units are always stabilized by coordination to electron-rich transition metal atoms, with the coordinating tellurium atoms acting as two-electron donors. As a synthesis route, the solid-state reaction in quartz glass vials was used uniformly. In addition to structural determination, the focus was on the characterization of the resulting compounds. For this purpose, resistance measurements were carried out on selected compounds, the magnetic behavior and the thermal degradation reactions were investigated and accompanying quantum chemical calculations were carried out. [German] In dieser Dissertation werden neuartige sowie bereits bekannte molekulare Tellurringe in Clusterverbindungen und quasi-eindimensionalen Koordinationspolymeren vorgestellt. Die Stabilisierung der zyklischen, homonuklearen Einheiten erfolgt dabei stets durch die Koordination an elektronenreiche Uebergangsmetallatome, wobei die koordinierenden Telluratome gegenueber diesen als Zwei-Elektronendonoren fungieren. Als Syntheseroute wurde dabei einheitlich auf die Festkoerperreaktion in Quarzglasampullen zurueckgegriffen. Neben der Strukturaufklaerung stand die Charakterisierung der erhaltenden Verbindungen im Fokus der Arbeit. Dazu wurden an ausgewaehlten Verbindungen Widerstandsmessungen durchgefuehrt, das magnetische Verhalten sowie die thermischen Abbaureaktionen untersucht und begleitende quantenchemische Rechnungen durchgefuehrt.

  10. Characterization by time-resolved UV/Vis and infrared absorption spectroscopy of an intramolecular charge-transfer state in an organic electron-donor-bridge-acceptor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hviid, L.; Verhoeven, J.W.; Brouwer, A.M.; Paddon-Row, M.N.; Yang, J.

    2004-01-01

    A long-lived intramolecular charge-separated state in an electron-donor-acceptor molecule is characterized by time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Bands that can be assigned to the negatively charged acceptor chromophore can be clearly observed in the time-resolved IR

  11. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  12. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation (λ = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1 w1 = 1.43cm) and then absorbed (∼ 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1 w2 = 1.8 - 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup (∼ 9%) of electrons to ∼ 1MeV

  13. Experiences and Motives of Australian Single Mothers by Choice who make Early Contact with their Child?s Donor Relatives

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Fiona J; Dempsey, Deborah J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of Australian parents of donor-conceived children are making contact with their child?s donor relatives prior to their child reaching the age of majority. This process, often referred to as ?donor linking?, can be achieved in Australia through either formal or informal mechanisms. Formal mechanisms exist in three states, each of which has legislation enabling donor linking in certain circumstances. Donor linking may also be achieved through informal mechanisms, s...

  14. Experience with spice teaching power electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    A free Spice version allowing general circuit simulation is used teaching power electronics. There is no lock on the circuit size, stabile and user friendly operation is experienced. A collection of transformer, converter and drive system models are implemented to investigate the usability...... of the programme in high power electronics....

  15. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    We study the electronic structure of C{sub 60} fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C{sub 60}-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C{sub 60} fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  16. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Pannonibacter phragmitetus LSSE-09 stimulated with external electron donors under alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lin; Luo Mingfang; Li Wangliang; Wei Xuetuan; Xie Keng; Liu Lijun; Jiang Chengying; Liu Huizhou

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Growing cells have high Cr (VI) resistant and reducing ability aerobically. → Resting cells show strong anaerobic-reduction potential. → Acetate can highly stimulate both aerobic and anaerobic reduction process. - Abstract: A novel Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strain LSSE-09, identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus, was isolated from industrial sludge. It has strong aerobic and anaerobic Cr (VI)-reduction potential under alkaline conditions. At 37 o C and pH 9.0, growing cells of strain LSSE-09 could completely reduce 100 and 1000 mg L -1 Cr (VI)-Cr (III) within 9 and 24 h, respectively under aerobic condition. Resting cells showed higher anaerobic reduction potential with the rate of 1.46 mg g -1 (dryweight) min -1 , comparing with their aerobic reduction rate, 0.21 mg g -1 min -1 . External electron donors, such as lactate, acetate, formate, pyruvate, citrate and glucose could highly increase the reduction rate, especially for aerobic reduction. The presence of 3000 mg L -1 acetate enhanced anaerobic and aerobic Cr (VI)-reduction rates up to 9.47 mg g -1 min -1 and 4.42 mg g -1 min -1 , respectively, which were 5 and 20 times faster than those without it. Strain LSSE-09 retained high activities over six batch cycles and NO 3 - and SO 4 2- had slightly negative effects on Cr (VI)-reduction rates. The results suggest that strain LSSE-09 has potential application for Cr (VI) detoxification in alkaline wastewater.

  17. Effects of the buffer layer inserted between the transparent conductive oxide anode and the organic electron donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy, A.; Kouskoussa, B.; Benchouk, K.; Khelil, A. [Facultad Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Diego Portales, Ejercito 141, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Cattin, L.; Soto, G.M. [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-CNRS, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes F-44000 (France); Toumi, L. [LPCM2E, Universite d' Oran Es-Senia, LPCM2E (Algeria); Diaz, F.R.; del Valle, M.A. [Laboratorio de Polimeros, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Santiago (Chile); Morsli, M.; Bernede, J.C. [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, LAMP, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes F-44000 (France)

    2010-04-15

    In optoelectronic devices, the work function of the transparent conductive oxide, which is used as anode, does not match well the highest occupied molecular orbital of the organic material, which induces the formation of a barrier opposed to hole exchange at this interface. Therefore a thin buffer layer is often used to achieve good matching of the band structure at the interface. From experimental results it can be deduced that the main effects of the buffer layer consist in a better matching of the band structure at the interface anode/organic material and in a more homogeneous organic layer growth. We show that, whatever the nature of the buffer layer-metal, oxide, organic material - the classical Schottky-Mott model allows to anticipate, at least roughly, the behaviour of the contact, even if some dipole effect are often present. A good correlation between the ''metal/buffer layer'' work function and the barrier {phi}{sub b} for hole exchange at anode/organic electron donor interfaces is obtained, as expected by the model. (author)

  18. Experiences and Motives of Australian Single Mothers by Choice Who Make Early Contact with their Child's Donor Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Fiona J; Dempsey, Deborah J

    2017-01-30

    An increasing number of Australian parents of donor-conceived children are making contact with their child's donor relatives prior to their child reaching the age of majority. This process, often referred to as 'donor linking', can be achieved in Australia through either formal or informal mechanisms. Formal mechanisms exist in three states, each of which has legislation enabling donor linking in certain circumstances. Donor linking may also be achieved through informal mechanisms, such as online donor registries, social media searches, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and fertility clinics which act as intermediaries between donors and recipients. Drawing on qualitative interview data, this article explores the donor linking practices of twenty-five single women who conceived using donated gametes. The findings suggest that early contact with donors is extremely popular among single women and that, even when formal legislative mechanisms are available, informal linking remains common. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Experiences and Motives of Australian Single Mothers by Choice who make Early Contact with their Child’s Donor Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of Australian parents of donor-conceived children are making contact with their child’s donor relatives prior to their child reaching the age of majority. This process, often referred to as ‘donor linking’, can be achieved in Australia through either formal or informal mechanisms. Formal mechanisms exist in three states, each of which has legislation enabling donor linking in certain circumstances. Donor linking may also be achieved through informal mechanisms, such as online donor registries, social media searches, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and fertility clinics which act as intermediaries between donors and recipients. Drawing on qualitative interview data, this article explores the donor linking practices of twenty-five single women who conceived using donated gametes. The findings suggest that early contact with donors is extremely popular among single women and that, even when formal legislative mechanisms are available, informal linking remains common. PMID:28137771

  20. Electric field reduced charging energies and two-electron bound excited states of single donors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, R.; Lansbergen, G.P.; Verduijn, J.; Tettamanzi, G.C.; Park, S.H.; Collaert, N.; Biesemans, S.; Klimeck, G.; Hollenberg, L.C.L.; Rogge, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present atomistic simulations of the D0 to D? charging energies of a gated donor in silicon as a function of applied fields and donor depths and find good agreement with experimental measurements. A self-consistent field large-scale tight-binding method is used to compute the D? binding energies

  1. Adult-to-adult living related donor renal transplantation in Yemen: the first experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Asba, Nagieb W Abu; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Al-Massani, Mokhtar M; Noman, Morshed A; Al-Shargabe, Soliman; Al-Mansour, Mohamed M; Nassar, Mogahed Y

    2007-06-01

    Between May 1998 and June 2006, 31 patients (21 males and 10 females) received a renal allograft from live-related donors at the Urology and Nephrology Center in the Al-Thawra Modern General Hospital Sana'a, Republic of Yemen. The cold ischemia time ranged between 48 and 68 minutes. The immunosuppressive protocol was double therapy (steroids and mycophenolate) in the first 8 cases. The subsequent cases received triple therapy with steroids, cyclosporine and mycophenolate. Episodes of acute rejection were treated with high dose steroids while anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was also used in cases of vascular or steroid resistant rejection. Primary graft function was achieved in 29 recipients (93.5%). The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those reported in the literature. The kidney transplantation program started sporadically in Yemen since 1998. However, a well-established program has been running regularly since the beginning of 2005.

  2. 6. workshop on electronics for LHC experiments. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review the electronics for LHC experiments and to identify areas and encourage common efforts for the development of electronics within and between the different LHC experiments and to promote collaboration in the engineering and physics communities involved in the LHC activities. (orig.)

  3. Tracing the role of endogenous carbon in denitrification using wine industry by-product as an external electron donor: Coupling isotopic tools with mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrey, R; Rodríguez-Escales, P; Soler, A; Otero, N

    2018-02-01

    Nitrate removal through enhanced biological denitrification (EBD), consisting of the inoculation of an external electron donor, is a feasible solution for the recovery of groundwater quality. In this context, liquid waste from wine industries (wine industry by-products, WIB) may be feasible for use as a reactant to enhance heterotrophic denitrification. To address the feasibility of WIB as electron donor to promote denitrification, as well as to evaluate the role of biomass as a secondary organic C source, a flow-through experiment was carried out. Chemical and isotopic characterization was performed and coupled with mathematical modeling. Complete nitrate attenuation with no nitrite accumulation was successfully achieved after 10 days. Four different C/N molar ratios (7.0, 2.0, 1.0 and 0) were tested. Progressive decrease of the C/N ratio reduced the remaining C in the outflow and favored biomass migration, producing significant changes in dispersivity in the reactor, which favored efficient nitrate degradation. The applied mathematical model described the general trends for nitrate, ethanol, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations. This model shows how the biomass present in the system is degraded to dissolved organic C (DOC en ) and becomes the main source of DOC for a C/N ratio between 1.0 and 0. The isotopic model developed for organic and inorganic carbon also describes the general trends of δ 13 C of ethanol, DOC and DIC in the outflow water. The study of the evolution of the isotopic fractionation of organic C using a Rayleigh distillation model shows the shift in the organic carbon source from the WIB to the biomass and is in agreement with the isotopic fractionation values used to calibrate the model. Isotopic fractionations (ε) of C-ethanol and C-DOC en were -1‰ and -5‰ (model) and -3.3‰ and -4.8‰ (Rayleigh), respectively. In addition, an inverse isotopic fractionation of +10‰ was observed for

  4. Electron characterization in OPERA Experiment; Caracterisation des electrons dans l'experience OPERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffari, Yvan [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4, Rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2006-09-15

    In 1998 by making use of a water Cherenkov detector the Super-Kamiokande Experiment in Japan has measured a deficit of {nu}{sub {tau}} atmospheric neutrinos without observing a corresponding rise in the {nu}{sub e} flux. This phenomenon is understood as neutrino oscillations, a mechanism implying a non vanishing neutrino mass. In 1999 the CHOOZ Experiment has definitely excluded the oscillations {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} within atmosphere. The OPERA Experiment aims at evidencing the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}oscillations through occurrence of {nu}{sub {tau}} and of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations by occurrence of {nu}{sub e} starting from a muon neutrino beam almost totally clean. Such a beam is actually produced at CERN (CNGS beam) in Switzerland and then directed upon the OPERA detector located 732 km southward under Gran Sasso mountains in Italy. The detector consists of more than 200,000 bricks (what amounts to a total mass of 1,800 tons made up of a nuclear emulsion foils / lead foils sandwich. This module structure allows reconstructing with a high spatial resolution ({delta}{sub {theta}} {approx_equal} 1 mrad and {delta}{sub r} {approx_equal} 1 {mu}m) the kink topology created by the {tau} lepton (issued from charged current interaction of a {nu}{sub {tau}} lepton with a lead nucleus) and its decay products. The work reported in this thesis consists in characterization of the electrons needed in the study of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}oscillations, with {tau} {yields} e, and the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, the {nu}{sub e} interacting through charged currents with a lead nucleus and producing an electron. A reconstruction algorithm of the electromagnetic cascades in nuclear emulsion was developed. This algorithm allows reproducing the longitudinal and transverse profiles used in evaluating the electron energies and their identification as well ({pi}/e separation by mean of a neuron

  5. Clinical experience with electron pseudoarc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, M.R.; Freeman, C.R.; Pla, M.; Guerra, J.; Souhami, L.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1993-01-01

    Between November 1986 and June 1990, 24 patients were treated with electron pseudoarc therapy at McGill University. There were 21 females and three males aged 27 to 81 years (median 62 years). Electron pseudoarc therapy is a treatment option for selected breast carcinoma patients for palliation of extensive chest wall disease, although morbidity may be considerable. The technique may, however, play a more useful role in other situations where the superficial portion of large curved surfaces is to be treated with curative intent, such as chest wall lymphoma and sarcoma, scalp angiosarcoma, scalp lymphoma and posterior cervical soft tissue sarcoma. (Author)

  6. O doador marginal: experiência de um centro de transplante de fígado The marginal donor: a single-center experience in orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olival Cirilo Lucena da Fonseca-Neto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Desde que o uso de enxertos marginais é solução aceita para escassez de órgãos para transplante, ele tornou-se muito comum em todo mundo e a literatura vem mostrando efetividade desses enxertos no transplante de fígado. OBJETIVO: Apresentar a experiência do Serviço de Transplante Hepático do Hospital Universitário Oswaldo Cruz, em transplante de fígado com o uso de doadores marginais. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo em 137 transplantes ortotópicos de fígado, usando enxertos marginais entre 1999 e 2006, com acompanhamento mínimo de 180 dias. Os receptores foram classificados de acordo com a função inicial do enxerto no pós-operatório como normal (FN e disfunção primária (DP. RESULTADOS: Não foi observada diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos FN e DP com os seguintes parâmetros dos doadores: idade, sódio sérico, tempo de protrombina, esteatose hepática, transaminases sérica, pressão sanguínea, drogas vasoativas, índice de massa corpórea, parada cardíaca antes da doação de órgão, doador em assistolia e tempo de isquemia quente. Análise da curva de sobrevida (Kaplan-Meier de pacientes e de enxertos de fígado de pacientes que receberam fígado de doadores ideais versus doadores marginais não mostrou diferença com significância estatística. CONCLUSÃO: Pode ser recomendado o uso de enxertos marginais para transplantes hepáticos, inclusive os provenientes de doadores com o coração parado.BACKGROUND: Since marginal grafts are a solution to deal with the shortage of organ donors, its use became more common worldwide, and the literature had shown its effectiveness in the liver transplantation (LT outcomes. AIM: To present a single center experience, at the Liver Transplantation Unit of Oswaldo Cruz University Hospital, with orthotopic LT using marginal organ donors. METHODS: Retrospectivety review of 137 orthotopic LT using marginal grafts between 1999 and 2006, with a minimum 180

  7. Experience with spice teaching power electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    A free Spice version allowing general circuit simulation is used teaching power electronics. There is no lock on the circuit size, stabile and user friendly operation is experienced. A collection of transformer, converter and drive system models are implemented to investigate the usability...

  8. A Proposed Classification System and Therapeutic Strategy for Chyle Leak After Laparoscopic Living-Donor Nephrectomy: A Single-Center Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Zi Qin; He, Bulang

    2018-04-01

    Chyle leak or chylous ascites remains a rare complication after laparoscopic living-donor nephrectomy. Its cause and management have not been well elucidated in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to review the incidence of chyle leak/chylous ascites after laparoscopic living-donor nephrectomy in our institute and in the literature to propose a classification system with its associated treatment strategy. In this retrospective review of laparoscopic living-donor nephrectomy patients from January 2005 to April 2016, we identified patients with chyle leak/chylous ascites along with the care performed. A proposed classification system based on our experience and literature is described. Chylous leak developed in 4 donors (2.25%). Of the 4 donors, 3 were treated nonoperatively with diet modification and subcutaneous octreotide injection. One patient required surgical intervention after not responding to second-line therapy with total parenteral nutrition. Chyle leak/chylous ascites after laparoscopic living-donor nephrectomy is rare, but a delayed diagnosis may lead to morbidity secondary to malnutrition and immunosuppression. Meticulous surgical dissection is essential to seal the lymphatic tubes during laparoscopic living-donor nephrectomy. The proposed classification system provides a practical and tailored guide to management based on the drainage volume of chyle leak and a guide to the earlier identification of refractory cases.

  9. High performance weak donor-acceptor polymers in thin film transistors: effect of the acceptor on electronic properties, ambipolar conductivity, mobility, and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Jonathan D; Fan, Jian; Seifter, Jason; Lim, Bogyu; Hufschmid, Ryan; Heeger, Alan J; Wudl, Fred

    2011-12-28

    We have studied the electronic, physical, and transistor properties of a family of donor-acceptor polymers consisting of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) coupled with different accepting companion units in order to determine the effects of donor-acceptor interaction. Using the electronically neutral benzene (B), the weakly accepting benzothiadiazole (BT), and the strongly accepting benzobisthiadiazole (BBT), the accepting strength of the companion unit was systematically modulated. All polymers exhibited excellent transistor performance, with mobilities above 0.1 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), even exceeding 1 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) for one of the BBT-containing polymers. We find that the BBT is the strongest acceptor, enabling the BBT-containing polymers to be strongly ambipolar. The BBT moiety also strengthens interchain interactions, which provides higher thermal stability and performance for transistors with BBT-containing polymers as the active layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Electronic structure of the nitrogen donors in 6H SiC as studied by pulsed ENDOR and TRIPLE ENDOR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savchenko, Dariia; Kalabukhova, E.N.; Pöppl, A.; Shanina, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 249, č. 11 (2012), s. 2167-2178 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Grant - others:The Center for Analysis of Functional Materials(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : 6H SiC * electronic structure * ENDOR * nitrogen donors Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.489, year: 2012

  11. Faster photoinduced electron transfer in a diluted mixture than in a neat donor solvent: effect of excited-state H-bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Nabajeet; Singha, Debabrata; Sahu, Kalyanasis

    2014-04-07

    In a neat electron-donating solvent (in this case aniline), photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the solvent to an excited acceptor (e.g. a coumarin fluorophore) may be anticipated to be the most efficient because of the close contact of the acceptor with many donors. Addition of an inert component would most likely retard the PET process by replacing some donors from the neighbourhood of the acceptors. Surprisingly, we found dramatic acceleration of PET (6-10 fold enhancement compared to neat aniline), for coumarin 102 (C102) dissolved in a binary mixture of aniline and an inert solvent (cyclohexane or toluene). The PET induced fluorescence follows an anomalous trend against the mole fraction of aniline (XAN); first quenches up to certain XAN (0.075 for cyclohexane; 0.13 for toluene), thereafter, enhances with increase in XAN. Although the non-interacting component cannot directly participate in the PET process, it may modulate C102-aniline H-bonding association by changing the polarity of the medium or by disrupting the aniline-aniline H-bond. The study clearly illustrates the dominant role of hydrogen bonding in activating the electron transfer rate where standard thermodynamics predicts very weak donor-acceptor interaction.

  12. High Extraction Free-Electron Laser Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-29

    to the wiggler at five locations in January 1992 to assist in beam characterization. The screens, in combination with new dipole coils along the...Lobb, L’onde Electrique 27, 27 (1947). 9. D.C. Quimby, "Floating Wire asurement of Transverse Magnetic Field Errors in a Planar Free-Electron Laser...Design of High Power Laser System" Appl. Phys. Lett. 23, 95 (1973) 6. J. Lobb, L’onde Electrique 27, 27 (1947). 9. D.C. Quimby, "Floating Wire Neasuresent

  13. Building local human resources to implement SLMTA with limited donor funding: The Ghana experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Bernard; van der Puije, Beatrice; Bekoe, Veronica; Adukpo, Rowland; Kotey, Nii A; Yao, Katy; Fonjungo, Peter N; Luman, Elizabeth T; Duh, Samuel; Njukeng, Patrick A; Addo, Nii A; Khan, Fazle N; Woodfill, Celia J I

    2014-11-03

    In 2009, Ghana adopted the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme in order to improve laboratory quality. The programme was implemented successfully with limited donor funding and local human resources. To demonstrate how Ghana, which received very limited PEPFAR funding, was able to achieve marked quality improvement using local human resources. Local partners led the SLMTA implementation and local mentors were embedded in each laboratory. An in-country training-of-trainers workshop was conducted in order to increase the pool of local SLMTA implementers. Three laboratory cohorts were enrolled in SLMTA in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Participants from each cohort attended in a series of three workshops interspersed with improvement projects and mentorship. Supplemental training on internal audit was provided. Baseline, exit and follow-up audits were conducted using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) checklist. In November 2013, four laboratories underwent official SLIPTA audits by the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM). The local SLMTA team successfully implemented three cohorts of SLMTA in 15 laboratories. Seven out of the nine laboratories that underwent follow-up audits have reached at least one star. Three out of the four laboratories that underwent official ASLM audits were awarded four stars. Patient satisfaction increased from 25% to 70% and sample rejection rates decreased from 32% to 10%. On average, $40 000 was spent per laboratory to cover mentors' salaries, SLMTA training and improvement project support. Building in-country capacity through local partners is a sustainable model for improving service quality in resource-constrained countries such as Ghana. Such models promote country ownership, capacity building and the use of local human resources for the expansion of SLMTA.

  14. Building local human resources to implement SLMTA with limited donor funding: The Ghana experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Nkrumah

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2009, Ghana adopted the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA programme in order to improve laboratory quality. The programme was implemented successfully with limited donor funding and local human resources. Objectives: To demonstrate how Ghana, which received very limited PEPFAR funding, was able to achieve marked quality improvement using local human resources. Method: Local partners led the SLMTA implementation and local mentors were embedded in each laboratory. An in-country training-of-trainers workshop was conducted in order to increase the pool of local SLMTA implementers. Three laboratory cohorts were enrolled in SLMTA in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Participants from each cohort attended in a series of three workshops interspersed with improvement projects and mentorship. Supplemental trainingon internal audit was provided. Baseline, exit and follow-up audits were conducted using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA checklist. In November 2013, four laboratories underwent official SLIPTA audits by the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM. Results: The local SLMTA team successfully implemented three cohorts of SLMTA in 15 laboratories. Seven out of the nine laboratories that underwent follow-up audits have reached at least one star. Three out of the four laboratories that underwent official ASLM audits were awarded four stars. Patient satisfaction increased from 25% to 70% and sample rejection rates decreased from 32% to 10%. On average, $40 000 was spent per laboratory to cover mentors’salaries, SLMTA training and improvement project support. Conclusion: Building in-country capacity through local partners is a sustainable model for improving service quality in resource-constrained countries such as Ghana. Such modelspromote country ownership, capacity building and the use of local human resources for the expansion of SLMTA.

  15. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the various options for patients with end stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a suitable patient. The kidney for transplantation is retrieved from either a cadaver or a live donor. Living donor nephrectomy has been developed as a method to address the shortfall in cadaveric kidneys available for transplantation. Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN, by reducing postoperative pain, shortening convalescence, and improving the cosmetic outcome of the donor nephrectomy, has shown the potential to increase the number of living kidney donations further by removing some of the disincentives inherent to donation itself. The technique of LLDN has undergone evolution at different transplant centers and many modifications have been done to improve donor safety and recipient outcome. Virtually all donors eligible for an open surgical procedure may also undergo the laparoscopic operation. Various earlier contraindications to LDN, such as right donor kidney, multiple vessels, anomalous vasculature and obesity have been overcome with increasing experience. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy can be done transperitoneally or retroperitoneally on either side. The approach is most commonly transperitoneal, which allows adequate working space and easy dissection. A review of literature and our experience with regards to standard approach and the modifications is presented including a cost saving model for the developing countries. An assessment has been made, of the impact of LDN on the outcome of donor and the recipient.

  16. The blood donor identity survey: a multidimensional measure of blood donor motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; France, Janis L; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Shaz, Beth H

    2014-08-01

    Evidence indicates that donor identity is an important predictor of donation behavior; however, prior studies have relied on diverse, unidimensional measures with limited psychometric support. The goals of this study were to examine the application of self-determination theory to blood donor motivations and to develop and validate a related multidimensional measure of donor identity. Items were developed and administered electronically to a sample of New York Blood Center (NYBC) donors (n=582) and then to a sample of Ohio University students (n=1005). Following initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the NYBC sample to identify key items related to self-determination theory's six motivational factors, a revised survey was administered to the university sample to reexamine model fit and to assess survey reliability and validity. Consistent with self-determination theory, for both samples CFAs indicated that the best fit to the data was provided by a six-motivational-factor model, including amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation. The Blood Donor Identity Survey provides a psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of donor motivations (ranging from unmotivated to donate to increasing levels of autonomous motivation to donate) that is suitable for nondonors as well as donors with varying levels of experience. Future research is needed to examine longitudinal changes in donor identity and its relationship to actual donation behavior. © 2014 AABB.

  17. “It’s a Trash”: Poetic Responses to the Experiences of a Mexican Egg Donor

    OpenAIRE

    Heather L. Walmsley; Susan Cox; Carl Leggo

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the use of found poetry as interpretive and aesthetic inquiry into the meaning and experience of reproductive tourism. The context is an ethnographic study of transnational egg donation, focusing upon the fertility services industry in Cancun, Mexico. Our source is an audio-recorded interview conducted with Maria, a young Mexican woman who struggles to maintain her integrity as a single mother donating eggs to a fertility clinic. Drawing upon Maria’s story, we experiment w...

  18. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making.

  19. Strategy for the procurement of electronics for the LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    At its meeting on 14 March 2001 the Finance Committee requested the preparation of a document outlining the strategy for future procurement of electronics for the LHC experiments. The bulk of the electronics for the LHC experiments is based on custom-developed designs, the manufacturing of which will be contracted out to industry using the CERN purchasing procedures to ensure competitive prices. Analysis of on-going procurement activities for the electronics for the LHC experiments shows that in almost all cases the application of the CERN purchasing procedures has resulted in bids from a sufficient number of qualified companies to ensure competitive prices and a reasonable distribution of returns between CERN Member States. There is no reason to expect that this pattern will change significantly for the electronics that still remains to be purchased to complete the construction of the LHC experiments.

  20. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  1. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  2. The drift chamber electronics for the NA48 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, R; Chiozzi, S; Clemencic, M; Ramusino, A C; Damiani, C; Gianoli, A; Malaguti, R; Petrucci, F; Scarpa, M

    2004-01-01

    A drift chamber readout electronics for about 8000 channels with concurrent data recording and readout has been developed to update NA48 experiment existing system. Drift times are measured in bins of 1.56 ns with respect to the continuously running 40 MHz experiment clock. The architecture is based on commercially available hardware for cost effectiveness and flexibility. The design of the electronics is described, and results from data-taking runs are presented. (13 refs).

  3. “It’s a Trash”: Poetic Responses to the Experiences of a Mexican Egg Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Walmsley

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of found poetry as interpretive and aesthetic inquiry into the meaning and experience of reproductive tourism. The context is an ethnographic study of transnational egg donation, focusing upon the fertility services industry in Cancun, Mexico. Our source is an audio-recorded interview conducted with Maria, a young Mexican woman who struggles to maintain her integrity as a single mother donating eggs to a fertility clinic. Drawing upon Maria’s story, we experiment with three forms of found poetry as a method for listening deeply to her voice. In this paper, we share our research process, poems, and reflections.

  4. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holin, Anna Maria [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin213 for the rst time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any e appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of θ 13 from background neutral current (NC) and short-track vμ charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from vμ-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 σ ve-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 1020 protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin213. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin2 2 θ 13 < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase δ = 0.

  5. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  6. Pixel electronics for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will use 3 barrel layers and 2x5 disks of silicon pixel detectors as the innermost elements of the semiconductor tracker. The basic building blocks are pixel modules with an active area of 16.4 mmx60.8 mm which include an n + on n-type silicon sensor and 16 VLSI front-end (FE) chips. Every FE chip contains a low power, high speed charge sensitive preamplifier, a fast discriminator, and a readout system which operates at the 40 MHz rate of LHC. The addresses of hit pixels (as well as a low resolution pulse height information) are stored on the FE chips until arrival of a level 1 trigger signal. Hits are then transferred to a module controller chip (MCC) which collects the data of all 16 FE chips, builds complete events and sends the data through two optical links to the data acquisition system. The MCC receives clock and data through an additional optical link and provides timing and configuration information for the FE chips. Two additional chips are used to amplify and decode the pin diode signal and to drive the VCSEL laser diodes of the optical links

  7. Density functional theory study of silodithiophene thiophenepyrrolopyrroledion-based small molecules: The effect of alkyl side chain length in electron donor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong Kyun; Yeo, Hak; Kwak, Kyung Won [Dept. of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Woon; Kim, Bong Soo [Photo-electronic Hybrids Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Koo [Dept. of Chemistry, Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Push–pull small molecules are promising electron-donor materials for organic solar cells. Thus, precise prediction of their electronic structures is of paramount importance to control the optical and electrical properties of the solar cells. Various types of alkyl chains are usually introduced to increase solubility and modify the morphology of the resulting molecular films. Here, using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT), we report the precise effect of increasing the length of the alkyl chain on the electronic structure of an electron donor molecule 6,60-((4,4-dialkyl-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]-dithiophene-2,6-diyl) bis(thiophene-5,2-diyl))bis(2,5-alkyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl) -2,5-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione) (DTS1TDPP). Alkyl groups were attached to the bridging position (silicon atom) of the fused rings and nitrogen atom of the pyrrolopyrroledione groups. We demonstrate that the alkyl groups do not perturb the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels, π-delocalized backbone structure, and UV–Vis absorption spectrum when they are placed at the least steric effect positions.

  8. Long-term health-related quality of life of living kidney donors: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzing, Christian; Hau, Hans-Michael; Kurtz, Greta; Schmelzle, Moritz; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Morgül, Mehmet Haluk; Wiltberger, Georg; Broschewitz, Johannes; Atanasov, Georgi; Bachmann, Anette; Bartels, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Over the last few years, the evaluation of the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of living kidney donors (LKD) has become of particular interest. The present study sought to evaluate the physical and mental HRQoL after kidney removal. The clinical and paraclinical course of these patients was examined, and the impact of preoperative donor evaluation, donor nephrectomy, and surgical recovery was evaluated. These data were compared with reference data of the general population. Between 1998 and 2010, 72 living kidney donations were performed at our institution. To assess the HRQoL, two questionnaires-the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and a special LKD questionnaire-were sent to all 72 living donors. The records of the follow-up examinations of all 72 donors were retrospectively analyzed in order to assess the clinical and paraclinical data after kidney donation. Out of 72 donors, 55 (76.4 %) responded to the questionnaires. There was no change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure during the 7-year follow-up (p > 0.05). Mild proteinuria (>150 mg/l) was observed in six cases. Kidney donors had a higher HRQoL compared to the general population with mean values of the physical and mental summation scale (PCS and MCS, respectively) being 51.3 (SD = 7.6) and 50.6 (SD = 8.1). Peri- or postoperative complications were associated with lower values for physical function and physical component summary (PCS) (p < 0.05). Living donor kidney transplantation appears to be safe for donors. The HRQoL is excellent. To ensure a positive outcome for donors, a good clinical evaluation of potential donors is essential.

  9. Neutrino-electron scattering at LAMPF: Large Cherenkov detector experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure neutrino-electron scattering is described. The neutrinos are generated in a beam stop from 800 MeV protons at LAMPF. The expected precision on sin 2 θ/sub w/ is 1%. The experiment also gives stringent hints on neutrino oscillations and is sensitive to neutrinos from supernova collapse. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  11. Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation preoperative survey using MDCT, a single medical center experience in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Cheng Su

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT scans performed on potential living donors for adult-to-adult liver transplantation (LDLT, with the aim of identifying significant findings that could be used to exclude potential transplantation donors. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 151 consecutive potential adult donors for LDLT from May 2007 to January 2015. Liver parenchyma steatosis, focal hepatic mass or intraabdominal malignancy, vascular variations, and donor liver volume were evaluated via MDCT. Grounds for excluding potential donors were also recorded and analyzed. Of the 151 potential donors, nine (6.0% had moderate to severe fatty liver, 37 (24.5% had hepatic arterial variants, 22 (14.6% had significant portal venous variants, and more than half were found to have right accessory inferior hepatic vein. No intraabdominal malignancies were found. Eighty-eight potential donors were rejected, with the most common cause being insufficient recipient volume or remnant donor volume (47.7%, moderate to severe parenchymal steatosis (10.2%, and recipient expiration prior to transplantation (8.0%. An additional 16 potential donors were excluded by the surgical team due to the complexity of their portal venous variations. The rate of exclusion by pre-transplant imaging evaluation with MDCT was 33.8%. MDCT can provide accurate quantification of donor liver volume and steatosis severity along with precise demonstration of vascular variants, which are crucial for the preoperative evaluation of LDLT. However, MDCT may be ineffective for evaluating the biliary system without hepatobiliary-excreted contrast agent and has the disadvantage of ionizing radiation.

  12. Electron and excitation energy transfers in covalently linked donor-acceptor dyads: mechanisms and dynamics revealed using quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Giannini, Samuele; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-12-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET), hole transfer (HT), charge recombination (CR) and energy transfer (EET) are fundamental mechanisms, which occur in both natural and artificial light harvesting systems. Here, we present a computational strategy which determines ET, HT, CR and EET rates in a consistent way and merges them in a kinetic model to reproduce the net excited state dynamics. The effects of the solvent are included in all steps of the calculations making the present strategy a useful tool for a rational design of charge and energy transfer processes in complex systems. An application to covalently linked zinc and free-base porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyads is presented. For each of the two systems, ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments have shown a specific photophysics with different processes taking place simultaneously. The model reveals that such a diversity is mainly due to the different relative stability of the charge-separated state, while the electronic couplings for charge and energy transfer processes are quite similar in the two dyads.

  13. Isoindigo-based small molecules for high-performance solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices: the electron donating effect of the donor group on photo-physical properties and device performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsawy, Walaa; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Cho, Shinuk; Oh, Seung-Hwan; Moon, Seung-Hyeon; Elbarbary, Ahmed; Lee, Jae-Suk

    2013-09-28

    Five solution processable isoindigo-based donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) small molecules with different electron donating strengths have been designed and synthesized. The variation in the electron donating strength of the donor group strongly affected the optical, thermal, electrochemical and photovoltaic device performances of the isoindigo organic materials. The highest power conversion efficiency of ~3.2% was achieved in the bulk heterojunction photovoltaic device consisting of ID3T as the donor and PC70BM as the acceptor. This work demonstrates the potential of isoindigo moieties as electron-deficient units and presents guidelines for the synthesis of D-A-D small molecules for producing highly efficient, solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices.

  14. Optimization of inorganic carbon sources to improve the carbon fixation efficiency of the non-photosynthetic microbial community with different electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-nan; Wang, Lei; Shan, Yi-na; Hu, Jiajun; Tsang, Yiufai; Hu, Yu; Fu, Xiaohua; Le, Yiquan

    2015-01-01

    As the non-photosynthetic microbial community (NPMC) isolated from seawaters utilized inorganic carbon sources for carbon fixation, the concentrations and ratios of Na2CO3, NaHCO3, and CO2 were optimized by response surface methodology design. With H2 as the electron donor, the optimal carbon sources were 270 mg/L Na2CO3, 580 mg/L NaHCO3, and 120 mg/L CO2. The carbon fixation efficiency in response to total organic carbon (TOC) was up to 30.59 mg/L with optimal carbon sources, which was about 50% higher than that obtained with CO2 as the sole carbon source. The mixture of inorganic carbon sources developed a buffer system to prevent acidification or alkalization of the medium caused by CO2 or Na2CO3, respectively. Furthermore, CO2 and HCO3(-), the starting points of carbon fixation in the pathways of Calvin-Benson-Bassham and 3-hydroxypropionate cycles, were provided by the carbon source structure to facilitate carbon fixation by NPMC. However, in the presence of mixed electron donors composed of 1.25% Na2S, 0.50% Na2S2O3, and 0.457% NaNO2, the carbon source structure did not exhibit significant improvement in the carbon fixation efficiency, when compared with that achieved with CO2 as the sole carbon source. The positive effect of mixed electron donors on inorganic carbon fixation was much higher than that of the carbon source structure. Nevertheless, the carbon source structure could be used as an alternative to CO2 when using NPMC to fix carbon in industrial processes.

  15. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savchenko, Dariia; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, Ján; Mokhov, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 13 (2016), 1-7, č. článku 135706. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-06697P; GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron spin resonance * SiC * nitrogen donors * relaxation times Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.068, year: 2016

  16. Electronic transitions and bonding properties in a series of five-coordinate "16-electron" complexes [Mn(CO)3(L2)]- (L2 = chelating redox-active .pi.-donor ligand)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartl, F.; Rosa, P.; Ricard, L.; Le Floch, P.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 251, 3-4 (2007), s. 557-576 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC068; GA AV ČR 1ET400400413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : manganese carbonyl * .pi.-donor ligand * electronic delocalization * Five-coordinate complex Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 8.568, year: 2007

  17. On the scalar electron mass limit from single photon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivaz, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss how the 90% C.L. lower limit on the mass of the scalar electron, as extracted from the single photon experiments, is affected by the way the background from radiative neutrino pair production is handled. We argue that some of the results presented at the Berkeley conference are overoptimistic, and that the mass lower limit is 65 GeV rather than the advertized value of 84 GeV, for the case of degenerate scalar electrons with massless photinos

  18. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  19. Electron transport for spectrum analysis and experiment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Wolfgang S.M.

    2010-01-01

    A survey is presented on modeling the effects of electron transport on the energy and angular spectra of electrons emitted or reflected from non-crystalline solid surfaces and nanostructures. This is intended to aid in the quantitative interpretation of such spectra and should also provide a useful guideline for experiment design. A brief review of the most significant characteristics of the electron-solid interaction is given and the theory describing the energy dissipation and momentum relaxation of electrons in solids is outlined, which is based on the so-called Landau-Goudsmit-Saunderson (LGS) loss function. It is shown that the basis for true quantitative spectrum interpretation is provided by the collision statistics, i.e. the number of electrons arriving at the detector after participating in a given number of inelastic collisions, being equal to the partial intensities. By introducing an appropriate stochastic process for multiple scattering, the validity of the partial intensity approach (PIA) can be extended to the true slowing down regime making it possible, in a very simple way, to fully account for energy fluctuations in the limit of large energy losses. The LGS loss function thus provides a unified theoretical basis for electron spectroscopy and microscopy. The usefulness of the concept of the collision statistics, or partial intensities, for quantitative spectrum interpretation is illustrated by considering various examples of practical significance, including elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS), (hard) X-ray photoelectron emission ((HA)XPS), electron coincidence spectroscopy, the Auger electron backscattering factor and the ionization depth distribution. Finally, the relationship between the partial intensities and the emission depth is discussed, which allows one to combine the unique features of electron spectroscopy for investigation of chemical, electronic and magnetic properties of

  20. Electron cloud experiments at Fermilab: Formation and mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments at Fermilab to explore the electron cloud phenomenon. The Main Injector will have its beam intensity increased four-fold in the Project X upgrade, and would be subject to instabilities from the electron cloud. We present measurements of the cloud formation in the Main Injector and experiments with materials for the mitigation of the Cloud. An experimental installation of Titanium-Nitride (TiN) coated beam pipes has been under study in the Main Injector since 2009; this material was directly compared to an adjacent stainless chamber through electron cloud measurement with Retarding Field Analyzers (RFAs). Over the long period of running we were able to observe the secondary electron yield (SEY) change and correlate it with electron fluence, establishing a conditioning history. Additionally, the installation has allowed measurement of the electron energy spectrum, comparison of instrumentation techniques, and energydependent behavior of the electron cloud. Finally, a new installation, developed in conjunction with Cornell and SLAC, will allow direct SEY measurement of material samples irradiated in the accelerator.

  1. A 20 keV electron gun system for the electron irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, S.K.; Dhole, S.D.; Bhoraskar, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    An electron gun consisting of cathode, focusing electrode, control electrode and anode has been designed and fabricated for the electron irradiation experiments. This electron gun can provide electrons of any energy over the range 1-20 keV, with current upto 50 μA. This electron gun and a Faraday cup are mounted in the cylindrical chamber. The samples are fixed on the Faraday cup and irradiated with electrons at a pressure ∼10 -7 mbar. The special features of this electron gun system are that, at any electron energy above 1 keV, the electron beam diameter can be varied from 5 to 120 mm on the Faraday cup mounted at a distance of 200 mm from the anode in the chamber. The variation in the electron current over the beam spot of 120 mm diameter is less than 15% and the beam current stability is better than 5%. This system is being used for studying the irradiation effects of 1-20 keV energy electrons on the space quality materials in which the irradiation time may vary from a few tens of seconds to hours

  2. Electronic availability of microgravity experiments safety and integration requirements documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jean M.

    1995-01-01

    This follow-on to NASA Contractor Report 195447, Microgravity Experiments Safety and Integration Requirements Document Tree, provides the details for accessing the systems that contain the official, electronic versions of the documents initially researched in NASA Contractor Report 195447. The data in this report serves as a valuable information source for the NASA Lewis Research Center Project Documentation Center (PDC), as well as for all developers of space experiments. The PDC has acquired the hardware, software, ID's, and passwords necessary to access most of these systems and is now able to provide customers with current document information as well as immediate delivery of available documents in either electronic or hard copy format.

  3. Longitudinal electron cooling experiments at HIRFL-CSRe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, L.J., E-mail: maolijun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, X.D.; Li, J.; Yang, J.C.; Yuan, Y.J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Reva, V.B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ma, X.M.; Yan, T.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tang, M.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring HIRFL-CSRe an electron cooler is operated to improve the beam conditions for experiments. The properties of cooled beams have been studied. The longitudinal beam dynamics during the cooling process was measured by a resonant Schottky detector. The dependencies of the parameters electron beam density and profile on cooling times were investigated. The friction force was measured directly with the aid of the high voltage system of the cooler and with the application of the beam bunching system as well. An experiment with bunched cold beam showed a dependence of the bunch length on the beam density.

  4. Advancing Small Satellite Electronics Heritage for Microfluidic Biological Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bruce; Mazmanian, Edward; Tapio, Eric

    2016-01-01

    DLR's Eu:CROPIS (Euglena and Combined Regenerative Organic-Food Production in Space) mission, launching in 2017, will carry multiple biological payloads into a sun-synchronous orbit, including NASA Ames' PowerCell experiment. PowerCell will attempt to characterize the viability of synthetic biology at micro-g, Lunar, and Martian gravity levels. PowerCell experiment requirements demand an electronic system similar to previous microfluidic biology payloads, but with an expanded feature set. As such, the system was based on PharmaSat (Diaz-Aguado et al. 2009), a previous successful biology payload from NASA Ames, and improved upon. Newer, more miniaturized electronics allow for greater capability with a lower part count and smaller size. Two identical PowerCell enclosures will fly. Each enclosure contains two separate and identical experiments with a 48-segment optical density measurement system, grow light system, microfluidic system for nutrient delivery and waste flushing, plus thermal control and environmental sensing/housekeeping including temperature, pressure, humidity, and acceleration. Electronics consist of a single Master PCB that interfaces to the spacecraft bus and regulates power and communication, plus LED, Detector, and Valve Manifold PCBs for each experiment. To facilitate ease of reuse on future missions, experiment electronics were designed to be compatible with a standard 3U small sat form factor and power bus, or to interface with a Master power/comm PCB for use in a larger satellite as in the case of PowerCell's flight on Eu:CROPIS.

  5. Electron beam diagnostic for the Los Alamos free-electron laser oscillator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electron beam diagnostic for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator experiment has been used to measure the time dependence of the electron energy distribution in a 100-μs time interval. The electron beam consists of macropulses that have a duration of 100 μs and a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Each macropulse consists of a series of micropulses that have approx. 30 ps duration, approx. 50 A peak current, and approx. 50 ns separation. The primary purpose of the electron beam diagnostic is measurement of the time dependence of the electron energy distribution during the build-up of the photon field in the oscillator. Since the exact time of build-up depends on various rf and cavity considerations, provisions were made to allow the observation window to be varied from 10 to 100 μs and to be delayed by times up to 100 μs. 5 references, 9 figures

  6. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauel, M.E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation

  7. Electronic Structure, Donor and Acceptor Transitions, and Magnetism of 3d Impurities in In2O3 and ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raebiger, H.; Lany, S,; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01

    3d transition impurities in wide-gap oxides may function as donor/acceptor defects to modify carrier concentrations, and as magnetic elements to induce collective magnetism. Previous first-principles calculations have been crippled by the LDA error, where the occupation of the 3d-induced levels is incorrect due to spurious charge spilling into the misrepresented host conduction band, and have only considered magnetism and carrier doping separately. We employ a band-structure-corrected theory, and present simultaneously the chemical trends for electronic properties, carrier doping, and magnetism along the series of 3d{sup 1}-3d{sup 8} transition-metal impurities in the representative wide-gap oxide hosts In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO. We find that most 3d impurities in In{sub 2}O{sub 3} are amphoteric, whereas in ZnO, the early 3d's (Sc, Ti, and V) are shallow donors, and only the late 3d's (Co and Ni) have acceptor transitions. Long-range ferromagnetic interactions emerge due to partial filling of 3d resonances inside the conduction band and, in general, require electron doping from additional sources.

  8. Electronic structure, donor and acceptor transitions, and magnetism of 3d impurities in In2O3 and ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raebiger, Hannes; Lany, Stephan; Zunger, Alex

    2009-04-01

    3d transition impurities in wide-gap oxides may function as donor/acceptor defects to modify carrier concentrations, and as magnetic elements to induce collective magnetism. Previous first-principles calculations have been crippled by the LDA error, where the occupation of the 3d -induced levels is incorrect due to spurious charge spilling into the misrepresented host conduction band, and have only considered magnetism and carrier doping separately. We employ a band-structure-corrected theory, and present simultaneously the chemical trends for electronic properties, carrier doping, and magnetism along the series of 3d1-3d8 transition-metal impurities in the representative wide-gap oxide hosts In2O3 and ZnO. We find that most 3d impurities in In2O3 are amphoteric, whereas in ZnO, the early 3d ’s (Sc, Ti, and V) are shallow donors, and only the late 3d ’s (Co and Ni) have acceptor transitions. Long-range ferromagnetic interactions emerge due to partial filling of 3d resonances inside the conduction band and, in general, require electron doping from additional sources.

  9. On chirality transfer in electron donor-acceptor complexes. A prediction for the sulfinimine···BF3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Joanna E; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2012-01-01

    Stabilization energies of the electron donor-acceptor sulfinimine···BF(3) complexes calculated at either the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ or the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level do not allow to judge, whether the N- or O-atom in sulfinimine is stronger electron-donor to BF(3) . The problem seems to be solvable because chirality transfer phenomenon between chiral sulfinimine and achiral BF(3) is expected to be vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) active. Moreover, the bands associated with the achiral BF(3) molecule are predicted to be the most intense in the entire spectrum. However, the VCD band robustness analyses show that most of the chirality transfer modes of BF(3) are unreliable. Conversely, variation of VCD intensity with change of intermolecular distance, angle, and selected dihedrals between the complex partners shows that to establish the robustness of chirality transfer mode. It is also necessary to determine the influence of the potential energy surface (PES) shape on the VCD intensity. At the moment, there is still no universal criterion for the chirality transfer mode robustness and the conclusions formulated based on one system cannot be directly transferred even to a quite similar one. However, it is certain that more attention should be focused on relation of PES shape and the VCD mode robustness problem. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sircombe N.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  11. Electron beam sounding rocket experiments for probing the distant magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron accelerators on sounding rockets have injected 8-40-keV electrons on closed magnetospheric tail field lines near 250 km altitude in the northern auroral zone. These beams mirrored at the southern conjugate point ad returned as 'echoes' which were detected on the rocket system. The 20 percent of the beam that returned was sufficient to measure field line lengths and verify magnetospheric magnetic models, to measure fluctuating electric fields, and electron pitch angle scattering (6-10) R(E) distant, and to identify 10-100 V field-aligned potentials above the rocket. The experiment gives new insight into the motion of natural electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  12. Donor type semiconductor at low temperature as maser active medium

    OpenAIRE

    Kornyushin, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    In some semiconductors donor impurity atoms can attract additional electrons, forming negative donor impurity ions. Thus we have 3 energy levels for electrons: zero energy levels at the bottom of the conductivity band, negative energy levels of the bounded electrons of the negative donor impurity ions, and deeper negative energy levels of the outer electrons of the neutral donor impurity atoms. So the donor impurity atoms could serve as active centres for a maser. The maximum achievable relat...

  13. Appropriateness of a donor liver with respect to macrosteatosis: application of artificial neural networks to US images--initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Jong Hyo; Kim, Kwang Gi; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Park, Seong Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; An, Su Kyung; Kim, Young Jun; Son, Kyu Ri; Lee, Hye Seung; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2005-03-01

    To retrospectively compare performance of artificial neural networks (ANNs) applied to ultrasonographic (US) images with that of radiologists for prediction of appropriateness of a donor liver with respect to macrosteatosis before liver transplantation. Institutional ethics committee approved study; written informed consent was obtained. ANNs, constructed with three-layered 15-neuron back-propagation algorithm, were trained to predict appropriateness of a donor liver with respect to macrosteatosis by using statistically significant laboratory and US parameters derived from univariate analyses, together with correct diagnosis. Input variables for ANNs were alkaline phosphatase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvate transaminase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, hepatorenal ratio of echogenicity, and tail area ratio and tail length of portal vein wall echogenicity. Three radiologists graded US images in 94 potential donors (71 men and 23 women) on the basis of four degrees of hepatic steatosis. After training and testing of ANNs, performance of ANNs and radiologists in predicting appropriateness of potential donors was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and compared by means of univariate z score test. Among 94 potential donor livers, 76 were normal or had mild steatosis, and 18 had moderate or severe macrosteatosis at histopathologic examination. Area under ROC curve (Az) of ANNs (Az=0.9673) was significantly greater than that of radiologists (faculty, Az=0.9106, P=.048; fellow, Az= 0.9038, P=.044; resident, Az=0.8931, P=.038). No statistically significant difference in sensitivity for predicting appropriateness as a liver donor with respect to macrosteatosis was found between ANNs (88.9%) and radiologists (P >.05). However, specificity of ANNs (96.1%) was significantly better than that of radiologists (P <.003). ANNs might be a useful tool to categorize whether a donor liver is appropriate for transplantation with respect to

  14. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Moody

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200  MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100  fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  15. Pediatric Donor to Adult Recipients in Donation After Cardiac Death Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, C; Song, J L; Yan, L N; Yang, J Y; Wen, T F; Li, B; Xu, M Q

    The impact of using liver allografts from donors who are younger than 14 years at the time of donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver transplantation in terms of early allograft dysfunction (EAD) and graft survival is undefined. To determine if adults undergoing DCD liver transplantation who receive a graft from a donor age younger than or equal to 13 years have similar outcomes to recipients of organs from older than 18-year-old donors. Records from adult patients undergoing DCD liver transplantation between March 2012 and December 2015 who received whole grafts from donors after cardiac death were reviewed. Patients with donors younger than or equal to 13 years (group 1) and older than 18 years (group 2) were compared for EAD rates, hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), and graft survival. Records of 60 DCD liver transplantation patients were analyzed. The 90-day and 1-year graft survival rate of both groups was 90% versus 96% (P = .427) and 80% versus 84% (P = .668), respectively. The EAD rates of groups 1 and 2 were 30% versus 34% (P = .806). The incidence of HAT was 20% in group 1 compared with 12% in group 2 (P = .610). Also, 0.7% 0.7%) DCD adult recipients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Saitoh, H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA USA (United States); Hugenschmidt, C. [Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  17. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  18. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  19. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment - ECHo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, L.; Blaum, K.; Chrysalidis, K.; Day Goodacre, T.; Domula, A.; Door, M.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Faessler, A.; Filianin, P.; Fleischmann, A.; Fonnesu, D.; Gamer, L.; Haas, R.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Kebschull, U.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Lahiri, S.; Maiti, M.; Mantegazzini, F.; Marsh, B.; Neroutsos, P.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Saenz, A.; Sander, O.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Schweiger, Ch.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Szücs, Z.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Weber, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2017-06-01

    Neutrinos, and in particular their tiny but non-vanishing masses, can be considered one of the doors towards physics beyond the Standard Model. Precision measurements of the kinematics of weak interactions, in particular of the 3H β-decay and the 163Ho electron capture (EC), represent the only model independent approach to determine the absolute scale of neutrino masses. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured electron capture spectrum of the nuclide 163Ho. The maximum energy available for this decay, about 2.8 keV, constrains the type of detectors that can be used. Arrays of low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are being developed to measure the 163Ho EC spectrum with energy resolution below 3 eV FWHM and with a time resolution below 1 μs. To achieve the sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass, together with the detector optimization, the availability of large ultra-pure 163Ho samples, the identification and suppression of background sources as well as the precise parametrization of the 163Ho EC spectrum are of utmost importance. The high-energy resolution 163Ho spectra measured with the first MMC prototypes with ion-implanted 163Ho set the basis for the ECHo experiment. We describe the conceptual design of ECHo and motivate the strategies we have adopted to carry on the present medium scale experiment, ECHo-1K. In this experiment, the use of 1 kBq 163Ho will allow to reach a neutrino mass sensitivity below 10 eV/ c 2. We then discuss how the results being achieved in ECHo-1k will guide the design of the next stage of the ECHo experiment, ECHo-1M, where a source of the order of 1 MBq 163Ho embedded in large MMCs arrays will allow to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass.

  20. Gas Electron Multipler (GEM) detectors for parity-violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, John; Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Solid Collaboration; Moller Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The JLab Parity Violation In Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment will use the upgraded 12 GeV beam and proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) to measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in DIS of polarized electrons with high precision in order to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Unlike many prior Parity-Violating Electron Scattering (PVES) experiments, PVDIS is a single-particle tracking experiment. Furthermore the experiment's high luminosity combined with the SoLID spectrometer's open configuration creates high-background conditions. As such, the PVDIS experiment has the most demanding tracking detector needs of any PVES experiment to date, requiring precision detectors capable of operating at high-rate conditions in PVDIS's full production luminosity. Developments in large-area GEM detector R&D and SoLID simulations have demonstrated that GEMs provide a cost-effective solution for PVDIS's tracking needs. The integrating-detector-based JLab Measurement Of Lepton Lepton Electroweak Reaction (MOLLER) experiment requires high-precision tracking for acceptance calibration. Large-area GEMs will be used as tracking detectors for MOLLER as well. The conceptual designs of GEM detectors for the PVDIS and MOLLER experiments will be presented.

  1. Thermal Resonator Experiments Using A Magnetized Electron Temperature Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbashewski, Scott; Sydora, Richard; van Compernolle, Bart; Poulos, Matt; Morales, George

    2017-10-01

    We present results from basic heat transport experiments of a magnetized electron temperature filament that behaves as a thermal resonator. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. A CeB6 cathode injects low energy electrons along a magnetic field into the center of a pre-existing plasma forming a hot electron filament embedded in a colder plasma. Previous work reported that the filament exhibits spontaneous excitation of thermal waves and temperature gradient driven drift-Alfvén waves that enhance cross-field transport. We have added to the cathode bias a series of low amplitude pulse trains tuned to the thermal resonance of the filament that externally excite thermal waves. Langmuir probe measurements allow for the determination of the phase velocity and radial decay length of the thermal mode. These results are used to compute the axial and transverse thermal conductivities of the magnetized plasma and compare with those given by classical theory. Agreement of the axial conductivity provides a measurement of electron temperature; deviation of the transverse conductivity suggests anomalous transport or non-uniform excitation. Work Supported by NSERC, Canada and NSF-DOE, USA.

  2. Lower hybrid wave electron heating experiments in Doublet IIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, R.L.; Luxon, J.L.; Chan, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments designed to heat electrons by Landau damping of waves at approximately twice the lower hybrid frequency have been carried out on Doublet IIA. This objective is in contrast to other lower hybrid experiments which are designed to heat ions using frequencies corresponding to the lower hybrid resonance frequency. Up to 500 kW of rf power was applied to discharges with approximately 100 kW ohmic input using parallel wavelengths chosen to optimize the spatial distribution of the power deposition based on linear or quasi-linear Landau damping. Coupling of the power to both electrons and ions was observed, but there was no indication of effective bulk heating of either species. The desired slow wave propagated into the plasma and efficient coupling of the wave energy to the plasma occurred, but this energy was poorly confined. Two possible models of the absorption and loss mechanisms remain unresolved: 1) The power is coupled to energetic electrons by Landau damping and is lost via anomolous electron transport before it can thermalize. 2) The power is coupled to energetic ions and is lost by direct particle losses before it can thermalize

  3. Short Rayleigh length free electron laser: Experiments and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Crooker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report experiments at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab and computer simulations performed at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS designed to probe the small Rayleigh length regime. We compare the gain, power, and sensitivity to mirror and electron beam misalignments as a function of decreasing Rayleigh length. The agreement is quite good, with experiments and simulations showing comparable trends as the Rayleigh length is decreased. In particular, we find that the gain and power do not decrease substantially at short Rayleigh length, contrary to a common Gaussian-mode filling factor argument. Within currently achievable alignment tolerances, the gain and power are still acceptable for FEL operation.

  4. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-01-01

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability

  5. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  6. Development of an electron gun for high power CW electron linac (1). Beam experiment for basic performance of electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshio; Nomura, Masahiro; Komata, Tomoki

    1999-05-01

    Presently, the Beam Group of Oarai Engineering Center in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) completed the high power CW electron linac. Then we started full-scale beam experiments after the government permission for a radiation equipment had given last January. Measurements of basic performance for the mesh-grid type electron gun have been done to launch stable beam at 300 mA peak current downstream of the accelerator. These experiments disclosed to increase beam loss in the electron gun in some cases of voltage supplied the mesh-grid in spite of same beam current from gun. Consequently, we could find the best condition for mesh-grid voltage and heater current to supply stable beam at 300 mA peak current for accelerator study. (author)

  7. Bonding Study on the Chemical Separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) by S-, N-, and O-Donor Ligands by Means of All-Electron ZORA-DFT Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masashi; Miyashita, Sunao; Nakashima, Satoru

    2015-07-20

    We performed a theoretical investigation for the selectivity of Eu(III)/Am(III) ions depending on the donor atoms by means of all-electron ZORA-DFT calculation. We estimated their selectivity as the relative stability in the complex formation reaction. The B2PLYP functional reproduced the experimental selectivity in which S- and N-donor ligands favor Am(III) ion, but O-donor ligand favors Eu(III) ion. Mulliken's bond overlap population analysis revealed that the contribution of the f orbital to the bonding was small or zero for Eu complex, whereas it was large for Am complex. The bonding nature of the f orbital for Am ion was the bonding type to S- and N-donor ligands, while it was the antibonding type to O-donor ligand. It was suggested that the difference in the bonding nature between the f orbital in the metal and the donor atoms determines the selectivity of Eu(III)/Am(III) by donor ligands.

  8. Coupling of metal-based light-harvesting antennas and electron-donor subunits: Trinuclear Ruthenium(II) complexes containing tetrathiafulvalene-substituted polypyridine ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagna, Sebastiano; Serroni, Scolastica; Puntoriero, Fausto

    2002-01-01

    as light-harvesting antennas and the tetrathiafulvalene electron donors can induce charge separation. The absorption spectra, redox behavior, and luminescence properties (both at room temperature in acetonitrile and at 77 K in a rigid matrix of butyronitrile) of the trinuclear metal complexes have been......+) (4,4'-Mebpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [{(bpy)(2)Ru(mu-2,3-dpp)}(2)Ru(bpy)](6+). The absorption spectra and redox behavior of all the new metal compounds can be interpreted by a multicomponent approach, in which specific absorption features and redox processes can be assigned to specific...... subunits of the structures. The luminescence properties of the complexes in rigid matrices at 77 K are very similar to those of the corresponding model compounds without TTF moieties, whereas the new species are nonluminescent, or exhibit very weak emissions relative to those of the model compounds...

  9. Experience of a Maastrich type II non heart beating donor program in a small city: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñambres, E; Suberviola, B; Guerra, C; Lavid, N; Lassalle, M; González-Castro, A; Ballesteros, M A

    2015-10-01

    To study the results of a non-controlled cardiac death (Maastricht type II) donor program in a city of 200,000 inhabitants. The study was initially focused on lung donation and was extended to kidney donation after 9 months. A prospective observational study was conducted between October 2012 and December 2013. The Intensive Care Unit of Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital in Santander (Spain), and surrounding areas. Patients (< 55 years) who died of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. All out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were treated with mechanical cardiac compression (LUCAS II). The diagnosis of death and organ preservation were performed in the ICU. A total of 14 calls were received, of which three were discarded. Of the 11 potential donors, 7 were effective donors with a median age of 39.5 years (range: 32-48). A total of 5 single lung transplants and four kidney transplants were performed. In addition, corneas and tissues were harvested. The non-valid donors were rejected mainly due to technical problems. There were no donation refusals on the part of the patient relatives. The lung transplant patient survival rate was 100% after one month and 80% after one year. One month after transplantation, the kidney recipients had a serum creatinine concentration of<2mg/dl. The interval from cardiac arrest to renal preservation was 80minutes (range: 71-89), and the interval from cardiac arrest to lung preservation was 84minutes (range: 77-94). A Maastricht type II donation program in a small city is viable for both abdominal and thoracic organs. The program was initially very cautious, but its potential is easily improvable by increasing donor and by equipping mobile ICU ambulances with mechanical cardiac compression systems. Full management of the donor in the ICU, avoiding the emergency department or operating rooms, reduces the warm ischemia time, thereby improving transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Ion and electron heating in ICRF heating experiments on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    2001-02-01

    This paper reports on the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating conducted in 1999 in the 3rd experimental campaign on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with an emphasis on the optimization of the heating regime. Specifically, an exhaustive study of seven different heating regimes was carried out by changing the RF frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity, and the dependence of the heating efficiency on H-minority concentration was investigated. It was found in the experiment that both ion and electron heating are attainable with the same experimental setup by properly choosing the frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity. In the cases of both electron heating and ion heating, the power absorption efficiency depends on the minority ion concentration. An optimum minority concentration exists in the ion heating case while, in the electron heating case, the efficiency increases with concentration monotonically. A simple model calculation is introduced to provide a heuristic understanding of these experimental results. Among the heating regimes examined in this experiment, one of the ion heating regimes was finally chosen as the optimized heating regime and various high performance discharges were realized with it. (author)

  11. Rate of family refusal of organ donation in dead-brain donors: the Iranian tissue bank experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Mazdeh, M; Khodadadi, A; Tirgar, N; Riazi, N

    2013-01-01

    The growing gap between organ supply and demand remains a worldwide serious problem. Losing dead-brain donor organs can be attributed to several reasons including un-recognition of potential donor by ICU staff, death before official declaration of brain death and high refusal rate of deceased donors' families. To study the trend of dead-brain patients' relatives refusal of organ donation from 2007 to 2011. This study was a retrospective review of all patients who had been introduced as brain death to the organ procurement unit (OPU) of Iranian Tissue Bank between April 2007 and April 2012 according to preliminary neurological exam performed in the hospital of origin. The refusal rate of dead-brain patients' families and its reasons was evaluated. A total of 874 ICU admitted patients with severe brain injury (Glasgow coma score donation according to the approved medical protocols (n=205) and not fulfilling the brain death criteria (n=66). The families of the remaining cases (n=462) had been interviewed 343 (74.2%) of whom permitted donation. The mean±SD age of donors was 29.8±13.2 years; the male/female ratio was almost 2. The most common reason of brain death was traffic collision (n=120; 56.3%) and cerebrovascular accidents (n=40; 18.8%). The refusal rate from 2007 to 2011 has decreased respectively, from 30.4% to 20% in Tehran, and from 57.1% to 51.6% in other cities. The overall refusal rate was 25.8%. Our study confirmed that more level of expertise of the coordinator team and continuous public education, would result in higher rate of consent to organ donation.

  12. New experiments on few-electron very heavy atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, H.

    1985-07-01

    New experiments, to test quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong Coulomb fields and to study atomic collisions at ultrarelativistic energies, are proposed. A 0.1% measurement of the 2 2 P/sub 1/2/-2 2 S/sub 1/2/ splitting in lithium like uranium (Z=92) and the 2 3 P 0 - 2 3 S 1 splitting in heliumlike uranium is proposed as a sub 1% test of the Lamb shift in a strong Coulomb field. Measurements of the hyperfine splitting of hydrogenlike thallium (Z=81) and the g/sub j/ factor of the ground state of hydrogenlike uranium are propsed as a test of the QED contribution to the magnetic moment of an electron bound in a strong Coulomb field. Measurements of capture cross sections for ultra relativistic very heavy nuclei are proposed to look for the capture of electrons from pair production. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Radiation load experiments with electronic components of the SYMPHONIE satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencker, A.; Wagemann, H.G.; Braeunig, D.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys fundamentals, realization and results of irradiation experiments which applied to 36 different electronic components of the Symphonie satellite and which were completed at the HMI Berlin and the C.N.E.T. Lannion in the years 1972/73. In a general section the evaluation of equivalent fluencies concerning 1 MeV electrons as radiation simulating the extraterrestric particle spectra with regard to the well-known semiconductor damage mechanisms is discussed. Then the realization of irradiation testing for the Symphonie satellite is described. Three selected examples demonstrate typical failure modes of semiconductor devices under radiation stress: Finally the main experimental results are shown in a standardized manner; a survey in English is given on p. 44. (orig.) [de

  14. Free electron laser experiments using a long pulse induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasour, J.A.; Lucey, R.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL Long Pulse Induction Linac is being employed in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. The authors present results of beam transport and focusing experiments as well as measurements of the output radiation generated by various magnetic wigglers. The electron gun of the accelerator presently has a 17-cmdiam. cold cathode which is located in a nearly zero magnetic field (B /SUB z/ less than or equal to 5 G). The gun voltage is flat to within approx. = + or - 5% for 1.5 μsec with this graphite brush cathode. The beam is focused by a series of solenoidal coils as it propagates through the 4-m-long accelerator. 2 A solenoidal field which can be varied from 1-10 kG confines the beam in the FEL interaction region. Previous experiments were limited by poor beam transport, focusing, and matching into the relatively large solenoidal field in the FEL region. By smoothing the axial magnetic field profile in the accelerator and making a more adiabatic transition from the low field in the accelerator to the high field in the FEL, beam transport into the wiggler has been substantially improved. Currently, a 700 kV beam with I > 500 A and r /SUB b/ < 0.75 cm is transported through the FEL region. Beam transport is in qualitative agreement with envelope code calculations

  15. Numerical experiments with photons, electron and positrons by Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.

    1996-01-01

    First version of the program FOTELP has presented at ETAN Conference in 1988. From 1991 this program has included in the international distribution (RSIC.Tenn., USA CCC-581). During the previous years the models of the Monte Carlo transport of photons, electrons and positrons were been modified, and includes the new cross section for elements from Z = 1 to Z = 100 in energy range from 1 keV to 20 MeV. The actual version of the program has the new numerical methods for probability calculations, and new techniques for sampling random values from their inverse distributions. The geometric module 05R were been replaced by more efficient module RFG for tic and tins zones in 3D. The experiences with programs ETRAN and ITS were been included. Available libraries of cross sections enabled program FOTELP to become the tool for numerical experiments in dosimetry, radiotherapy, radiation damage in electronics, and calculations radiation detectors efficiency. In this paper the new results of the program modifications were been presented with consideration on the models of other authors, and results of numerical experiments that approve validity of the new models included in the program. (author)

  16. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Giruzzi, G.; Gentile, B. de; Rodriguez, L. (Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France)); Fyaretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Yu.; Trukhin, V. (Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy, Moscow (USSR)); Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, K.; Politzer, P.; Prater, R.; Snider, R. (General Atomics, San Di

    1990-05-01

    Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed using 60 GHz waves launched from the high field side of the torus. Preliminary analysis indicates rf driven currents between 50 and 100 kA in discharges with total plasma currents between 200 and 500 kA. These are the first ECCD experiments with strong first pass absorption, localized deposition of the rf power, and {tau}{sub E} much longer than the slowing-down time of the rf generated current carriers. The experimentally measured profiles for T{sub e}, {eta}{sub e} and Z{sub eff} are used as input for a 1D transport code and a multiply-ray, 3D ray tracing code. Comparisons with theory and assessment of the influence of the residual electric field, using a Fokker-Planck code, are in progress. The ECH power levels were between 1 and 1.5 MW with pulse lengths of about 500 msec. ECCD experiments worldwide are motivated by issues relating to the physics and technical advantages of the use of high frequency rf waves to drive localized currents. ECCD is accomplished by preferentially heating electrons moving in one toroidal direction, reducing their collisionality and thereby producing a non-inductively driven toroidal current. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Scaled electron experiments at the University of Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, I.; Bai, G.; Bernal, S.; Beaudoin, B.; Feldman, D.; Fiorito, R.B.; Godlove, T.F.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.G.; Quinn, B.; Papadopoulos, C.; Reiser, M.; Rodgers, J.; Stratakis, D.; Sutter, D.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Tian, K.; Walter, M.; Wu, C.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) and the Long Solenoid Experiment (LSE) are two electron machines that were designed explicitly to study the physics of space-charge-dominated beams. The operating parameters of these machines can be varied by choice of apertures and gun operating conditions to access a wide range of parameters that reproduce, on a scaled basis, the full nonlinear time-dependent physics that is expected in much costlier ion systems. Early operation of these machines has demonstrated the importance of the details of beam initial conditions in determining the downstream evolution. These machines have also been a convenient tested for benchmarking simulation codes such as WARP, and for development of several novel diagnostic techniques. We present our recent experience with multi-turn operation as well as recent longitudinal and transverse physics experiments and comparisons to simulation results. Development of novel diagnostic techniques such as time-dependent imaging using optical transition radiation and tomographic beam reconstruction are also described

  18. Kidney and liver transplants from donors after cardiac death: initial experience at the London Health Sciences Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Caumartin, Yves; Marotta, Paul J.; Ghent, Cameron; Levstik, Mark A.; Quan, Douglas; Muirhead, Norman; House, Andrew A.; McAlister, Vivian; Jevnikar, Anthony M.; Luke, Patrick P.W.; Wall, William

    2010-01-01

    Background The disparity between the number of patients waiting for an organ transplant and availability of donor organs increases each year in Canada. Donation after cardiac death (DCD), following withdrawal of life support in patients with hopeless prognoses, is a means of addressing the shortage with the potential to increase the number of transplantable organs. Methods We conducted a retrospective, single-centre chart review of organs donated after cardiac death to the Multi-Organ Transplant Program at the London Health Sciences Centre between July 2006 and December 2007. In total, 34 solid organs (24 kidneys and 10 livers) were procured from 12 DCD donors. Results The mean age of the donors was 38 (range 18–59) years. The causes of death were craniocerebral trauma (n = 7), cerebrovascular accident (n = 4) and cerebral hypoxia (n = 1). All 10 livers were transplanted at our centre, as were 14 of the 24 kidneys; 10 kidneys were transplanted at other centres. The mean renal cold ischemia time was 6 (range 3–9.5) hours. Twelve of the 14 kidney recipients (86%) experienced delayed graft function, but all kidneys regained function. After 1-year follow-up, kidney function was good, with a mean serum creatinine level of 145 (range 107–220) μmol/L and a mean estimated creatinine clearance of 64 (range 41–96) mL/min. The mean liver cold ischemia time was 5.8 (range 5.5–8) hours. There was 1 case of primary nonfunction requiring retransplantation. The remaining 9 livers functioned well. One patient developed a biliary anastomotic stricture that resolved after endoscopic stenting. All liver recipients were alive after a mean follow-up of 11 (range 3–20) months. Since the inception of this DCD program, the number of donors referred to our centre has increased by 14%. Conclusion Our initial results compare favourably with those from the transplantation of organs procured from donors after brain death. Donation after cardiac death can be an important means of

  19. Kidney and liver transplants from donors after cardiac death: initial experience at the London Health Sciences Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Caumartin, Yves; Chent, Cameron; Levstik, Mark A; Quan, Douglas; Muirhead, Norman; House, Andrew A; McAlister, Vivian; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Luke, Patrick P W; Wall, William

    2010-04-01

    The disparity between the number of patients waiting for an organ transplant and availability of donor organs increases each year in Canada. Donation after cardiac death (DCD), following withdrawal of life support in patients with hopeless prognoses, is a means of addressing the shortage with the potential to increase the number of transplantable organs. We conducted a retrospective, single-centre chart review of organs donated after cardiac death to the Multi-Organ Transplant Program at the London Health Sciences Centre between July 2006 and December 2007. In total, 34 solid organs (24 kidneys and 10 livers) were procured from 12 DCD donors. The mean age of the donors was 38 (range 18-59) years. The causes of death were craniocerebral trauma (n = 7), cerebrovascular accident (n = 4) and cerebral hypoxia (n = 1). All 10 livers were transplanted at our centre, as were 14 of the 24 kidneys; 10 kidneys were transplanted at other centres. The mean renal cold ischemia time was 6 (range 3-9.5) hours. Twelve of the 14 kidney recipients (86%) experienced delayed graft function, but all kidneys regained function. After 1-year follow-up, kidney function was good, with a mean serum creatinine level of 145 (range 107-220) micromol/L and a mean estimated creatinine clearance of 64 (range 41-96) mL/min. The mean liver cold ischemia time was 5.8 (range 5.5-8) hours. There was 1 case of primary nonfunction requiring retransplantation. The remaining 9 livers functioned well. One patient developed a biliary anastomotic stricture that resolved after endoscopic stenting. All liver recipients were alive after a mean follow-up of 11 (range 3-20) months. Since the inception of this DCD program, the number of donors referred to our centre has increased by 14%. Our initial results compare favourably with those from the transplantation of organs procured from donors after brain death. Donation after cardiac death can be an important means of increasing the number of organs available for

  20. Hot electron target interaction experiments at the GOL-3 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrelin, V.T.; Burdakov, A.V.; Chebotaev, P.Z.

    1997-01-01

    At the GOL-3 facility, experiments on the interaction of powerful hot electron streams with various materials have been performed. For energy densities of the hot electron stream above 10 MJ/m 2 an explosive-like erosion was observed, which at energy densities of 30 MJ/m 2 reaches 500 μm for fine grain graphite and 200 μm for tungsten. Under these conditions, the corona of the carbon vapour cloud has temperatures below 1.2eV and densities up to 10 17 cm -3 . It propagates along the magnetic field lines with maximum velocities of 2.7 x 10 6 cm/s. The longitudinal and transverse (along and across magnetic field lines) vapour velocities of the colder bulk plasma are about 10 6 cm/s. A model for explosive-like erosion was developed and tested against the GOL-3 results. For graphite the destruction threshold is 10 kJ/g. This value is considerably lower than the vaporization enthalpy of 20.5 kJ/g for three atomic vaporization. The validated model was applied to a numerical analysis of the occurrence of explosive-like erosion for ITER disruptions and runaway electrons. If the energy density of the runaways remains below 30 MJ/m 2 , explosive-like erosion of graphite occurs for electron energies below 20 MeV. For the energetic tail of Maxwellian plasma electrons with temperatures up to 20 keV and power densities of 10 MW/cm 2 without any angular spread, explosive-like erosion becomes comparable to erosion by vaporization. (author)

  1. Hot electron target interaction experiments at the GOL-3 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrelin, V. T.; Burdakov, A. V.; Chebotaev, P. Z.; Filippov, V. V.; Koidan, V. S.; Mekler, K. I.; Melnikov, P. I.; Postupaev, V. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Schcheglov, M. A.; Wurz, H.

    1997-11-01

    At the GOL-3 facility, experiments on the interaction of powerful hot electron streams with various materials have been performed. For energy densities of the hot electron stream above 10 MJ/m2 an explosive-like erosion was observed, which at energy densities of 30 MJ/m2 reaches 500 mu m for fine grain graphite and 200 mu m for tungsten. Under these conditions, the corona of the carbon vapour cloud has temperatures below 1.2 eV and densities up to 1017 cm-3. It propagates along the magnetic field lines with maximum velocities of 2.1*106 cm/s. The longitudinal and transverse (along and across magnetic field lines) vapour velocities of the colder bulk plasma are about 106 cm/s. A model for explosive-like erosion was developed and tested against the GOL-3 results. For graphite the destruction threshold is 10 kJ/g. This value is considerably lower than the vaporization enthalpy of 20.5 kJ/g for three atomic vaporization. The validated model was applied to a numerical analysis of the occurrence of explosive-like erosion for ITER disruptions and runaway electrons. If the energy density of the runaways remains below 30 MJ/m2, explosive-like erosion of graphite occurs for electron energies below 20 MeV. For the energetic tail of Maxwellian plasma electrons with temperatures up to 20 keV and power densities of 10 MW/cm2 without any angular spread, explosive-like erasion becomes comparable to erosion by vaporization

  2. Electron spectroscopy of carbon materials: experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barbary, A A; Trasobares, S; Ewels, C P; Stephan, O; Okotrub, A V; Bulusheva, L G; Fall, C J; Heggie, M I

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparative spectroscopic study of carbon as graphite, diamond and C 60 using C1s K-edge electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, and theoretical modelling. The first principles calculations of these spectra are obtained in the local density approximation using a self-consistent Gaussian basis pseudo-potential method. Calculated spectra show excellent agreement with experiment and are able to discriminate not only between various carbon hybridisations but also local variation in environment. Core-hole effects on the calculated spectra are also investigated. For the first time, the EEL spectrum of carbyne is calculated

  3. Electron spectroscopy of carbon materials: experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Barbary, A A [University of Sussex, School of Life Sciences, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); University of Ain-Shams, Faculty of Education, Department of Physics, Cairo (Egypt); Trasobares, S [Laboratoire de physique des Solides Batiment 510, Universite Paris Sud 91405, Orsay (France); Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales Ingenieria Metalurgica Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Cadiz, Apdo 40 Puerto Real, 11510-Cadiz (Spain); Ewels, C P [University of Sussex, School of Life Sciences, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); Stephan, O [Laboratoire de physique des Solides Batiment 510, Universite Paris Sud 91405, Orsay (France); Okotrub, A V [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, pr. Ak. Lavrentieva 3 (Russian Federation); Bulusheva, L G [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, pr. Ak. Lavrentieva 3 (Russian Federation); Fall, C J [ELCA Informatique SA, Avenue de la Harpe 22-24, CH-1000 Lausanne 13 (Switzerland); Heggie, M I [University of Sussex, School of Life Sciences, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-22

    We present a comparative spectroscopic study of carbon as graphite, diamond and C{sub 60} using C1s K-edge electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, and theoretical modelling. The first principles calculations of these spectra are obtained in the local density approximation using a self-consistent Gaussian basis pseudo-potential method. Calculated spectra show excellent agreement with experiment and are able to discriminate not only between various carbon hybridisations but also local variation in environment. Core-hole effects on the calculated spectra are also investigated. For the first time, the EEL spectrum of carbyne is calculated.

  4. Determination of the Electron Neutrino Mass from Experiments on Electron-Capture Beta-Decay (EC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the programme is to measure the electron-neutrino mass, for which at present an upper limit of 500~eV is known. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment studies the shape of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum in electron-capture near its upper end-point and deduces a mass from small shape changes completely analogous to those in the well-known determination of the electron antineutrino mass in the tritium beta-minus decay. \\\\ \\\\ In a low-energy bremsstrahlung process, the capture takes place from a virtual S state associated with a radiative P~@A~S electromagnetic transition, and the resonant nature of the process leads to important enhancements of the photon intensities at low energy, in particular near the resonance energies co (X-rays). This effect gives this type of experiment a chance to compete with experiments on continuous beta spectra. \\\\ \\\\ The programme concentrates on two long-lived isotopes: \\\\ \\\\ 1)~~|1|6|3Ho. The Q value for this isotope has been found to be 2.6-2.7 keV. A detector specially construct...

  5. Development of an electron momentum spectrometer for time-resolved experiments employing nanosecond pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Liu, Zhaohui; Niu, Shanshan; Wang, Enliang; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-03-01

    The low count rate of (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has long been a major limitation of its application to the investigation of molecular dynamics. Here we report a new EMS apparatus developed for time-resolved experiments in the nanosecond time scale, in which a double toroidal energy analyzer is utilized to improve the sensitivity of the spectrometer and a nanosecond pulsed electron gun with a repetition rate of 10 kHz is used to obtain an average beam current up to nA. Meanwhile, a picosecond ultraviolet laser with a repetition rate of 5 kHz is introduced to pump the sample target. The time zero is determined by photoionizing the target using a pump laser and monitoring the change of the electron beam current with time delay between the laser pulse and electron pulse, which is influenced by the plasma induced by the photoionization. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by the EMS measurement on argon using a pulsed electron beam, illustrating the potential abilities of the apparatus for investigating the molecular dynamics in excited states when employing the pump-probe scheme.

  6. The relevance of the vertex bremsstrahlung photon detection in the electron-neutrino (antineutrino) electron scattering experiments at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Broggini, C; Moretti, M

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the size of the electron-antineutrino electron into electron-antineutrino electron cross section reduction due to the rejection of the events with a vertex bremsstrahlung photon above a certain energy in the final state. In particular we analyze the effect in experiments designed to detect the low energy electron-antineutrino and electron-neutrino from a nuclear reactor and from the Sun. We find that such reduction has to be considered in a relatively high statistic reactor experiment, while it is negligible for pp and 7Be solar neutrino detection.

  7. Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

    2011-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

  8. Experiments in electron microscopy: from metals to nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy has advanced remarkably as a tool for biological structure research since the development of methods to examine radiation-sensitive unstained specimens and the introduction of cryo-techniques. Structures of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution can now be obtained from images of single particles as well as crystalline arrays. It has also become possible to analyze structures of molecules in their functional context, i.e. in their natural membrane or cellular setting, and in an ionic environment like that in living tissue. Electron microscopy is thus opening ways to answer definitively questions about physiological mechanisms. Here I recall a number of experiments contributing to, and benefiting from the technical advances that have taken place. I begin—in the spirit of this crystallography series—with some biographical background, and then sketch the path to an analysis by time-resolved microscopy of the opening mechanism of an ion channel (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor). This analysis illustrates how electron imaging can be combined with freeze-trapping to illuminate a transient biological event: in our case, chemical-to-electrical transduction at the nerve-muscle synapse. (invited comment)

  9. The feasibility of solo-surgeon living donor nephrectomy: initial experience using video-assisted minilaparotomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seung; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Lee, Seung Ryeol; Jeong, Woo Ju; Yang, Seung Choul; Han, Woong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Today, many kinds of surgery are being conducted without human assistants. Living donor nephrectomy (LDN) using video-assisted minilaparotomy surgery (VAM) has been performed by solo-surgeon using Unitrac® (Aesculap Surgical Instrument, Germany). We examined the results from VAM-solo-surgeon living donor nephrectomy (SLDN) and conventional VAM-human-assisted living donor nephrectomy (HLDN). Between July 2007 and April 2008, 82 cases of VAM-LDN were performed by two surgeons. From these cases, we randomly assigned 35 cases to undergo solo-surgery (group I) and the other 47 cases to undergo surgery with one human assistant (group II). All VAM-LDN procedures were performed in the same manner. Only the roles of a first assistant were substituted by the Unitrac® in group I. We compared the perioperative and postoperative data, including operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay, between the two groups. We also investigated cases that developed complications. There were no significant differences in the patient demographic data between the two groups (P > 0.05). The mean operative time was 201.9 ± 32.9 min in group I and 202.4 ± 48.3 min in group II (P = 0.954), whereas mean blood loss was 209.7 ± 167.3 ml in group I and 179.6 ± 87.8 ml in group II (P = 0.294). Postoperative hospital stay were 5.4 ± 1.1 days in group I and 5.5 ± 1.6 days in group II (P = 0.813). The incidence of perioperative complications was not significantly different between the two groups. Our study demonstrates that VAM-SLDN can be performed safely, is economically beneficial, and is comparable to VAM-HLDN in terms of postoperative outcomes.

  10. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-15

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π(*)) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment associated with excitation of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, D.J.; Boxer, S.G.

    1987-02-10

    The magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment, ..delta mu.., associated with the Q/sub y/ transition of the dimeric primary electron donor (special pair or P870) in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers have been measured by Stark spectroscopy at 20 /sup 0/C. The magnitude of ..delta mu.. is found to be f/sup -1/ (10.3 +/- 0.7) D, where f is a correction factor for the local dielectric properties of the protein matrix. With the spherical cavity approximation and an effective local dielectric constant of 2, f = 1.2, and absolute value of ..delta mu.. is 8.6 +/- 0.6 D. Absolute value of ..delta mu.. for the Q/sub y/ transition of the special pair is approximately a factor of 3.4 and 2 greater than for the monomeric bacteriochlorophylls and bacteriopheophytins, respectively, in the reaction center. The angle between ..delta mu.. and the transition dipole moment for excitation of the first singlet electron state of the special pair was found to be 24 +/- 2/sup 0/. The measured values are combined to suggest a physical model in which the lowest excited singlet state of the special pair has substantial charge-transfer character and where charge is separated between the two monomers comprising the dimeric special pair. This leads to the hypothesis that the first charge-separated state in bacterial photosynthesis is formed directly upon photoexcitation. These data provide stringent values for comparison with theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the chromophores in the reaction center.

  12. Pleasurable and Intersubjectively Embodied Experiences of Electronic Dance Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Torvanger Solberg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available How do dancers engage with electronic dance music (EDM when dancing? This paper reports on an empirical study of dancers' pleasurable engagement with three structural properties of EDM: (1 breakdown, (2 build-up, and (3 drop. Sixteen participants danced to a DJ mix in a club-like environment, and the group’s bodily activity was recorded with an infrared, marker-based motion capture system. After they danced, the subjects filled out questionnaires about the pleasure they experienced and their relative desire to move while dancing. Subsequent analyses revealed associations between the group’s quantity of motion and self-reported experiences of pleasure. Associations were also found between certain sonic features and dynamic changes in the dancers' movements. Pronounced changes occurred in the group's quantity of motion during the breakdown, build-up, and drop sections, suggesting a high level of synchronization between the group and the structural properties of the music. The questionnaire confirmed this intersubjective agreement: participants perceived the musical passages consistently and marked the build-up and drop as particularly pleasurable and motivational in terms of dancing. Self-reports demonstrated that the presence and activity of other participants were also important in the shaping of one's own experience, thus supporting the idea of clubbing as an intersubjectively embodied experience.

  13. Clinical experience with routine diode dosimetry for electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy is frequently administered based on clinical setups without formal treatment planning. We felt, therefore, that it was important to monitor electron beam treatments by in vivo dosimetry to prevent errors in treatment delivery. In this study, we present our clinical experience with patient dose verification using electron diodes and quantitatively assess the dose perturbations caused by the diodes during electron beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A commercial diode dosimeter was used for the in vivo dose measurements. During patient dosimetry, the patients were set up as usual by the therapists. Before treatment, a diode was placed on the patient's skin surface and secured with hypoallergenic tape. The patient was then treated and the diode response registered and stored in the patient radiotherapy system database via our in-house software. A customized patient in vivo dosimetry report showing patient details, expected and measured dose, and percent difference was then generated and printed for analysis and record keeping. We studied the perturbation of electron beams by diodes using film dosimetry. Beam profiles at the 90% prescription isodose depths were obtained with and without the diode on the beam central axis, for 6-20 MeV electron beams and applicator/insert sizes ranging from a 3-cm diameter circular field to a 25 x 25 cm open field. Results: In vivo dose measurements on 360 patients resulted in the following ranges of deviations from the expected dose at the various anatomic sites: Breast (222 patients) -20.3 to +23.5% (median deviation 0%); Head and Neck (63 patients) -21.5 to +14.8% (median -0.7%); Other sites (75 patients) -17.6 to +18.8% (median +0.5%). Routine diode dosimetry during the first treatment on 360 patients (460 treatment sites) resulted in 11.5% of the measurements outside our acceptable ±6% dose deviation window. Only 3.7% of the total measurements were outside ±10% dose deviation. Detailed

  14. Parental versus non-parental-directed donation: an 11-year experience of infectious disease testing at a pediatric tertiary care blood donor center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, Cyril; Seo, Andrew; Miller, Peter M; Lezama, Niara; Criss, Valli R; Colvin, Camilla; Luban, Naomi L C; Wong, Edward C C

    2017-11-01

    Directed donation is associated with a higher prevalence of donations that are positive for infectious disease markers; however, little is known about the positive rates among parental-directed, non-parental-directed, and allogeneic donations. We reviewed blood-collection records from January 1997 through December 2008, including infectious disease results, among parental, non-parental, and community donations. Infectious disease rates were compared by Mann-Whitney U test. In total, 1532 parental, 4910 non-parental, and 17,423 community donations were examined. Among parental donors, the median rate of positive infectious disease testing was 8.66% (interquartile range (IQR), 4.49%) for first-time donors and 1.26% (IQR, 5.86%) for repeat donors; among non-parental donors, the rate was 1.09% (IQR, 0.98%) for first-time donors and 0% (IQR, 0.83%) for repeat donors; and, among community donors, the rate was 2.95% (IQR, 1.50%) for first-time donors and 0.45% (IQR, 0.82%) for repeat donors. The mean rate of positive infectious disease testing for first-time parental donors was significantly higher (7.63%), whereas all repeat donors had similar rates. However, the rate of positive infectious disease testing among first-time non-parental donors was significantly lower than that in the other groups, especially for the period from 2001 through 2008. First-time non-parental and community donors had significantly higher infectious disease risk than the respective repeat donors. First-time parental donors had the highest rates of positive infectious disease testing. We suggest that first-time parental blood donation should be discouraged. Repeat community donors or first-time non-parental donors provide a safer alternative. These findings can foster better patient education, donor selection, and possibly a reduced risk of infectious disease. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  16. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  17. The effect of permodified cyclodextrins encapsulation on the photophysical properties of a polyfluorene with randomly distributed electron-donor and rotaxane electron-acceptor units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurica Farcas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis as well as the optical, electrochemical and morphological properties of two polyrotaxanes (4a and 4b, which consist of electron-accepting 9,9-dicyanomethylenefluorene 1 as an inclusion complex in persilylated β- or γ-cyclodextrin (TMS-β-CD, TMS-γ-CD (1a, 1b and methyltriphenylamine as an electron-donating molecule. They are statistically distributed into the conjugated chains of 9,9-dioctylfluorene 3 and compared with those of the corresponding non-rotaxane 4 counterpart. Rotaxane formation results in improvements of the solubility, the thermal stability, and the photophysical properties. Polyrotaxanes 4a and 4b exhibited slightly red-shifted absorption bands with respect to the non-rotaxane 4 counterpart. The fluorescence lifetimes of polyrotaxanes follow a mono-exponential decay with a value of τ = 1.14 ns compared with the non-rotaxane, where a bi-exponential decay composed of a main component with a relative short time of τ1 = 0.88 (57.08% and a minor component with a longer lifetime of τ2 = 1.56 ns (42.92% were determined. The optical and electrochemical band gaps (ΔEg as well as the ionization potential and electronic affinity characterized by smaller values compared to the values of any of the constituents. AFM reveals that the film surface of 4a and 4b displays a granular morphology with a lower dispersity supported by a smaller roughness exponent compared with the non-rotaxane counterpart.

  18. Electron cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, D. V.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Bagryansky, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new plasma startup scenario in the gas dynamic trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target (‘seed plasma’), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition of approximately 1 ms the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. This paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECRH, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of the consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences from the conventional scenario are discussed. A theoretical model describing the ECR breakdown and the seed plasma accumulation in a large-scale mirror trap is developed on the basis of the GDT experiment.

  19. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  20. Laboratory Experiments Enabling Electron Beam use in Tenuous Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miars, G.; Leon, O.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Delzanno, G. L.; Castello, F. L.; Borovsky, J.

    2017-12-01

    A mission concept is under development which involves firing a spacecraft-mounted electron beam from Earth's magnetosphere to connect distant magnetic field lines in real time. To prevent excessive spacecraft charging and consequent beam return, the spacecraft must be neutralized in the tenuous plasma environment of the magnetosphere. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations suggest neutralization can be accomplished by emitting a neutral plasma with the electron beam. Interpretation of these simulations also led to an ion emission model in which ion current is emitted from a quasi-neutral plasma as defined by the space charge limit [1,2]. Experiments were performed at the University of Michigan's Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory (PEPL) to help validate the ion emission model. A hollow cathode plasma contactor was used as a representative spacecraft and charged with respect to the chamber walls to examine the effect of spacecraft charging on ion emission. Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) measurements were performed to understand ion flow velocity as this parameter relates directly to the expected space charge limit. Planar probe measurements were also made to identify where ion emission primarily occurred and to determine emission current density levels. Evidence of collisions within the plasma (particularly charge exchange collisions) and a simple model predicting emitted ion velocities are presented. While a detailed validation of the ion emission model and of the simulation tools used in [1,2] is ongoing, these measurements add to the physical understanding of ion emission as it may occur in the magnetosphere. 1. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, J.D. Moulton, and E.A. MacDonald, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3647, 2015. 2. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, and J.D. Moulton, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3588, 2015. ________________________________ * This work is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.; Ziock, K.O.H.

    1992-08-01

    The analysis of the deuterium content in the CD target used in an experiment to study the π + d → 2p reaction at incident pion energies from 4 to 20 MeV was completed. The final paper describing this experiment will be submitted for publication this summer. Analysis of LAMPF Exp. on pion absorption in 4 He is continuing. In 1991, we collaborated with D. Pocanic from the Univ. of Virginia on a measurement at LAMPF of the π 0 production in π + p interactions. This run proved the validity of the method and additional data were obtained in a second run during the summer of 1992, using a new target. Current collaborations at LAMPF include the search for the decay μ + → e + + γ(MEGA) and a measurement of the Michel ρ parameter in the decay μ → e + v + v. A U.Va.--PSI collaboration is measuring pion beta decay to an accuracy of less than 1%, using a large acceptance CsI detector to measure the π 0 following decay of stopped π + mesons. Most of the U.Va. effort is devoted to the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) program to the construction of the CLAS forward calorimeter. An apparatus to measure the properties of the scintillators with light from a N 2 laser was built in the spring of 1992. The electronic circuitry for the energy signal from the EGN detector and the circuitry needed to route the signals from the all the photomultipliers to the TDC and ADC circuits are being developed. Experimental proposals for the study of electroproduction of nucleon resonances at CEBAF, including measurements with polarized beam and targets, are being developed

  2. Deceased Organ Donors With a History of Increased Risk Behavior for the Transmission of Blood-Borne Viral Infection: The UK Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Patrick B; Summers, Dominic M; Robb, Matthew; Hulme, William; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Watson, Christopher J E; Neuberger, James; Bradley, J Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Deceased organ donors are routinely screened for behaviors that increase the risk of transmissible blood-borne viral (BBV) infection, but the impact of this information on organ donation and transplant outcome is not well documented. Our aim was to establish the impact of such behavior on organ donation and utilization, as well transplant recipient outcomes. We identified all UK deceased organ donors from 2003 to 2015 with a disclosed history of increased risk behavior (IRB) including intravenous drug use (IVDU), imprisonment and increased risk sexual behavior. Of 17 262 potential donors, 659 (3.8%) had IRB for BBV and 285 (1.7%) were seropositive for BBV, of whom half had a history of IRB (mostly IVDU [78.5%]). Of actual donors with IRB, 393 were seronegative for viral markers at time of donation. A history of recent IVDU was associated with fewer potential donors proceeding to become actual organ donors (64% vs 75%, P = 0.007). Donors with IRB provided 1091 organs for transplantation (624 kidneys and 467 other organs). Transplant outcome was similar in recipients of organs from donors with and without IRB. There were 3 cases of unexpected hepatitis C virus transmission, all from an active IVDU donor who was hepatitis C virus seronegative at time of donation, but was found to be viremic on retrospective testing. Donors with a history of IRB provide a valuable source of organs for transplantation with good transplant outcomes and there is scope for increasing the use of organs from such donors.

  3. Electron and photon identification in the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrina, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Raja, R.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-06-01

    The electron and photon reconstruction and identification algorithms used by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are described. The determination of the electron energy scale and resolution is presented. Studies of the performance of the electron and photon reconstruction and identification are summarized.

  4. The Double Star Plasma Electron and Current Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fazakerley

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Double Star Project is a collaboration between Chinese and European space agencies, in which two Chinese magnetospheric research spacecraft, carrying Chinese and European instruments, have been launched into equatorial (on 29 December 2003 and polar (on 25 July 2004 orbits designed to enable complementary studies with the Cluster spacecraft. The two Double Star spacecraft TC-1 and TC-2 each carry a Double Star Plasma Electron and Current Experiment (PEACE instrument. These two instruments were based on Cluster Flight Spare equipment, but differ from Cluster instruments in two important respects. Firstly, a Double Star PEACE instrument has only a single sensor, which must be operated in a manner not originally envisaged in the Cluster context in order to sample the full range of energies. Secondly, the DPU hardware was modified and major changes of onboard software were implemented, most notably a completely different approach to data compression has been adopted for Double Star, which allows high resolution 3-dimensional distributions to be transmitted almost every spin, a significant improvement over Cluster. This paper describes these instruments, and includes examples of data collected in various magnetospheric regions encountered by the spacecraft which have been chosen to illustrate the power of combined Double Star and Cluster measurements.

  5. Cardiac retransplantation: is it justified in times of critical donor organ shortage? Long-term single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerler, Heidi; Simon, Andre; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Hagl, Christian; Oppelt, Petra; Haverich, Axel; Strueber, Martin

    2008-12-01

    Survival after heart transplantation has improved significantly over the last decades. There are a growing number of patients that require cardiac retransplantation because of chronic allograft dysfunction. With regard to the critical shortage of cardiac allograft donors the decision to offer repeat heart transplantation must be carefully considered. Since 1983 a total of 807 heart transplantations have been performed at our institution. Among them 41 patients received cardiac retransplantation, 18 patients because of acute graft failure and 23 because of chronic graft failure. Data were analyzed for demographics, morbidity and risk factors for mortality. The acute and chronic retransplant group was compared to those patients undergoing primary transplantation. The mean interval between primary transplantation and retransplantation was 1.9 days in the acute and 6.7 years in the chronic retransplant group. Mean follow-up was 6.9 years. Baseline characteristics were similar in the primary and retransplant group. Actuarial survival rates at 1, 3, 5 and 7 years after primary cardiac transplantation compared to retransplantation were 83, 78, 72 and 64% vs 53, 50, 47 and 36%, respectively (p<0.001). Early mortality after acute retransplantation was significantly higher compared to late retransplantation (10/18, 55.6% vs 4/23, 17.4%, p=0.011). Major causes of death were acute and chronic rejection, infection and sepsis. Cardiac retransplantation is associated with lower survival rates compared to primary transplantation. However, results after retransplantation in chronic graft failure are significantly better compared to acute graft failure. Therefore, we consider cardiac retransplantation in chronic graft failure a justified therapeutic option. In contrast, patients with acute graft failure seem to be inappropriate candidates for cardiac retransplantation.

  6. Denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri coupled with CO2 reduction by Sporomusa ovata with hydrogen as an electron donor assisted by solid-phase humin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Katayama, Arata

    2016-09-01

    A co-culture system comprising an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa ovata DSMZ2662, and a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778, enabled denitrification using H2 as the sole external electron donor and CO2 as the sole external carbon source. Acetate produced by S. ovata supported the heterotrophic denitrification of P. stutzeri. A nitrogen balance study showed the reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas without the accumulation of nitrite and nitrous oxide in the co-culture system. S. ovata did not show nitrate reduction to ammonium in the co-culture system. Significant proportions of the consumed H2 were utilized for denitrification: 79.9 ± 4.6% in the co-culture system containing solid-phase humin and 62.9±11.1% in the humin-free co-culture system. The higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen in the humin-containing system was attributed to the higher denitrification activity of P. stutzeri under the acetate deficient conditions. The nitrogen removal rate of the humin-containing co-culture system reached 0.19 kg NO3(-)-N·m(-3)·d(-1). Stable denitrification activity for 61 days of successive sub-culturing suggested the robustness of this co-culture system. This study provides a novel strategy for the in situ enhancement of microbial denitrification. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jiemin; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang; Xing, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bacterial communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors were investigated. • MiSeq was first used in analysis of communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. • Electron donors had significant effect on bacterial communities. - Abstract: Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities

  8. Liver transplantation in hepatitis B core-negative recipients using livers from hepatitis B core-positive donors: a 13-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohorquez, Humberto E; Cohen, Ari J; Girgrah, Nigel; Bruce, David S; Carmody, Ian C; Joshi, Shoba; Reichman, Trevor W; Therapondos, George; Mason, Andrew L; Loss, George E

    2013-06-01

    The use of livers from hepatitis B surface antigen-negative (HBsAg- )/hepatitis B core antibody-positive (HBcAb+ ) donors in liver transplantation (LT) for HBsAg(-) /HBcAb- recipients is still controversial because of a lack of standard antiviral prophylaxis and long-term follow-up. We present our 13-year experience with the use of HBcAb+ donor livers in HBcAb- recipients. Patients received prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulin at the time of LT and then lamivudine daily. De novo hepatitis B virus (HBV) was defined as positive HBV DNA detection. Between January 1999 and December 2010, 1013 adult LT procedures were performed at our center. Sixty-four HBsAg- /HBcAb- patients (6.3%) received an HBsAg- /HBcAb+ liver. All donor sera were negative for HBcAb immunoglobulin M and HBV DNA. The mean follow-up was 48.8 ± 40.1 months (range = 1.2-148.8). Both the patient survival rates and the graft survival rates were 92.2% and 69.2% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. No graft losses or deaths were related to de novo HBV. Nine of the 64 patients (14.1%) developed de novo HBV. The mean time from LT to de novo HBV was 21.4 ± 26.1 months (range = 10.8-92.8 months). De novo HBV was successfully treated with adefovir or tenofovir. In conclusion, HBcAb+ allografts can be safely used in HBcAb- recipients without increased mortality or graft loss. Lifelong prophylaxis, continuous surveillance, and compliance are imperative for success. Should a de novo infection occur, our experience suggests that a variety of treatments can be employed to salvage the graft and obtain serum HBV DNA clearance. Copyright © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. The reduction of nitrate, nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia by enzymes from Cucurbita pepo L. in the presence of reduced benzyl viologen as electron donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, C. F.; Hageman, R. H.; Hewitt, E. J.; Hucklesby, D. P.

    1965-01-01

    1. Enzyme systems from Cucurbita pepo have been shown to catalyse the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia in yields about 90–100%. 2. Reduced benzyl viologen serves as an efficient electron donor for both systems. Activity of the nitrite-reductase system is directly related to degree of dye reduction when expressed in terms of the function for oxidation–reduction potentials, but appears to decrease to negligible activity below about 9% dye reduction. 3. NADH and NADPH alone produce negligible nitrite loss, but NADPH can be linked to an endogenous diaphorase system to reduce nitrite to ammonia in the presence of catalytic amounts of benzyl viologen. 4. The NADH– or NADPH–nitrate-reductase system that is also present can accept electrons from reduced benzyl viologen, but shows relationships opposite to that for the nitrite-reductase system with regard to effect of degree of dye reduction on activity. The product of nitrate reduction may be nitrite alone, or nitrite and ammonia, or ammonia alone, according only to the degree of dye reduction. 5. The relative activities of nitrite-reductase and hydroxylamine-reductase systems show different relationships with degree of dye reduction and may become reversed in magnitude when effects of degree of dye reduction are tested over a suitable range. 6. Nitrite severely inhibits the rate of reduction of hydroxylamine without affecting the yield of ammonia as a percentage of total substrate loss, but hydroxylamine has a negligible effect on the activity of the nitrite-reductase system. 7. The apparent Km for nitrite (1 μm) is substantially less than that for hydroxylamine, for which variable values between 0·05 and 0·9mm (mean 0·51 mm) have been observed. 8. The apparent Km values for reduced benzyl viologen differ for the nitrite-reductase and hydroxylamine-reductase systems: 60 and 7·5 μm respectively. 9. It is concluded that free hydroxylamine may not be an intermediate in the reduction of nitrite

  10. Theory of one and two donors in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, A. L.; Baena, A.; Calderón, M. J.; Koiller, Belita

    2015-04-01

    We provide here a roadmap for modeling silicon nano-devices with one or two group V donors (D). We discuss systems containing one or two electrons, that is, D0, D-, D_2+ and D_20 centers. The impact of different levels of approximation is discussed. The most accurate instances—for which we provide quantitative results—are within multivalley effective mass including the central cell correction and a configuration interaction account of the electron-electron correlations. We also derive insightful, yet less accurate, analytical approximations and discuss their validity and limitations—in particular, for a donor pair, we discuss the single orbital LCAO method, the Hückel approximation and the Hubbard model. Finally, we connect these results with recent experiments on devices with few dopants.

  11. Theory of one and two donors in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, A L; Baena, A; Calderón, M J; Koiller, Belita

    2015-04-22

    We provide here a roadmap for modeling silicon nano-devices with one or two group V donors (D). We discuss systems containing one or two electrons, that is, D(0), D(-), D(+)(2) and D(0)(2) centers. The impact of different levels of approximation is discussed. The most accurate instances--for which we provide quantitative results--are within multivalley effective mass including the central cell correction and a configuration interaction account of the electron-electron correlations. We also derive insightful, yet less accurate, analytical approximations and discuss their validity and limitations--in particular, for a donor pair, we discuss the single orbital LCAO method, the Hückel approximation and the Hubbard model. Finally, we connect these results with recent experiments on devices with few dopants.

  12. From hadronic parity violation to electron parity-violating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oers, Willem T.H. van

    2010-01-01

    The weak interaction is manifested in parity-violating observables. With the weak interaction extremely well known parity-violating measurements in hadronic systems can be used to deduce strong interaction effects in those systems. Parity-violating analyzing powers in electron-proton scattering have led to determining the strange quark contributions to the charge and magnetization distributions of the nucleon. Parity-violating electron-proton and electron-electron scattering can also be performed to test the predictions of the Standard Model in the 'running' of the electroweak mixing angle or sin 2 θ W .

  13. Experiments with electron beam injection in ionosphere plasma and rare gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovskij, V.F.; Meshkov, I.N.; Seleznev, I.A.; Syresin, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    The active experiment 'Electron' is intended for the electron beam injection from a meteorological rocket in the ionosphere plasma. The beam is injected in the ionosphere plasma at a current of 0.5 A and an energy of 6.5 - 8 keV. The energy spectra are given for the plasma electrons and ions. The radio-wave spectrum is measured in a RF frequency range of 100-500 MHz. The radio wave traversing through the electron beam injection region is discussed. The laboratory experiments are performed with the electron beam injection in a rare gas to model the active outer-space experiments

  14. Electron and photon identification in the D0 experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    Roč. 750, Jun ( 2014 ), s. 78-95 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron and photon reconstruction * electron and photon identification * Tevatron Run II * D0 * DZero * Fermilab Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014

  15. Results of minimally invasive surgical treatment of allograft lithiasis in live-donor renal transplant recipients: a single-center experience of 3758 renal transplantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarier, Mehmet; Duman, Ibrahim; Yuksel, Yucel; Tekin, Sabri; Demir, Meltem; Arslan, Fatih; Ergun, Osman; Kosar, Alim; Yavuz, Asuman Havva

    2018-02-26

    Allograft lithiasis is a rare urologic complication of renal transplantation (RT). Our aim is to present our experience with minimally invasive surgical treatment of allograft lithiasis in our series of live-donor renal transplant recipients. In a retrospective analysis of 3758 consecutive live-donor RTs performed in our center between November 2009 and January 2017, the results of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of renal graft lithiasis diagnosed at follow-up were evaluated. Twenty-two (0.58%) patients underwent minimally invasive surgery for renal graft lithiasis. The mean age was 41.6 years, and duration between RT and surgical intervention was 27.3 months (range 3-67). The mean stone size was 11.6 mm (range 4-29). Stones were located in the urethra in 1, bladder in 2, ureter in 9, renal pelvis in 7 and calices in 3 patients. Surgical treatment included percutaneous nephrolithotomy in 1, cystoscopic lithotripsy in 3, flexible ureteroscopic lithotripsy in 6 and rigid ureteroscopic lithotripsy in 12 patients. No major complications were observed. One patient (4.5%) who underwent flexible ureteroscopy developed postoperative urinary tract infection. All patients were stone-free except two (9%) patients who required a second-look procedure after flexible ureteroscopic lithotripsy for residual stones. Stone recurrence was not observed in any patient during a mean follow-up duration of 30.2 months (range 8-84). Renal transplant lithiasis is uncommon and minimally invasive surgical treatment is rarely performed for its treatment. Endourological surgery may be performed safely, effectively and with a high success rate in these patients.

  16. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A S; Pedersen, O B; Magnussen, K

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  17. Solid electron sources for the energy scale monitoring in the KATRIN experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zbořil, Miroslav; Vénos, D

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment represents a next-generation tritium $\\beta$-decay experiment designed to perform a high precision direct measurement of the electron anti-neutrino mass m($\

  18. Monitoring electronics during the experiments with the OSIRIS (HMI Berlin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebosz, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the software to perform the constant monitoring of the electronics dedicated to control the multidetector system. It supervises the correct status of the gamma spectroscopy measurements. (author). 3 figs

  19. Electronic Medical Record Keeping: Eleven Years Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To rep ort the su ccess of a p ap erless med ical record system in a small clinic in a d evelop ing economy and to highlight the ad vantages and challenges of electronic med ical record keep ing, even with a small bu d get. Method: The concept of electronic med ical record (EMR) as a record keep ing method at Life Sup ...

  20. The Japan Marrow Donor Program, 25 years of experience in achieving 20,000 bone marrow transplantations: organization structure, activity, and financial basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hidehiko; Ito, Masaharu; Kato, Shunichi; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Takanashi, Minoko; Kanamori, Heiwa; Masaoka, Toru; Takaku, Fumimaro

    2018-01-24

    The Japan Marrow Donor Program (JMDP), established in 1991, has continued to grow in its capacity to facilitate unrelated bone marrow (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) for the past 25 years in Japan. The current donor pool is 463,465 (as of 31 December 2016) and 20,237 transplants were performed with the help of the Japanese Red Cross, government, and supporters. As JMDP introduced PBSCT in 2010, the vast majority of transplants are BMT. All donors are fully typed for HLA-A, B, C, and DR. The peak age of registered donors is around 40 years. The 8/8 HLA-matched donors are found in our registry for 96% of the patients and 54% of the patients receive a transplant. The median time between the initiation of donor search and the transplantation is approximately 122 days. The median interval between the initiation of donor search and identification of the first potential donor is 40 days. The most common diseases for which unrelated BMT/PBSCT is indicated are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and malignant lymphoma. In recent years we have seen a marked increase in elderly patients who received BMT.

  1. Screening of organ and tissue donors for West Nile virus by nucleic acid amplification--a three year experience in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Peter A G; Fox, Julie D; Lee, Bonita; Chui, Linda; Preiksaitis, Jutta

    2008-10-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV)-specific nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) of organ and tissue donors remains controversial. We report three years of WNV donor screening in Alberta Canada using NAAT. Between 2003 and 2005, 1549 initial specimens were received. A valid negative result was issued within the specified turnaround time on 1531 (98.8%). The initial NAAT was successful for 1393 samples (90%), while repeat testing using an alternate NAAT resolved a further 126 samples. For 12 of 14 donors, a second specimen provided a valid negative result. Failure to generate a valid negative result in time resulted in rescheduling of one living related organ transplant, and surgery proceeded in the absence of a final result in one multi-organ donation after risk assessment. For 11 tissue donors, tissues were discarded due to lack of a WNV result. Invalid results usually occurred on postmortem haemolyzed tissue donor samples due to inhibitory reactions. There were no confirmed positive donors, no false-positive results and no solid organs lost due to WNV testing. We conclude that WNV NAAT of organ and tissue donors can be implemented without compromising availability of donors but requires committed laboratory support.

  2. Nyretransplantation med levende donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Løkkegaard, H; Rasmussen, F

    2000-01-01

    In recent years transplantation from living donors has accounted for 25-30% of all kidney transplants in Denmark corresponding to 40-45 per year. Most of these living donors are parents or siblings, although internationally an increasing number are unrelated donors. Donor nephrectomy is associated...

  3. Data acquisition electronics for NESTOR experiment: project and tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameli, Fabrizio; Bonori, Maurizio; Bottai, Sergio; Capone, Antonio; Curti, Franco; Desiati, Paolo; De Marchis, Giancarlo; Massa, Fabrizio; Masullo, Rocco; Piccari, Luigi; Vannucci, Italo

    1999-01-01

    The NESTOR detector, at present under construction, is a telescope for high-energy neutrino astronomy. The apparatus, based on Cherenkov light detection, will be deployed in deep sea (about 4000 m) near the S.W. Greek coast. We briefly describe the NESTOR detector, then we describe with more details the electronics for NESTOR data acquisition and transmission. The detector signals are sampled at 200 MHz and all the resulting information are transmitted to the laboratory on 30 km long electro-optical cable. The estimated Mean Time Between Failure of the full electronics system is greater than 20 years. Tests performed on the first prototypes confirm the main characteristics of these electronics: the dynamic range allowed for the signals is bigger than 1000, the pulse shape is reconstructed with an 8 bit ADC accuracy and the resolution in the measurement of the signal 'threshold crossing time' is better than 200 ps

  4. Electron temperature diagnostics in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartiromo, R.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Murari, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Franz, P.; Martin, P.; Zabeo, L.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated approach to the problem of electron temperature diagnostics of the plasma in a reversed field pinch. Three different methods, sampling different portions of the electron distribution function, are adopted, namely Thomson scattering, soft X-ray spectroscopy by pulse-height analysis and filtered soft X-ray intensity ratio. A careful analysis of the different sources of systematic errors is performed and a novel statistical approach is adopted to mutually validate the three independent measurements. A satisfactory agreement is obtained over a large range of experimental conditions, indicating that in the plasma core the energy distribution function is well represented by a maxwellian. (author)

  5. Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emken, Timon; Kouvaris, Chris; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    techniques involving detection of dark matter-electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial...

  6. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  7. Risk of Exposure to Zika Virus and Impact on Cord Blood Banking and Adult Unrelated Donors in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The Canadian Blood Services Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Zachary; Morris, Gail; Campbell, Todd; Mostert, Karen; Dibdin, Nicholas; Fearon, Margaret; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Mercer, Dena; Young, Kimberly; Allan, David

    2018-04-01

    Zika virus has emerged as a potential threat to the Canadian blood supply system. Stem cell donors within Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood Bank (CBB) and OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network (OM) now undergo screening measures designed to reduce the risk of Zika virus transmission. The impact these screening measures have on cord blood and unrelated adult stem cell donations is currently unknown. Among 146 donor workups initiated by OM between July 2016 and May 2017, 102 were completed and 44 workups were canceled. There were 17 potential donors (11.6%) with a risk of Zika virus exposure identified by the donor questionnaire (13 completed, 4 canceled workups). None of the workups involved a donor diagnosed with confirmed Zika virus within the past 6 months. Only 1 of the 44 canceled workups (and only 1 of 4 cases with a risk of Zika transmission) was canceled because of the risk of Zika transmission, and a backup donor was selected. Canadian Blood Services' CBB identified 25 of 875 cord blood units (2.9%) from women who donated their infants' cord blood and underwent screening that otherwise met the initial cell number thresholds for banking and had at least 1 risk factor for exposure to Zika virus. No women were diagnosed with Zika virus at any point of their pregnancy. All 25 units were discarded. Unrelated donors at OM have a higher incidence of a risk of exposure to Zika virus compared with cord blood donors. Only rarely did transplant centers cancel donor workups due to potential Zika virus exposure. The impact of screening for Zika virus exposure risk on cord blood banking was minor. Continued vigilance and surveillance is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using annotations in an electronic process handbook to systematically incorporate experience into processes

    OpenAIRE

    Becker-Kornstaedt, U.; Reinert, R.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge and experience are key assets in software process improvement. An instrument to communicate software process knowledge to the people performing the process are process handbooks in printed or file-based form. However, even in the electronic form, these handbooks still lack adequate support to incorporate experience gained during process execution. This paper presents the concept of an electronic process handbook that allows users to incorporate their experience into the process hand...

  9. Improving the medical student experience using electronic timetabling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanantham S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sayinthen Vivekanantham, Rahul Prashanth Ravindran Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKTechnology within health care delivery is improving at an unprecedented rate.1 Medical students demonstrate a preference towards mobile learning2 and familiarity with technology is essential to medical practice.1 We believe electronic timetables are an underutilized technology that can be embraced by institutions delivering medical education.

  10. High Average Power UV Free Electron Laser Experiments At JLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, David; Benson, Stephen; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-01-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at ∼2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  11. NINO ASIC electronics used in MRPC/TOF experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yongjie; Li Cheng

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the excellent properties of MRPC, an front-end amplifier/discriminator chip-NINO ASIC, was developed in ALICE TOF group at CERN. This ASIC was fabricated with the 0.25 μm CMOS technology. It is highly integrated and can deal with 8 channels per chip. It has differential input and is differential signal shaping and throughout transition. The peaking time of the amplifier is less than 1 ns. It has LVDS outputs and the width of the output signal depended on the charge of input. This allows the TOT measurement of HPTDC system. A position sensitive MRPC was tested with beam facility using the front-end electronics based on NINO and good results were obtained. (authors)

  12. The University of Washington electronic medical record experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Nanette J

    2010-07-01

    The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington initiated and continues to develop a role in the electronic medical record, starting with the development of the first integrated web-based interface, called MINDscape. An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) grant in 1992 began the process, which also led to the development of a clinical medical librarian position. Over the years, the librarian's role in the clinical environment became more established, and with the advent of clinical online resources, it offered further opportunities for librarians to provide the expertise needed to incorporate the appropriate resources. The collaborative journey continues as librarians, now able to directly access the EMRs, provide information about what resources to use and where best to place them and design how best to provide notes or feedback to clinicians.

  13. The G3 Experience with Electronic Publishing: An Editor's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, W. M.

    2003-12-01

    G3 (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems) is an all-electronic journal published jointly by the AGU, the Geochemical Society, and the European Association of Geochemistry. G3 publishes original scientific contributions pertaining to understanding the Earth as a system, including relevant observational, experimental, and theoretical investigations of the solid Earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. The journal was initiated as a result of a grass roots effort with the following goals in mind: a copyright policy designed to enhance, rather than inhibit, the dissemination of scientific information (for example, allowing authors to post electronic reprints on their web sites), provide a means of publishing, in immediately useable formats, large data sets, provide a means for ready dissemination of computer modeling and analysis tools, and provide a forum where authors could use novel ways of illustrating both data and models (e.g., formats such as movies, virtual reality images, sound, mathematical models, etc.), and finally to reduce costs and speed publication. In most respects, G3 has been enormously successful and has met most of its goals. G3 began publishing in December of 1999; in the subsequent 3 1/2 years 625 papers have been submitted to it and 325 have been published. It currently has over 600 institutional and personal subscribers. Papers are submitted through the web (a variety of formats are accepted, however, Microsoft Word is most common) and are converted to Adobe pdf format for peer review. Except that it is fully electronic using the web and e-mail, the peer review process is traditional, which insures the quality of the papers published. Accepted papers are copyedited and converted to SGML for archival purposes. HTML and Acrobat pdf versions are then generated from the SGML and published as they are ready on the G3 web site (www.g-cubed.org). Large data sets are routinely published in digital formats that can be readily downloaded by readers

  14. Initial experience with a electronic CT image transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K. E.; Loughrey, C.; Morrison, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    An electronic image transfer system for computed tomographic images links the CT scanner in Altnagelvin Hospital, Londonderry with the regional neuroradiology department in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast. In the first 13 months of operation, scans of 100 patients were transferred; 49 scans were taken in acute neurosurgical emergencies, and 51 were non-acute sent for a specialist neuroradiological opinion. Potentially hazardous inter-hospital transfer was avoided in 21 cases of acute neurosurgical emergency, and more efficient and appropriate referral was achieved in the cases whose scans had been sent for sent for radiological second opinion. We believe that the system has substantially improved the diagnosis and management of patients with neurosurgical problems in both hospitals. PMID:8658991

  15. Current drive experiments at the electron cyclotron frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erckmann, V.; Gasparino, U.; Maassberg, H.; Renner, H.; Tutter, M.; Kasparek, W.; Mueller, G.A.; Schueller, P.G.; Thumm, M.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental investigation of non-inductive current drive by electromagnetic waves in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies and the comparison with theoretical predictions attracts increasing interest in both, tokamak as well as stellarator research. In spite of the low current drive efficiency (compared to Lower Hybrid Current Drive) Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) is a candidate for MHD-mode control and current profil shaping in tokamaks and stellarators due to the high localization of the driven currents and the capability to drive currents in the plasma centre in large machines. ECCD is an appropriate tool for the control of the pressure effects on the profile of the rotational transform, particularly the bootstrap current in stellarators. This is a crucial condition to maintain good confinement properties in low shear configurations such as W VII-AS. Basic experimental investigations were performed at the W VII-AS stellarator, where the small EC-driven currents are not masked by large inductively driven currents as in tokamaks. The theoretical treatment of ECCD in stellarators would require a Fokker Planck solution in full phase space taking into account the complex magnetic field configuration (trapped particles, loss cone effects) which is untractable. In a first approach, we have compared our experimental data to a simple analytical current drive model (linearized in slab geometry) which is incorporated in a ray-tracing code. In a second step, we have analysed the sensitivity of the model with respect to simplified assumptions on trapped particles and quasi-linear effects. (orig.)

  16. Design of Electronic Experiments Using Computer Generated Virtual Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    is displayed on the front panel DC Voltage meter. C LABORATORY 4 DESIGN The original Laboratory 4, Transistor ( BJT ) Characteristics, experiment...voltage relations of an NPN transistor in a common-emitter circuit configuration used in both the static and dynamic operation. 5. Transistor curve...of a BJT common emitter amplifier to stated specifications, test it for prop biasing signal amplification characteristics and operational stability. 7

  17. Negative polarity of phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester adjacent to donor macromolecule domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alley, Olivia J.; Dawidczyk, Thomas J.; Hardigree, Josué F. Martínez; Katz, Howard E.; Wu, Meng-Yin; Johns, Gary L.; Markovic, Nina; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial fields within organic photovoltaics influence the movement of free charge carriers, including exciton dissociation and recombination. Open circuit voltage (V oc ) can also be dependent on the interfacial fields, in the event that they modulate the energy gap between donor HOMO and acceptor LUMO. A rise in the vacuum level of the acceptor will increase the gap and the V oc , which can be beneficial for device efficiency. Here, we measure the interfacial potential differences at donor-acceptor junctions using Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy, and quantify how much of the potential difference originates from physical contact between the donor and acceptor. We see a statistically significant and pervasive negative polarity on the phenyl-C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) side of PCBM/donor junctions, which should also be present at the complex interfaces in bulk heterojunctions. This potential difference may originate from molecular dipoles, interfacial interactions with donor materials, and/or equilibrium charge transfer due to the higher work function and electron affinity of PCBM. We show that the contact between PCBM and poly(3-hexylthiophene) doubles the interfacial potential difference, a statistically significant difference. Control experiments determined that this potential difference was not due to charges trapped in the underlying substrate. The direction of the observed potential difference would lead to increased V oc , but would also pose a barrier to electrons being injected into the PCBM and make recombination more favorable. Our method may allow unique information to be obtained in new donor-acceptor junctions

  18. Cryopreservation of adult unrelated donor products in hematopoietic cell transplantation: the OneMatch experience and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Joseph; Morris, Gail; Rizk, Mina; Shorr, Risa; Mercer, Dena; Young, Kimberly; Allan, David

    2017-11-01

    The frequency of cryopreserving blood stem or progenitor products from unrelated donors is not known and the underlying reasons are poorly documented. Greater insight is needed to develop policies on cryopreservation that balance donor safety with patient needs. Cryopreservation requests between January 1, 2014, and May 31, 2016, at the OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network at Canadian Blood Services were reviewed and a systematic review of the literature was performed. Thirty products of 719 (4.2%) unrelated donor collections facilitated by OneMatch were cryopreserved. Patient-related reasons were most common and included the need to delay transplant for continued antimicrobial treatment (six patients), patient too deconditioned to proceed with scheduled transplant (five patients), and/or need for more treatment for relapsed disease (three patients). Donor-related issues leading to cryopreservation requests were less common (five cases), mainly due to lack of donor availability after attempting to reschedule. Cryopreservation of a product that was never infused occurred infrequently (two cases, 7%). In our systematic review of the literature, 993 cases were identified in 32 published reports. Both patient-related and donor-related reasons were cited but not specifically reported, precluding quantitative insight regarding the relative frequency of causes. The impact of cryopreservation on hematopoietic engraftment appears negligible when compared to controls in a subset of studies; however, reporting of outcomes was inconsistent. Future studies with standard outcome measures are needed to clarify the impact of cryopreservation on engraftment and other transplant outcomes. International guidelines that consider the ethical framework surrounding requests for donor product cryopreservation are needed. © 2017 AABB.

  19. Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuation Measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D R; Lee, W; Mazzucato, E; Park, H K; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Luhmann, N C; Menard, J E

    2009-08-10

    A collective scattering system has measured electron gyro-scale fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas to investigate electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Observations and results pertaining to fluctuation measurements in ETGstable regimes, the toroidal field scaling of fluctuation amplitudes, the relation between between fluctuation amplitudes and transport quantities, and fluctuation magnitudes and k-spectra are presented. Collectively, the measurements provide insight and guidance for understanding ETG turbulence and anomalous electron thermal transport.

  20. Internal interface for RFC muon trigger electronics at CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Pietrusinski, Michall

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes design and practical realization of an internal communication layer referred to as the Internal Interface (II). The system was realized for the RFC Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment. Fully automatic implementation of the communication layer is realized in the FPGA chips and in the control software. The methodology of implementation was presented in the description form of the interface structure from the sides of hardware and software. The examples of the communication layer realizations were given for the RFC Muon Trigger.

  1. Pediatric liver transplantation using left hepatic segments from living related donors: surgical experience in 100 recipients at Saint-Luc University Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Ahmed A; Bourdeaux, Christophe; Kader, Hesham A; Janssen, Magda; Sokal, Etienne; Lerut, Jan; Ciccarelli, Olga; Veyckemans, Francis; Otte, Jean-Bernard; de Goyet, Jean de Ville; Reding, Raymond

    2006-05-01

    Living-related liver transplantation was developed in the context of deceased donor organ shortage, which is particularly acute for pediatric recipients. This retrospective study analyzes the surgical technique and complications in the first 100 pediatric liver transplantation using left segmental liver grafts from living donors, performed at Saint-Luc University Clinics between July 1993 and April 2002. Pre-operative evaluation in donors and recipients, analysis of the surgical technique, and postoperative complications were reviewed. After a median follow-up period of 2526 days, no donor mortality was encountered, with a minimal morbidity and no long-term sequelae. At one and five yr post-transplantation, the actuarial patient survival rates were 94% and 92%, the corresponding figures being 92% and 89% for graft survival. The incidences of portal vein and hepatic artery thromboses, and of biliary complications were 14%, 1%, and 27%, respectively. Living-related liver transplantation in children constitutes an efficient therapy for liver failure to face the increased demand for liver grafts. Donor morbidity was kept to acceptable incidence, and surgical technique in the recipient needs to be tailored to minimize postoperative complications.

  2. Application of ureterorenoscope and flexible ureterorenoscope lithotripsy in removing calculus from extracorporeal living donor renal graft: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Zuo-Fu; Wang, Jiahui; Yu, Lu-Xin; Wang, Wen-Ting; Shi, Lei; Lin, Xiang-Nan

    2017-11-01

    Here, we reported our clinical application of ureterorenoscope (URS) and flexible URS lithotripsy in stone removal on 10 cases of excised living donor kidney graft. After the extraction of donor kidney by retroperitoneal laparoscopy, the donor graft was perfused with 4 °C HCA solution. Calculus between 2-4 mm were removed intact with lithotomy forceps under direct vision of URS. Larger calculi of >4 mm were fractured with flexible URS combining holmium laser lithotripsy. Fragments of the calculus were extracted with basket extractor and lithotomy forceps. All operations were successful. The operation time was 14-31 min (average 21.2 ± 6.3 min). The kidneys were then transplanted to the recipients using routine procedure. The transplanted kidneys functioned well after transplantation. Gross hematuria resolved 1-4 d after operation (average 2.6 ± 0.9 d). The transplanted kidneys functioned well without early complications such as functional recovery delay and acute graft rejection. The donors and recipients were followed for 12 months. The size of the transplanted kidneys was normal and new stones or urinary obstruction was not seen upon urinary color Doppler ultrasound examination. In conclusion, we believe it is feasible, safe and effective to use URS or flexible URS combining holmium laser lithotripsy on extracorporeal living donor kidney.

  3. Precise measurement in elastic electron scattering: HAPPEX and E-158 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacheret, A.

    2004-12-01

    Parity Violation asymmetry measurements in elastic electron scattering are in one hand an interesting way of retrieving new informations about the sea quarks of the nucleon and in the other hand a powerful test of the Standard Model electroweak sector at low energy. This thesis describes the HAPPEX experiment at JLab and the E-158 experiment at SLAC (USA) which measure de parity violation asymmetries in elastic scattering of polarized electron on nuclei like Hydrogen or Helium and on atomic electrons. With the measurements on hadronic targets one can extract the strange quarks contribution to the charge and current density of the nucleon. With the electron-electron scattering one can test the standard model at the loop level and far from the Z pole by extracting sin 2 θ W . In this thesis we describe the formalism associated with the electroweak probe. We present in detail the experimental methods used to make such precise measurements of parity violation asymmetry. Then, we describe the experimental set-up of each experiment and in particular the electron detector and the feedback loop on the beam current for the HAPPEX experiment and the analysis of E-158 run III with a dedicated systematic study on the beam sub-pulse fluctuations. We present the preliminary results for each experiment with a comparison with the other existing results and the future experiments. (author)

  4. Inhomogeneous free-electron distribution in InN nanowires: Photoluminescence excitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2010-09-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN nanowires (NWs) and a high-crystalline quality InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The PLE experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN NW. The differences in the PLE spectra can be accounted for the inhomogeneous electron distribution within the NWs caused by a bulk donor concentration (ND+) and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states (Nss+) . For NW radii larger than 30 nm, ND+ and Nss+ modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data.

  5. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  6. Design and Development of a CPCI-Based Electronics Package for Space Station Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacz, John S.; Clapper, Randy S.; Wade, Raymond P.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center is developing a Compact-PCI (CPCI) based electronics package for controlling space experiment hardware on the International Space Station. Goals of this effort include an easily modified, modular design that allows for changes in experiment requirements. Unique aspects of the experiment package include a flexible circuit used for internal interconnections and a separate enclosure (box in a box) for controlling 1 kW of power for experiment fuel heating requirements. This electronics package was developed as part of the FEANICS (Flow Enclosure Accommodating Novel Investigations in Combustion of Solids) mini-facility which is part of the Fluids and Combustion Facility s Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). The CIR will be the platform for future microgravity combustion experiments and will reside on the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The FEANICS mini-facility will be the primary means for conducting solid fuel combustion experiments in the CIR on ISS. The main focus of many of these solid combustion experiments will be to conduct applied scientific investigations in fire-safety to support NASA s future space missions. A description of the electronics package and the results of functional testing are the subjects of this report. The report concludes that the use of innovative packaging methods combined with readily available COTS hardware can provide a modular electronics package which is easily modified for changing experiment requirements.

  7. Shallow hydrogen-related donors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, J.; Weber, J.

    1993-01-01

    Photothermal ionization spectroscopy on neutron-irradiated and subsequently hydrogen-plasma-treated silicon reveals the existence of new shallow donors. The binding energies of the observed effective-mass-like donors are between 34 and 53 meV. The optical dipole transitions of the different donors are shifted towards higher energies by ΔE=0.1--0.2 cm -1 , when deuterium is used in the plasma instead of hydrogen. This isotope shift of the optical dipole transitions between the electronic levels of the defects is direct proof of the incorporation of hydrogen in these defects

  8. De novo hepatitis B virus infection after pediatric liver transplantations with hepatitis B core antibody-positive donors: a single-center 20-yr experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Oh, Seak Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Song, Seung Min; Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Dae Yeon; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2015-05-01

    DNHB is common in countries with high prevalence of hepatitis B, and therefore, contracting hepatitis B after LT with HBcAb(+) grafts is a major concern. We studied DNHB in 247 children (aged HBcAb(+) donor grafts. The incidence of DNHB was 5.7% (14 of 247 children) and that in HBcAb(+) donor grafts was 19.7% (13 of 66 children). The incidence of DNHB without LAM prophylaxis was 31.3% (nine of 29 children), while that with prophylaxis was 10.8% (four of 37 children). LAM prophylaxis negatively correlated with DNHB by Cox regression analysis (p = 0.028, odds ratio = 0.258). Among 13 DNHB patients with HBcAb(+) donor grafts, eight recovered from DNHB and four showed the emergence of LAM resistance. There was no DNHB-related graft failure. This study showed that HBcAb(+) donor graft was associated with development of DNHB, and use of LAM prophylaxis decreased the incidence of DNHB with HBcAb(+) graft. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  10. Nyretransplantation med levende donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Løkkegaard, H; Rasmussen, F

    2000-01-01

    In recent years transplantation from living donors has accounted for 25-30% of all kidney transplants in Denmark corresponding to 40-45 per year. Most of these living donors are parents or siblings, although internationally an increasing number are unrelated donors. Donor nephrectomy is associate...... in cadaver transplantation. The ethical and psychological aspects related to transplantation from a living donor are complex and need to be carefully evaluated when this treatment is offered to the patients.......In recent years transplantation from living donors has accounted for 25-30% of all kidney transplants in Denmark corresponding to 40-45 per year. Most of these living donors are parents or siblings, although internationally an increasing number are unrelated donors. Donor nephrectomy is associated...... with only few complications. The long-term outcome for kidney donors is good without increase in mortality or risk for development of hypertension and renal failure; proteinuria may be seen. Living kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment of end-stage renal disease with better graft survival than...

  11. Triggering, front-end electronics, and data acquisition for high-rate beauty experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.; Lankford, A.J.

    1988-04-01

    The working group explored the feasibility of building a trigger and an electronics data acquisition system for both collider and fixed target experiments. There appears to be no fundamental technical limitation arising from either the rate or the amount of data for a collider experiment. The fixed target experiments will likely require a much higher rate because of the smaller cross section. Rates up to one event per RF bucket (50 MHz) appear to be feasible. Higher rates depend on the details of the particular experiment and trigger. Several ideas were presented on multiplicity jump and impact parameter triggers for fixed target experiments. 14 refs., 3 figs

  12. Síntesis de materiales moleculares a partir de donadores electrónicos orgánicos y aceptores electrónicos inorgánicos. // Synthesis of molecular materials starting from organic electronic donors and inorganic electronic receivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cázares Sánchez

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Los materiales moleculares están formados por un donador electrónico y un aceptor electrónico condensados en una fase.La síntesis de nuevos materiales moleculares se puede realizar por electrosíntesis o por síntesis química convencional. Eneste trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos de la síntesis de nuevos materiales moleculares por electrosíntesis a partirde los donadores electrónicos orgánicos: BETS y BEDT; y aceptores electrónicos inorgánicos de fierro y cobalto. Laposibilidad de síntesis de los materiales a partir de los donadores y aceptores utilizados fue analizada con voltametríacíclica; mientras que los materiales fueron caracterizados mediante espectrometría infrarroja (IR y por microscopioelectrónico de barrido (MEB.Palabras claves: Donador electrónico, aceptor electrónico, electrosíntesis, material molecular.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.Molecular materials are constituted of an electronic donor and an aceptor organized in a condensed phase. A synthetizednew molecular material is posible using electrosynthesis or conventional chemistry synthesis. In this job, we reported theresults to the synthesis of new molecular materials that have been prepared by electrosynthesis from organics electronicsdonors: BETS and BEDT; and inorganics electronics aceptors of iron and cobalt. The possibility to sinthetizes the materialsfrom the donors and aceptors used was analized with ciclic voltametry; while the materials were characteryzed with thehelp of infrared spectrometry and scanning electronic microscopy.Key words: electronic donor, electronic aceptor, electrosynthesis, molecular material.

  13. Retrocausation acting in the single-electron double-slit interference experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkyo, Noboru

    The single electron double-slit interference experiment is given a time-symmetric interpretation and visualization in terms of the intermediate amplitude of transition between the particle source and the detection point. It is seen that the retarded (causal) amplitude of the electron wave expanding from the source shows an advanced (retrocausal) bifurcation and merging in passing through the double-slit and converges towards the detection point as if guided by the advanced (retrocausal) wave from the detected electron. An experiment is proposed to confirm the causation-retrocausation symmetry of the electron behavior by observing the insensitivity of the interference pattern to non-magnetic obstacles placed in the shadows of the retarded and advanced waves appearing on the rear and front sides of the double-slit.

  14. Doação de leite humano: experiência de mulheres doadoras Donación de leche humana: experiencia de mujeres donantes Breast milk donation: women's donor experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucienne Christine Estevez de Alencar

    2009-02-01

    schooling, 58.3% of which were first-time mothers. Data gathering was based on interviews carried out during home visits. In addition to descriptive statistical analyses of quantitative data, a qualitative data categorical analysis was also performed. RESULTS: The most frequently reported reasons for donating breast milk were altruism and excess milk production. The most frequent time interval for donation was 13 days after delivery. Contact by phone with the milk bank was the most common means of communication used by the majority of participants (n=22 to obtain information that enabled the donating process. CONCLUSIONS: Psychosocial aspects identified and the experience of donors can contribute to the empowerment of the formal and informal social donation-support network, in addition to serving as a driver for the implementation of technical and policy strategies in promoting future donation practices.

  15. Experiments on Ion Space-Charge Neutralization with Pulsed Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Herleb, U

    1996-01-01

    The method of space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated with electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes has been experimentally investigated. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source may be increased by one order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant than for low charge states. For $Al^(7+)$ ions from an aluminium target a charge enhancement by a factor of 4 has been achieved by electron beam focusing.

  16. Experiments on Ion Beam Space-Charge Neutralization with Pulsed Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Herleb, U

    1998-01-01

    Space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated by electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes has been experimentally investigated. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source can be increased by an order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant than for low charge states. A charge enhancement factor of four has been achieved by neutralization with pulsed electron beams for Al7+ ions generated from an aluminium target.

  17. Different sensitivities of photosystem II in green algae and cyanobacteria to phenylurea and phenol-type herbicides: effect on electron donor side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsova, Ekaterina K; Stefanov, Martin A; Dobrikova, Anelia G; Apostolova, Emilia L

    2017-07-14

    The effects of short-term treatment with phenylurea (DCMU, isoproturon) and phenol-type (ioxynil) herbicides on the green alga Chlorella kessleri and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis salina with different organizations of photosystem II (PSII) were investigated using pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen evolution measured by polarographic oxygen electrodes (Clark-type and Joliot-type). The photosynthetic oxygen evolution showed stronger inhibition than the PSII photochemistry. The effects of the studied herbicides on both algal and cyanobacterial cells decreased in the following order: DCMU>isoproturon>ioxynil. Furthermore, we observed that the number of blocked PSII centers increased significantly after DCMU treatment (204-250 times) and slightly after ioxynil treatment (19-35 times) in comparison with the control cells. This study suggests that the herbicides affect not only the acceptor side but also the donor side of PSII by modifications of the Mn cluster of the oxygen-evolving complex. We propose that one of the reasons for the different PSII inhibitions caused by herbicides is their influence, in different extents, on the kinetic parameters of the oxygen-evolving reactions (the initial S0-S1 state distribution, the number of blocked centers SB, the turnover time of Si states, misses and double hits). The relationship between the herbicide-induced inhibition and the changes in the kinetic parameters is discussed.

  18. Feasibility of transition radiation diagnostic for hot electrons generated in indirect-drive experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoyuan; Zheng, Jian; Hu, Guangyue; Yang, Dong; Liu, Yonggang; Li, Sanwei; Jiang, Xianhua; Wang, Zhebin; Zhang, Huan; Peng, Xianshi; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2017-10-01

    In the experiment of indirect-drive laser fusion, parameter instabilities like stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) can generate abundant hot electrons, which can preheat fuel and degrade target gain. Hot electrons are usually investigated through their bremsstrahlung measured with filter-fluoresce (FF) X-ray spectrometer. In this presentation, we propose the feasibility of studying hot electrons by detecting the transition radiation (TR) emitted when energetic electrons pass through the outer surface of a hohlraum. With aid of Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the intensity of optical TR is equivalent to that of 0.2 eV black-body radiation (BR) in the typical experiments of the SG-III prototype facility with the energy of 10 kJ during 1 ns. Therefore, optical transition could be a candidate for the measurement of hot electrons without preheating. However, our simulations shows that the outer surface can be heated to 0.55 eV due to the hot electrons, leading to much brighter BR than the TR. In fact, our streaked optical pyrometer indicates that the preheating temperature reaches 0.7-1.0 eV. Hence it would be impossible to diagnose the hot electrons through optical TR. Our calculations show that it is plausibly feasible to detect the TR in the region of far infrared or THz.

  19. Test of New Readout Electronics for the BONuS12 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Mathieu [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire (IPN), Orsay (France)

    2017-07-01

    For decades, electron-proton scattering experiments have been providing a large amount of data on the proton structure function. However, because of the instability of free neutrons, fewer experiments have been able to study the neutron structure function. The BONuS collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory addresses this challenge by scattering electrons off a deuterium target, using a RTPC capable of detecting the low-momentum spectator protons near the target. Events of electrons scattering on almost free neutrons are selected by constraining the spectator protons to very low momenta and very backward scattering angles. In 2005, BONuS successfully measured the neutron structure with scattering electrons of up to 5.3 GeV energy. An extension of this measurement has been approved using the newly upgraded 12 GeV electron beam and CLAS12 (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer). For this new set of measurements, a new RTPC detector using GEM trackers is being developed to allow measurements of spectator protons with momenta as low as 70 MeV/c. The new RTPC will use a new readout electronic system, which is also used by other trackers in CLAS12. This thesis will present the first tests of this electronics using a previously built RTPC of similar design.

  20. Risk factors associated with hepatitis B or C markers or elevated alanine aminotransferase level among blood donors on a tropical island: the Guadeloupe experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fest, T; Viel, J F; Agis, F; Coffe, C; Dupond, J L; Hervé, P

    1992-10-01

    Donated blood is currently screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels to prevent posttransfusion hepatitis. A prospective study of 2368 blood donors was carried out in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) with a view to determining the risk factors associated with serologic abnormalities. Blood donors included in the study had to complete a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed on the data thus obtained: 571 donations (24%) were positive for at least one of the four analyzed markers. The results were that 3.2 percent were positive for HBsAg, 22 percent for anti-HBc, and 0.8 percent for anti-HCV, and 1.4 percent had ALT > or = 45 IU per L. A good correlation was found between anti-HCV and elevated ALT. Transfusion history and two socioeconomic categories (working class, military personnel) were found to be risk factors. Other risk factors were lifelong residence in Guadeloupe (with risk increasing with the number of years), birthplace and current residence in the southern part of the island, and the existence of gastrointestinal discomfort unrelated to viral hepatitis (odds ratio = 2.98). The results of this study illustrate the difficulty of implementing a preventive policy against posttransfusion hepatitis in a tropical area. The unique epidemiologic situation of Guadeloupe as regards hepatitis B virus has led to more restrictive criteria for the acceptance of blood donors.

  1. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRATER, R; PETTY, CC; LUCE, TC; HARVEY, RW; CHOI, M; LAHAYE, RJ; LIN-LIU, Y-R; LOHR, J; MURAKAMI, M; WADE, MR; WONG, K-L

    2003-01-01

    A271 ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak in which the measured off-axis electron cyclotron current drive has been compared systematically to theory over a broad range of parameters have shown that the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D provides an excellent model of the relevant current drive physics. This physics understanding has been critical in optimizing the application of ECCD to high performance discharges, supporting such applications as suppression of neoclassical tearing modes and control and sustainment of the current profile

  2. Do Years of Experience With Electronic Health Records Matter for Productivity in Community Health Centers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frogner, Bianca K; Wu, Xiaoli; Ku, Leighton; Pittman, Patricia; Masselink, Leah E

    This study investigated how years of experience with an electronic health record (EHR) related to productivity in community health centers (CHCs). Using data from the 2012 Uniform Data System, we regressed average annual medical visits, weighted for service intensity, as a function of full-time equivalent medical staff controlling for CHC size and location. Physician productivity significantly improved. Although the productivity of all other staff types was not significantly different by years of EHR experience, the trends showed lower productivity among nurses and other medical staff in CHCs with fewer years of EHR experience versus more years of experience.

  3. Electron and proton spectrometry in the AFGL auroral E program. I. Experiment overview and preliminary auroral electron data. Environmental research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, W.J.; Heroux, L.; Salter, R.H.

    1982-04-09

    The design of spectrometers to determine electron and proton spectra over energy ranges between 2 eV and 60 keV, and their application in a dual rocket experiment to measure these particle fluxes in a continuous aurora, are discussed briefly. Details of the overall experiment, including relevant flight parameters, are given, and preliminary results of electron measurements are presented.

  4. Computer Algorithms in the Search for Unrelated Stem Cell Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a medical procedure in the field of hematology and oncology, most often performed for patients with certain cancers of the blood or bone marrow. A lot of patients have no suitable HLA-matched donor within their family, so physicians must activate a “donor search process” by interacting with national and international donor registries who will search their databases for adult unrelated donors or cord blood units (CBU. Information and communication technologies play a key role in the donor search process in donor registries both nationally and internationaly. One of the major challenges for donor registry computer systems is the development of a reliable search algorithm. This work discusses the top-down design of such algorithms and current practice. Based on our experience with systems used by several stem cell donor registries, we highlight typical pitfalls in the implementation of an algorithm and underlying data structure.

  5. Systems of donor transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.T. de Charro (Frank); J.E.M. Akveld (Hans); E. Hessing (Ellen)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe development of medical knowledge has resulted in a demand in society for donor organs, but the recruitment of donor organs for transplantation is difficult. This paper aims to provide some general insights into the complex interaction processes involved. A laissez-faire policy, in

  6. Dealing with Donor Anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Techniques that reduce donors' resistance to college fund-raising requests, either direct mail or telephone solicitations, are offered. These include: respecting the prospects' concerns about privacy; offering nonintrusive giving options; honesty and clarity of communication; reinforcing donor sense of control; connecting with prospects'…

  7. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  8. Opportunities for parity violating electron scattering experiments at the planned MESA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    We suggest to start an accelerator physics project called the Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) as an extension to our experimental facilities. MESA may allow to introduce an innovative internal target regime based on the ERL principle. A second mode of operation will be to use an external polarized electron beam for parity violating experiments.

  9. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  10. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  11. Users' Personal Conceptions of Usability and User Experience of Electronic and Software Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaksma, Tim R.; de Jong, Menno D.T.; Karreman, Joyce

    2018-01-01

    Research problem: Despite the abundance of research into usability and user experience (UX), there is still debate about the relationship between both concepts. The user perspective is underrepresented in all discussions. This study examines the personal conceptions that users of electronic and

  12. Development of Ultra Low-Temperature Electronics for the AEgIS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kellerbauer, Alban; Doser, Michael; Caspers, Friedhelm

    This thesis presents the development of electronics for operation at cryogenic temperatures, with particular emphasis on the cryogenic electronics required for the Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) experiment at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The research is focused on a highly sensitive charged particle detection system for a Penning trap, on cryogenic low-pass filters and on a low-loss DC-contact RF switch. The detection system consists of a high quality factor tuned circuit including a superconducting coil, and a low-noise amplifier. Since the experimental setup of the AEgIS experiment requires it, the developed electronics must reliably operate at 4.2 K (~269C) and in high constant magnetic field of more than 1 Tesla. Therefore, the performance of the cryogenic electronic designs were carefully evaluated at low-temperature/high magnetic field, the result of which have important implications for the AEgIS experiment. Moreover, a new possibility of ...

  13. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond : Second experiment and additional analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, B.J.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M.S.; Dréau, A.E.; Reiserer, A.A.; Vermeulen, R.F.L.; Schouten, R.N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D.J.; Goodenough, K.D.; Elkouss Coronas, D.; Wehner, S.D.C.; Taminiau, T.H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same

  14. Neonatal Nurses Experience Unintended Consequences and Risks to Patient Safety With Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Katherine M; Gephart, Sheila M; Carrington, Jane M

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we examine the unintended consequences of nurses' use of electronic health records. We define these as unforeseen events, change in workflow, or an unanticipated result of implementation and use of electronic health records. Unintended consequences experienced by nurses while using electronic health records have been well researched. However, few studies have focused on neonatal nurses, and it is unclear to what extent unintended consequences threaten patient safety. A new instrument called the Carrington-Gephart Unintended Consequences of Electronic Health Record Questionnaire has been validated, and secondary analysis using the tool explored the phenomena among neonatal nurses (N = 40). The purposes of this study were to describe unintended consequences of use of electronic health records for neonatal nurses and to explore relationships between the phenomena and characteristics of the nurse and the electronic health record. The most frequent unintended consequences of electronic health record use were due to interruptions, followed by a heavier workload due to the electronic health record, changes to the workflow, and altered communication patterns. Neonatal nurses used workarounds most often with motivation to better assist patients. Teamwork was moderately related to higher unintended consequences including patient safety risks (r = 0.427, P = .007), system design (r = 0.419, P = .009), and technology barriers (r = 0.431, P = .007). Communication about patients was reduced when patient safety risks were high (r = -0.437, P = .003). By determining the frequency with which neonatal nurses experience unintended consequences of electronic health record use, future research can be targeted to improve electronic health record design through customization, integration, and refinement to support patient safety and better outcomes.

  15. Very low frequency valuation of a modulated beam of electrons: an application to the ARAKS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, L.

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of the ARAKS experiments was to study the effects due to the injection of energy electrons into the aurora zone. Here we analyse the TBF (2, 4 and 6 kHz) signals observed on the basis of interpretations in a closed or radiated field. We show that these signals are of an electromagnetic nature below fsub(HB) = 5 kHz and electrostatic above that figure, that they are correlated with the functioning of the electron cannon and independent of the electrons' angle of attack. They propagate in the electronic hissing mode. At frequencies below fsub(HB), the main contribution comes from the close field, whereas it comes from the radiated field for f greater than fsub(HB) [fr

  16. Search of prompt electrons in the NA14 photoproduction experiment at the CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Bouard, G.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to isolate a prompt electron signal from the data of the NA14 photoproduction experiment at CERN. For that aim, a fast data filtering program has been developed. In order to have a good understanding of the electrons behaviour in the electromagnetic calorimeter, electrons from photon conversion were selected. The observation of events with a reconstructed psi and the sharing between the different psi production mechanism leads to a clear excess of the inelastic process relative to a QCD theoretical expectation. The prompt electrons measurement method, when applied to events obtained from a π - beam, does not give any evidence for a signal. With incident photons, a strong signal is seen which cannot been explained by the Bethe Heitler mechanism and psi production alone. This signal is stronger than the photon-gluon fusion model prediction [fr

  17. Theory and simulation of an inverse free-electron laser experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J.-M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high-power CO2 laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam moving along a wiggler has been carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2690 (1996)]. The data generated by this inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) experiment are studied by means of theory and simulation. Included in the simulations are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge; energy spread of the electrons; and arbitrary wiggler-field profile. Two types of wiggler profile are considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period. (The period of the wiggler is ˜3 cm, its magnetic field is ˜1 T, and the wiggler length is 0.47 m.) The energy increment of the electrons (˜1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (˜40 MeV). At a laser power level ˜0.5 Gw, the simulation results on energy gain are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Preliminary results on the electron energy distribution at the end of the IFEL are presented. Whereas the experiment produces a near-monotone distribution of electron energies with the peak shifted to higher energy, the simulation shows a more structured and non-monotonic distribution at the end of the wiggler. Effects that may help reconcile these differences are considered.

  18. The determination of electron momentum densities by inelastic scattering gamma-ray-electron coincidence measurements: The (γ,eγ)-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollason, A.J.; Bell, F.; Schneider, J.R.

    1989-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the recoiling electron in 320 keV gamma ray inelastic scattering collisions in thin aluminium targets. The angular correlation of these electrons detected in coincidence with the scattered photon is in agreement with the kinematic requirements of the Compton effect and is correctly predicted by Monte Carlo simulations based on the impulse approximation. Further simulations of ideal-geometry experiments indicate that information about the initial electron momenta is available from an examination of those electron-photon events originating in a surface layer of one electronic mean free path depth and that elastic scattering of the recoil electrons from greater depths produces a nearly flat background to this signal. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the (γ,eγ) experiment for studying electron momentum densities with synchrotron radiation. (orig.) With 23 refs., 17 figs

  19. Time-resolved EPR study on the photoexcited triplet state of the electron-donor-acceptor complex formed in the system of fac-tris[2-(4-octyl-phenyl) pyridine] iridium(III) and tetracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhebin, Fu; Shuhei, Yoshioka; Hisao, Murai

    2014-01-09

    The physical properties of the phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode material fac-tris(phenylpyridine) iridium(III), Ir(ppy)3, have been reported with experimental and theoretical studies. Here, the photochemical properties of the excited triplet state of partially modified fac-tris[2-(4-octyl-phenyl) pyridine] iridium(III), Ir(C8ppy)3, were investigated using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (tr-EPR) and optical methods by adding tetracene in the toluene solution. The tr-EPR observation at 77 K revealed the following two species: the excited triplet state of tetracene and another triplet species with zero field splitting parameters of |D| = 0.088 cm(-1) and |E| = 0.018 cm(-1) with characteristic spin polarization. The latter species was assigned to the electron-donor-acceptor (EDA) complex formed between Ir(C8ppy)3 and tetracene. The mechanism of formation and the properties of this EDA complex, including the information on the principal axes of (3)Ir(C8ppy)3*, are discussed.

  20. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) Spacecraft Silicone Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Under a microscope, atomic oxygen (AO) exposed silicone surfaces are crazed and seen as "islands" separated by numerous crack lines, much analogous to mud-tile cracks. This research characterized and compared the degree of AO degradation of silicones by analyzing optical microscope images of samples exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) AO as part of the Spacecraft Silicone Experiment. The Spacecraft Silicone Experiment consisted of eight DC 93-500 silicone samples exposed to eight different AO fluence levels (ranged from 1.46 to 8.43 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm) during two different Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) missions. Image analysis software was used to analyze images taken using a digital camera. To describe the morphological degradation of each AO exposed flight sample, three different parameters were selected and estimated: (1) average area of islands was determined and found to be in the 1000 to 3100 sq mm range; (2) total length of crack lines per unit area of the sample surface were determined and found to be in the range of 27 to 59 mm of crack length per sq mm of sample surface; and (3) the fraction of sample surface area that is occupied by crack lines was determined and found to be in the 25 to 56 percent range. In addition, average crack width can be estimated from crack length and crack area measurements and was calculated to be about 10 mm. Among the parameters studied, the fraction of sample surface area that is occupied by crack lines is believed to be most useful in characterizing the degree of silicone conversion to silicates by AO because its value steadily increases with increasing fluence over the entire fluence range. A series of SEM images from the eight samples exposed to different AO fluences suggest a complex sequence of surface stress due to surface shrinkage and crack formation, followed by re-distribution of stress and shrinking rate on the sample surface. Energy dispersive spectra (EDS) indicated that upon AO

  1. Characterization of an anion antisite defect as a deep double donor in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Katsui, A.; Jeon, D.Y.; Watkins, G.D.; Gislason, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    A study of optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) on the anion antisite defect in electron irradiated InP has been made by monitoring the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), combined with DLTS experiment. Comparison of the ODMR and DLTS results reveals that the intrinsic anion antisite defect acts as a deep double-donor in the gap. The first ionization (D o /D 1+ ) process occurs both in thermal and optical excitation as a mid-gap electron trap, detected by DLTS and DLOS experiment. (author) 12 refs., 6 figs

  2. Marginal kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Gopalakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for a medically eligible patient with end stage renal disease. The number of renal transplants has increased rapidly over the last two decades. However, the demand for organs has increased even more. This disparity between the availability of organs and waitlisted patients for transplants has forced many transplant centers across the world to use marginal kidneys and donors. We performed a Medline search to establish the current status of marginal kidney donors in the world. Transplant programs using marginal deceased renal grafts is well established. The focus is now on efforts to improve their results. Utilization of non-heart-beating donors is still in a plateau phase and comprises a minor percentage of deceased donations. The main concern is primary non-function of the renal graft apart from legal and ethical issues. Transplants with living donors outnumbered cadaveric transplants at many centers in the last decade. There has been an increased use of marginal living kidney donors with some acceptable medical risks. Our primary concern is the safety of the living donor. There is not enough scientific data available to quantify the risks involved for such donation. The definition of marginal living donor is still not clear and there are no uniform recommendations. The decision must be tailored to each donor who in turn should be actively involved at all levels of the decision-making process. In the current circumstances, our responsibility is very crucial in making decisions for either accepting or rejecting a marginal living donor.

  3. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  4. Dosimetry of laser-accelerated electron beams used for in vitro cell irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, C.; Kaluza, M.; Karsch, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schürer, M.; Sobiella, M.; Woithe, J.; Pawelke, J.

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric characterization of laser-accelerated electrons applied for the worldwide first systematic radiobiological in vitro cell irradiation will be presented. The laser-accelerated electron beam at the JeTi laser system has been optimized, monitored and controlled in terms of dose homogeneity, stability and absolute dose delivery. A combination of different dosimetric components were used to provide both an online beam as well as dose monitoring and a precise absolute dosimetry. In detail, the electron beam was controlled and monitored by means of an ionization chamber and an in-house produced Faraday cup for a defined delivery of the prescribed dose. Moreover, the precise absolute dose delivered to each cell sample was determined by an radiochromic EBT film positioned in front of the cell sample. Furthermore, the energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated electron beam was determined. As presented in a previous work of the authors, also for laser-accelerated protons a precise dosimetric characterization was performed that enabled initial radiobiological cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, a precise dosimetric characterization, optimization and control of laser-accelerated and therefore ultra-short pulsed, intense particle beams for both electrons and protons is possible, allowing radiobiological experiments and meeting all necessary requirements like homogeneity, stability and precise dose delivery. In order to fulfill the much higher dosimetric requirements for clinical application, several improvements concerning, i.e., particle energy and spectral shaping as well as patient safety are necessary.

  5. A novel aerobic-anoxic biological filter for nitrogen removal from UASB effluent using biogas compounds as electron donors for denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Rodríguez Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar una nueva configuración de filtro biológico, aerobio, para obtener la nitrificación y desnitrificación del efluente de un reactor UASB que trata agua residual doméstica. El filtro biológico estuvo compuesto por dos compartimientos, uno superior aerobio nitrificante simulando un filtro percolador y uno inferior anóxico desnitrificante con medio de soporte sumergido. Adicionalmente, fue evaluada la factibilidad de usar el biogás producido en el reactor UASB como donador de electrones para la desnitrificación. Para una carga hidráulica aplicada de 5.6 m3 m-2 d-1, una carga orgánica aplicada de 0.26 kg DQO m-3 d-1 y una carga aplicada de nitrógeno amoniacal de 0.08 kg m-3 d-1 se obtuvo una transformación del nitrógeno amoniacal entre el 60 y 74%, con concentraciones efluentes menores de 13 mg L-1. A pesar de la presencia de oxígeno disuelto en el compartimiento de desnitrificación, se alcanzaron concentraciones de nitrato efluente menores de 10 mg L-1. Los resultados obtenidos indican que el metano presente en el biogás, fue el principal donador de electrones para la desnitrificación.

  6. Design of simulated nuclear electronics laboratory experiments based on IAEA-TECDOC-530 on pcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghousia, S.F.; Nadeem, M.; Khaleeq, M.T.

    2002-05-01

    In this IAEA project, PK-11089 (Design of Simulated Nuclear Electronics Laboratory Experiments based on IAEA-TECDOC-530 on PCs), a software package consisting of Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiments on Nuclear Electronics compatible with the IAEA-TECDOC-530 (Nuclear Electronics Laboratory Manual) has been developed in OrCAD 9.0 (an electronic circuit simulation software environment) as a self-training aid. The software process model employed in this project is the Feedback Waterfall model with some Rapid Application Model. The project work is completed in the five phases of the SDLC, (all of them have been fully completed) which includes the Requirement Definition, Phase, System and Software Design, Implementation and Unit testing, Integration and System-testing phase and the Operation and Maintenance phase. A total of 125 circuits are designed in 39 experiments from Power Supplies, Analog circuits, Digital circuits and Multi-channel analyzer sections. There is another set of schematic designs present in the package, which contains faulty circuits. This set is designed for the learners to exercise the troubleshooting. The integration and system-testing phase was carried out simultaneously. The Operation and Maintenance phase has been implemented by accomplishing it through some trainees and some undergraduate engineering students by allowing them to play with the software independently. (author)

  7. Electron cooling application for luminosity preservation in an experiment with internal targets at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Meshkov, I N; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D; Sidorin, A O; Smirnov, A V; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Trubnikov, G V

    2003-01-01

    This report is an investigation of the beam parameter evolution in the experiments with internal target. In calculations of the proton and deuteron beams we concentrated on cluster, atomic beam, storage cell and pellet targets at ANKE experiment mainly. In these calculations electron and stochastic cooling, intrabeam scattering, scattering on the target and residual gas atoms are taken into account. Beam parameter evolution is investigated in the long-term time scale, up to one hour, at different beam energies in the range from 1.0 to 2.7 GeV for proton beam and from 1 to 2.11 GeV for deuteron beam. The results of numerical simulations of the proton and deuteron beam parameters at different energies obtained using new version of BETACOOL program (elaborated at the first stage of this work [1]) are presented. Optimum parameters of the electron cooling system are estimated. The COSY experiment requirements can be satisfied even when electron cooling time is rather long. That allows to apply an electron cooling ...

  8. Conversion-electron experiment to characterize the decay of the 237Np shape isomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Bauer, R.W.; Gardner, D.G.; Decman, D.J.; Meyer, R.A.; Roy, N.; Sale, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Conversion electrons from the decay of low-lying levels of 237 Np have been measured to detect the population of these levels by gamma-ray decay of the 237 Np shape isomer. Analysis of the 208-keV transition L conversion-electron peak gives an upper limit of about 17 μb for the population of the 3/2 - 267-keV level in 237 Np from the shape isomer decay. Model calculations are compared with the measured limit. Improvements are suggested for this experiment. 9 refs., 4 figs

  9. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas studied by two terahertz pulse experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary form only given. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas induced by strong terahertz (THz) transient is investigated using two THz pulse experiments. It is shown that UV emission from nitrogen plasma generated by liberated electrons is a good indication of the local...... electric field at the antenna tip. Using this method resonant properties of antennas fabricated on high resistivity silicon are investigated in the strong field regime. Decrease of antenna Q-factor due to ultrafast carrier multiplication in the substrate is observed....

  10. Experiment and simulations of sub-ps electron bunch train generation at Fermilab photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.-E; Church, M.; /Fermilab; Piot, P.; Prokop, C.R.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-10-01

    Recently the generation of electron bunch trains with sub-picosecond time structure has been experimentally demonstrated at the A0 photoinjector of Fermilab using a transverse-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. The temporal profile of the bunch train can be easily tuned to meet the requirements of the applications of modern accelerator beams. In this paper we report the A0 bunch-train experiment and explore numerically the possible extension of this technique to shorter time scales at the Fermilab SRF Accelerator Test Facility, a superconducting linear electron accelerator currently under construction in the NML building.

  11. Heat Pinches in Electron-Heated Tokamak Plasmas: Theoretical Turbulence Models versus Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, P.; Thyagaraja, A.; Weiland, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Knight, P. J.

    2005-10-01

    Two fluid turbulence models, the drift wave based quasilinear 1.5D Weiland model and the electromagnetic global 3D nonlinear model cutie, have been used to account for heat pinch evidence in off-axis modulated electron cyclotron heating experiments in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project. Both models reproduce the main features indicating inward heat convection in mildly off-axis cases. In far-off-axis cases with hollow electron temperature profiles, the existence of outward convection was reproduced only by cutie. Turbulence mechanisms driving heat convection in the two models are discussed.

  12. A new approach to front-end electronics interfacing in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00015561; Borga, Andrea; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Kai; Drake, Gary; Donszelmann, Mark; Francis, David; Gorini, Benedetto; Lanni, Francesco; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Levinson, Lorne; Narevicius, Julia; Roich, Alexander; Ryu, Soo; Schreuder, Frans Philip; Schumacher, Jorn; Vandelli, Wainer; Vermeulen, Jos; Wu, Weihao; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    For new detector and trigger systems to be installed in the ATLAS experiment after LHC Run 2, a new approach will be followed for Front-End electronics interfacing. The FELIX (Front-End LInk eXchange) system will function as gateway connecting: on one side to detector and trigger electronics links, as well as providing timing and trigger (TTC) information; and on the other side a commodity switched network built using standard technology (either Ethernet or Infiniband). The new approach is described in this paper, and results achieved so far are presented.

  13. A new approach to front-­‐end electronics interfacing in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borga, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration; Lanni, Francesco; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Levinson, Lorne; Narevicius, Julia; Roich, Alexander; Schreuder, Frans Philip; Schumacher, J\\"orn; Vandelli, Wainer; Vermeulen, Jos; Ryu, Soo; Zhang, Jinlong; Anderson, John Thomas; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Chen, Kai; Chen, Hucheng; Drake, Gary; Donszelmann, Mark; Francis, David

    2015-01-01

    For new detector and trigger systems to be installed in the ATLAS experiment after LHC Run 2 a new approach will be followed for front-end electronics interfacing. The FELIX (Front-End Link eXchange) system will interface to links connecting to front-end detector and trigger electronics instead of the RODs (ReadOut Drivers) currently used. FELIX will function as a gateway to a commodity switched network built using standard technology (either Ethernet or Infiniband). In the paper the new approach will be described and results of the demonstrator program currently in progress will be presented.

  14. Assessment of hot-electron microstability in the initial TMX-U experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T.A.; Chen, Y.J.; Ellis, R.; James, R.; Lasnier, C.

    1983-04-01

    During the initial TMX-U experiments, we investigated the sloshing-ion and hot-electron distributions. We require these components to ultimately construct a thermal barrier for improved tandem mirror confinement. The plasma parameters we achieved approach values required for thermal barrier operation but have been limited by the power available. This report is concerned with the stability of the hot electron distribution formed. Nonthermal microwave emissions near the electron-cyclotron frequency f/sub ce/ of the minimum end-cell magnetic field indicate the presence of electron microinstabilities, which we have tentatively identified by their frequencies. We observed the upper-hybrid loss-cone mode (f/f/sub ce/ approx. 1.1) during high density operation with a relatively small fraction of hot electrons. At lower density operation with a higher hot electron fraction, we observed emissions consistent with the whistler instability. During emission bursts at 12.5 GHz (f/f/sub ce/ approx. 0.9) we observed a rapid rise in the high frequency thermal emissions, indicating a spreading of the distribution. Some of the more violent bursts are correlated with enhanced end loss currents

  15. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pion and electrons. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.

    1998-05-01

    The work in this report is grouped into four categories. (1) The experiments in pion nucleus physics were primarily studies of pion absorption and scattering in light nuclei, carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). (2) The experiments on fundamental particle properties were carried out at LAMPF and at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, the pion-beta decay experiment is still under construction and will begin taking data in 1999. (3) The experiments in electro-nuclear physics were performed at the Stanford Linear Electron Accelerator (SLAC), at the Saclay Laboratory in France, at the LEGS facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory. These experiments relate mainly to the question of the role of longitudinal and transverse strength for inelastic scattering from nuclei, measurements of fundamental nuclear properties with tagged polarized photons, and to the quark structure of the nucleon and its excited states. (4) Experiments on absorption of antiprotons in heavy nuclei, were carried out by K. Ziock primarily while on a sabbatical leave in Munich, Germany

  16. Ex-vivo partial nephrectomy after living donor nephrectomy: Surgical technique for expanding kidney donor pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Nyame

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation has profound improvements in mortality, morbidity, and overall quality of life compared to renal replacement therapy. This report aims to illustrate the use of ex-vivo partial nephrectomy in a patient with a renal angiomyolipoma prior to living donor transplantation. The surgical outcomes of the donor nephrectomy and recipient transplantation are reported with 2 years of follow-up. Both the donor and recipient are healthy and without any significant comorbidities. In conclusion, urologic techniques such as partial nephrectomy can be used to expand the living donor pool in carefully selected and well informed transplant recipients. Our experience demonstrated a safe and positive outcome for both the recipient and donor, and is consistent with other reported outcomes in the literature.

  17. Blood donation and blood donor mortality after adjustment for a healthy donor effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    investigated the relation between blood donation frequency and mortality within a large cohort of blood donors. In addition, our analyses also took into consideration the effects of presumed health differences linked to donation behavior. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Using the Scandinavian Donation......BACKGROUND: Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that blood donors experience lower mortality than the general population. While this may suggest a beneficial effect of blood donation, it may also reflect the selection of healthy persons into the donor population. To overcome this bias, we...... and Transfusion database (SCANDAT), we assessed the association between annual number of donations in 5-year windows and donor mortality by means of Poisson regression analysis. The analyses included adjustment for demographic characteristics and for an internal healthy donor effect, estimated among elderly...

  18. Ring recognition and electron identification in the RICH detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S; Hoehne, C; Ososkov, G

    2010-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In this contribution we will present algorithms and software which have been developed for electron identification in CBM. Efficient and fast ring recognition in the RICH detector is based on the Hough Transform method which has been accelerated considerably compared to a standard implementation. Ring quality selection is done using an Artificial Neural Network which also has been used for electron identification. Due to optical distortions ellipse fitting and radius corre ction routines are used for improved ring radius resolution. These methods allow for a high purity and efficiency of reconstructed electron rings. For momenta above 2 GeV/c the ring reconstruction efficiency for electrons embedded in central Au+Au collisions at 25 AGeV beam energy is 95% resulting in an electron identification efficiency of 90% at a pion suppression factor of 500. Including information from the TRD a pion suppression of 10 4 is reached at 80% efficiency. The developed algorithm is very robust to a high ring density environment. Current work focusses on detector layout studies in order to optimize the detector setup while keeping a high performance. All developed algorithms were tested on large statistics of simulated events and are included into the CBM software framework for common use.

  19. Syntheses of donor-acceptor-functionalized dihydroazulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Jevric, Martyn; Bond, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch has been of interest for use in molecular electronics and advanced materials. The switching between the two isomers has previously been found to depend strongly on the presence of donor and acceptor groups. The fine-tuning of opt...

  20. Modeling charge transfer at organic donor-acceptor semiconductor interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cakir, Deniz; Bokdam, Menno; de Jong, Machiel Pieter; Fahlman, M.; Brocks, G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop an integer charge transfer model for the potential steps observed at interfaces between donor and acceptor molecular semiconductors. The potential step can be expressed as the difference between the Fermi energy pinning levels of electrons on the acceptor material and holes on the donor

  1. Prognos is of living donor liver transplantation performed during different periods in infants with biliary atresia: a single-center experience with 101 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUA Xiangwei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo compared the prognosis between infants with biliary atresia (BA who underwent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT during 2006-2009 and 2010-2012 in the Department of Liver Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and to evaluate the prognos is of LDLT performed during different periods. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 101 infants with BA who underwent LDLT from October 2006 to December 2012. These patients were divided into 2006-2009 group and 2010-2012 group according to the year the procedure was performed. The two groups were compared in terms of preoperative general data, intraoperative status, and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis; measurement data were analyzed by t test, and enumeration data were analyzed by Fisher exact probability test and chi-square test. ResultsThe preoperative general data showed no significant difference between the two groups. Compared with the 2006-2009 group, the 2010-2012 group had significantly less intraoperative blood loss (t=2.05, P=0.04, a significantly shorter cold ischemia time of donor liver (t=3.25, P<0.01, and significantly lower incidence of postoperative biliary complications (χ2=4.27, P=0.04, pulmonary infection (χ2=4.47, P=0.03, and acute rejection (P=0.03. The 2010-2012 group had significantly improved survival compared with the 2006-2009 group; the 1 and 2 year cumulative survival rates for the 2010-2012 group were 884% and 88.4%, respectively, versus 84.4% and 75% for the 2006-2009 group. ConclusionThe development of surgical techniques, improvement in perioperative management, and standardized follow-up can significantly increase the success rate of surgery and survival rate and reduce postoperative complications in BA patients.

  2. The prototype readout electronics system for the External Target Experiment in CSR of HIRFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Kang, L.; Li, M.; Liu, S.; Zhou, J.; An, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A prototype readout electronics system was designed for the External Target Experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The kernel parts include the 128-channel 100 ps high-resolution time digitization module, the 16-channel 25 ps high-resolution time and charge measurement module, and the trigger electronics, as well as the clock generation circuits, which are all integrated within the PXI-6U crate. The laboratory test results indicate that a good resolution is achieved, better than the requirement. We also have conducted initial commissioning tests with the detectors to confirm the functions of the system. Through the research of this prototype electronics, preparation for the future extended system is made.

  3. Manipulations of Double Electron Beams within One RF Period for Seeded SM-LWFA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Feng; Cline, David B; Kimura, Wayne D; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2005-01-01

    Although seeded SM-LWFA only requires one electron beam to initiate the laser wakefield, it would be highly desirable to have a second electron beam traveling after the first one to probe the accelerated electrons. To create and preserve significant amount of wakefield in the STELLA SM-LWFA experiment, the first e-beam needs to be tiny (<40 microns FWHM) in size and short in length within the plasma. To probe the wakefield which is damped within 10 ps for certain plasma density, the separation between the first and second beams needs to be within one RF period and the second e-beam must have smaller energy spread and smaller size. Design of double beams in one RF period to meet the strict requirements and the preliminary beam study at BNL-ATF facility are presented. The scheme of double beams with ATF bunch compressor is also discussed.

  4. Recent Operating Experience involving Power Electronics Failure in Korea Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaedo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, modern power electronics devices for electrical component were steadily increased in electrical systems which used for main power control and protection. To upgrade the system reliability we recommended the redundancy for electrical equipment trip system. The past several years, Korean Nuclear power plants have changed the electrical control and protection systems (Auto Voltage Regulator, Power Protection Relay) for main generator and main power protection relay systems. In this paper we deal with operating experience involving modern solid state power electronics failure in Korean nuclear power plants. One of the failures we will discuss the degraded phenomenon of power electronics device for CEDMCS(Control Element Drive Mechanism Control System). As the result of the failure we concerned about the modification for trip source of main generator excitation systems and others. We present an interesting issue for modern solid state devices (IGBT, Thyristors). (authors)

  5. Electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments on magnetic mirror device MM-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Weishu; Cheng Shiquing; Xing Dazhong; Duan Shuyun; Wang Jinhe; Chen Dingguo

    1986-01-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments have been carried out on a simple magnetic mirror device (MM-2). The intensity of the magnetic field in the center of the device is around 3 x 10 -1 T. The mirror ratio equals to 2.64:1. The mirror space is 60 cm. The inner diameter of the vacuum chamber is 20 cm. The plasma is produced and heated by the microwave radiation fed into the chamber radially in the midplane. The microwave power source is a gyrotron which produces 30 kW output power in 15 GHz frequency within 10 ms pulse duration. The hard X-ray signal is observed while the diamagnetism signal appars. The analysis of the bremsstrahlung emission shows that the temperature of the hot electron is about 25-30 KeV. The electron densit measured by the multigrid energy analyzer is about (1.1-3.9) x 10 -3

  6. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Electron Beam Design and Calibration for the Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Michael; Flauta, R.; Gray, T. K.; Kim, J.; Lau, C. Y.; Lee, M. B.; Neumann, M. J.; Surla, V.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2008-11-01

    An electron beam has been developed as part of the Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment (SLiDE) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The purpose of the SLiDE apparatus is to examine the motion of liquid lithium under fusion relevant heat loads and magnetic fields. To mimic the heat fluxes present in the divertor of a fusion machine, a linear sheet beam is utilized which can operate over a range of applied magnetic fields and power levels. With steady state operation up to 15kW input power, the beam can produce peak heat fluxes of 10 MW/m^2 and heat flux gradients comparable to those found in fusion experiments. The design of the electron beam was developed using commercial beam transport codes and the final design is diagnosed with a two-lead Faraday cup. Beam performance and characteristics are presented.

  8. ELECTRONIC EDUCATION IN UNDERGRADUATE RADIOLOGY: THE EXPERIENCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MALAGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sendra Portero

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998, radiology teaching and learning electronic resources have been developed at the University of Málaga. Some experiences on undergraduate radiology education are presented in this paper: a self-conducted training on radiology called “A Walk through Radiology”, some projects to create and develop radiology consulting tools, a project about audio-recorded virtual lectures (AMERAM, started on 2005, and a Web portal to collect radiology education Internet resources. Finally, we conclude with some reflections about the experience along these years, which has contributed to improve the student’s radiology learning in our centre and has supplied educative tools to students and postgraduates of this and other cities. We consider that the European Space of Higher Education learning philosophy, student centered and self-learning based, gives a vital role to undergraduate electronic education tools.

  9. Observation of Flat Electron Temperature Profiles in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Majeski, R.; Schmitt, J. C.; Auburn University, AL; Hansen, C.

    2017-01-01

    It has been predicted for over a decade that low-recycling plasma-facing components in fusion devices would allow high edge temperatures and flat or nearly flat temperature profiles. In recent experiments with lithium wall coatings in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a hot edge (> 200 eV) and flat electron temperature profiles have been measured following the termination of external fueling. In this work, reduced recycling was demonstrated by retention of ~ 60% of the injected hydrogen in the walls following the discharge. Electron energy confinement followed typical Ohmic confinement scaling during fueling, but did not decrease with density after fueling terminated, ultimately exceeding the scaling by ~ 200% . Lastly, achievement of the low-recycling, hot edge regime has been an important goal of LTX and lithium plasma-facing component research in general, as it has potentially significant implications for the operation, design, and cost of fusion devices.

  10. Beam dynamics analysis of femtosecond microbunches produced by the staged electron laser acceleration experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of the femtosecond (fs microbunches, created during laser acceleration, is a crucial step to enable staging of the laser acceleration process. This paper focuses on the optimization of the beam dynamics of fs microbunches transported through the staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA-II experiment being carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. STELLA-II consists of an inverse free electron laser (IFEL untapered undulator, which acts as an electron beam energy modulator; a magnetic chicane, which acts as a buncher; a second IFEL tapered undulator, which acts as an accelerator; and a dipole, which serves as an energy spectrometer. When the energy-modulated macrobunch traverses through the chicane and a short drift space, microbunches of order fs in duration (i.e., ∼3  fs FWHM are formed. The 3-fs microbunches are accelerated by interacting with a high-power CO_{2} laser beam in the following tapered undulator. These extremely short microbunches may experience significant space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation effects when traversing the STELLA-II transport line. These effects are analyzed and the safe operating conditions are determined. With less than 0.5-pC microbunch charge, both microbunch debunching and emittance growth are negligible, and the energy-spread increase is less than 5%. These results are also useful for the laser electron acceleration project at SLAC and in possible future programs where the fs microbunches are employed for other purposes.

  11. The source of monoenergetic electrons for the monitoring of spectrometer in the KATRIN neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Slezák, Martin

    The international project KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment) is a next-generation tritium $\\beta$-decay experiment. It is designed to measure the electron anti-neutrino mass by means of a unique electron spectrometer with sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c$^2$. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude over the last results. Important part of the measurement will rest in continuous precise monitoring of high voltage of the KATRIN main spectrometer. The monitoring will be done by means of conversion electrons emitted from a solid source based on $^{83}$Rb decay. Properties of several of these sources are studied in this thesis by means of the semiconductor $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. Firstly, measurement of precise energy of the 9.4 keV nuclear transition observed in $^{83}$Rb decay, from which the energy of conversion electrons is derived, is reported. Secondly, measurement of activity distribution of the solid sources by means of the Timepix detector is described. Finally, a report on measurement of r...

  12. Disruption simulation experiment using high-frequency rastering electron beam as the heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, S.; Seki, M.

    1987-01-01

    The disruption is a serious event which possibly reduces the lifetime of plasm interactive components, so the effects of the resulting high heat flux on the wall materials must be clearly identified. The authors performed disruption simulation experiments to investigate melting, evaporation, and crack initiation behaviors using an electron beam facility as the heat source. The facility was improved with a high-frequency beam rastering system which provided spatially and temporally uniform heat flux on wider test surfaces. Along with the experiments, thermal and mechanical analyses were also performed. A two-dimensional disruption thermal analysis code (DREAM) was developed for the analyses

  13. Electronic ground support equipment for the Cluster Electric Field and Wave Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sten, T.A.

    1992-10-01

    In a collaboration between ESA and NASA, ionosphere plasma structures will be studied by four indentical space probes to be launched in 1995 from French Guiana. The Electric Field and Wave (EFW) experiment will be designed to measure electric field and density fluctations by means of four sensors, each deployed on a 50 meter wire boom. In order to perform comprehensive tests and calibrations of the EFW experiment, computer controlled electronic ground support equipment has been developed. This report describes the hardware of the equipment, produced and assembled at the University of Oslo. 15 figs

  14. Reliability data bank in electronics: ITALTEL experience over 10 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turconi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the Italtel Reliability Data Bank experience in electronics after ten years from data bank creation. Technological evolution on systems and equipment have originated a reliability data bank evolution in order to maintain and improve its performances. This paper will describe the concepts employed to design the today data bank features enabling it to be an important Company tool for reliability activities. (orig.)

  15. Neutrino interaction vertex location with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornushkin, Yu.A.; Dmitrievskij, S.G.; Chukanov, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of ν τ appearance from ν μ →ν τ oscillation in a ν μ beam. Description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by the electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  16. Improvements to the YbF electron electric dipole moment experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, B. E.; Rabey, I. M.; Devlin, J. A.; Tarbutt, M. R.; Ho, C. J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The standard model of particle physics predicts that the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron is very nearly zero. Many extensions to the standard model predict an electron EDM just below current experimental limits. We are currently working to improve the sensitivity of the Imperial College YbF experiment. We have implemented combined laser-radiofrequency pumping techniques which both increase the number of molecules which participate in the EDM experiment and also increase the probability of detection. Combined, these techniques give nearly two orders of magnitude increase in the experimental sensitivity. At this enhanced sensitivity magnetic effects which were negligible become important. We have developed a new way to construct the electrodes for electric field plates which minimizes the effect of magnetic Johnson noise. The new YbF experiment is expected to comparable in sensitivity to the most sensitive measurements of the electron EDM to date. We will also discuss laser cooling techniques which promise an even larger increase in sensitivity.

  17. Experiments on Interactions of Electrons with Molecular Ions in Fusion and Astrophysical Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, Mark E [ORNL; Aliabadi, Habib [ORNL; Bahati, Eric [ORNL; Fogle, Mark R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Ehlerding, A. [Stockholm University, Sweden; Geppert, W. [Stockholm University, Sweden; Hellberg, F. [Stockholm University, Sweden; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali [Stockholm University, Sweden; Larsson, Mats [Stockholm University, Sweden; Thomas, Richard D [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Through beam-beam experiments at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the CRYRING heavy ion storage ring at Stockholm University, we are seeking to formulate a more complete picture of electron-impact dissociation of molecular ions. These inelastic collisions play important roles in many low temperature plasmas such as in divertors of fusion devices and in astrophysical environments. An electron-ion crossed beams experiment at ORNL investigates the dissociative excitation and dissociative ionization of molecular ions from a few eV up to 100 eV. Measurements on dissociative recombination (DR) experiments are made at CRYRING, where chemical branching fractions and fragmentation dynamics are studied. Taking advantage of a 250-kV acceleration platform at the MIRF, a merged electron-ion beams energy loss apparatus is employed to study DR down to zero energy. Recent results on the dissociation of molecular ions of importance in fusion and astrophysics are presented.

  18. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of norfloxacin and N-donor mixed-ligand ternary copper(II) complexes: Stability and interaction with SDS micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli Muniz, Gabriel S.; Incio, Jimmy Llontop; Alves, Odivaldo C.; Krambrock, Klaus; Teixeira, Letícia R.; Louro, Sonia R. W.

    2018-01-01

    The stability of ternary copper(II) complexes of a heterocyclic ligand, L (L being 2,2‧-bipyridine (bipy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)) and the fluorescent antibacterial agent norfloxacin (NFX) as the second ligand was studied at pH 7.4 and different ionic strengths. Fluorescence quenching upon titration of NFX with the binary complexes allowed to obtain stability constants for NFX binding, Kb, as a function of ionic strength. The Kb values vary by more than two orders of magnitude when buffer concentration varies from 0.5 to 100 mM. It was observed that previously synthesized ternary complexes dissociate in buffer according with the obtained stability constants. This shows that equimolar solutions of NFX and binary complexes are equivalent to solutions of synthesized ternary complexes. The interaction of the ternary copper complexes with anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) micelles was studied by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Titration of NFX-loaded SDS micelles with the complexes Cu:L allowed to determine the stability constants inside the micelles. Fluorescence quenching demonstrated that SDS micelles increase the stability constants by factors around 50. EPR spectra gave details of the copper(II) local environment, and demonstrated that the structure of the ternary complexes inside SDS micelles is different from that in buffer. Mononuclear ternary complexes formed inside the micelles, while in buffer most ternary complexes are binuclear. The results show that anionic membrane interfaces increase formation of copper fluoroquinolone complexes, which can influence bioavailability, membrane diffusion, and mechanism of action of the antibiotics.

  19. [Electronic parent-child health records--potentials, aims and international experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piso, B; Mathis-Edenhofer, S; Schramm, F; Wild, C

    2014-04-01

    Against the background of a planned re-orientation of the Austrian maternity and child programme, which might include an electronic instead of paper-based realisation, this article aims to give an overview of international pilot projects of electronic parent-child preventive care initiatives (ePCPI) as well as their aims, potentials and constraints. A literature search in databases and hand search for international (pilot) projects was undertaken. 9 of the 30 identified ePCPI can be treated as electronic parent and/or child health records, which have been realised within a comprehensive electronic health record, as an electronic version of a paper-based document or as a centre-based IT solution. Only a few ePCPI use the additional potential of health services planning and evaluation besides core components (e. g., administration of care) and facilitate systemic learning based on feedback and evaluation -cycles. Based on experiences from international ePCPIs some core components of successful planning and implementation, like the definition of aims and their monitoring, the constitution of teams responsible for planning and conception and the early involvement of end-users and stakeholders, should be considered to minimise avoidable mistakes. Consequent technology assessments, including those of IT-based interventions, are required to allow a reflected approach. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  1. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in the 22 MeV Accelerator for a Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Justin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CeC) offers a potential new method of cooling hadron beams in colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the future electron ion collider eRHIC. A 22 MeV linear accelerator is currently being built as part of a proof of principle experiment for CeC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this thesis we present a simulation of electron beam dynamics including space charge in the 22 MeV CeC proof of principle experiment using the program ASTRA (A Space charge TRacking Algorithm).

  2. Deceased donor uterus retrieval: A novel technique and workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, G; Anthony, T; McKenna, G J; Koon, E C; Wallis, K; Klintmalm, G B; Reese, J C; Johannesson, L

    2018-03-01

    Uterus transplantation has proven successful when performed with a living donor. Subsequently, interest in the novel field of reproductive transplantation is growing. The procedure is still considered experimental, with fewer than 25 cases performed worldwide, and the techniques of both uterus procurement and transplantation are still developing. We detail a new approach to deceased donor uterus procurement. In contrast to reported techniques and our own initial experience, in which the deceased donor uterus was procured post cross-clamp and after other organs were procured, our approach now is to perform the uterus procurement prior to the procurement of other organs in a multiorgan donor and hence prior to cross-clamp. We describe our practical experience in developing and implementing the logistical workflow for deceased donor uterus procurement in a deceased multiorgan donor setting. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  3. Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, D.B.

    1988-06-01

    The tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the first experiment to investigate the thermal-barrier tandem-mirror concept. One attractive feature of the tandem magnetic mirror as a commercial power reactor is that the fusion reactions occur in an easily accessible center-cell. On the other hand, complicated end-cells are necessary to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and improved particle confinement of the center-cell plasma. In these end-cells, enhanced confinement is achieved with a particular axial potential profile that is formed with electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRF heating, ECRH). By modifying the loss rates of electrons at spatially distinct locations within the end-cells, the ECRH can tailor the plasma potential profile in the desired fashion. Specifically, the thermal-barrier concept requires generation of a population of energetic electrons near the midplane of each end-cell. To be effective, the transverse (to the magnetic field) spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma must be fairly uniform. In this dissertation we characterize the spatial structure of the ECRH-generated plasma, and determine how the structure builds up in time. Furthermore, the plasma should efficiently absorb the ECRF power, and a large fraction of the electrons must be well confined near the end-cell midplane. Therefore, we also examine in detail the ECRH power balance, determining how the ECRF power is absorbed by the plasma, and the processes through which that power is confined and lost. 43 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs

  4. The Electronic Logbook for the Information Storage of ATLAS Experiment at LHC (ELisA)

    CERN Document Server

    Corso-Radu, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Magnoni, L

    2012-01-01

    A large experiment like ATLAS at LHC (CERN), with over three thousand members and a shift crew of 15 people running the experiment 24/7, needs an easy and reliable tool to gather all the information concerning the experiment development, installation, deployment and exploitation over its lifetime. With the increasing number of users and the accumulation of stored information since the experiment start-up, the electronic logbook actually in use, ATLOG, started to show its limitations in terms of speed and usability. Its monolithic architecture makes the maintenance and implementation of new functionality a hard-to-almost-impossible process. A new tool ELisA has been developed to replace the existing ATLOG. It is based on modern web technologies: the Spring framework using a Model-View-Controller architecture was chosen, thus helping building flexible and easy to maintain applications. The new tool implements all features of the old electronic logbook with increased performance and better graphics: it uses the ...

  5. Learning to work with electronic patient records and prescription charts: experiences and perceptions of hospital pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Angela; O'Rourke, Rebecca; Tully, Mary P

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic patient records (EPR) and electronic prescribing systems (such as electronic patient medication and administration records (EPMAR)) have many benefits. Changes and problems can result, however. Anecdotally, how pharmacists respond to system introduction varies greatly; there is very little information regarding pharmacists' experience in the literature. This study aimed to establish the changes that electronic systems afforded to hospital pharmacists' working practices and to investigate how and why they had responded to EPR and EPMAR. Four semi-structured focus groups were conducted with pharmacists with different levels of seniority, with 4-6 participants in each. The focus groups were held 8 months after implementation of EPR and EPMAR were complete, and each focus group met once. Transcripts were analyzed manually using thematic analysis and data interpreted through the application of Actor Network Theory (ANT) and human activity systems as described in Engestrom's Expansive Learning Theory (ELT). The three main overarching themes identified involved reduced patient contact, professional representation in the clinical environment and documentation in the EPR. Pharmacists felt less visible to, and had poorer relationships with, patients as they no longer saw them when they checked prescriptions. Interprofessional relationships changed as pharmacists provided informal EPMAR training for doctors and spoke more often with nurses to relay important information. Changes in whether, what and how pharmacists recorded information also were seen, particularly between pharmacists of different generations and years of working at the hospital. Analysis of the changes afforded by electronic systems using ANT and ELT suggest that pharmacists develop individual working practices in response to changes that electronic systems provide. For implementation success of EPR and EPMAR systems, pharmacists need to be taught not just the practicalities of system

  6. The effect of tail stretching on the ionospheric accessibility of relativistic electron beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, J.; Johnson, J.; Sanchez, E. R.; Kaganovich, I.; Greklek-McKeon, M.; Powis, T.

    2017-12-01

    New accelerator technologies have made it possible to install a lightweight electron beam accelerator onto small to medium satellites. Electron beams fired along the geomagnetic field would be able to carry energy flux into the ionosphere if they were fired into the loss cone, making these particles observable from the ground. Such an experiment would provide a way to accurately map field lines. One of the important challenges to utilizing this concept is understanding accessibility of these electrons to the ionosphere. While relativistic electron beams are generally more stable than lower energy beams, they are more sensitive to the effects of field-line curvature, which can significantly modify the loss cone [Porazik et al., 2014] making accessibility to the ionosphere sensitive to the launch angle with respect to the magnetic field. We examine the loss cone for 1 MeV electrons in a realistic magnetospheric geometry considering, in particular, the role of field-line stretching. To map the loss cone, we consider conservation of the first adiabatic invariant to second order in ρ/L using the asymptotic series derived by Gardner [Phys Fluids, 1966], which is valid on the midnight meridian. We investigate the loss cones for different magnetic field models controlled by a stretching parameter over the entire midnight meridian. We found that, because tail stretching increases field line curvature near the midplane but decreases curvature elsewhere, accessibility to the ionosphere is increased by tail stretching in regions above and below the midplane, although accessibility of particles passing through the midplane is reduced. This result implies that satellites armed with electron beam accelerators may be able to visibly affect the atmosphere from distances greater than previously anticipated.

  7. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affiniti...

  8. Extraction of High Charge Electron Bunch from the ELSA RF Injector Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J; Binet, A; Lagniel, J M; Le Flanchec, V; Pichoff, N

    2004-01-01

    A new scheme based on a photoinjector and a RF linear accelerator operating at 352 MHz has been recently proposed as a versatile radiographic facility. Beam pulses of 60 ns duration contain 20 succesive electron bunches which will be extracted at 2.5 MeV from a photoinjector then accelerated through the next structure to the final energy of 51 MeV. Bunches carrying 100 nC are required for this purpose. As a first demonstrating step, 50 nC electron bunches have been produced and accelerated to 2.5 MeV with the 144 MHz ELSA photoinjector at Bruyères le Chatel. For this experiment, we compare the results and the numerical simulations made with PARMELA, MAGIC and MAFIA codes.

  9. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in a gas blanket experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuthy, A.

    1979-02-01

    Radial profiles of electron density, temperature and H sub(β) intensity are presented for the rotating plasma device F-1. The hydrogen filling pressure, the average magnetic field strength at the midplane, and the power input to the discharge have been varied in the ranges 10-100 mTorr, 0.25-0.5 Tesla, and 0.1 to 1.5 MW, respectively. These experiments have been performed with the main purpose of studying the gas blanket (cold-mantle) state of the plasma. It is shown, that a simple spectroscopic method can be used to derive the radial distribution of the electron temperature in such plasmas. The observed peak temperatures and densities are in agreement with earlier theoretical estimates. (author)

  10. Subharmonic buncher for the Los Alamos free-electron laser oscillator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    A high efficiency free-electron laser oscillator experiment is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A buncher system has been designed to deliver 30-ps, 5-nC electron bunches to a 20-MeV standing-wave linac at the 60th subharmonic of the 1300-MHz accelerator frequency. The first 108.3-MHz buncher cavity accepts a 5-ns, 5-A peak current pulse from a triode gun. Following a 120-cm drift space, a second 108.3-MHz cavity is used, primarily to enhance the bunching of the trailing half of the bunch. A 1300-MHz cavity with 20-cm drift spaces at the each end completes the beamline components. The bunching process continues into the linac's first three accelerating cells. Two thin iron-shielded lenses and several large-diameter solenoids provide axial magnetic fields for radial focusing

  11. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Fuchs, Silvio; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Zastrau, Ulf; Blinne, Alexander; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Förster, Eckhart

    2013-01-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed

  12. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Blinne, Alexander; Fuchs, Silvio; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Paulus, Gerhard G; Förster, Eckhart; Zastrau, Ulf

    2013-09-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  13. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  14. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  15. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  16. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  17. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  18. Donor transplant programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Sulaiman

    1999-01-01

    The transplantation of organs and tissues from one human to another human has become an essential and well established form of therapy for many types of organ and tissue failure. In Malaysia, kidney, cornea and bone marrow transplantation are well established. Recently, liver, bone and heart transplanation have been performed. Unfortunately, because of the lack of cadaveric organ donation, only a limited number of solid organ transplantation have been performed. The cadaveric organ donor rate in Malaysia is low at less than one per million population. The first tissue transplanted in Malaysia was the cornea which was performed in the early 1970s. At that time and even now the majority of corneas came from Sri Lanka. The first kidney transplant was performed in 1975 from a live related donor. The majority of the 629 kidney transplants done at Hospital Kuala Lumpur to date have been from live related donors. Only 35 were from cadaver donors. Similarly, the liver transplantation programme which started in 1995 are from live related donors. A more concerted effort has been made recently to increase the awareness of the public and the health professionals on organ and tissue donation. This national effort to promote organ and tissue donation seems to have gathered momentum in 1997 with the first heart transplant successfully performed at the National Heart Institute. The rate of cadaveric donors has also increased from a previous average of I to 2 per year to 6 per year in the last one year. These developments are most encouraging and may signal the coming of age of our transplantati on programme. The Ministry of Health in conjunction with various institutions, organizations and professional groups, have taken a number of proactive measures to facilitate the development of the cadaveric organ donation programme. Efforts to increase public awareness and to overcome the negative cultural attitude towards organ donation have been intensified. Equally important are efforts

  19. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  20. Perampanel: An audit of clinical experience using the epilepsy electronic patient record.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, E

    2016-07-01

    Perampanel is a non-competitive antagonist of AMPA glutamate receptors on post synaptic neurons. The aim of this study was to conduct an audit of the experience of perampanel treatment in Ireland based on the interrogation of the national epilepsy electronic patient record (EPR). A retrospective audit was compiled which reviewed the progress of patients who had been treated across two regional epilepsy centres. The EPR was used to identify patients and collect information relevant to their perampanel therapy. Collected data was entered into a statistical package for social sciences for analysis using descriptive statistics.\\r\

  1. Thermodynamic and Spectrophotometric Studies of Electron Donor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry,. University of Nigeria, Nsukka 41001, Nigeria. *For correspondence: E-mail: philuzor4u@yahoo.com; Tel: +234-803-7008 294. Received: 10 May 2012. Revised accepted: 29 January 2013.

  2. Thermodynamic and Spectrophotometric Studies of Electron Donor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermodynamic results show that as temperature changed from 30 to 70 °C, enthalpy change (ÄH) was steady at -0.254 kcal.mol-1 while the free energy (ÄG) changed from -3.904 to -4.450 kcal.mol-1. The complex appeared to be more stable at the slightly elevated temperature of 50 °C with a value of 757.14 mol-1.

  3. Pressure dependence of donor excitation spectra in AlSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, L.; McCluskey, M.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2002-01-16

    We have investigated the behavior of ground to bound excited-state electronic transitions of Se and Te donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Using broadband far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, we observe qualitatively different behaviors of the electronic transition energies of the two donors. While the pressure derivative of the Te transition energy is small and constant, as might be expected for a shallow donor, the pressure derivatives of the Se transition energies are quadratic and large at low pressures, indicating that Se is actually a deep donor. In addition, at pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, we observe evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the selenium electronic transitions and a two-phonon mode.

  4. Front-End-Electronics Communication software for multiple detectors in the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bablok, Sebastian; Hartung, G; Keidel, R; Kofler, C; Krawutschke, T; Lindenstruth, V; Röhrich, D

    2006-01-01

    In the ALICE experiment at CERN, the Detector Control System (DCS) employs several interacting software components to accomplish its task of ensuring the correct operation and monitoring of the experiment. This paper describes the Front-End-Electronics Communication (FeeCommunication) software and its role within the DCS. The FeeCommunication software's central task is passing configuration and monitoring data between the top level DCS process control and the field devices of several detectors within ALICE. The lowest level of the FeeCommunication software runs on the DCS boards, specialized embedded systems which are in direct contact with the field devices and are physically located within the detector. The middle and upper layers run on standard PC hardware located in the counting room or other external locations. This paper focuses on the design and implementation of the FeeCommunication software and the steps that were taken to fulfill the imposed reliability and performance requirements, specifically th...

  5. Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide: a successful exercise in international cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, M; van Leeuwen, A; vd Zanden, H G; van Rood, J J

    1994-07-01

    Bone marrow transplantation using unrelated donors has become a clinical reality but a large number of challenges remain. One of the most important and a crucial one is locating a suitable donor. To cope with this very large registries have been formed but each of these lacks donors with phenotypes which occur in other registries. To facilitate the search process a collation system designated Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW) was started. Several times a year it collects the phenotypes of all donors from all participating registries on a worldwide basis. The data are sorted by phenotype number of the broad antigens; the splits are specified immediately after the broad phenotypes. Here the experience with the first 11 editions is summarized. Although there is a steady increase in the numbers of donors and phenotypes included in BMDW, origin.

  6. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre Anuar I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  7. Stability of Organ Donor Designations on Driver's Licenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, N K R; Sullivan, C; Figueroa, M; Pencak, J A; Thornton, J D

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the stability of decisions that people make to be organ donors. We sought to determine the rate of stability of organ donor designations on driver's licenses. With the use of a cross-sectional study design, we reviewed the health records of 2500 randomly selected primary-care patients at a large urban safety-net medical system to obtain their demographic and medical characteristics. We also examined the two most recent unique driver's licenses, state identification cards, or learner's permits that were scanned into electronic health records as part of the patient registration process. We obtained organ donor designations from these documents for each patient. Of all patients, 1174 (47%) had two driver's licenses, identification cards, or permits in their electronic medical records. The two documents were issued an average of 3.5 years apart. Overall, 114 (10%) patients had differing organ donor designations on their two documents. Among the 502 patients who were designated as organ donors on the first document, 32 (6%) were not designated as organ donors on the second document. Among the 672 patients who were not designated as organ donors on the first document, 82 (12%) were designated as organ donors on the second document. There was little relationship between stability of organ donor designations and patient demographic and medical characteristics. About 1 of every 10 patients changed their organ donor designation, but stability was not associated with any demographic or medical factors. Further work is needed to understand why individuals change their organ donor designation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Tian [Iowa State U.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  9. Study of neutrino interactions with the electronic detectors of the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N.; Altinok, O.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bagulya, A.; Bendhabi, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugiere, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunet, F.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chukanov, A.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Dal Corso, F.; De Lellis, G.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Declais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Egorov, O.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Favier, J.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Gollnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Goncharova, L.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guler, A.M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamada, K.; Hara, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Ishida, H.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kazuyama, K.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Kubota, H.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Lippi, I.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P.; Lutter, G.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Mannai, K.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, P.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nikitina, V.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olchevski, A.; Paniccia, M.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pretzl, K.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tran, T.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C.S.; Yoshioka, T.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2011-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is based on a hybrid technology combining electronic detectors and nuclear emulsions. OPERA collected muon-neutrino interactions during the 2008 and 2009 physics runs of the CNGS neutrino beam, produced at CERN with an energy range of about 5-35 GeV. A total of $5.3 \\times 10^{19}$ protons on target equivalent luminosity has been analysed with the OPERA electronic detectors: scintillator strips target trackers and magnetic muon spectrometers equipped with resistive plate gas chambers and drift tubes, allowing a detailed reconstruction of muon-neutrino interactions. Charged Current (CC) and Neutral Current (NC) interactions are identified, using the measurements in the electronic detectors, and the NC/CC ratio is computed. The momentum distribution and the charge of the muon tracks produced in CC interactions are analysed. Calorimetric measurements of the visible energy are performed for both the CC and NC samples. For CC events the Bjorken-$y$ distribution and the hadronic shower profile ...

  10. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto [Collider Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  11. Response in electrostatic analyzers due to backscattered electrons: case study analysis with the Juno Jovian Auroral Distribution Experiment-Electron instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G; Allegrini, F; Randol, B M; McComas, D J; Louarn, P

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we introduce a model to characterize electron scattering in an electrostatic analyzer. We show that electrons between 0.5 and 30 keV scatter from internal surfaces to produce a response up to ~20% of the ideal, unscattered response. We compare our model results to laboratory data from the Jovian Auroral Distribution Experiment-Electron sensor onboard the NASA Juno mission. Our model reproduces the measured energy-angle response of the instrument well. Understanding and quantifying this scattering process is beneficial to the analysis of scientific data as well as future instrument optimization.

  12. Electron Microscopy Studies, Surface Analysis and Microbial Culturing Experiments on a Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, J. K. W.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Griffin, C.; Whitby, C.; Avci, R.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Combined electron microscopy studies and culturing experiments have shown that Nakhla became contaminated with recent terrestrial microorganisms. Additional surface analysis detected an as yet unknown organic species which may represent a biomarker.

  13. Bridging experiment and theory: a template for unifying NMR data and electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M L; Cho, Herman; de Jong, Wibe A

    2016-01-01

    The testing of theoretical models with experimental data is an integral part of the scientific method, and a logical place to search for new ways of stimulating scientific productivity. Often experiment/theory comparisons may be viewed as a workflow comprised of well-defined, rote operations distributed over several distinct computers, as exemplified by the way in which predictions from electronic structure theories are evaluated with results from spectroscopic experiments. For workflows such as this, which may be laborious and time consuming to perform manually, software that could orchestrate the operations and transfer results between computers in a seamless and automated fashion would offer major efficiency gains. Such tools also promise to alter how researchers interact with data outside their field of specialization by, e.g., making raw experimental results more accessible to theorists, and the outputs of theoretical calculations more readily comprehended by experimentalists. An implementation of an automated workflow has been developed for the integrated analysis of data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and electronic structure calculations. Kepler (Altintas et al. 2004) open source software was used to coordinate the processing and transfer of data at each step of the workflow. This workflow incorporated several open source software components, including electronic structure code to compute NMR parameters, a program to simulate NMR signals, NMR data processing programs, and others. The Kepler software was found to be sufficiently flexible to address several minor implementation challenges without recourse to other software solutions. The automated workflow was demonstrated with data from a [Formula: see text] NMR study of uranyl salts described previously (Cho et al. in J Chem Phys 132:084501, 2010). The functional implementation of an automated process linking NMR data with electronic structure predictions demonstrates that modern software

  14. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  15. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  16. Experiences with electronic health records: early adopters in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Barbara J; Ford, Eric W; Peterson, Lori T

    2011-01-01

    : Electronic health records (EHRs) are becoming a required technology across the health care sector. Long-term care (LTC) facilities have lagged other settings in adopting health information technologies but represent an area where significant care coordination benefits might be realized. Nevertheless, managers face many of the same challenges implementing EHRs that exist in other environments when implementing enterprise-wide systems. : This study was conducted to provide a description of the early users' experiences with EHRs in LTC facilities. : Semistructured interviews were conducted. The 10 sites were all the "freestanding" LTC facilities using an EHR as of July 2008 in Texas. The interview respondents included administrators, nursing managers, nurses, certified nurse aides, and other system users. Semistructured interviews across multiple stakeholders were used to assess constructs critical to EHR adoption and implementation. : The LTC facility employees who work with EHR systems on a daily basis were positive about their experiences. In particular, operational improvements were achieved through increased access to resident information, cost avoidance, increased documentation accuracy, and implementation of evidence-based practices. : Overall, administrators believed that the systems improved care quality and employee satisfaction and were cost effective and that the EHR made a positive return on investment. Electronic documentation led to both increases in charge capture related to resource utilization group documentation, significant savings in pharmacy waste, and reductions in nursing overtime as medical record management became more automated. Quality improvement came from computer-aided monitoring of the certified nurse aide's attendance to residents' activities of daily living.

  17. A training apartment with electronic aids to daily living: lived experiences of persons with brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Anette; Karlsson, Gunnar; Söderström, Marianne; Tham, Kerstin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how persons with acquired brain damage experienced their 1-week stay in an apartment fitted with electronic aids to daily living (EADL). The study focused on how the individuals adapted to this artificial environment in their performance of daily activities and how their occupational experiences influenced their view of the future. The 11 participants were interviewed on the last day of their rehabilitation period in an EADL-equipped training apartment. The data were collected and analyzed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological (EPP) method. The findings revealed four main characteristics that described an adaptation process that occurred during the week in the EADL-equipped training apartment: plunging into an EADL-equipped environment, "landing" and feeling comfortable with the new environment, incorporating the "new" in daily activities, and "taking-off" for the future. In a short time, the combination of the EADL and the aesthetically attractive environment gave the participants experiences that contributed to a "taking off" for their future life. Findings from this study suggest that, in clinical practice, clients may need initial guidance from the therapists to "land" and feel comfortable in a new environment, like a training apartment, before they can learn how to incorporate new electronic aids in their every day activities.

  18. A Low Cost Implementation of an Existing Hands-on Laboratory Experiment in Electronic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Onime

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In engineering the pedagogical content of most formative programmes includes a significant amount of practical laboratory hands-on activity designed to deliver knowledge acquisition from actual experience alongside traditional face-to-face classroom based lectures and tutorials; this hands-on aspect is not always adequately addressed by current e-learning platforms. An innovative approach to e-learning in engineering, named computer aided engineering education (CAEE is about the use of computer aids for the enhanced, interactive delivery of educational materials in different fields of engineering through two separate but related components; one for classroom and another for practical hands-on laboratory work. The component for hands-on laboratory practical work focuses on the use of mixed reality (video-based augmented reality tools on mobile devices/platforms. This paper presents the computer aided engineering education (CAEE implementation of a laboratory experiment in micro-electronics that highlights some features such as the ability to closely implement an existing laboratory based hands-on experiment with lower associated costs and the ability to conduct the experiment off-line while maintaining existing pedagogical contents and standards.

  19. Observation of TGFs and Relativistic Electron Precipitation in RELEC experiment on-board Vernov Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasyuk, M.I.; Svertilov, S.I.; Bogomolov, V.V.; Garipov, G.K.; Bogomolov, E.A. A.V.; Myagkova, I.N.; Klimov, P.A.; Prokhorov, A.V.; Klimov, S.I.; Grechko, T.V.; Grushin, V.A.; Vavilov, D.I.; Korepanov, V.E.; Belyaev, S.V.; Demidov, A.N.; Ferencz, Cs.; Bodnár, L.; Szegedi, P.; Rothkaehl, H.; Moravski, M.

    2016-01-01

    Experiment “RELEC” on-board satellite Vernov, launched July 2014, contains a suite of scientific instruments including gamma-spectrometer (0.01-3.0 MeV), spectrometer of electrons (0.2-15.0 MeV), UV (300-400 nm) and optic sl (600--800 nm) photometer and imager, radio wave low frequency (0.001 - 40.0 kHz) and high frequency (0.05 - 15.0 MHz) analyzers. Gamma and electron spectrometers were used to study transient events, including terrestrial gamma-flashes (TGFs) and precipitations of relativistic electrons from the Earth magnetosphere with ~15 mcs time resolution. Comparative correlating analysis of the data taken by the on-board instruments were made. First catalogue of TGFs detected by “RELEC” during is presented. Events that are included in this catalogue were selected by criterion of having at least 5 gamma-quanta during the time interval of 1 ms, simultaneously in at least two gamma-spectrometer detectors. TGFs included in this catalogue have a typical duration of about 400 microseconds, and in total contain from 10 to 40 gamma-quanta. For each selected for catalogue TGF candidate, we will show light curve and a correlating data of other instruments of “RELEC” on-board Vernov satellite. Results of observations of trapped, quasi-trapped and precipitated electron flux and spectral variations in different areas in the near-Earth space including low L-shells in wide dynamical range from ~1 up to 104 part/cm2s are discussed in this report. (author)

  20. Cross-border reproductive care for law evasion: a qualitative study into the experiences and moral perspectives of French women who go to Belgium for treatment with donor sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Wannes; Pennings, Guido; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-01-01

    One consequence of the legal diversity in Europe is that legal restrictions on treatments can be evaded by going abroad. Many French lesbian couples and single women are crossing the border to Belgium because they are denied access to treatments with donor sperm at home. This is the first qualitative research study into the experiences and moral perspectives of these women. Between June 2012 and May 2013, 11 lesbian couples and 2 single women were recruited at the department of reproductive medicine at Ghent University Hospital. The data from the semi-structured interviews was analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The results show that these women face several additional challenges to the already difficult process of cross-border treatment. Before they can start the treatment, they can only obtain information from the internet or from stories of friends who also went abroad for treatment with donor sperm. During the treatment, they need to find local clinics or physicians to monitor their cycle. Several women managed to game the French system to ensure partial reimbursement for their treatment when they were successful in finding a physician who was willing to prescribe drugs and perform tests. Most women had difficulties justifying their absence from work. In general these women felt that they were discriminated against and that their rights were not protected because of who they are. In that regard, the lack of legal recognition of the genetically unrelated partner in their country was particularly hard to cope with for the lesbian couples. These women have to develop many different strategies to deal with the difficulties they face during cross-border reproductive care. It is concluded that it is very important that they find a physician who is willing to support them in their 'baby project'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expansion Rate Measurements at Moderate Pressure of Nonneutral Electron Plasmas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Kyle A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Paul, Stephen F.; Belli, Emily A.; Chao, Edward H.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the expansion rate of pure-electron plasmas have been performed on the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) device at background helium gas pressures in the 5 x 10(superscript -8) Torr to 1 x 10(superscript -5) Torr range, where plasma expansion due to electron-neutral collisions dominates over plasma expansion due to trap asymmetries. It is found that the expansion rate, defined as the time rate of change of the particles' mean-square radius, scales approximately linearly with pressure and inversely as the square of the magnetic field strength in this regime, in agreement with classical predictions

  2. The capacitor banks for the text diagnostic neutral beam and electron cyclotron heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelin, K.; Jagger, J.; Baker, M.; Ourou, A.; De Turk, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) has been operational since November of 1980. Since that time, many experimental systems have been added to the machine. Currently, two major experiments are being added to compliment the diagnostics already online. These systems, the Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) and the Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments are described in separate papers. A set of five modular, bipolar capacitor banks are used to power both the DNB and the ECH. The total capacitance of the banks is 92μF. The stored energy is about 500kJ at+or-100kV. The banks are built as five identical, interchangeable modules. One module is adequate to run the DNB. Up to four banks are used to power the ECH. The banks are portable so that they can be moved to the open end of the laboratory for maintenance. This gives much better access for repair work and allows the experiments to continue to run with the remaining banks. Due to budgetary constraints, these banks were constructed in the most economical manner possible consistent with worker safety and long term reliability. The capacitors themselves are on loan from Los Alamos National Labs. They are rated at 1.85μF at 60kV. Our application requires that they be used in a series/parallel configuration with a peak voltage of 50kV each. This paper describes the electrical, mechanical and control design considerations required to achieve a working set of banks

  3. Web based electronic logbook and experiment run database viewer for Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredian, T.W.; Stillerman, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, the scientists and engineers at the Alcator C-Mod experiment at MIT have been recording text entries about the experiments being performed in an electronic logbook. In addition, separate documents such as run plans, run summaries and experimental proposals have been created and stored in a variety of formats in computer files. This information has now been organized and made available via any modern web browser. The new web based interface permits the user to browse through all the logbook entries, run information and even view some key data traces of the experiment. Since this information is being catalogued by Internet search engines, these tools can also be used to quickly locate information. The web based logbook and run information interface provides some additional capabilities. Once logged into the web site, users can add, delete or modify logbook entries directly from their browser. The logbook window on their browser also provides dynamic updating when any new logbook entries are made. There is also live C-Mod operation status information with optional audio announcements available. The user can receive the same state change announcements such as 'entering init' or 'entering pulse' as they would if they were sitting in the C-Mod control room. This paper will describe the functionality of the web based logbook and how it was implemented

  4. Identification of Copper(II) Complexes in Aqueous Solution by Electron Spin Resonance: An Undergraduate Coordination Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micera, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment which examines, through electron spin resonance spectroscopy, complex species formed by cupric and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate ions in aqueous solutions. The experiment is illustrative of several aspects of inorganic and coordination chemistry, including the identification of species…

  5. Technopedagogical Design of Electronic Learning Portfolios: An Experience with Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Díaz Barriga Arceo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article the technopedagogical design of electronic learning portfolios with eighteen undergraduate psychology students is reported. The e-portfolio model is based on the approach of situated learning and authentic assessment, and relies on the metaphors of the portfolio as mirror, map and sonnet. It includes a description of the e-portfolio; the skills and learnings expected of the student; key questions for reflection; minimum input required; the type of evidence or artifacts expected; and the technological resources employed. Examples of the students’ reflections and of the self-assessments and co-assessments performed are provided. The findings suggest that e-learning portfolios enable the recovery and systematization of learning productions and experiences, and can function as a tool for monitoring learning as well as for reflection on the individual’s own professional identity, personal and academic trajectory.

  6. Emittance growth caused by bends in the Los Alamos free-electron laser energy recovery experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimentally transporting the beam from the wiggler to the decelerators in the energy recovery experiment (ERX) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory free-electron laser was more difficult than expected because of the large initial emittance in the beam. This emittance was apparently caused in an early 60 0 achromatic bend. To get this beam through subsequent bends without wall interception, the quadrupole focusing had to be changed from the design amount; as a result, the emittance grew further. This paper discusses various mechanisms for this emittance growth in the 60 0 bend, including effects caused by path changes in the bend resulting from wake-field-induced energy changes of particles in the beam and examines emittance filters, ranging from a simple aperture near a beam crossover to more complicated telescope schemes designed to regain the original emittance before the 60 0 bend

  7. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomae, R., E-mail: rthomae@tlabs.ac.za; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V. [CERN, BE/ABP/HSL, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  8. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  9. First results of the University of Maryland electron beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkung, W.; Loschialpo, P.; Reiser, M.; Suter, J.; Lawson, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of emittance growth in periodically focused intense beams. For initial studies, the electron gun consists of a 1-cm diam., dispenser-type cathode and an anode covered with a wire mesh. To avoid neutralization, 5 /mu/s, 60 Hz pulses are used and the current is 230 mA at 5 kV. By varying the voltage from 10 kV to 500 volts the space charge depression, /omega/sub //omega/sub //o, of the particle oscillation frequencies in the focusing channel can be changed from approximately 0.04 to approximately 0.2. Further increase of /omega/sub //omega/sub //o should be possible with modified guns and the use of emittance control grids. Four prototype solenoids have been built, and the results of experiments with the first two are presented. 8 refs

  10. Phase changes in f-electron metals: discrepancies between experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akella, Jagannadham; Weir, Samuel T.; Ruddle, Chantel

    1997-01-01

    Using a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) phase transformation and equation of state (EOS) at room temperature for some lanthanides and actinides were studied to multimegabar (megabar = 100 GPa) pressures. Experimental data are compared with the theoretically predicted crystal structural changes and the pressure-volume relationships. A generalized trend for the phase transformations in the lanthanides can be seen, which has broad agreement with theory. There is a general agreement between theory and experiment for the structural changes in the lighter actinides, however in detail there are some discrepancies still. We conclude that an accurate and robust theoretical base for predicting the phase transformations in the f-electron metals can be developed by incorporating the DAC data as markers for fine tuning the theory. (author)

  11. Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-fieldquantized slow cesium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Jason M.; Munger Jr., Charles T.; Gould, Harvey.

    2007-04-05

    A proof-of-principle electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM)experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic fields, and electricfield quantization has been performed. With the ambient magnetic fieldsseen by the atoms reduced to less than 200 pT, an electric field of 6MV/m lifts the degeneracy between states of unequal lbar mF rbar and,along with the low (approximately 3 m/s) velocity, suppresses thesystematic effect from the motional magnetic field. The low velocity andsmall residual magnetic field have made it possible to induce transitionsbetween states and to perform state preparation, analysis, and detectionin regions free of applied static magnetic and electric fields. Thisexperiment demonstrates techniques that may be used to improve the e-EDMlimit by two orders of magnitude, but it is not in itself a sensitivee-EDM search, mostly due to limitations of the laser system.

  12. Low voltage powering of on-detector electronics for HL-LHC experiments upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bobillier, Vincent; Vasey, Francois; Karmakar, Sabyasachi; Maity, Manas; Roy, Subhasish; Kundu, Tapas Kumar

    2018-01-01

    All LHC experiments will be upgraded during the next LHC long shutdowns (LS2 and LS3). The increase in resolution and luminosity and the use of more advanced CMOS technology nodes typically implies higher current consumption of the on-detector electronics. In this context, and in view of limiting the cable voltage drop, point-of-load DC-DC converters will be used on detector. This will have a direct impact on the existing powering scheme, implying new AC-DC and/or DC-DC stages as well as changes in the power cabling infrastructure. This paper presents the first results obtained while evaluating different LV powering schemes and distribution layouts for HL-LHC trackers. The precise low voltage power source requirements are being assessed and understood using the CMS tracker upgrade as a use-case.

  13. Parity violation asymmetry in the inelastic electron-proton scattering at the A4 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozza, Luigi; Glaeser, Boris; Mora Espi, Maria Carmen [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Balaguer Rios, David; Diefenbach, Juergen; Imai, Yoshio; Kabuss, Eva-Maria; Lee, Jeong-Han; Schilling, Ernst; Harrach, Dietrich von; Weinrich, Christoph [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Baunack, Sebastian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Maas, Frank [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The A4 experiment at the MAMI accelerator facility at Mainz studies the nucleon structure by measuring single spin asymmetries in the electron-proton scattering. The apparatus was designed for measuring asymmetries in the elastic scattering, separating elastic and inelastic events by measuring the energy of the scattered particles in an homogeneous PbF{sub 2} electromagnetic calorimeter. However, also inelastic events have been recorded during the measurements and contain threshold pion production and Δ(1232) resonance excitation. In order to extract parity violation asymmetries from these data, background contributions to the energy spectrum need to be estimated in MC simulations. An update of the A4 MC containing the contribution of π{sup 0} decay gammas from double-pion production is presented.

  14. Distinguishing between electrons and γ-rays in experiment TGV using a pulse rise time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, P.; Stekl, I.; Benes, P.; Brudanin, V.B.; Rukhadze, N.I.; Egorov, V.G.; Kovalenko, V.E.; Kovalik, A.; Pismennij, R.; Salamatin, A.V.; Timkin, V.; Vylov, Ts.; Venos, D.

    2002-01-01

    The TGV (Telescope Germanium Vertical) collaboration is interested in the measurement of double-beta decay of 48 Ca (TGV I) and 106 Cd (TGV II). The background in the experiment TGV I has been suppressed by several methods. One of them was based on distinguishing between electrons and gamma rays due to the different rise time of the signals obtained from semiconductor detector. Two experimental setups have been tested, the first one used a charge-sensitive analog-to-digital converter, while the second one utilized digital oscilloscope. The reduction of the background counting rate (due to gamma rays) in single HPGe detector by a factor of (1.4-3.8) was reached. (author)

  15. Database and interactive monitoring system for the electronics of RPC muon trigger in CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wiacek, D; Kudla, I; Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2005-01-01

    The main task of the RPC (resistive plate chamber) muon trigger monitoring system design for the CMS (compact muon solenoid) experiment (at LHC in CERN Geneva) is the visualization of data that includes the structure of electronic trigger system (e.g. geometry and imagery), the way of its processes and to generate automatically files with VHDL source code used for programming of the FPGA matrix. In the near future, the system enables the analysis of condition, operation and efficiency of individual muon trigger elements, registration of information about some muon trigger devices and present previously obtained results in interactive presentation layer. A broad variety of different database and programming concepts for design of muon trigger monitoring system was presented in this article.

  16. Universal I/O board for the laser-electron photons experiments at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugaya, Y.; Nomachi, M.

    1999-01-01

    A data acquisition system on the basis of network technologies has been developed for experiments using high-energy photons from backward-Compton scattering between laser lights and 8 GeV electrons at SPring-8. A universal I/O VME-board (UIO) is designed as a buffer-sequencer module with a reconfigurable logic circuit and a 1 Mbyte memory. The UIO is applied as a high-speed module for flexible data readout and buffering. Data from the various detectors are transferred from the UIO to a VME CPU-board in the common format. Altera Hardware Description Language is used to read data from a fast encoding and readout ADC (FERA) system for TOF counters and Cherenkov counters

  17. Triggering on electrons and photons with the CMS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e6. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger (HLT) combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In this intense hadronic environment, the L1 electron/photon trigger provides a powerful tool to select interesting events. It is based upon information from the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL), a high-resolution detector comprising 75848 lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystals in a "barrel" and two "endcaps". The performance as well as the optimization of the ele...

  18. Charged dopants in neutral supercells through substitutional donor (acceptor): nitrogen donor charging of the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Robin; Pawar, Ravinder; Öberg, Sven; Larsson, J. Andreas

    2018-02-01

    Charged defects are traditionally computed by adding (subtracting) electrons for negative (positive) impurities. When using periodic boundary conditions this results in artificially charged supercells that also require a compensating background charge of the opposite sign, which makes slab supercells problematic because of an arbitrary dependence on the vacuum thickness. In this work, we test the method of using neutral supercells through the use of a substitutional electron donor (acceptor) to describe charged systems. We use density functional theory (DFT) to compare the effects of charging the well-studied NV-center in diamond by a substitutional donor nitrogen. We investigate the influence of the donor-N on the NV-center properties as a function of the distance between them, and find that they converge toward those obtained when adding an electron. We analyze the spin density and conclude that the donor-N has a zero magnetic moment, and thus, will not be seen in electron spin resonance. We validate our DFT energies through comparison to GW simulations. Charging the NV-center with a substitutional donor-N enables accurate calculations of slabs, without the ambiguity of using charged supercells. Implantation of donor-N atoms opens up the possibility to engineer NV-centers with the desired charge state for future ICT and sensor applications.

  19. IN-SITU EXPERIMENTS OF VACUUM DISCHARGE USING SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, T; Leifer, K; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of vacuum discharge mechanisms and induced surface damage is indispensable for the CLIC feasibility study. We have been conducting dc sparc experiments inside a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at Uppsala university in order to investigate localized breakdown phenomena. By using a SEM, we achieve the resolution of the electron probe in the few-nm range, which is of great advantage as the surface roughness of the polished accelerating structures is in the same scale. The high accelerating field of 1 GV/m is realized by biasing an electrode with 1 kV set above the sample with a gap of sub μm. Furthermore, a second SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to modify the topography of sample surfaces thus the geometrical dependence of field emissions and vacuum discharges can be studied. The FIB can be used for the surface damage analysis as well. We have demonstrated subsurface damage observations by using FIB to sputter a rectangular recess into the sample in the breakd...

  20. Experiments on electron temperature profile resilience in FTU tokamak with continuous and modulated ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirant, S.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments performed on FTU tokamak, aiming at validation of physics-based transport models of the electron temperature profile resilience, are presented. ECRH is used to probe transport features, both in steady-state and in response to perturbations, while ECCD and LHCD are used for current density profile shaping. Observed confinement behaviour shows agreement with a critical temperature gradient length modelling. Central, low gradient plasma is characterized by low stiffness and low electron thermal diffusivity. Strong stiffness and high conduction are found in the confinement region. Resilience is experimentally characterized by an index of the resistance of the profile to adapt its shape to localized ECRH, while the diffusivity and its low-high transition are measured both by power balance and heat pulse propagation analysis. A particular attention is given to the investigation of the transition layer between low-high diffusivity and low-high stiffness regions. A dependence of LTc on magnetic shear, similar to what found in Tore Supra, and consistent with ETG based anomalous transport, is found. (author)

  1. Electron Bernstein wave emission based diagnostic on National Spherical Torus Experiment (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.; Taylor, G.; Caughman, John B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Preinhaelter, J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Urban, J.

    2008-01-01

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with n(e) up to 10(20) m(-3) and B-T less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for T-e measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local T-e measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust T-e(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of >90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While T-e(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge n(e) scale length resulted in >20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency during H modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when T-e < 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase T-e inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  2. Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Based Diagnostic on National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.; Taylor, G.; Caughman, John B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Preinhaelter, J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Urban, J.; Wilgen, John B.

    2008-01-01

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with n(e) up to 10(20) m(-3) and B(T) less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for T(e) measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local T(e) measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust T(e)(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of >90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While T(e)(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge n(e) scale length resulted in >20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency during H modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when T(e)< 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase T(e) inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  3. Oocyte cryopreservation for donor egg banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Ana; Remohí, José; Chang, Ching-Chien; Nagy, Zsolt Peter

    2011-09-01

    . In the present manuscript, the current experience with oocyte donation using cryopreservation technology is reviewed. The outcomes of two recently established donor egg cryobanks at Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad in Spain and Reproductive Biology Associates in the USA (involving a large number of cases) demonstrate that egg cryo-survival is high and that fertilization, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy rates are similar to those reported after fresh egg donation. It also provides additional advantages of being more efficient, more economical, easier for both donors and recipients and potentially also safer, because eggs can now be quarantined for 6 months (or longer) to retest for infectious diseases in the donors. It is the opinion of the authors, based on several advantages associated with the use of donor egg cryobanking, that in the future there will be fewer traditional egg donations and increasingly more cryo-egg donations. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Suitability of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a feed batch operating bio-electrochemical system; Idoneidad del agua de lavado de aceites de oliva como donador de electrones en un sistema alimentado por lotes bioelectroquímico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermoso, F.G.; Fernández-Rodríguez, M.J.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, A.; Serrano, A.; Borja, R.

    2017-07-01

    Olive oil washing water derived from the two-phase manufacturing process was assessed as an electron donor in a bio-electrochemical system (BES) operating at 35 ºC. Start-up was carried out by using acetate as a substrate for the BES, reaching a potential of around +680 mV. After day 54, BES was fed with olive oil washing water. The degradation of olive oil washing water in the BES generated a maximum voltage potential of around +520 mV and a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency of 41%. However, subsequent loads produced a decrease in the COD removal, while current and power density diminished greatly. The deterioration of these parameters could be a consequence of the accumulation of recalcitrant or inhibitory compounds, such as phenols. These results demonstrated that the use of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a BES is feasible, although it has to be further investigated in order to make it more suitable for a real application. [Spanish] El agua de lavado del aceite de oliva procedente del proceso de elaboración en dos fases fue utilizada como donador de electrones en un Sistema Bioelectroquímico (BES) operado a 35ºC. Se realizó una etapa de arranque del sistema mediante alimentación con acetato, alcanzando un potencial de referencia de +680 mV. Tras 54 días, el sistema se alimentó con agua de lavado de aceite, generando un potencial máximo de +520 mV y una eliminación de materia del 41%, en demanda química de oxígeno. Sin embargo, cargas subsecuentes conllevaron una bajada en la eliminación de materia, mientras que la densidad de corriente y de potencia disminuyeron ostensiblemente. El empeoramiento de estos parámetros puede deberse a la acumulación de compuestos recalcitrantes o inhibidores, como fenoles. Por tanto, el uso del agua de lavado de aceite de oliva en un BES es factible, aunque es necesario llevar a cabo nuevas investigaciones que hagan más atractiva su aplicación a escala real.

  5. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  6. Angle selective backscattered electron contrast in the low-voltage scanning electron microscope: Simulation and experiment for polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Q., E-mail: qwan2@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Masters, R.C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Lidzey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Abrams, K.J. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Dapor, M. [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT-FBK) and Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications (TIFPA-INFN), via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Plenderleith, R.A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Rimmer, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Claeyssens, F.; Rodenburg, C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Recently developed detectors can deliver high resolution and high contrast images of nanostructured carbon based materials in low voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEM) with beam deceleration. Monte Carlo Simulations are also used to predict under which exact imaging conditions purely compositional contrast can be obtained and optimised. This allows the prediction of the electron signal intensity in angle selective conditions for back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging in LVSEM and compares it to experimental signals. Angle selective detection with a concentric back scattered (CBS) detector is considered in the model in the absence and presence of a deceleration field, respectively. The validity of the model prediction for both cases was tested experimentally for amorphous C and Cu and applied to complex nanostructured carbon based materials, namely a Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate (PNIPAM/PEGDA) semi-interpenetration network (IPN) and a Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) film, to map nano-scale composition and crystallinity distribution by avoiding experimental imaging conditions that lead to a mixed topographical and compositional contrast - Highlights: • An optimised model for nano-scale analysis of beam sensitive materials by LVSEM. • Simulation and separation of composition and topography in a CBS detector. • Selective angle backscattered electron collection for mapping of polymers.

  7. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  8. Donor attention to reading materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S F; Osmond, L; Choquet, K; Yi, Q-L; Goldman, M

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory predonation reading materials inform donors about risk factors for transmissible disease, possible complications of donation and changes to the donation process. We aimed to assess the attention to predonation reading materials and factors which may affect attention. A national survey in 2008 of 18,108 blood donors asked about self-assessed attention to reading the materials. In face-to-face interviews, 441 donors completed additional questions about reading the materials and a literacy test. Qualitative interviews of 27 donors assessed their approach to reading. In the national survey, most of the first-time donors said they read all or most of the materials (90.9% first-time vs. 57.6% repeat donors, P reading them carefully (P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read, most knew that donors are informed of positive transmissible disease test results (97.1%, 95.5, 98.0 P > 0.05), but fewer recalled seeing the definition of sex (77.2%, 56.9, 24.2 P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read were compared (P > 0.05). Qualitative interviews showed that donors are reluctant to read any more than necessary and decide based on perceived importance or relevance. Attention to predonation reading materials tends to be better among first-time donors. The effectiveness is limited by low motivation to read, especially for repeat donors, as well as poor literacy. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. High-resolution noncontact AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy investigations of self-assembled photovoltaic donor-acceptor dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grévin, Benjamin; Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Biniek, Laure; Brinkmann, Martin; Leclerc, Nicolas; Zaborova, Elena; Méry, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads are used as model nanostructured heterojunctions for local investigations by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). With the aim to probe the photo-induced charge carrier generation, thin films deposited on transparent indium tin oxide substrates are investigated in dark conditions and upon illumination. The topographic and contact potential difference (CPD) images taken under dark conditions are analysed in view of the results of complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments. After in situ annealing, it is shown that the dyads with longer donor blocks essentially lead to standing acceptor-donor lamellae, where the acceptor and donor groups are π-stacked in an edge-on configuration. The existence of strong CPD and surface photo-voltage (SPV) contrasts shows that structural variations occur within the bulk of the edge-on stacks. SPV images with a very high lateral resolution are achieved, which allows for the resolution of local photo-charging contrasts at the scale of single edge-on lamella. This work paves the way for local investigations of the optoelectronic properties of donor-acceptor supramolecular architectures down to the elementary building block level.

  10. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-06-24

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  11. Studies of scintillator optical properties, electronics simulation and data analysis for the BOREXINO neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewke, Timo

    2013-10-18

    Borexino is a state-of-the-art low-energy neutrino detector. Many results, like the first real-time measurement of {sup 7}Be neutrinos and the detection of pep neutrinos, could be reported. However, still some parts of the solar neutrino spectrum remain unseen. With a better detector understanding and monitoring these unexploited regions could be investigated. The results achieved in course of the present thesis account for accomplishing these improvements. First, the ionization quenching for electrons in liquid scintillators is investigated using a specially designed and build experiment. This effect is especially interesting for low-energy events and, therefore, has a direct influence on the possibility to detect CNO and pp neutrinos. With a coincidence circuit and the properties of Compton scattering the quenching is analysed. Further, the so-called Birks factor kB is measured for the scintillator used in the running Borexino experiment. As the Birks factor is also an important input parameter to simulations of the future large scale neutrino experiment LENA, the Birks factor of LENA's most probable scintillator is determined as well. Second, as muons are responsible for a large amount of background, an excellent working muon veto is essential. During this thesis, it was achieved to monitor the muon tagging stability and efficiency for a long period of time. Further, to verify the muon track reconstruction Monte Carlo simulations are needed. For the Inner Detector of Borexino the simulation is fully operable. In course of this thesis the complete electronics system of the Outer Detector is included into the simulation tool. In this way, a functioning simulation mimicking real physical events is generated. In addition, the output of the simulation can now be accessed and evaluated by the normal data handling system of Borexino. A comparison to real data and, therefore, validating the muon track reconstruction is now possible. Last, to check the neutron

  12. Studies of scintillator optical properties, electronics simulation and data analysis for the BOREXINO neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewke, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Borexino is a state-of-the-art low-energy neutrino detector. Many results, like the first real-time measurement of 7 Be neutrinos and the detection of pep neutrinos, could be reported. However, still some parts of the solar neutrino spectrum remain unseen. With a better detector understanding and monitoring these unexploited regions could be investigated. The results achieved in course of the present thesis account for accomplishing these improvements. First, the ionization quenching for electrons in liquid scintillators is investigated using a specially designed and build experiment. This effect is especially interesting for low-energy events and, therefore, has a direct influence on the possibility to detect CNO and pp neutrinos. With a coincidence circuit and the properties of Compton scattering the quenching is analysed. Further, the so-called Birks factor kB is measured for the scintillator used in the running Borexino experiment. As the Birks factor is also an important input parameter to simulations of the future large scale neutrino experiment LENA, the Birks factor of LENA's most probable scintillator is determined as well. Second, as muons are responsible for a large amount of background, an excellent working muon veto is essential. During this thesis, it was achieved to monitor the muon tagging stability and efficiency for a long period of time. Further, to verify the muon track reconstruction Monte Carlo simulations are needed. For the Inner Detector of Borexino the simulation is fully operable. In course of this thesis the complete electronics system of the Outer Detector is included into the simulation tool. In this way, a functioning simulation mimicking real physical events is generated. In addition, the output of the simulation can now be accessed and evaluated by the normal data handling system of Borexino. A comparison to real data and, therefore, validating the muon track reconstruction is now possible. Last, to check the neutron tagging, CNGS

  13. Electron Dynamics of the Rod-Pinch Diode in the Cygnus Experiment at Los Alamos

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Lin; Bowers, Kevin; Carlson, R; De Volder, B G; Kwan, Thomas J T; Smith, J R; Snell, C M

    2005-01-01

    In this work, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are used to examine the electron physics in the rod-pinch diode, a device that can be used to produce a relatively low-energy (a few MeV) radiographic electron source. It is found that with diode parameters for which the electrons' dominant dynamics are approximated well as a magnetized fluid, the diode produces an electron source with a desired small spot size as the electrons drift to and impinge on the anode tip. However, for a large cathode-to-anode radius ratio, a population of electrons that consists predominantly of electrons emitted from the downstream surface of the cathode is found to propagate in the upstream direction and the diode may perform anomalously as a consequence. A method is proposed for improving the quality of the electron source by suppressing electron emission from the downstream cathode surface to reduce the presence of unmagnetized electrons.

  14. Angle selective backscattered electron contrast in the low-voltage scanning electron microscope: Simulation and experiment for polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Q; Masters, R C; Lidzey, D; Abrams, K J; Dapor, M; Plenderleith, R A; Rimmer, S; Claeyssens, F; Rodenburg, C

    2016-12-01

    Recently developed detectors can deliver high resolution and high contrast images of nanostructured carbon based materials in low voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEM) with beam deceleration. Monte Carlo Simulations are also used to predict under which exact imaging conditions purely compositional contrast can be obtained and optimised. This allows the prediction of the electron signal intensity in angle selective conditions for back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging in LVSEM and compares it to experimental signals. Angle selective detection with a concentric back scattered (CBS) detector is considered in the model in the absence and presence of a deceleration field, respectively. The validity of the model prediction for both cases was tested experimentally for amorphous C and Cu and applied to complex nanostructured carbon based materials, namely a Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate (PNIPAM/PEGDA) semi-interpenetration network (IPN) and a Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) film, to map nano-scale composition and crystallinity distribution by avoiding experimental imaging conditions that lead to a mixed topographical and compositional contrast. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of secondary electrons in some experiments determining fluorescence emission from nitrogen C3Πu levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Arqueros, F.

    2005-01-01

    The processes involved in fluorescence emission from C 3 Π u levels of N 2 molecule by electron impact are studied. Secondary electrons are shown to play an important role in typical experiments for the measurement of emission cross sections and fluorescence yields, dominating at high impact energies. A simple model is proposed which accounts for fluorescence measurements in a wide range of experimental conditions, and in particular for some recent results up to 1 GeV energies

  16. A new electron linac for pulse radiolysis experiments at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.

    1990-01-01

    A new electron accelerator LAE 10 is under construction at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. This facility will be dedicated to pulse radiolysis and related experiments. The basic parameters of the linac are the following: electron energy 10 MeV, pulse durations 10-100 ns, peak current 10-2 A respectively. Accelerator structure traveling wave type powered by klystron operated at a frequency 1818 MHz is applied. (author)

  17. A new electron linac for pulse radiolysis experiments at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimek, Z.

    A new electron accelerator LAE 10 is under construction at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. This facility will be dedicated to pulse radiolysis and related experiments. The basic parameters of the linac are the following: electron energy 10 MeV, pulse durations 10-100 ns, peak current 10-2 A respectively. Accelerator structure traveling wave type powered by klystron operated at a frequency 1818 MHz is applied.

  18. Electronic structure of palladium-hydrogen and palladium-deuterium from de Haas-van Alphen experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed experimental study of the electronic structure of a transition metal-hydrogen interstitial alloy is presented in this thesis. Data on the Fermi surface and on the electron scattering rates of palladium-hydrogen and palladium-deuterium are obtained from de Haas-van Alphen experiments using a torque balance spectrometer and a field modulation spectrometer. The present results suggest that the isotope effect observed in the superconductive transition temperature of concentrated PdH(D)sub(x) is, at least partly, due to a difference in the electronic structure of PdHsub(x) compared to that of PdDsub(x). (Auth.)

  19. Lower hybrid heating data on the Wega experiment revisited using ion stochastic heating and electron Landau damping theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormezano, C.; Hess, W.; Ichtchenko, G.

    1980-07-01

    The already obtained data on the Wega Tokamak by lower hybrid heating (f=500 MHz - Psub(HF)=130 KW) are revisited in the light of recent theories on ion stochastic heating and quasi-linear electron Landau damping. It is possible to correctly estimate with these theories the fast ion mean energy, the H.F. power density coupled to the ions and that coupled to the electrons. The values of the parallel index of refraction, Nsub(//), which are necessary to obtain a good quantitative agreement between experiment and theoretical estimates, are the same for the ions and for the electrons, even though at higher values than expected

  20. Physicians’ experience adopting the electronic transfer of care communication tool: barriers and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Grood C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloe de Grood, Katherine Eso, Maria Jose Santana Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess physicians' perceptions on a newly developed electronic transfer of care (e-TOC communication tool and identify barriers and opportunities toward its adoption. Participants and methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching center as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an e-TOC communication tool. The e-TOC technology was developed through iterative consultation with stakeholders. This e-TOC summary was populated by acute care physicians (AcPs and communicated electronically to community care physicians (CcPs. The AcPs consisted of attending physicians, resident trainees, and medical students rotating through the Medical Teaching Unit. The CcPs were health care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital to the community. AcPs and CcPs completed validated surveys assessing their experience with the newly developed e-TOC tool. Free text questions were added to gather general comments from both groups of physicians. Units of analysis were individual physicians. Data from the surveys were analyzed using mixed methods. Results: AcPs completed 138 linked pre- and post-rotation surveys. At post-rotation, each AcP completed an average of six e-TOC summaries, taking an average of 37 minutes per e-TOC summary. Over 100 CcPs assessed the quality of the TOC summaries, with an overall rating of 8.3 (standard deviation: 1.48; on a scale of 1–10. Thematic analyses revealed barriers and opportunities encountered by physicians toward the adoption of the e-TOC tool. While the AcPs highlighted issues with timeliness, usability, and presentation, the CcPs identified barriers accessing the web-based TOC summaries, emphasizing that the summaries were timely and the

  1. Physicians' experience adopting the electronic transfer of care communication tool: barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grood, Chloe; Eso, Katherine; Santana, Maria Jose

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess physicians' perceptions on a newly developed electronic transfer of care (e-TOC) communication tool and identify barriers and opportunities toward its adoption. The study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching center as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an e-TOC communication tool. The e-TOC technology was developed through iterative consultation with stakeholders. This e-TOC summary was populated by acute care physicians (AcPs) and communicated electronically to community care physicians (CcPs). The AcPs consisted of attending physicians, resident trainees, and medical students rotating through the Medical Teaching Unit. The CcPs were health care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital to the community. AcPs and CcPs completed validated surveys assessing their experience with the newly developed e-TOC tool. Free text questions were added to gather general comments from both groups of physicians. Units of analysis were individual physicians. Data from the surveys were analyzed using mixed methods. AcPs completed 138 linked pre- and post-rotation surveys. At post-rotation, each AcP completed an average of six e-TOC summaries, taking an average of 37 minutes per e-TOC summary. Over 100 CcPs assessed the quality of the TOC summaries, with an overall rating of 8.3 (standard deviation: 1.48; on a scale of 1-10). Thematic analyses revealed barriers and opportunities encountered by physicians toward the adoption of the e-TOC tool. While the AcPs highlighted issues with timeliness, usability, and presentation, the CcPs identified barriers accessing the web-based TOC summaries, emphasizing that the summaries were timely and the quality of information supported continuity of care. Despite the barriers identified by both groups of physicians, the e-TOC communication tool was well received. Our experience can serve as a template for other health research teams considering the implementation

  2. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  3. Pharmacy Customers’ Experiences With Electronic Prescriptions: Cross-Sectional Survey on Nationwide Implementation in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Johanna; Ahonen, Riitta

    2018-01-01

    Background One of the forerunners in electronic health, Finland has introduced electronic prescriptions (ePrescriptions) nationwide by law. This has led to significant changes for pharmacy customers. Despite the worldwide ambition to develop ePrescription services, there are few reports of nationally adopted systems and particularly on the experiences of pharmacy customers. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate Finnish pharmacy customers’ (1) experiences with purchasing medicines with ePrescriptions; (2) experiences with renewing ePrescriptions and acting on behalf of someone else at the pharmacy; (3) ways in which customers keep up to date with their ePrescriptions; and (4) overall satisfaction with ePrescriptions. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to 2913 pharmacy customers aged ≥18 years purchasing prescription medicines for themselves with an ePrescription in 18 community pharmacies across Finland in autumn 2015. Customers’ experiences were explored with 10 structured questions. The data were stored in SPSS for Windows and subjected to descriptive analysis, chi-square, Fisher exact, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, the Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results Completed questionnaires were returned by 1288 customers, a response rate of 44.19% (1288/2913). The majority of the respondents did not encounter any problems during pharmacy visits (1161/1278, 90.85%) and were informed about the current status of their ePrescriptions after their medication was dispensed (1013/1276, 79.44%). Over half of the respondents had usually received a patient instruction sheet from their physician (752/1255, 59.92%), and nearly all of them regarded its content as clear (711/724, 98.2%). Half of the respondents had renewed their ePrescriptions through the pharmacy (645/1281, 50.35%), and one-third of them had acted on behalf of someone else with ePrescriptions (432/1280, 33.75%). Problems were rarely encountered in the renewal process (49/628, 7.8%) or when

  4. Pharmacy Customers' Experiences With Electronic Prescriptions: Cross-Sectional Survey on Nationwide Implementation in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämsä, Elina; Timonen, Johanna; Ahonen, Riitta

    2018-02-23

    One of the forerunners in electronic health, Finland has introduced electronic prescriptions (ePrescriptions) nationwide by law. This has led to significant changes for pharmacy customers. Despite the worldwide ambition to develop ePrescription services, there are few reports of nationally adopted systems and particularly on the experiences of pharmacy customers. The aim of this study was to investigate Finnish pharmacy customers' (1) experiences with purchasing medicines with ePrescriptions; (2) experiences with renewing ePrescriptions and acting on behalf of someone else at the pharmacy; (3) ways in which customers keep up to date with their ePrescriptions; and (4) overall satisfaction with ePrescriptions. Questionnaires were distributed to 2913 pharmacy customers aged ≥18 years purchasing prescription medicines for themselves with an ePrescription in 18 community pharmacies across Finland in autumn 2015. Customers' experiences were explored with 10 structured questions. The data were stored in SPSS for Windows and subjected to descriptive analysis, chi-square, Fisher exact, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, the Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Completed questionnaires were returned by 1288 customers, a response rate of 44.19% (1288/2913). The majority of the respondents did not encounter any problems during pharmacy visits (1161/1278, 90.85%) and were informed about the current status of their ePrescriptions after their medication was dispensed (1013/1276, 79.44%). Over half of the respondents had usually received a patient instruction sheet from their physician (752/1255, 59.92%), and nearly all of them regarded its content as clear (711/724, 98.2%). Half of the respondents had renewed their ePrescriptions through the pharmacy (645/1281, 50.35%), and one-third of them had acted on behalf of someone else with ePrescriptions (432/1280, 33.75%). Problems were rarely encountered in the renewal process (49/628, 7.8%) or when acting on behalf of another person (25

  5. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  6. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tingjun [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  7. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients.

  8. International collaborative donor project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Zambudio, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    The International Donor Collaborative Project (PCID) research group was created in 1996 in Spain with the aim of promoting research in the field of organ donation and transplantation, led by Spanish surgeons. During this period they have developed the questionnaires of the PCID, both the attitude towards cadaver and live donation, which are the most used questionnaires in publications in indexed journals. They have been the driving group of stratified studies representative of the populations under study, and of the performance of multivariate statistical analyzes in the field of psycho-social research in organ donation and transplantation. The main contributions of the group focus on the analysis of health center professionals and emerging migrant groups. In recent years, studies have been extended to the United States, Latin America (mainly Mexico) and Europe. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Electronic Health Record (EHR) Organizational Change: Explaining Resistance Through Profession, Organizational Experience, and EHR Communication Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ashley K

    2018-04-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act passed by the U.S. government in 2009 mandates that all healthcare organizations adopt a certified electronic health record (EHR) system by 2015. Failure to comply will result in Medicare reimbursement penalties, which steadily increase with each year of delinquency. There are several repercussions of this seemingly top-down, rule-bound organizational change-one of which is employee resistance. Given the penalties for violating EHR meaningful use standards are ongoing, resistance to this mandate presents a serious issue for healthcare organizations. This study surveyed 345 employees in one healthcare organization that recently implemented an EHR. Analysis of variance results offer theoretical and pragmatic contributions by demonstrating physicians, nurses, and employees with more experience in their organization are the most resistant to EHR change. The job characteristics model is used to explain these findings. Hierarchical regression analyses also demonstrate the quality of communication surrounding EHR implementation-from both formal and informal sources-is negatively associated with EHR resistance and positively associated with perceived EHR implementation success and EHR's perceived relative advantage.

  10. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Ruth B. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Pembroke College

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  11. Development of a tool to measure user experience following electronic health record implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Montgomery, Donna Cook; Philpot, Lindsey M; Barnes, Sunni A; Compton, Jan; Kennerly, Donald

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a survey tool to assess electronic health record (EHR) implementation to guide improvement initiatives. Survey tools are needed for ongoing improvement and have not been developed for aspects of EHR implementation. The Baylor EHR User Experience (UX) survey was developed to capture 5 concept domains: training and competency, usability, infrastructure, usefulness, and end-user support. Validation efforts included content validity assessment, a pilot study, and analysis of 606 nurse respondents. The revised tool was sent to randomly sampled EHR nurse-users in 11 acute care facilities. A total of 1,301 nurses responded (37%). Internal consistency of the survey tool was excellent (Cronbach's α = .892). Survey responses including 1,819 open comments were used to identify and prioritize improvement efforts in areas such as education, support, optimization of EHR functions, and vendor change requests. The Baylor EHR UX survey was a valid tool that can be useful for prioritizing improvement efforts in relation to EHR implementation.

  12. A pilot program to evaluate deceased donor disease transmission risk: the New York Organ Donor Network Infectious Disease Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett Madan, Rebecca; Delli Carpini, Kristin; Huprikar, Shirish; Lerner, Harvey; Patel, Gopi; Ratner, Lloyd E; Goldstein, Michael J; Herold, Betsy C

    2014-10-27

    Recent cases of donor-derived infections raise the question of how best to screen donors without excessive restriction of the donor pool. The New York Organ Donor Network (NYODN) established an Infectious Diseases Working Group (IDWG) in 2008, which established an on-call schedule of voluntary transplant infectious disease physicians to provide remote evaluations for donors at increased risk for disease transmission. Data were reviewed from 40 available IDWG evaluations from 2008 to 2011. Eighteen cases (45%) were considered to be at unacceptable risk for infection transmission. Sixteen of these cases were excluded from donation secondary to IDWG recommendation; there was limited recipient center interest in the remaining two cases. Approximately 22 (55%) cases were categorized by the IDWG as acceptable, with 14 proceeding to recovery of 49 organs. IDWG physician recommendations were conveyed to recipient centers, and screening guidelines for donors were revised based on the IDWG experiences. Establishment of a donation service area disease transmission evaluation service is a valuable program for donor screening and may promote dissemination of more detailed donor information to recipient centers.

  13. Transport Measurements on Si Nanostructures with Counted Sb Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Garratt, Elias; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Donor based spin qubits are a promising platform for quantum computing. Single qubits using timed implant of donors have been demonstrated.1 Extending this to multiple qubits requires precise control over the placement and number of donors. Such control can be achieved by using a combination of low-energy heavy-ion implants (to reduce depth straggle), electron-beam lithography (to define position), focused ion beam (to localize implants to one lithographic site) and counting the number of implants with a single ion detector.2 We report transport measurements on MOS quantum dots implanted with 5, 10 and 20 Sb donors using the approach described above. A donor charge transition is identified by a charge offset in the transport characteristics. Correlation between the number of donors and the charge offsets is studied. These results are necessary first steps towards fabricating donor nanostructures for two qubit interactions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1J. J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013) 2J. A. Seamons et al., APL 93, 043124 (2008).

  14. Local and regular plasma oscillations in bulk donor type semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Kornyushin, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    Restoring force acts on the electronic cloud of the outer electrons of a neutral or charged impurity atom when it is shifted relative to the inner charged core. Because of this the dipole oscillation arises, which influences considerably the dispersion law of the plasma oscillation in bulk donor semiconductors. Assuming that only one transition of the outer electron from the ground state to the first excited state is essential, the dispersion law is calculated. It is shown that calculated dis...

  15. Donor selection criteria and procurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agcaoili, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    Donor selection is one of the most important aspects of tissue banking practice. Without a good donor selection criteria, the results of any effort of trying to preserve tissues will have disastrous outcome for the recipient of these tissues. While with a very good and strict donor selection the Tissue Bank can guarantee safe and effective tissue allografts. There are significant aspects in the history and physical examination of the donor that must be emphasized. A donor exclusion criteria has also been formulated together with a list of all the needed laboratory examinations to eliminate possible diseases that may be transferred from the donor. The methods of procurement of tissue allografts from living and cadaver donors will be described. The limitations and advantages of each will be taken.There are also special restrictions that are important in the practice of removing the tissues from the donors. All the necessary equipment should be ready and the potential risk on the personnel should be known to all doing Tissue Banking

  16. Triangulating the Position of Antimony Donors Implanted in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau-Oxton, Chloe; Nielsen, Erik; Luhman, Dwight; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    A potential candidate for a quantum bit is a single Sb atom implanted in silicon. A single-electron-transistor (SET) situated close to an Sb donor can be used to measure the occupancy and spin of the electron on the donor while the lithographically patterned poly-silicon gates defining the SET can be used to control donor occupancy. In our samples two clusters of Sb donors have been implanted adjacent to opposite sides of the SET through a self-aligned process. In this talk, we will present experimental results that allow us to determine the approximate position of different donors by determining their relative capacitance to pairs of the SET's poly-silicon gates. We will present the results of capacitive-based modeling calculations that allow us to further locate the position of the donors. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. High-field EPR spectroscopy of thermal donors in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, R.; Rasmussen, F.B.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal donors generated in p-type boron-doped Czochralski-grown silicon by a 450 degrees C heat treatment have been studied by high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the experiments conducted at a microwave frequency of 140 GHz and in a magnetic field of approximately 5 T four individual...... thermal donors species could be resolved. These were observed in their singly ionized TD+ charge state. For the first time in the four decades of thermal donor research the g tensor values for specific members of the Si-NL8 family are given. Also the symmetry of the observed species is discussed....

  18. Heart transplantation from older donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current situation of the shortage of suitable donor organs, heart transplantation from older donors is one of the ways to increase the performance of more heart transplants, particularly, in patients with urgent need of transplantation. While planning a heart transplantation from older donor one should consider increased risk of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, preexisting coronary artery disease, accelerated transplant vasculopathy which may adversely affect early and long-term survival of recipients. Subject to careful selection of donor–recipient pairs, effective prevention and treatment of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, pre-existing atherosclerosis and transplant vasculopathy the early and long-term survival of heart transplant recipients from older donors is comparable to heart transplantation from young donors.

  19. The Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer: a refraction-based electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Stoeckl, Christian; Mileham, Chad; Begishev, Ildar; Theobald, Wolfgang; Bromage, Jake; Regan, Sean; Klein, Sallee; Vescovi, Milenko; Munoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Villanueva, Francisca; Veloso, Felipe

    2017-10-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The diagnostic delivers refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single-shot Moiré image. A Talbot-Lau interferometer was benchmarked using laser-target and X-pinch x-ray backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for: a) 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using Cu targets and b) a 4 x 25 µm copper X-pinch driven by a 400kA/350ns generator. X-ray backlighter quality was assessed in order to optimize areal electron density gradient retrieval and electron density mapping. TXD enabled accurate areal electron density detection with high contrast (>25%) and spatial resolution of 50 µm in the high-power laser experiments, while a higher spatial resolution <27 µm and lower contrast (<15%) were found in pulsed power experiments, thus demonstrating the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas. DENA0002955; FONDECYT N1171412.

  20. Development of a high repetition rate laser-plasma accelerator for ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic microscopy and electron diffraction allowed the understanding of the organization of atoms in matter. Using a temporally short source, one can measure atomic displacements or modifications of the electronic distribution in matter. To date, the best temporal resolution for time resolved diffraction experiments is of the order of a hundred femto-seconds (fs). Laser accelerators are good candidates to reach the femtosecond temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments. Such accelerators used to work at a low repetition rate, so that it was necessary to develop a new one operating at a high repetition rate in order to accumulate a large amount of data. In this thesis, a laser-plasma accelerator operating at the kHz repetition rate was developed and built. This source generates electron bunches at 100 keV from 3 mJ and 25 fs laser pulses. The physics of the acceleration has been studied, and the effect of the laser wavefront on the electron transverse distribution has been demonstrated. (author)

  1. The changing donor landscape of health sector aid to Vietnam: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Khuat, Thi Hai Oanh; Le, Quang Duong; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2015-05-01

    The study objective was to identify how donors and government agencies in Vietnam responded to donor proliferation in health sector aid between 1995 and 2012. Interviews were conducted with key informants from donor agencies, central government, and civil society in Hanoi in 2012 (n = 34 interviews), identified through OECD Creditor Reporting System data, internet research, and snowball sampling. Interview transcripts were coded for key themes using the constant comparative method. Documentary materials were used in triangulation and validation of key informant accounts. The study identified a timeline of key events and key themes. The number of donors providing health sector aid to Vietnam increased sharply during the late 1990s and early 2000s, then leveled off and declined between 2008 and 2012. Reasons for donor entry included Vietnam's health needs, perceptions of health as less politically sensitive, and donor interests in facilitating market access. Reasons for donor withdrawal included Vietnam's achievement of middle-income status, the global financial crisis, and donors' shifting global priorities. Key themes included high competition among donors, strategic actions by government to increase its control over aid, and the multiplicity of government units involved with health sector aid. The study concludes that central government and donor agencies in Vietnam responded to donor proliferation in health sector aid by endorsing aid effectiveness policies but implementing these policies inconsistently in practice. Whereas previous literature has emphasized donor proliferation's transaction costs, this study finds that the benefits of a large number of less coordinated donors may outweigh the increased administrative costs under certain conditions. In Vietnam, these conditions included relatively high capacity within government, low government dependence on aid, and government interest in receiving diverse donor recommendations. Vietnam's experience of donor

  2. Nonlinear two-stream interaction between a cold, relativistic electron beam and a collisional plasma-Astron experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1979-05-01

    Experiments on the two-stream instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a neutral gas, carried out with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Astron beam, have been analyzed using a nonlinear saturation model for a cold beam. The behavior of the observed microwave emission due to the instability is in good agreement with that of the beam energy loss. Collisions on the plasma electrons weaken the nonlinear state of the instability but do not stabilize the mode. The beam essentially acts as if it were cold, a result substantiated by linear theory for waves propagating along the beam. In order to predict the effect of both beam momentum scatter and plasma electron collisions on the stability of the mode in future experiments a full two-dimensional linear theory must be developed

  3. The History and Challenges of Blood Donor Screening in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Li, Ka Yi; Yan, Ke; Ou, Guojin; Li, Wenhui; Wang, Jue; Song, Ning; Tian, Li; Ji, Xin; Chen, Yongjun; Liang, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhong; Wu, Yanyun

    2017-04-01

    Since the establishment of People's Republic of China in 1949, the Chinese government has encountered several catastrophes related to transfusion transmitted diseases. The government's increasing attention to blood safety has prompted the initiation of a series of policies and measures that have enhanced the level of safety for the blood supply and met the basic clinical demands of blood for 1.3 billion people in the country. Blood donation screening strategies in China predominantly comprise donor screening and donor testing. Donor screening includes selection of low-risk blood donors by the use of a donor history questionnaire, predonation physical examination, and initial rapid donor testing. Donor testing includes direct pathogen detection and serology tests. The year 1998 marked the most transformative change in blood donor selection and screening policies in China. Before 1998, paid donation was the predominant mode of blood donation. Donor screening and donor testing were conducted before donation, and only those who were eligible were allowed to donate. To ensure the safety of blood, donor testing was performed again after donation. After the implementation of the Blood Donation Law in 1998, to promote voluntary and unpaid donation, predonation donor testing was eliminated to reduce the amount of waiting time and to provide a more convenient donation experience for blood donors. However, it is the national requirement that donated blood should undergo 2 rounds of testing using different equipment or reagents, conducted by different personnel. Donor selection has transitioned from paid donation and obligatory donation to voluntary donation with fixed volunteer groups, as the latter mode of donation provides the lowest risks. Donations are currently screened for syphilis, hepatitis C virus, HIV, and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Units, previously typed only for ABO, are now routinely tested for both ABO and Rh(D). Innovations in testing technologies and methods

  4. Negative peri-donation events among whole blood donors in a blood bank in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasola, Foluke A

    2017-12-31

    The existence and sustenance of the blood bank depends on blood donors. It is imperative that the donation experience is satisfactory for the donors. Therefore this study was carried out to determine the frequency of undesirable events experienced by the blood donor as part of donor haemovigilance. This was a retrospective descriptive study of the events that occurred amongst the blood donors of the blood bank of a tertiary institution. The blood donor incident book was reviewed for the period of six months. Negative undesirable events occurred in 2% of the donor populations, of which 45.8% could not complete the blood donation process while only 16.7% completed the blood donation process. Mild vasovagal attack occurred in 0.2% of the donor population. Undisclosed deferrable risk factors/ behaviours were identified by the phlebotomist in the bleeding room which made donors unfit for donation even though they had passed the donor screening criteria. This accounted for 20.8% of those with negative experience. Guidelines are required to identify donors that are not likely to complete donation to avoid wastage of time, blood, resources and reduce undesirable experiences.

  5. Pharmacy customers' experiences with the national online service for viewing electronic prescriptions in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämsä, Elina; Timonen, Johanna; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Ahonen, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    To investigate (1) Finnish pharmacy customers' familiarity with My Kanta, the national online service for viewing electronic prescriptions (ePrescriptions), (2) how commonly My Kanta is used, (3) who the typical users are, and (4) users' experiences of the usability of My Kanta. A survey was conducted among pharmacy customers (aged ≥18) purchasing medicines for themselves. Questionnaires (N=2915) were distributed from 18 community pharmacies across Finland in autumn 2015. The data obtained was stored in SPSS for Windows and subjected to descriptive analysis, chi-square tests and logistic regression analysis. In total, 1288 respondents were included (response rate 44%). Most (62%) of the customers were familiar with My Kanta. The majority of them (78%) were using it to view their ePrescriptions. My Kanta was perceived as clear, easy to use and to provide a good overall picture of the prescribed medications. Familiarity with My Kanta was associated with a higher education than basic school, regular use of prescription medicines, and sufficient information received about ePrescriptions. Men used My Kanta more often than women. Respondents aged 75 or older were less likely to be familiar with and to use the service compared to 18-34year olds. Most of the Finnish pharmacy customers were familiar with the national online service, My Kanta, for viewing ePrescriptions. Service users perceived it as easy to use and beneficial in managing their overall medication. Customers under 75, those educated beyond basic school, those using prescription medicines regularly, and those who had obtained sufficient information about ePrescriptions were most likely to be familiar with My Kanta. Men and customers under 75 were the typical users of the service. Some customers, however, were unaware of the service, or unable or reluctant to use it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carina; Hall, Jenny; Banda, Masford; Beard, James; Bird, Jon; Kazembe, Peter; Fottrell, Ed

    2014-01-01

    As hardware for electronic data capture (EDC), such as smartphones or tablets, becomes cheaper and more widely available, the potential for using such hardware as data capture tools in routine healthcare and research is increasing. We aim to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of four EDC systems being used simultaneously in rural Malawi: two for Android devices (CommCare and ODK Collect), one for PALM and Windows OS (Pendragon), and a custom-built application for Android (Mobile InterVA--MIVA). We report on the personal field and development experience of fieldworkers, project managers, and EDC system developers. Fieldworkers preferred using EDC to paper-based systems, although some struggled with the technology at first. Highlighted features include in-built skip patterns for all systems, and specifically the 'case' function that CommCare offers. MIVA as a standalone app required considerably more time and expertise than the other systems to create and could not be customised for our specific research needs; however, it facilitates standardised routine data collection. CommCare and ODK Collect both have user-friendly web-interfaces for form development and good technical support. CommCare requires Internet to build an application and download it to a device, whereas all steps can be done offline with ODK Collect, a desirable feature in low connectivity settings. Pendragon required more complex programming of logic, using a Microsoft Access application, and generally had less technical support. Start-up costs varied between systems, and all were considered more expensive than setting up a paper-based system; however running costs were generally low and therefore thought to be cost-effective over the course of our projects. EDC offers many opportunities for efficient data collection, but brings some issues requiring consideration when designing a study; the decision of which hardware and software to use should be informed by the aim of data collection

  7. Voluntary whole-blood donors, and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors: motivation to donate, altruism and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Michael; Lattacher, Helene; Janda, Monika

    2005-10-01

    To establish if voluntary whole-blood donors and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors may differ in their motivation to donate, altruism, aggression and autoaggression. Whole-blood (n=51), platelet (n=52) and plasma donors (n=48) completed a battery of validated questionnaires while waiting to donate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of variance and t-tests were performed to detect differences between groups as noted. Altruism (mean=40.2) was slightly higher in whole-blood donors than in platelet (mean=38.3) and plasma donors (mean=39.1) (p=0.07). Blood donors (mean=2.8) scored lower in the spontaneous aggression measure than platelet (mean=4.1) and plasma donors (mean=4.4) (p=0.01). Plasma donors (mean=4.9) had higher auto-aggression than whole-blood donors and platelet donors (mean for both groups=3.4) (p=0.01). Differences between the three groups were mediated by sociodemographic variables (MANCOVA). Whole-blood donors donated to help others, platelet and plasma donors mostly to receive the compensation. However, those platelet and plasma donors, who would continue to donate without compensation were similar in altruism and aggression to whole-blood donors. While most platelet donors and plasma donors were motivated by the compensation, those who stated that they would continue to donate without compensation had altruism and aggression scores similar to voluntary whole-blood donors.

  8. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: meeting the challenge of consumerism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddins, Mark; Hart, Gabrielle; He, Bulang; Kanchanabat, Burapa; Mohan Rao, M

    2003-11-01

    Despite the increasing adoption of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy, no study has examined donor perceptions following this procedure. In particular, it has been tacitly assumed that a less invasive procedure might in itself provide a more satisfactory donor experience. The present study reviews the experience of donors undergoing laparoscopic nephrectomy, and examines the extent to which contemporary management practice addresses issues relevant to consumerism. Forty-two donors participated in a structured telephone interview, and 33 (79%) returned a written questionnaire. Coming through the survey was a strong sense of commitment to donation, and most respondents were satisfied with the experience. The main criticisms related to hotel services, the duration of the preoperative investigations, the perceived quality of nursing care on the general wards, medical communication and the duration of postoperative follow up. The self-reported time to meet recovery goals was extremely broad. Considering the nature of criticisms offered by the respondents, it is concluded that the expectations of donors as health-care consumers will only be met through modification of existing protocols.

  9. Doping Phosphorene with Holes and Electrons through Molecular Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Rajesh, S; Manjunatha, S; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K; Rao, C N R

    2017-11-03

    An important aspect of phosphorene, the novel two-dimensional semiconductor, is whether holes and electrons can both be doped in this material. Some reports found that only electrons can be preferentially doped into phosphorene. There are some theoretical calculations showing charge-transfer interaction with both tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). We have carried out an investigation of chemical doping of phosphorene by a variety of electron donor and acceptor molecules, employing both experiment and theory, Raman scattering being a crucial aspect of the study. We find that both electron acceptors and donors interact with phosphorene by charge-transfer, with the acceptors having more marked effects. All the three Raman bands of phosphorene soften and exhibit band broadening on interaction with both donor and acceptor molecules. First-principles calculations establish the occurrence of charge-transfer between phosphorene with donors as well as acceptors. The absence of electron-hole asymmetry is noteworthy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Do Financial Incentives Increase the Use of Electronic Health Records? Findings from an Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Moreno; Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Stacy Dale

    2013-01-01

    This working paper reviews impacts of the Electronic Health Records Demonstration implemented by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, finding that moderate incentive payments did not lead to universal electronic health record (EHR) adoption and use in a two-year time frame. However, the demonstration showed that incentives can influence physician use of EHRs.

  11. Optical properties and energy spectra of donors in Gasub(x)Insub(1-x)P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, V.; Kopylov, A.A.; Pikhtin, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    Impurity optical absorption is studied in n-Gasub(x)Insub(1-x)P for compositions with indirect band structure. For the first time the photoionization bands of shallow donor centers have been observed in semiconductor solid solutions. Analysis of spectra has shown the electron transitions to excited states of donor to contribute considerably to absorption. A simple theoretical model is presented to explain the shift of ionization energy of silicon donor and the variation in shape of the impurity absorption band

  12. Improving first-time donor attendance rates through the use of enhanced donor preparation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Barbara; France, Christopher R; Foot, Jayne; Rozsa, Amy; Hayman, Jane; Waller, Daniel; Hunder, Everard

    2016-06-01

    Many nondonors are positive about blood donation and this motivates booking an appointment to donate. However, as their appointment approaches barriers to donating-such as anxiety-may become salient and deter attendance. Building on research of France and colleagues demonstrating the positive effect of enhanced preparation materials on donor recruitment, this study sought to determine whether these materials could effectively boost first donation appointment attendance. A field study comprising a 3 (brochure: none, e-mail, hard copy) × 2 (national call center [NCC] contact: none, call) between-subjects design was conducted with 3646 nondonors who had scheduled their first appointment. Participants in the brochure conditions received either a hard copy or an e-mailed link to electronic materials modeled on the donor preparation research of France and colleagues. Participants in the NCC call condition also received a call scripted in line with these preparation materials. The key outcome was new donor attendance rate. Although first-appointment attendance rates were high in the control (no additional contact) condition at 85.07% of those not canceling in advance, dual exposure to the preparation materials through a NCC call and an electronic brochure boosted attendance. The relative risk of attending in the NCC call and electronic brochure condition was 1.0836 (95% confidence interval, 1.0352-1.1343; p = 0.0006), with attendance 8.36% higher than in the control. This gain in attendance came at a relative increase in recruitment costs of 2%. The use of tailored communication to address new donors' concerns and prepare them for donating bolsters attendance rates. © 2016 AABB.

  13. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  14. Use of robotics in liver donor right hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Da; Wu, Chao-Yin; Wu, Yao-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Liver transplantation is the best solution for end stage liver disease, and has been widely accepted and rapidly developed in the past decades. Along with the improved outcomes of liver transplantation, living-related donor transplantation has been conducted to overcome the shortage of the deceased donor. The most important aspects of the living-related liver transplantation are donor safety and fast recovery after graft procurement. Meanwhile, the rapid progress of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in general surgery has generated heated debate regarding the appropriateness of MIS in living-related donor graft hepatectomy. Technical innovations and instrument enhancements have been allowing recruitment of more potential candidates through smaller wounds and better surgical experience. Although MIS has been documented with safety and feasibility in complex liver surgery, the progress is slow in regard to the application of MIS in donor graft hepatectomy. Pioneer surgeons have devoted themselves to develop the pure MIS approach for the liver donor surgery, but the steep learning curve for pure MIS major hepatectomy remains a major barrier for wide adoption. The introduction of robotic system may lower the barrier for entry for practice into MIS donor hepatectomy.

  15. “Instruction for Thinking” for Fundamental Experiments in Electrical and Electronic Engineering as a Base for Enhancing Creative Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Koji; Yoshimoto, Ken-Ichi

    Specialist knowledge and creative ability are important for engineers to solve various problems in manufacturing products. Creative ability cannot be acquired without real experiences and much knowledge. This paper discusses the educational effects of “instruction for thinking” in fundamental experiments in electrical and electronic engineering. An experiment was conducted in which students were required not only to use their previous knowledge but also to think by themselves in order to enhance creative ability. In this experiment, the present authors encouraged students to find out problems on their own, and waited until they worked out the solution. After the experiment, we conducted a questionnaire on students to the motivation for studying the technical subjects. As a result, it was confirmed that the practical ability for thinking was improved.

  16. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  17. Indication of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the T2K experiment and its long-term implications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment primarily searching for oscillations of muon neutrinos into electron neutrinos. T2K will also make precise measurements of the atmospheric oscillation parameters via muon neutrino disappearance. The experiment uses 30 GeV protons from the new J-PARC Main Ring accelerator, located in Tokai, Japan, to generate a conventional neutrino beam to the Super-Kamiokande far detector. The hadron production measurements of the NA61 experiment at CERN were used to predict the neutrino fluxes at the near and far detectors. The T2K oscillation analysis compares the rates of observed and predicted muon and electron neutrino candidates in the far detector. We present first results based on data accumulated from January 2010 to March 2011. Six electron neutrino events pass the selection criteria for electron appearance at Super-Kamiokande, whereas the expected number of background events is 1.5±0.3. The probability of a fluctuation of the back...

  18. Stability of Extraterrestrial Glycine under Energetic Particle Radiation Estimated from 2 keV Electron Bombardment Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Escribano, R.; Moreno, M. A.; Herrero, V. J.

    2015-06-01

    The destruction of solid glycine under irradiation with 2 keV electrons has been investigated by means of IR spectroscopy. Destruction cross sections, radiolysis yields, and half-life doses were determined for samples at 20, 40, 90, and 300 K. The thickness of the irradiated samples was kept below the estimated penetration depth of the electrons. No significant differences were obtained in the experiments below 90 K, but the destruction cross section at 300 K was larger by a factor of 2. The radiolysis yields and half-life doses are in good accordance with recent MeV proton experiments, which confirms that electrons in the keV range can be used to simulate the effects of cosmic rays if the whole sample is effectively irradiated. In the low temperature experiments, electron irradiation leads to the formation of residues. IR absorptions of these residues are assigned to the presence CO2, CO, OCN-, and CN- and possibly to amide bands I to III. The protection of glycine by water ice is also studied. A water ice film of ˜150 nm is found to provide efficient shielding against the bombardment of 2 keV electrons. The results of this study show also that current Monte Carlo predictions provide a good global description of electron penetration depths. The lifetimes estimated in this work for various environments ranging from the diffuse interstellar medium to the inner solar system, show that the survival of hypothetical primeval glycine from the solar nebula in present solar system bodies is not very likely.

  19. Association of ABO and Rh blood group types to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and syphillis infection, a five year experience in healthy blood donors in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, Z.; Durrani, S.H.; Tariq, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to find out the frequency of Hepatitis B Hepatitis C, Syphilis, HIV and malaria in apparently healthy blood donors and to find out any association between ABO and Rh blood groups. Methods: It was a descriptive study carried out at Rehman Medical Institute laboratory. All blood donors who volunteered for blood donation from Jan 2008 to Dec 2014 were reviewed for blood groups and screening tests. Those who were eligible were then screened for Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV, syphilis and malaria on Architect 8200i through chemiluminescent immunoassay whereas malaria was screened by a thin film. Blood group was determined by both forward and reverse grouping. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software and expressed as frequencies. Results: A total of 41033 apparently healthy donors were included in the study. All of them were voluntary donors. Their age ranged from 18-70 years with a mean age of 38+-10.5 years. Out of these 41033, 40245 (98.3%) were males and 788(1.9%) were females. The most frequent blood group was B positive followed by O positive. Out of 41033 donors 961 (2.30%) had Hepatitis B, 566 (1.30%) had Hepatitis C, 363 (0.90%) had syphilis, 311 (0.76%) had malaria and 30 (0.07%) had HIV. There is a significant association between A blood group and HIV and hepatitis B. Donors with blood group O had no significant association with any blood transmitted infection. Conclusion: Blood group O may have some influence in protecting against blood transmitted infection. People having Blood group A are more prone to get Hepatitis B and HIV. (author)

  20. Utilization of donors who have suffered cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation in intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Cal S; Kaufman, Stuart S; Girlanda, Raffaele; Little, Cheryl M; Rekhtman, Yuliya; Raofi, Vandad; Laurin, Jaqueline M; Shetty, Kirti; Fennelly, Erin M; Johnson, Lynt B; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2008-10-15

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of a person destined to become an organ donor has been associated with overall poor donor quality, especially for the intestinal donor, as splanchnic vasoconstriction that is intended to preserve coronary and cerebral blood flow may result in clinically relevant intestinal ischemia. Outcomes of recipients who receive intestine grafts that have suffered CPR are unknown. We sought to analyze our clinical experience in using